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Vegetable Gardening: Cucumbers...what's your favorite variety?

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Glenda_Michigan
Fowlerville, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 4, 2013
9:57 AM

Post #9408118

I'd like to also grow cucumbers this summer. What is your favorite variety? Is there really a difference between varieties? I've never had a bad cucumber...

I'll also be growing pumpkins, green beans, potatoes, and watermelons... :-)
Kydaylilylady
Waddy, KY

February 4, 2013
11:09 AM

Post #9408181

I grew Dasher last year and had absolutely the best cucumber crop that I've ever had. That also could have been attributed to the field being newly turned sod but I guess we'll find out this coming year because I plan to put them in the same field, just on the other side. I also planted National Pickler and they were great for pickles. People at the markets also liked the pickling cucumbers due to their smaller seed size.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 4, 2013
1:39 PM

Post #9408349

I plant CORINTO cucumbers every year.
It is a parthenocarpic variety (= these varieties develop fruit without pollination) and it produces constantly during our Texas hot days of spring/summer.
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-8483-corinto-f1-og.aspx

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
2:58 PM

Post #9408457

I like Muncher. Good, consistent flavor and size.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 4, 2013
3:09 PM

Post #9408469

Small growing area so I've tried Little Leaf, Spacemaster and Alibi.
Alibi was my number one favorite, second Spacemaster and last was Little Leaf.
I did not pickle, these were grown for feasting on while fresh.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 4, 2013
3:11 PM

Post #9408473

Most any of the burpless but specially the Burpee Burpless DW is a cucumber fanatic/gourmet and that is her favorite we have had really good crops the last 5 years so she said last year that she was finally getting burned out on them she can eat a half dozen of the large per day
Glenda_Michigan
Fowlerville, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 4, 2013
4:33 PM

Post #9408559

What is a burpless cucumber??? :-S

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
5:32 PM

Post #9408632

It means it supposedly doesn't have the gene that has a bitter tang to it -- but under the wrong conditions you can still get a bitter one.

More than you wanted to know:http://cuke.hort.ncsu.edu/cucurbit/wehner/articles/art090.pdf
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

February 4, 2013
6:17 PM

Post #9408674

i grew diva last yr.. its an all female plant..it did well..
even with the intense heat..and constant watering i needed
to do.. this yr i want to try sweet sucess..?? anyone try this one??
its suppose to be close to seedless.. slender..and thin skin..
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
6:30 PM

Post #9408696

I have grown nearly all of the mentioned ones- I liked Diva, Sweet Success, Muncher & General Lee. I find many of the burpless ones are watery, which I don't like at all. Summer Dance did great for me- it was long, slender thin skinned and spineless. Good crunch too.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

February 4, 2013
6:45 PM

Post #9408723

Try Fanfare. It is a semi-bush so it don't take up much space. Really good cucumber. We have used it for years at our market & outsell all other offerings from other vendors.
When customers find something they like, they return all the time.
For pickles we use Alibi. Very good production, must be picked every other day!

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greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2013
4:55 AM

Post #9408949

Another vote for Diva; here's the description:
Diva Cucumber
58 days. Another All America winner (2002) from our good neighbors to the North Johnnys Selected Seeds, Diva is a nearly seedless parthenocarpic variety. It produces exclusively female flowers which do not require pollination to set fruit. The result is a very prolific set of nearly seedless fruit at every node and a very sweet, never bitter flavor. Diva is considered a Beit Alpha type, the smooth skinned class of fruits that originated in the Middle East. Fruits are very crisp with an attractive medium green color. Diva is resistant to scab and mildews.

and I also really like this one:
Tanja Cucumber
56 days. This is a premium European open-pollinated slicing cucumber. Beautiful, long, firm & bitter-free fruits. This variety picks over an unusually long period. A cucumber for both greenhouse and open air cultivation in your garden. This delicious cucumber can be harvested all summer long.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 5, 2013
4:58 AM

Post #9408951

All of my cukes are grown off the ground on a trellis ,I started this because I grew some Armenians and they would curl badly if not grown where they could hang..The other reason is I do not like picking cukes any place a snake is likely to hide...I grew up in the swamp country and we would find many Copperheads cooling off hiding under the cucumber vines..Not FUN
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 5, 2013
5:04 AM

