Photo by Melody

Vegetable Gardening: Another Veggie growing friend...

Communities > Forums > Vegetable Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 10, Views: 131
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

DavidofDeLand

DavidofDeLand
DeLand, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 21, 2013
2:35 PM

Post #9392719






This message was edited Jan 22, 2013 7:00 AM

This message was edited Jan 22, 2013 7:02 AM

This message was edited Feb 26, 2013 10:20 AM

Thumbnail by DavidofDeLand   Thumbnail by DavidofDeLand   Thumbnail by DavidofDeLand
Click an image for an enlarged view.

GrowingNVegas
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 9a)

January 21, 2013
3:16 PM

Post #9392759

Welcome David.

Your photos are lovely.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 21, 2013
3:29 PM

Post #9392772

I never would of thought of that ,, Maybe it is the zone difference ,, Great Idea!!!!
Photos are great!!! Thank you...

DavidofDeLand

DavidofDeLand
DeLand, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 21, 2013
3:52 PM

Post #9392787



This message was edited Jan 22, 2013 7:03 AM

This message was edited Feb 26, 2013 10:20 AM
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2013
1:39 PM

Post #9393893

I love the way you have the greens (cabbages?) arranged around the bird bath.

Hope you have lots of fun here on Dave's.

DavidofDeLand

DavidofDeLand
DeLand, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 22, 2013
5:01 PM

Post #9394082



This message was edited Feb 26, 2013 10:21 AM

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2013
5:47 PM

Post #9394125

If you like Cabbage, Mustard, Lettuce & Spinach, you might also like these Brassicas as cold-hardy salad greens:
- Komatsuna mild, cold-hardy, productive
- Tatsoi - very mild, cold-hardy, slower-growing
- Mizuna - medium mild, a little mustardy

Bok Choy and Chinese cabbage (Napa or Michihili) are less cold-hardy. They might not be good crops for mid-winter, but great for spring and Fall (avoid hot weather). Most Chinese cabbage varieties are better adapted as Fall crops in most climates.

Whatever is growing when heat or frost approach can be harvested and eaten at whatever age they reached, for example in salad. The smaller, the more tender and sweet! Seedling & baby leaf crops can be companion-grown (inter-cropped?) under taller crops. Or they can be planted with slower-growing crops and then harvested before the other crop gets big.

Both Bok Choy and Chinese cabbage will bolt in frost and Chinese cabbage may bolt after a week or two of coldish nights. Both are very mild in flavor. Young & baby leaves belong in salad, and you can steam or fry older leaves.

DavidofDeLand

DavidofDeLand
DeLand, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 22, 2013
6:18 PM

Post #9394164





This message was edited Feb 26, 2013 10:21 AM

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 23, 2013
5:21 PM

Post #9395303

Great! Do you grow any of the baby green stem varieties?

Or red or purple leaf varieties?
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 24, 2013
1:58 AM

Post #9395609

David, welcome and thanks for the great photos -- good inspiration!

Your lettuce looked like it was in a fairly shady area. Is that right? I'm always seeking things that can take a little shade, since I've only got good sun in part of my yard.

DavidofDeLand

DavidofDeLand
DeLand, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 24, 2013
5:31 AM

Post #9395688



This message was edited Feb 26, 2013 10:22 AM

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Vegetable Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
very important question farmgirl21 31 Jan 8, 2008 12:31 AM
Need Source For Chinese Vegetable Seed berrygirl 18 Jun 15, 2008 7:21 PM
An accidental lesson Farmerdill 26 Feb 24, 2013 12:10 PM
Planting the "Three sisters" HilltopDaisy 94 Jul 6, 2011 3:38 AM
Rhubarb emilyrasmus 19 Apr 25, 2013 4:55 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America