Winter sowing

East Greenbush, NY

Did anyone ever try "Winter Sowing" vegetables and did you have success?

sun city, CA(Zone 9a)

trying for the first time this year. hope the crazy weather doesnt defeat me.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

I haven't tried winter sowing, but I did leave several open pollinated tomatoes on the ground to see if they produce this year.

Melons volunteer every year, so I guess they are "winter sown".

Beans and peas sometimes poke through in unexpected places.

Then there's whatever sprouts from the compost that is spread around the garden in the spring.

There are several onions sprouting out there - must be a few I missed when I pulled the main crop last June.

I sowed arugula once several years ago, and it comes up in various places around the garden. It stays green all winter long, and is a welcome addition to a sandwich.

Do wild onions/garlic count? They grow like weeds here. I like to cut a few to put on baked potatoes.

Hmmm... maybe I'm "winter sowing" after all.

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Have only WS veggies once, and, I had GREAT success!

As long as you keep your jugs closed and located where they will get sunlight and rainwater (or get hit by the sprinklers), they will grow when they are ready to, which will ususally be sooner than later, due to the "greenhouse" effect of the vessel. I used gallon milk jugs secured from my local Starbucks. They gave them to me by the garbage bag full, for the asking.

The added benefit of WS veggies is that they will be much hardier and hardened off for transplanting.

#1 Ten Hut!
#2 Early Dividene Broccoli @ 48 days
#3 Emerald Giant Bell Peppers @ 21 days
#4 Sample Jug
#5 Seedlings

Linda

Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Staten Island, NY(Zone 6a)

HI GYM GIRL, WHAT IS THE BENEFIT OF KEEPING THE TOPS ON THE MILK JUGS. I DID SOME LAST YEAR WITH THE TOPS OFF AND THE SEEDS DID GERMINATE

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

I think for the greenhouse effect of capturing the heat during the day. Also, some areas get snow, and it protects the seedlings.

I think...

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Having lived (and wintersown) where there is snow, I always count the snow as part of the moisture the helps seeds. I would keep the lids on to make sure the seeds you want is what grows in there. In NY at this time of year, she wants the heat in there, but the lid just vents excess heat! In tx extra heat is bad, in ny, it might help.

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