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Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2013
4:27 PM

Post #9438849

We all have them--go-to recipes. They are the ones we go to so often we don't even need the recipe any more. They all have three things in common---they are family pleasers, they are crowd pleasers, and they are easy to prepare. I'd love to hear some that all of you go to, and I'll start the thread with one of my own in the following post. ~pen.

Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2013
4:45 PM

Post #9438875

SMALL BROWNIE CAKE
Adapted from a Gold Medal recipe

Throw everything in a medium bowl. Can be mixed by hand. I always bake this in silicon cupcake liners. Living alone, I leave a couple out for near-term consumption by the cook and wrap the remaining ones individually in plastic wrap and put in the freezer. They are very rich and do not need to be frosted or garnished, IMO.

1 ½ C sugar
Ύ C Wondra flour
½ C cocoa
Ό tsp salt (omit if using salted butter)
Ύ C butter, melted and cooled (1 ½ sticks)
3 eggs (at room temp)
1 ½ tsp vanilla

Whipped cream, shaved chocolate for serving (optional).

Preheat oven to 350°
Grease and flour round pan, 8 x 1 ½”

Mix all cake ingredients. Spread in pan. Bake about 35 min or until top is dry, edges are crispy and toothpick test is clean.

Cool 10 min; remove from pan. Cool cake completely. Can serve with whipped cream and chocolate for a nice presentation. Refrigerate or freeze any remaining cake.

CUPCAKES
Fill 10 cupcake liners 2/3 full. Bake 20-30 min. at 350.

VARIATION
Sub 1/2 C coconut for the cocoa, add some chopped pecans, use coconut oil for some of the butter and you have a coconutty version of blondies.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

March 4, 2013
5:22 PM

Post #9438914

Chinese Salad

1/4 C sunflower seeds
1/4 C slivered almonds
2 packages ramen noodles (throw away the seasoning package), crushed

One head of napa cabbage, thinly sliced
1/2 C carrots (pulsed in the food processor)


Dressing
5 T rice wine vinegar
2 T soy sauce
2 T sesame oil
2 T honey
1/4 C sugar


Heat dressing, stirring until sugar dissolves. Do not boil. Mix nuts and noodles in a large bowl. Pour dressing over and toss well. Mix in cabbage and carrots. Serve immediately.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2013
6:48 AM

Post #9439358

happytail, I've had that salad--or a variation of it--before, and it is most excellent. Thanks for posting! ~ pen

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

March 5, 2013
4:14 PM

Post #9439968

It is a great quickie, and very filling. We love it!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 6, 2013
5:35 AM

Post #9440440

Everyone loves this, I've never met anyone who doesn't like it. I use BS chicken breasts and cook for less time, and I often double the sauce, because my family likes it. Good with rice pilaf and broccoli.



Honey-Mustard Chicken

3 lb. chicken -- cut up
1/4 c. butter
1/2 c. honey
1/4 c. prepared mustard
1 t. salt
1 t. curry powder

Instructions: Melt butter in baking dish. Mix honey, mustard, and seasonings. Roll chicken in mixture. Bake at 375 degrees for one hour.

Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2013
2:13 PM

Post #9441033

Celene, sounds good. Glad to have the ratios for the honey-mustard sauce. I bet it would be good with pork chops, too. Thanks for posting. ~pen


Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2013
2:32 PM

Post #9441047

Have ya'll tried Knorr's Homestyle Stock? Excellent product!

MEXICAN CHICKEN SQUASH SOUP

8 chicken thighs, skin on
4 med yellow squash or 6-7 small, sliced (about 2.75 lb.)
1 can whole kernel corn - do not drain
2 cans cream style corn
1 10-oz can Rotel (Original) - do not drain
1 15-oz can tomato sauce (I use Hunt's)
water
1 tub Knorr Homestyle Stock
s & p, garlic granules, sugar
cayenne or sriracha sauce to taste (if more heat wanted)

Put chicken pieces in bottom of large soup pot and add water to ~ half way up chicken layer; cover and simmer until chicken is nearly done.

Add squash (if slices are large, cut in half) and cook a few minutes on top of chicken--do not stir.

Add corn, Rotel, tomato sauce, Knorr stock and enough water to make soup consistency; stir, cover and simmer until squash is tender.

Remove chicken pieces; slide skin off. Debone if desired, or return whole pieces to pot. If too soupy, simmer uncovered until reduced.