Post #9408954

After reading the post from Greenhouse and others I will surely give DIVA a shot..seems to me Johnny's is on top of things for new varities ,I tried the Zephyr squash from them a good while back and now would not think of not having the Zephyr in my garden we love it ..
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 5, 2013
5:36 AM

Post #9408974

Hmmm... Grits apparently you've not seen the copperheads lazing away the day up in the vines (off the ground) in the shade of the vines, waiting for an unsuspecting butterfly or bee or... lol

I've found a couple and since, I am oh, so careful when I reach in for a cucumber.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 5, 2013
6:22 AM

Post #9409024

Christi we have not had many snakes the last few years and I surveyed my garden class about and they all agreed that the snakes are becoming fewer ,i kinda think it may have been you that suggested it had some relationship with the wild hogs Hey I am all for more hogs less snakes
Biker1
McLean, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2013
6:50 AM

Post #9409055

Divas are Wonderful!!! Cukes do fine, here, as long as I use row covers to protect from the beetles that lead to wilt.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

February 5, 2013
4:51 PM

Post #9409657

Cucina is a small, very prolific, great tasting cucumber, but I also love Straight Eight. Didn't do as well with Eurika, but maybe it was the heat here.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 6, 2013
3:26 PM

Post #9410533

Where to find the seeds for Fanfare??

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

February 6, 2013
3:30 PM

Post #9410539

Totally Tomatoes has them for one.
http://www.totallytomato.com/
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 6, 2013
3:46 PM

Post #9410558

Okay thanks will go there right away
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 6, 2013
7:18 PM

Post #9410735

Not only did i look at TT I bought some seeds for Fanfare also some for diva it said FanFare needs a polinator what would you recomend
gardadore
Saylorsburg, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2013
7:34 PM

Post #9410750

I forgot to send this earlier (due to an interruption) which notated a couple of other Fanfare sites. Glad you found the seeds. I used to grow Fanfare but switched to Sweet Success and then when I ran out of those tried Diva last summer which I really liked!

It needs a pollinator simply means the flowers need to be pollinated by bees rather than self pollinating. It is not all female like Diva. So you must plant it outside. Diva can be grown in a greenhouse and does not require bees or other insects to pollinate the flowers. I grew mine outside but was going to try to experiment with growing it in a special tent to keep away the cucumber beetles.

This message was edited Feb 6, 2013 11:43 PM
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 7, 2013
4:33 AM

Post #9410903

I have some leftover seeds from an ill advised exp that turned out to be all male it bloomed profusely but never ever had even one cuke ...That should make it a prime canidate as a pollinator or public office for that matter LOL
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2013
4:47 AM

Post #9410907

LOL ~ Grits you won't do... 8 )
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2013
7:54 AM

Post #9411051

While not suited for a main crop, the lemon cucumbers, like Boothbay Blonde, are cute and just the right size for a two-person serving.
gardadore
Saylorsburg, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2013
8:11 AM

Post #9411068

I forgot I ordered more of the lemon ones as well since they may be small, but delicious!!
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 8, 2013
6:49 AM

Post #9411927

My DW loves the lemon variety I like cukes but my DW is addicted to them

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

February 11, 2013
7:15 PM

Post #9416121

I like Diva too - but if you plan on making pickles, you might want a pickling-type cucumber. They are only okay as fresh sliced cucumbers, but have a better texture after pickling. For both Picklers and Slicers, I look for Powdery Mildew resistance, because it is a problem here (& every where else I have gardened, too). Also FYI, cucumbers are something you want to pick young & green, before the seeds develop.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 12, 2013
4:42 AM

Post #9416334

I have grown the Lemon variety for about 40 yrs off and on the last couple it has become badly infected with an Aphid like insect so I think that if I plant the Lemon this year it will be someplace away from the rest of the garden which will be easy as I am shrinking my veggy garden ...

