Hilliard, OH

My father-in-law just lost a large section of wooded area in his backyard to a power company easement. I am trying to identify plants that he can replace in that area. He lives in Columbia, SC with high heat and high humidity and lots of sunlight. He can replant the area but the plants cannot reach higher than 10 feet, and it is in a floodplain. He mentioned native grasses? Any help would be awesome.
Thanks,
Will

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Hi Will.

Here are a few suggestions from Clemson University for you, and also info for the Clemson Extension center in Columbia, Richland County. They can be most helpful in guiding your FIL to the right plants.
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/county/richland/


Needle palms and sabal minor palms are well adapted to that area and stay under 10 ft.

http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/trees/hgic1019.html

This link lists grasses with their habits and requirements
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/flowers/hgic1178.html

http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/shrubs/hgic1075.html

http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/shrubs/hgic1086.html


For gardeners who would like to have a red-leafed
ornamental grass in their perennial beds, there are
other choices. There are three cultivars of our native
switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) that have red
foliage, which is especially prominent in the fall.
‘Shenandoah’, ‘Squaw’ and ‘Rotstrahlbusch’ are
non-invasive red switchgrasses for sunny gardens,
and all three will adapt to a wide range of soil
conditions. ‘Shenandoah’ looks the most like
Japanese bloodgrass, as its foliage starts out green
with the tips turning red in early summer

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