Season (after reduced): add salt, pepper, garlic granules and sugar to taste (and cayenne or sriracha if desired).

Serve with bottle of sriracha on the side for guests who like extra spicy.

Can prepare ahead and place in containers in freezer until the fat separates. Skim fat off top before reheating.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 6, 2013
5:22 PM

Post #9441212

The honey mustard sauce is good on salmon (I add a little soy sauce), grilled tofu, ham, or pork as well. I don't eat meat, so I've never personally tasted it, but even the fussiest kid in my family eats it like it's going out of style if you cut BS chicken breasts into "nuggets". I also like the sauce on roasted sweet potatoes, I add it about 10 min before they're done cooking. It's up there with sweet chili sauce in terms of versatility at my house.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2013
6:13 PM

Post #9441273

Celene, do you make your own sweet chili sauce?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 6, 2013
7:38 PM

Post #9441355

I do, now. For a long time, the Vietnamese store near my house carried a brand I liked, and when they couldn't get it any more, I started making my own.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 15, 2013
2:36 PM

Post #9450592

Celene, I have never made sweet chili sauce. Will you post your recipe? ~pen

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 15, 2013
3:28 PM

Post #9450644

I wish I could say that I had some top-secret recipe that I personally developed, but this is the one I use. I sub out vegetarian fish sauce for regular fish sauce. http://thaifood.about.com/od/thaicurrypasterecipes/r/Easy-Thai-Sweet-Chili-Sauce-Recipe.htm

gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 15, 2013
6:17 PM

Post #9450805

I was going to make the honey mustard chicken tonight, but spent to long in the yard, and didnt get to it.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

March 15, 2013
6:23 PM

Post #9450810

Hubby out of town this weekend, so I guess it will be cereal for dinner. Maybe I'll pick up something for lunch on my way to work tomorrow, so I don't snack myself to death the next two days.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2013
11:24 AM

Post #9452421

I make this for myself in the summer--if I make it to take somewhere I leave the lettuce out and mix in before serving. If I just make it for the house (a few days worth of meals for me) I'll leave the lettuce out until I want a serving.

BLT Pasta Salad

1 c mayo or Miracle Whip or 1/2 & 1/2 of both
1/4 c bottled lemon juice
2 tsp sugar
2 tsp chicken base--I have the Better Than Boullion type
1 bag of Wacky Mac colored rotini or pasta of choice-cooked al dente
8 slices of thick cut bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled
1 pt grape tomatoes, halved and seeded
3 scallions, sliced
4 c romaine lettuce, chopped or shredded

Mix 1st four ingredients and salt and pepper to taste for dressing.
Add cooled cooked pasta, bacon, tomato and scallions.
Add lettuce when ready to serve. Lettuce will wilt if mixed in and stored with leftovers.

I'm thinking of mixing the mayo 1/2 & 1/2 with greek yogurt next time I try it. The chicken base is for salt and another flavor base but you could do a sprinkle of Hidden Valley Ranch dressing mix in the mayo or maybe other herbs you like.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2013
6:58 PM

Post #9452919

dmac, your BLT salad sounds yummo. I don't think I have ever had such. I'm getting a mental image of serving the salad with the romaine leaves on the side--so you can spread the salad on the leaves and have as a finger food. Would that work?? Thanks for posting. ~ pen
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2013
7:10 PM

Post #9452932

This is my go-to dressing for potato salad and deviled eggs. It's tangy and creamy and complex and easy to throw together. I try to make it the day before I cook the potatoes or eggs or at least a few hours.

POTATO SALAD DRESSING

Whisk together….
Mayo – 1 Ό C
Sour cream – 1/3 C
Buttermilk – 3 T
Mustard – 2.5 T (Dijon)
Mustard, 2 tsp (dry)
1 T cider vinegar
Dill, 1 T fresh or ½ T dry or less
Tarragon 1/2 T or less
Celery seed – 1 T
Cayenne – Ό tsp
Celery salt – 1/8 tsp
Kosher salt to taste
Cracked pepper to taste (I use Seasoned Pepper – McCormick or Lowry)
pickle juice if needed to thin - sweet or dill, depending on which way you're going

Makes enough for 3 1/2 lbs. potatoes

Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2013
7:18 PM

Post #9452942

DEVILED EGGS

I won a contest at a family reunion for best dish for my deviled eggs. I don't measure stuff--depends on how many eggs I'm doing--but in general it goes like this...