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grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 12, 2013
4:48 AM

Post #9416342

should have edited that to read that the pic is a mutation according to a Genectist (SP?) it is a common mutation in the lemon variety This pic is just to show the size of the fleciated vine

Thumbnail by grits74571
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 12, 2013
6:08 AM

Post #9416425

I was just wondering what was that elongated leaf ...
grits74571 are you saying that that leaf is from the lemon cucumber plant? huh?
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 12, 2013
11:37 AM

Post #9416732

No that is not a leaf that is the vine it is a mutant due to a ressesive gene it is called fleciating meaning flattened I discovered this and spent about a month talking with genetisist from the Oklahoma State U. all the way to Minn. a lady from the exp. station at Lane Oklahoma Dr. Angela Davis Phd. was most helpfull we taked several times via phone and e mail
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

February 12, 2013
4:03 PM

Post #9416996

wow,copperheads in the garden.. i have garter snakes..they make their
dens in rock gardens.. and im happy to have them... im sure they eat bugs
i dont want around..they do scare me when im pulling weeds..and i dont expect
them..
would be a whole different situation if i ran into rattlesnake.. :(
u all be careful..
go in to snap a cuc off vine..and get bitten.. wow..
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 14, 2013
6:57 AM

Post #9418728

Many years ago I decided to let the snake alone in my garden and I did so until I found a garter snake swallowing a toad ,after that I started watching and found that many snakes would eat toads ,by the time the light bulb went on in my thick head I was out of toads but I did have a lot of unwanted snakes so at that point I decided that I peferred toads over snakes

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

February 14, 2013
2:16 PM

Post #9419139

When we were building our house, one of they guys working found a 6 foot rattlesnake with 12 rattles and a button! He had been around a while. It still scares me that one of the dogs will find another one of those around here, but we have been here 2 years, and all I have seen are black snakes. But I wouldn't want them eating my frogs or toads either.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

February 14, 2013
4:14 PM

Post #9419242

Cucumbers & snakes related ?

This thread is Favorite Cucumbers.
Glenda_Michigan
Fowlerville, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 14, 2013
6:24 PM

Post #9419337

LOL! I guess so...when you find them both together! ;) lol
Up in Michigan, I haven't had any problems with snakes in my garden; thank goodness!! Of course, my garden is "paved" with an Earth Mat-like product so there is not undergrowth to hide in.

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

February 18, 2013
6:20 AM

Post #9422808

I think I had a relative that lived in the South say that some poisonous snakes have a distinctive smell - I don't remember which type of snake (cotton-mouth or water moccasin), but I think the smell might have been "like cucumbers"

RE flattened vine - Saw a Gerbera daisy like that at the nursery, and my daughter (grade school age) insisted on buying it. Once the weird flower and stem were spent and dead-headed off, the next ones grew in normal. My daughter was disappointed, I was relieved.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2013
7:45 AM

Post #9424161

Snakes and cukes are related.. but it depends on which state you are in. In the south you cant have gardens without snakes- Mn doesn't have that problem with cukes that grow snakes... The gene isn't as predominant in the colder north...
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 19, 2013
8:10 AM

Post #9424216

Ewwww, you guys. Last year was a year horrible for the copperheads here in my garden. Brrrrr, I don't mind snakes if I know where they are and they stay away from where I am. So that doen't really work out well for me, and all this talk of finding snakes in the cucumbers is giving me the willies LOL.

That being said, last year we tried Boothby's Blonde and DH thought is was good and he liked the name. Does have spines, though. I'll always try something new to me if it has alliteration in the name! I'm just starting out learning to pickle, but I found Alibi easy to grow and also Homemade Pickles. This year I'm going to try Suyo Long--but maybe not now that you've mentioned the snakes...

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2013
8:28 AM

Post #9424253

Another thing feral hogs adore- the snakes. Dont think you will have any prob with snakes Terri- the hogs will have gotten your problems taken care of. Enjoy your cukes growin- and by the way, snakes climb into trees to cool off, copperheads dont climb as often as moccadins or chicken snakes.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 19, 2013
8:59 AM

Post #9424278

The hogs don't come into my garden since DH installed the electric fence. Knock wood...☺

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2013
9:05 AM

Post #9424289

I simply mean that you can play in your garden without fear of being in a nest of snakes- as Many hogs as you have your snake population shouldn't be bad- tho snakes WON'T know inside the electric fence is a safe haven. Let me know how those cukes taste please? I am growin lemon cukes this year.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 19, 2013
10:00 AM

Post #9424370

LOL! I kinda did know what you meant, but the snakes made their way into my garden last year anyway. My goofiest dog, the border collie/German shepherd mix even got bit--not once, but twice. She's fine, she's got an iron constitution, bless her. And the pigs did try to break through my fence last year...Always a adventure gardening in my neck of the woods. Hope those hogs are feasting right now.

