Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Hi,

Please help me to ID this.

Thank you

Kind regards,
Stephanie

Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo
Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Can you get some more close-up pics please?

Resin

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Hi Resin,

Ok. I will to get more close-up pics the next time I am there at the park. But it will be in one to two weeks time only.

Thanks,
Stephanie

Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

Also if there are any cones, flowers, seed pods, etc would certainly help. To me, it doesn't have a Casuarina look but then again it's not something I see often.

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Ok I will go there again growin. I will check the ground has the cones/pods or not as the tree may be too tall for me or my camera to zoom in. Thanks.

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Hi Resin, growin,

I took more pics today. I didn't see any flower, seed pod or cone.

Could it be a Gymnostoma species ?

Btw, please disregard the third pic (taken from afar) of the first set of pics that were uploaded in my first message. It does not represent the tree.

Thanks,
Stepanie

Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo Thumbnail by StephanieChoo
Seattle, WA

The foliage reminds me of Cryptomeria.

Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

I think your mention of Gymnostoma might be right but I look to Resin for a good ID.

Contra Costa County, CA(Zone 9b)

The several species of Casurina that grow around here all have much longer needles, usually 6" +, depending on species. They are almost all olive-green, drab coloring, even the new growth. Unless pruned up, they are branched to the ground and have a fairly formal Christmas tree shape. They tolerate a lot of wind, then the 'formal Christmas tree shape' becomes more windswept, but almost always maintains one main leader, then horizontal or somewhat hanging branches.

Darwin, Australia

I don't think it's Casuarinaceae, and I'm not sure it's any of the conifers either. It actually reminds me of Melaleuca bracteata.

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Thanks Darwiniensis! Yes, I agree. The tree does look like Melaleuca bracteata.

Thank you Diana_K, growin, vngarden :-D

Darwin, Australia

You're welcome!

Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Melaleuca was my first thought with the new pics too; M. bracteata looks good, but maybe also compare M. linariifolia.

Resin

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

I think it is closer to M. bracteata as well.

Thanks for your feedback, Resin!

Stephanie

Darwin, Australia

Melaleuca linariifolia has pale, peeling, papery bark (the classic Melaleuca bark which gives them their common name, Paperbark).
Like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Melaleuca_linariifolia_bark.jpg

M. bracteata has darker, gray/brown, fissured bark, as do the trees posted above by Stephanie Choo.
There is a good image of M. bracteata bark on this page:
http://www.grevilleapark.org/static_images/1701/index.html

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Hi Darwiniensis,

We have many similar plants growing in our countries. As for Melaleuca linariifolia, I don't think I have come across this tree yet. Next time when I see one, I will definitely post a pic ;-)

Thanks!
Stephanie

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

Hello Resin, growin, Diana_K, vngarden, Darwiniensis,

How are you?

Fyi, recently the park people put up signage on the tree. It says Melaleuca bracteata 'Revolution Gold'.

The ID identified was correct :-D

Thank you again!
Stephanie

Thumbnail by StephanieChoo

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