Mash cooked egg yolks together with grated cheddar cheese until the cheese is no longer discernible (my secret ingredient.) Add finely chopped baby dill pickles to taste and moisten with POTATO SALAD DRESSING (posted above). Taste and add more cider vinegar if you want it a little more tangy. Pipe into halved egg whites and sprinkle with paprika. These get inhaled wherever I take them. ~ pen

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 17, 2013
7:45 PM

Post #9452960

I think that looks like a very tasty dressing, I may try it with yogurt instead of mayo. I am not the world's biggest fan of mayo, I won't eat the kind from a jar, only homemade and only on certain things. Certainly seems to be well-seasoned and unlikely to be bland!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2013
8:30 PM

Post #9452998

Celene, have you tried Blue Plate mayo? I rate it above Hellmans and just below homemade. It's made in New Orleans--dunno if you can get it is Columbus. Sometimes we have it here but usually not. I order it from Amazon. Anyway, if you keep it on hand for other eaters in your household, suggest you try Blue Plate. ~pen

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 18, 2013
5:50 AM

Post #9453227

I will give it a try, but mayo has a weird mouth feel for me. I don't know whether it's the egg or the oil, but generally I don't want too much of it. If it's in salad dressing and not too prominent, it's okay. Cilantro and chipotle aioli, that sort of thing is fine. Mayo on a sandwich? Not fine. Good thing I'm not weird, eh? Some people have food issues. I have lifetime subscriptions, lol.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 18, 2013
3:54 PM

Post #9453890

Celene, when my son (who is a much better cook than I) makes my potato salad dressing, he goes heavier on the mustard and lighter on the mayo. There is a whole class of folks out there who prefer mustard potato salad.

I hear you about the weird mouth feel thing. I feel somewhat that way about peas and beans. There's something about that burst of dryness inside them that doesn't play well on my palate, but it was much more pronounced when I was younger.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 18, 2013
6:49 PM

Post #9454066

I never met a bean I didn't like :) My husband feels the way you do about beans, though--he hates the grainy middle.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 20, 2013
1:09 PM

Post #9456088

Ok. What's a BS chicken breast?

P.S. EXCELLENT thread idea...thanks, Pennzer!

This message was edited Mar 20, 2013 2:10 PM
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 20, 2013
1:25 PM

Post #9456115

I took it as boneless skinless.

I too love beans. Im not thrilled about kidney beans, but every other bean I love, them, I just like . Love love any southern pea as well.

This message was edited Mar 20, 2013 3:31 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 20, 2013
1:29 PM

Post #9456123

Then, I'll have to post my Red Beans and Rice Recipe for you, and change your mind...

Boneless, skinless. Ya'll don't even want to know what I came up with, LOL!
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 20, 2013
1:31 PM

Post #9456127

I love red beans and rice, but with the smaller red beans, not kidney beans. I would love the recipe you use tho.
purpledixie56
Ancaster/Hamilton, ON
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2013
7:47 PM

Post #9458629

Hi I'm new from Ontario,Canada. I agree about beans, they are so try. I especially hate chick (garbonzo) beans. I like the look of your chicken recipe except my family doesn't like curry. I do but it has to be sweet, not hot. I would have to cut it down to 1/4 tsp. Zone 6a

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 23, 2013
12:10 AM

Post #9458755

I like super spicy food, so I'm not the best person to judge, but you REALLY can't taste the curry, it just adds complexity. This sauce isn't hot at all, but starting off with less rather than more curry makes sense. You can add it, but you can't take it out. You may also want to try a sweet curry powder, they're spicy and complex, but not hot.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 23, 2013
6:52 AM

Post #9458917

I dont eat potato chips that much anymore, but tried the the Lays Shiracha chips ,they the hottest things ive ever put in my mouth. I dont know if whether to call them spicy, or just hot. If you like a kick in the mouth, give them a try.

This message was edited Mar 23, 2013 1:13 PM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 23, 2013
8:17 AM

Post #9459004

I don't love potato chips, but now I'm intrigued! Thank you! Purple, I'd send you some Singapore curry powder, it is very sweet and mild, but I'm skeptical about shipping a powder like that internationally. They'll think I'm a terrorist or something.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2013
8:19 AM

Post #9459969

I've been making these for about 15 yrs or so. Got the recipe off an old Food Network show (Calling All Cooks) that featured home cooks at home with the show host making their "famous" dish in their own kitchen.
I've added a couple minor things for color but I get request for this all the time.