I'll try to remember to post photos of the cukes I grow. My New Year's resolutions were to stop using exclamation points so much and to get that camera out and take more photos to share. I'm just learning to pickle so the cukes will get some special attention this year. My grandmother used to grow a cuke called Blue Ribbon. Can't find that one anywhere now.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2013
10:48 AM

Post #9424411

I haven't heard that one in a really long time. Will let ya know if i find anything on it tho. Borders hate snakes and are usy REALLY good at hunting and killing them.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 19, 2013
11:38 AM

Post #9424465

►Never grew cukes before.

►Just ordered Fanfare and Alibi from Totally Tomatoes.

►Will need ya'lls help...

►Hugs!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2013
1:35 PM

Post #9424580

Lynda, give em room to sprawl out from your boxes, or give em trellis to go up. They can shade everything. are sun lovers that don't like bein touched. Thsts why mine are planted at edge of box and run across a lattice that keeps em out of grass and lets em dangle. Yum pina colada cheesecake, just what my sweet tooth wanted! Where was I? The burpless ones can get watery, if overwatered. Other than that they are a grateful and easy plant packed full of goodness.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 19, 2013
4:25 PM

Post #9424722

Also, your drip irrigation system will come in handy. They don't like water on their leaves (promotes fungus). Also, watch out for squash bugs.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 19, 2013
5:33 PM

Post #9424776

Not only not liking water on the leaves but cucumbers need a consistant watering. Drip irrigation will be perfect. If they are allowed to become too dry, they quickly become bitter. You will do fine. Cucumbers grow themselves.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 20, 2013
5:14 AM

Post #9425195

For my weekly Garden class this week the topic is to be Using your digital camera as a garden tool I just hope no one tries digging with one ..But with my class you never can tell...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 20, 2013
6:12 AM

Post #9425244

[quote="grits74571"]For my weekly Garden class this week the topic is to be Using your digital camera as a garden tool I just hope no one tries digging with one ..But with my class you never can tell...[/quote]


Excellent topic! I always take photos of a new found plant and then after it has been established to see how well it has grown. The comparisons are remarkable. How else do you use the camera besides digging with it? lol
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 21, 2013
5:50 AM

Post #9426419

After reading this thread I thought about putting some cukes in the latest hugelkulture bed but my DW soon trashed that idea by reminding me that ,my dog has access to that bed and she is a cucumber thief..So now I need to come up with something else and will do a bed like my Mother used a long time ago..and this is a method I have used before ..When I get started I will post pictures

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 21, 2013
7:39 AM

Post #9426584

Good! I am curious to see what that will be...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 21, 2013
5:05 PM

Post #9427172

Same here Kittriana ~ always fun to see/learn different things. I also find the old ways were the best ways most of the time.

DavidofDeLand

DavidofDeLand
DeLand, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 21, 2013
5:11 PM

Post #9427182

Yes!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 21, 2013
5:28 PM

Post #9427202

Hey David...

Lifes lessons make me wish I had listened and learned more. Two ways of learning things. One is from others' experience (the easy way) and one is by making my own mistakes (the HARD way). lol
grits74571
Talihina, OK

February 22, 2013
6:28 AM

Post #9427634

Christi if we did learn from our mistakes I would be the smatest ****** on the planet.I told my class the best use For my camera is to post pictures on Daves and get IDs of unknown plants within an hour
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 22, 2013
5:05 PM

Post #9428311

Absolutely on the ID forum and the Daves suggestion too. Good going Grits!

The camera can chronicle the plantings in your garden also and document what you had purchased. I take a photo of the tag first, followed up by the photo of the plant. That way I will always have the ID on file... if I can find it. lol
grits74571
Talihina, OK

June 27, 2013
4:18 AM

Post #9575174

Just needed to bring up this old thread and say that the new cucumber bed did not happen due to some sewer problems i was forced to leave room for the workers truck ..On the other subject I have both the Diva and the Fanfare planted the fanfare is a very fast growing plant and is starting to put on fruit as is the Diva will keep posted on the eating results soon
grits74571
Talihina, OK

June 27, 2013
5:25 AM

Post #9575234

I did get something new put into use I have piped the drain (condensate) water from the A/C unit to a small row of cukes they are loving the constant supply of water...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 27, 2013
6:17 AM

Post #9575292

And that is a good thing. They will not be bitter with a consistent supply of moisture.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 27, 2013
8:53 AM

Post #9575521

When I lived in Texas, as a kid, I always had to watch for rattlers in the watermelon vines. One thing we learned early, when one came slithering across your path, you just stand still and let it pass.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 27, 2013
11:01 AM

Post #9575711

Ohhh...don't use the word "slither" I hate that word. Lol

I plant Rosella where the A/C condensation comes out. I saw that water and I couldn't pass it up.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 4, 2013
5:03 PM

Post #9586958

Picked the first Diva today and DW gave it high marks it sure looked good as she scarfed it down (sigh) maybe tomorrow I will get one for myself just eat it out there in the garden ,where she seldom treads LOL

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

July 4, 2013
7:28 PM

Post #9587097

Ours are really taking off now. Vines are near 7 ft tall. On strings in a high tunnel.
Fanfare, Eos & one other.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 13, 2013
9:25 AM

Post #9597478

I picked Burpless cukes today which I grow every year. Really love this variety which makes big fruit that is always tender and tasty. I also picked Straight Eight, an old stanby in the garden that I often grow. Next to the Straight Eight in the picture is one from my Suyo Longs. Impressed with these so far.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 13, 2013
9:27 AM

Post #9597482

Also picked Camilla Cukes. First year growing Camilla for me but really like them so will be growing from now on. These are one of those all female varieties that sets tons of fruits.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 13, 2013
3:14 PM

Post #9597790

Enjoying reading everyone's favorites. I've grown several cukes mentioned and currently grow Suyo and Boston Pickling (known as Green Prolific at one time). Spacemaster was a favorite in the square foot yarden back in the 70's. It's prolific but I seem to recall it has a short season. We have more space now to grow cukes vertically due to snails and slugs.

Burpee Burpless is good but the Asian cukes are burpless and not watery, Jo.

I don't favor smooth skin, market-type cukes anymore (Marketmore and Straight Eight). Though the traditional farm garden cuke around here is Straight Eight, it has a reputation for being prone to every disease a cucumber can get. No worries, they use lots of chemicals. I do a lot of canning and like Boston Pickling for relishes and pickles. It's a little scary looking with its black spines but they come right off. My garden leans toward old American varieties and saved seed.

Copperheads are a problem here in the country and much worse in the city. They love the gutter downspout drains because chipmunks and flying squirrels go in them. Not a problem in the country so much. Maybe hawks pick them off? One of our two dogs is a hunting hound (Plotthound) and she can scent and hear a copperhead moving underground. She stands over a mouse or vole run and listens for them moving, then pounces on the run and digs like crazy. Once she gets them out she starts whipping them around. She has been bitten sixteen times over the last six or seven years. She occasionally delivers them to the back door not quite dead. Both sides of her dewlaps have V-shaped scars running from cheek to mouth where the fangs have gone in. No fur grows there. Gives her a vicious looking Joker scowl. We think she might be a million dollar anti-venom machine at this point. She only kills copperheads (in the snake department). We have an emergency snake kit for her that we travel with. It consists of Benadryl right away, Rimadyl for two days and amoxicillan for ten days.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 13, 2013
4:45 PM

Post #9597862

There will come a time when the poison starts affecting her, but she knows her calling, keep up with the benadryl and Rimadyl, she knows you are pleased when she catches the snakes...I did not get cukes in this year, have an issue to resolve on trellises with my daughters views of front yard esthetics. The cucumbers look really good. From this early spring...