Oatmeal Lemon Bars

1 tsp vanilla
1 c soft butter
1 c sugar
2 c all purpose flour
1 c raw oats (I use old fashioned)
1 14 oz can sweetened condensed milk
1 orange, zest of finely chopped or microplaned
1 lime, zest of finely chopped or microplaned
3 lemons-zest of one finely chopped or microplaned AND
juice of all three.
*lemons are tricky so if you should taste your final filling to see if it's lemony enough for you and add more juice accordingly. Some lemons just may not be as juicy as others.

350 degree oven, 13 x 9 pan, sprayed with nonstick spray.

Cream butter, sugar and vanilla.
Add flour, then oats. Mixture will be crumbly.
Press 3/4 of the dough into the bottom of prepared pan evenly. It won't be a super thick layer.
Reserve the remaining 1/4 of dough.

In a bowl mix the sweetened condensed milk, lemon juice and zests.
Pour over the crust, spread evenly to the edges of the dough.
Crumble the reserved 1/4 of the dough over the top of the filling.
Bake 30-40 minutes or until crumbles are golden and browned a bit.
Cool completely (the hardest part) at least 1 hour before cutting.

I wish I could tell you something about how they store but I take them to work and have never had leftovers.
I imagine airtight container for a week or so. I think they may even freeze well.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2013
3:07 PM

Post #9460437

Love anything with EB milk. Thanks, dmac! ~pen

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 24, 2013
3:10 PM

Post #9460441

Those sound FABULOUS.

It's not seasonal, but this is one of the recipes that everyone loves and requests. It's versatile--make it into layers like a cake, make it into cupcakes, keep it as a bundt cake. Add chocolate chips. Add chopped candied ginger, or grated orange peel. No nuts? More nuts? Either is fine. It keeps well, in fact it tastes better the day after it's baked. It freezes well, so if you make a couple in September and wrap them tightly, you'll have a quick dessert on hand. Want to fancy it up? Glaze with a cream cheese glaze, and drizzle caramel sauce on top of that. I like it with plain old confectioner's sugar. Oh, and it makes a heck of a trifle, too. I do not use canned pumpkin, I use homegrown puree, about 1-3/4 to 2 cups. Want to use up mashed sweet potatoes? That'll work, too--you may need to add some liquid to get a canned pumpkin-y texture.


Pumpkin Bundt Cake

-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 cup vegetable oil
3 eggs
1 can pumpkin -- (15 ounce)
puree
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 1/2 cups white sugar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease one 10 inch bundt or tube pan.

Cream oil, beaten eggs, pumpkin and vanilla together.

Sift the flour, sugar, baking soda, ground nutmeg, ground allspice, ground cinnamon, ground cloves and salt together. Add the flour mixture to the pumpkin mixture and mix until just combined. If desired, stir in some chopped nuts. Pour batter into the prepared pan.

Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Let cake cool in pan for 5 minutes then turn out onto a plate and sprinkle with confectioners' sugar.





Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2013
4:31 PM

Post #9465276

I posted this recipe for Jo-An (jomoncon) on the Strawberry Bread thread and thought I would cross post it here...


STRAWBERRY BREAD

3 C flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
3 tsp cinnamon
2 C sugar...
Mix all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the center.

2 (10-oz) pkg frozen sliced strawberries, thawed
4 eggs, well beaten
1 1/2 C cooking oil
1 1/4 C chopped pecans...
Mix and combine in a separate bowl. Pour into the well of the dry ingredients. Stir all together carefully, just enough to dampen all ingredients.

Pour into two greased and floured loaf pans. Bake in preheated oven for one hour or until done. Test with toothpick or thermometer to be sure the center is cooked through.

Serve warm or wrap cooled loaves in plastic wrap and store in fridge or freeze for later use.

This is especially good sliced thick, buttered on top and toasted under the broiler. Makes a great breakfast addition.


jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

March 29, 2013
3:41 AM

Post #9465576

Celene, your Pumpkin Bundt Cake sounds fabulous. I think I will try it with sweet potatoes since I still have some delicious ones left over from a case I got last fall. I wonder how it would do with a sweet winter squash? I may give that a try also.