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drobarr

drobarr
Hummelstown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2013
6:34 AM

Post #9599541

Burpless and straight 8's are my favs

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2013
7:34 AM

Post #9599610

I grew Boston Pickling, H-19 Little Leaf and Muncher this year. For taste, Muncher still wins by a mile. Burpless and no spines, too. However, the pickle worms seem to prefer Muncher, too, and for productivity it doesn't come close to matching Boston Pickling. BP gives me an awful tummyache, though -- they look like they'd be great for pickling but not so much for fresh eating.

The H-19 Little Leaf had an early flush of high productivity but now only has minor yields. The leaves are also burning up as the temperatures ramp up. This makes me suspect that H-19 might be a good cuke for short season climates.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2013
10:26 AM

Post #9601142

Burpless cucumbers. Second Picture Straight Eight (smaller one) and Camilla.

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pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 16, 2013
5:09 PM

Post #9601550

I read an article just recently where plants release a chemical signal to attract good bugs &/or repel bad bugs. Since it isn't something that breeders were looking for, some varieties have had it almost bred out of them. Now they are going to try to reselect and breed it back in. The article talked about aphids and ladybugs in particular. But I had noticed that with Beans and Bean beetles, too - they really prefer some varieties to others.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 17, 2013
12:08 PM

Post #9602429

I decided to start a second crop of cucumbers. Sowed seeds of Suyo Long and Orient Expess both of which are Asian types.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2013
11:54 AM

Post #9605073

Burpless cucumbers picked yesterday.

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DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2013
5:01 AM

Post #9605796

Picked my first Suyo Long this week. It is long--about 17 inches--and a little crunchier than my other cukes.

This message was edited Jul 21, 2013 6:00 AM

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 20, 2013
8:06 AM

Post #9605955

I like the taste of those Suyo Longs.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 21, 2013
2:14 PM

Post #9607388

Straight Eight first picture, Camilla second pictire.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 28, 2013
3:37 PM

Post #9614586

I just bought some seeds of a pickling type called Double Yield. Supposed to be a very. very, great producer.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 29, 2013
4:17 AM

Post #9614976

I was mostly disappointed by Viva and not real impressed by the fanfare but It may be the location ...This could be my fault as I planted those in a location where I have had fairly good results before ,now comes the But I had started some peaches from seed just east of that spot and did not foresee the kind of growth that happened the trees are now over 12' tall and bushy so that shade could be at the heart of my failure with the viva and the fanfare both ...Live and learn LOL

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2013
9:58 AM

Post #9625837

Top Burpless, middle Straight Eight and bottom Green Fingers.

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sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2013
1:43 PM

Post #9630679

Another vote for Boston Pickling
Got seeds from a store display rack couple years ago and still growing them. They're doing GREAT this year no doubt happy with lots of rain, crisp prolific and delicious.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2013
3:05 PM

Post #9630744

I'd post more comments but am up to my ears in relishes, pickles and pickling projects. Bless those Boston picklers. We planted a six foot fence line in May and another 6" fence line four weeks later. The first line is still producing and the second one will start coming in this week. Suyo actually out-produces them though and I prefer Suyo for fresh pickles that will store four to six weeks .

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2013
3:13 PM

Post #9630750

I really like Suyo Long, am growing it this year. Had one called China Long last year but really didn't like that one at all.

I have seeds for Muncher and Double Yield both pickling types that I will plant in the spring. My Camilla cucumbers will be back. First year for Camilla here and I love this variety.

Straight Eight is an old standard type.

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kgc45542
Ballston Spa, NY

November 30, 2013
10:28 AM

Post #9718960

I had great luck this year with Eureka. Sandy loamy soil, trellised, I water every other day
had plenty to pickle and munching too. Will certainly plant them again next year.
Gracye
Warrenton, VA

December 10, 2013
3:51 AM

Post #9725171

There is supposedly an old variety with VERY SMALL seeds. It is favored for pickling. Anyone know of this variety? I want to grow it, and thought I'd ask you all. Thanks in advance!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 10, 2013
9:38 AM

Post #9725413

There are several old varieties of small seeded picklers. Boston is one.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2013
10:33 AM

Post #9726120

Parisian is meant to be a Gherkin pickler, but it does have small seeds. Homemade and Chipper are others that are said to have fewer seeds. I don't know it they are smaller. I have grown Parisian before and can say that the seeds are small.