I like the idea of freezing it. It's just DH & I now, and if I have a whole cake, his sweet tooth kicks in. I usually bake cakes in small loaf pans, and then freeze the extras.
Jo-Ann

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 29, 2013
3:50 AM

Post #9465577

It's fine with other orangey winter squash. I just use whatever I have cooked. It won't be as orange, but it will still be tasty.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 1, 2013
10:21 AM

Post #9468662

Was there a mention of a red beans & rice recipe someone was going to post here? :-)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
10:37 AM

Post #9468680

Tam, the Anson Mills website has a pretty good recipe for red beans and rice, aka "reezy peezy"... Of course they want you to buy their Charleston rice and Sea Island red peas, but it's still the traditional favorite of the Lowcountry Gullah population.
http://ansonmills.com/recipes/454?recipes_by=grain

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

April 1, 2013
11:42 AM

Post #9468752

Thanks, darius,

I didn't even realize red beans and rice was a local dish (or that there was a local variation on that). I will definitely have to give that a try. Thanks for the link - and the education.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 1, 2013
2:53 PM

Post #9468944

Ok, I'm stumped. Somebody please explain what a "rice grit" is...

And yeah, Tam, it was I who was supposed to post the red beans and rice recipe, but I got busy.

Will do, poste haste and toot sweet, soon as I find a minute!

Linda

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
3:03 PM

Post #9468955

Rice grits are similar to corn grits, but made from rice and not corn. The best of either are stone ground so there is little to no heat from the milling process. (Heat destroys natural enzymes.)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 1, 2013
4:15 PM

Post #9469044

Thanks, Darius!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2013
12:26 PM

Post #9487435

Celene, pumpkin is not one of my fave things, but it is one of my friend's fave things, so I made your pumpkin bundt cake and took to an Easter luncheon at her house. Everyone loved it! My pumpkin friend insisted on getting the recipe from me, and that is the sincerest form of thanks for a food offering. I did add a cinnamon/sugar glaze so it would keep longer. Thanks for a great recipe!

I will be trying many of the others here, too. Next up is your honey-mustard chicken. :)

~ pen

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 17, 2013
6:19 PM

Post #9487897

Glad your friend liked it! Let me know what you think of the honey mustard chicken...my niece just asked me to make salmon with the same glaze. She also puts that glaze on hot dogs. Blech

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 18, 2013
8:08 AM

Post #9488455

My go-to recipe. I can't leave home without it, either...

"Lilly Mae's Greens"

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=6284693

Enjoy!
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 18, 2013
11:00 AM

Post #9488622

Sounds yummy, I of course consider the bacon fat a must ;-O

When I read last week that red beans were even more full of good things, than say a blueberry, I started thinking of your red beans and rice recipe. Did you post it and I missed it someplace??

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 18, 2013
12:24 PM

Post #9488711

Soon as I get a minute, I'll post it -- some wheres, LOL! It's not hard at all, and the recipe is almost just like for Lilly Mae's Greens. Chop up your seasoning, put it all together in about 10 minutes in a crock pot, and "go to bed" (that's a theme with my cooking!!!).
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 5, 2013
11:35 AM

Post #9509156

SMALL BROWNIE CAKE

I posted the basic recipe above on March 14. I have recently made a couple batches with some modifications, and they are wonderful! Changes are indicated with a *.

1 1/2 C sugar
3/4 C Wondra flour
*1/2 C Hershey's Special Dark Cocoa (great product!)
1/4 tsp salt (omit if using salted butter)
*1/4 tsp instant coffee granules
*1/4 tsp cinnamon
3 eggs at room temp
3/4 C butter (melted and cooled)
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Directions as posted above. I make as cupcakes and do not frost them, but I'm taking some to my daughter's next week, and we're going to dip them in a chocolate-coffee ganache.
~ pen

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 17, 2013
6:27 AM

Post #9523667

Pennzer, I have looked at our local supermarkets high and low and I can no longer find McCormick's Seasoned Pepper and thought they had stopped making it. It was a good balance for my favorite go-to Aglio E Olio. It's a pretty forgiving recipe, using as much garlic and red pepper flakes as you like, but that particular blend worked well with the red chili pepper flakes to control the heat. Now I guess I'll go on line and see if I canfind it that way.

All these dessert recipes make my mouth water but we've cancelled desserts in the interests of cancelling some hip width.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

May 18, 2013
10:45 PM

Post #9525455

If you don't find it elsewhere, you might give Amazon a try. I've had very good success there with hard to find food items, and many are actually priced below local markets.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 19, 2013
4:38 AM

Post #9525536

Is this it?
http://www.amazon.com/McCormick-Seasoning-Lemon-Pepper-28-Ounce/dp/B0015MVGGY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1368963469&sr=8-2&keywords=mccormick seasoned pepper

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 19, 2013
6:01 AM

Post #9525579

No, Celene, thanks for looking though. I did find it at http://www.spiceplace.com/mccormick-seasoned-pepper.php but I hesitate to buy it in such large quantity because of deterioration of the product. The spice area at most markets has expanded quite a bit lately but I usually go to Penzey's for everything. This was an old standby for years, and i couldn't believe I couldn't find it!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2013
8:55 AM

Post #9525764

You could freeze most of it, but it's a moot point since it's out of stock.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 19, 2013
8:58 AM

Post #9525770

LOL I found some last time I looked, when we first talked about it and that's gone too now. I have the magic touch to make things disappear...anybody have a wart they need removed? Or a troublesome family member...this may not last, so move quickly!!!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 19, 2013
9:07 AM

Post #9525780

lol M5
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2013
9:27 AM

Post #9525799

You and my mom then:lol: I swear all it took was for her to say she liked something/anything and it became discontinued or cancelled (all her favorite tv shows:) I can't say the tv shows bothered me too much--I remember one was Mickey Rooney living in a college dorm with his grandson (around the 80's).
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 12, 2013
10:16 AM

Post #9556357

Serve with wieners or brats on a bun--really good!

HOT DOG SAUCE

1 lb ground meat
1 onion, chopped

Seasonings….
Suggest start with quantities given; adjust per taste…

Ό T granulated garlic
Ύ T white vinegar
2 T chili powder
1/8 tsp cinnamon
Ό tsp red pepper flakes
1/8 tsp cumin
1 tsp salt
½ tsp ground allspice
1 dash Worcestershire Sauce
3 oz tomato paste
Freshly ground nutmeg to taste (careful not to overdo)
2 C water

Brown meat and onion. Mash meat with potato master to fine, even consistency. Add seasonings and water; bring to boil, then lower heat, cover and simmer gently 3 hours. Add water as needed while simmering if reducing too much. Finished consistency should be a bit soupy.

CheerMom

CheerMom
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 22, 2013
2:33 PM

Post #9568860

Did I miss the Red Beans and Rice recipe?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 24, 2013
8:51 AM

Post #9571112

No, I haven't posted it yet. Mea Culpa!!!!

Ok. I'm gonna do this on the fly! And, remember, I'm a Southern cook. We eyeball most things in the kitchen, LOL, so no measurements are etched in stone here.

RED KIDNEY BEANS AND RICE
Depending on how many you're feeding, get a 1-2 lb. bag of Camelia Red Kidney Beans (if they don't have Camelia Brand, get what they have). Just make sure they are the large, red kidney beans...

Rinse the beans thoroughly in a large bowl under some cool running water, to wash away dust, fuzz, etc. Scoop out handfuls of the beans and examine for any small pebbles, bad beans, etc., and remove these. When they're cleaned, proceed.

Two camps: Soak beans overnight or don't soak overnight. Soaking reduces cooking time...If you're gonna soak them, put them in the pot you're gonna cook them in and cover them with about 3-4" water. Sit it on the stove and go to bed...

Use a heavy bottom pot that resists stuff sticking to it...

Turn on the flame in the morning to get your beans going.

Dice up a couple large onions so you end up with about two large handfulls of onion.
Dice up a couple green bell peppers to get about two large handfulls, too.
Dice up some garlic, about 2 tablespoons
Dice up some celery, about 1 cup
Couple bay leaves (2-3)
Season All Brand Seasoning (2 tablespoons)
Course Ground Black Pepper (1 tsp). If finely ground, use 1/2 tsp., or to taste.
Onion powder (doesn't hurt to add a couple more dashes)
Paprika (about 1 tablespoon)
Garlic powder (1/2 tsp)

Saute the veggies in some oil just until they release their fragrance, about 1-2 minutes. Add to the pot of beans, and bring the pot to a rolling boil. Then, reduce the heat to a simmer. Mix the Season All, Black Pepper, Onion and Garlic Powders, and Paprika in a small cup of water to dissolve, and pour into the bean pot. Simmer the beans, checking that they are not sticking to the bottom, and there is enough liquid to cover them by about 2". Cook them down until they are tender, but not mushy, just about when they start to split. Once they split, taste them and check your seasonings for adjustments. Probably they will need salt at this point, so adjust to your taste.