One thing about the older varieties that I can also attest to: the vining ones do have to be tended to regularly. They need steady watering and once they fruit they have to be picked often to get a good, continuous production going. I like the vines, though, as they are easier for me to see the fruit. Sometimes those little devils hide under the leaves and you miss fruit here and there until you get a "wopper" going LOL!

brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

December 12, 2013
10:52 AM

Post #9726816

Pick your cux's small and you do not have to deal with those large seeds.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

January 23, 2014
3:42 PM

Post #9754294

I have seeds for many new to me varieties that I will be starting this spring.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 24, 2014
6:15 AM

Post #9754593

Can't wait for planting time to get the cux and tomatoes out into the ground. This winter just doesn't seem to want to let up. Reminds me of the 60's and 70's.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 24, 2014
7:55 AM

Post #9754661

They say if you can remember the 60's you weren't there. :)

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 24, 2014
8:01 AM

Post #9754667

I beg to differ with you on that one.
I graduated in 1960. Remember it well.
I was in the army from 1964 to 1970. Many good memories there.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 24, 2014
8:43 AM

Post #9754697

LOL! High School class of '77. We have record breaking lows several winters in a row in central Illinois while I was in high school; and, yes I did walk to school (almost a mile). We walked in groups to keep warm LOL!

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 24, 2014
10:23 AM

Post #9754760

Did you forget, it was uphill both ways. LOL.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 24, 2014
12:09 PM

Post #9754822

CG, you would be differing with Robin Williams, not me. Anyway, didn't mean to derail the cuke thread.
Glenda_Michigan
Fowlerville, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 9, 2014
3:08 AM

Post #9765375

LOVE all the info and pictures you all have posted!!
Does the fact that I am in (Michigan) Zone 5b have any bearing on what variety of cucumber I should choose?
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 10, 2014
8:19 AM

Post #9766374

Glenda, I think that some veggies are affected by the different soils and definitely zones. That is why I find myself growing more than one variety and experimenting with new varieties since I moved from Illinois to Texas. Also, I really do think personal taste factors in so much.

I went to Tractor Supply yesterday. I thought I would mention that, for those of us who would like to save on shipping, that they are carrying quite a few Burpee varieties including some organic seeds. Also they had a wrack of Seeds of Change seeds.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 10, 2014
10:07 AM

Post #9766461

That's good info, Terry.

Thanks for sharing!
cytf
Staten Island, NY

February 10, 2014
6:27 PM

Post #9766801

Last year for the first I planted Carolina Hybrid cucumber, I use a trellis for 2 vines and I had produce until fall.I will try them again this year

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Glenda_Michigan
Fowlerville, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2014
8:13 PM

Post #9772711

Awesome! Thanks for the tip, Terri! :)
grits74571
Talihina, OK

March 4, 2014
8:38 AM

Post #9781628

This year I am going to do something different I have about 10 varieties of left over seeds so am just going to mix all of those into one long row and see what happens
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2014
8:58 AM

Post #9781636

LOL! Grits, I've done that. I'm there with my tomatoes actually. To me, that is the fun in gardening.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

March 4, 2014
3:53 PM

Post #9781908

This sounds about perfect for me I am totally anal when it comes to labels ..
I label every plant I set out and every seed in the ground..but when it comes to planning I am like Charlie Manson HELTER SKELTER
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2014
6:33 AM

Post #9782264

I've just signed up for GrowVeg.com to help me plan out my garden. I think if I can get it down on paper (or record it on the computer) I can at least remember what my gameplan was and, therefore, stick with it. I'm trying to do rotational plantings.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 8, 2014
4:55 AM

Post #9784513

I could never find Mac software for garden planning and I didn't like the idea of paying for an online service, so I ended up making a template of my garden in Photoshop Elements. I print it out every year and fill it in so I can plan my rotations. I also label my seeds and plants so I know what I've got, and what works and what doesn't. I'd better get busy planting my peppers and tomatoes in flats, come to think of it!

I think I'm growing Diva again this year; last year my cucumbers succumbed to wilt and I'm hoping this year will be better!

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