Once the beans are just getting tender, smash some of them against the side of the pot with a large spoon. Smashing the pulp thickens the juice. The more you smash, the thicker the bean juice will be, so determine this for yourself. I like my beans with much more juice than beans (almost like a bean soup), so I will smash a lot of beans, and cook them with more water...

It is optional to add a couple splashes of Louisiana Hot Sauce into the pot, or just put the bottle on the table.

FLUFFY WHITE RICE
We boil, rinse, strain, then steam rice in New Orleans. So, you may wanna stop here...ok, go on?

It does NOT matter how much rice you wanna cook. The key is to keep enough water in the pot so the rice doesn't soak it all up and get mushy!

So, I usually cook 2-3 cups of rice to go with a family size pot of red beans.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Pay attention to how salty your beans may be, and, adjust the saltiness of your rice accordingly...
Add two caps of oil to the water (veggie, olive, etc.)
Slowly pour the rice into the boiling water, stirring it in to keep it moving in the boiling water. Don't let it settle on the bottom or it will be one large lump!

Reduce the fire to a simmer that keeps the rice moving gently in the water. (Do not cover the pot, if you don't want a boil over and have to clean your stove.) You can leave the top askew (halfway on/off).

Stir the rice occasionally, to keep it off the bottom...

Set your timer for 18 minutes, then taste your rice. It should still have the slightest soft crunch to it. You're approximately 2-3 minutes away from it being done at this point, so taste it again in 1 minute increments until it's just at that soft crunch point.

Pour it into a colander, rinse under cold running water, & strain the excess water. Add enough water to the pot to make a double boiler (about 3-4 cups), and bring the water to a boil. Set the colander over the pot, cover, and reduce the heat. Make sure the bottom of the colander is not sitting in the water! Steam the rice on low heat, just until it comes back up to temperature, and fluff with a fork. It helps to make a hole in the middle of rice so the steam can rise up without mushing your rice up. The kernels should have split. All done!

If your rice is past the soft crunch point, immediately pour it into the colander and rinse it thoroughly under cold, running water to STOP if from cooking further. Do NOT steam at this point, because you'll end up with a pot of mush...

The principal here is to boil the rice just to the soft crunch point, stop it from cooking further by cooling it under the running water, then steaming it in the colander until it cooks the rest of the way. Steaming it causes the rice to dry out, and the kernels to split. When you fluff it up, your rice kernels should not stick together. Nice!

Lemme know if I've confused you...

P.S. The only thing that makes this meal more complete is a nice pork chop, some chicken or roast, and fried bananas or plantains on the side...

P.S.S. You could throw a couple smoked ham hocks in the pot when your start to cook the beans for additional flavor of a Southern kind, LOL!

Trust me, the instructions seem to be long, but once you get the hang of it, you can put this pot together in 15 minutes.

ALSO, you can just throw everything into your Crock pot and cook it overnight (my favorite way to NOT be chained to the store) on low. Dinner will be ready in the morning. Depending on how much beans you've cooked in the Crock pot, you may need to transfer the beans and liquid to a larger pot and adjust the liquid level (add a bit more water) . They should be ready to smash up at this point. Again, check your seasonings and adjust.

Linda

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 24, 2013
10:24 AM

Post #9571237

Linda, I'm gonna chime in about soaking beans overnight... There are some good reasons to soak beans.

Soaking removes some of the anti-nutrients such as phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors, but only if you stir in 2 TBL liquid whey, apple cider vinegar, or lemon juice into the soaking water. Be sure to rinse away that water and add fresh water to cook them. See [HYPERLINK@en.wikipedia.org]

Soaking also helps to remove the indigestible complex sugars (oligosaccharides) from the outer coating of the beans, and you'd be surprised at the amount of field dirt on the bean surfaces that's not visible to the naked eye.
http://missvickie.com/howto/beans/howtosoak.html

Here's a short history of red beans and rice:
[HYPERLINK@en.wikipedia.org]

CheerMom

CheerMom
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 24, 2013
4:05 PM

Post #9571709

Yum! I think I can do it. Thanks for the tip about rice...I'm going to try it that way...!!!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2013
4:37 PM

Post #9571736

Oh I made lentils & rice for dinner but will try this when I'm back. Sounds so good.
Tam
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 7, 2013
7:12 PM

Post #9590759

I have made this twice recently, and it is my newest go-to recipe. It's great with crackers or try it mixed with diced boiled potatoes. YUM!

I use neufchatel cheese, granulated garlic and all dried herbs, so it's really easy to make. Note that the recipe given makes 3 cups, so you might want to scale it down. I don't see why it wouldn't keep a long time in the fridge if you don't use raw garlic.


BOURSIN CHEESE
food.com

Yield: 3 cups

2 garlic cloves
8 ounces butter, at room temperature
16 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
3 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese (the real stuff, and freshly-grated)
1 tablespoon fresh dill, minced or 1 teaspoon dried dill weed, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/2 teaspoon basil
1/2 teaspoon chives
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Directions:

1 Have cheeses and butter at room temperature.
2 Crush garlic.
3 Mix cheeses, butter and garlic.
4 Add remaining ingredients, mix well.
5 Pack into a container just large enough to hold the boursin and store in refrigerator.
6 To serve, bring to room temperature.
7 Serve with crackers or mix with potatoes.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 7, 2013
7:23 PM

Post #9590772

Penn, I have a Boursin recipe from about 10-15 years ago. Will have to find and compare it to this one. I liked it but haven't made it in ages,.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 8, 2013
8:38 AM

Post #9591404

Yes, darius, let's compare. This is the only recipe for Boursin I have tried. We put out a platter of crackers with this cheese spread for a dinner party, and it was quite a hit. My SIL mixed it with boiled, diced buttered potatoes and mixed in some thinly sliced scallions, and served it with prime rib--very rich and so very tasty! I also made burgundy mushrooms, and everyone is still talking about this meal. I think it will be a tradition now in our family.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 10, 2013
4:11 PM

Post #9594508

Penn, it may be on my old computer. I just got back from some medical stuff in NC and then an overnight trip with a DG friend to get peaches in SC. I'm beat (and now have peaches to process) so it may be a few days.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 12, 2013
4:11 AM

Post #9596021

I don't have all the URL's, sorry.

Homemade Boursin
1 garlic clove, peeled
1/2 cup fresh basil leaves
1/4 cup chives
1 pkg (8 oz) cream cheese
1/4 cup pitted & drained black olives

Chop the garlic & herbs in a food processor. Add the cream cheese and blend until smooth. Transfer to a small bowl and chill.

Serve with crackers or spread on pcs. of french bread topped with very thin slices of roast beef.

Here's another:
Homemade Boursin Cheese Recipe

1 lb cream cheese, softened
1/4 C Asaigo or Parmesan cheese, grated
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp garlic powder
1 pkg. Hidden Valley Ranch dressing, dry mix

Directions:
Allow cream cheese to soften enough to mix in all other ingredients. Mix well and chill before serving.
Try adding a little garlic powder at a time, I found it a little overpowering in this quantity. Perhaps because there may be some in the dry mix too. Just a matter of taste. Enjoy!

And, another:
Homemade Boursin with Garlic and Herbs Recipe

* 8 ounces cream cheese, softened
* 1/4 cup butter, softened
* 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Beau Monde Seasoning
* 1 clove garlic, minced
* 1/4 teaspoon Herbs de Provence
* 1 teaspoon fresh minced parsley (dried is okay)
* 1 teaspoon water
* 1/4 teaspoon red wine vinegar
* 1/4 teaspoon Worchestershire sauce

Directions:

Beat cream cheese and butter together until the mixture is light and fluffy. Be sure to scrape bowl often. Add the remaining ingredients and beat until well blended. Pack into a container, cover tightly and allow to stay refrigerated for at least 12 hours to allow flavors to blend. Serve chilled with crackers.

URL for the last recipe:
http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/250/HomemadeBoursinwithGarlica20093.shtml

Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2013
4:41 PM

Post #9596826

darius, thanks for posting those. I will copy and attach to my file for boursin. Reading all of them will inspire me to try different ingredients. I especially note the one that has vinegar and water. My recipe makes a pretty stiff mixture--maybe needs a little loosening. ~pen
EucalyptusMorn
Mansfield, TX

August 3, 2013
2:53 PM

Post #9620507

Carolina Coleslaw

I have been making this coleslaw since the summer of 1974. I am asked to bring it to potlucks and always asked for the recipe. My family loves it.

Slaw
1 large cabbage (about 3 pounds), trimmed, quartered, and cored
1 medium-size sweet green pepper, cored, seeded, and minced (for color use 1/2 green pepper and 1/2 sweet red pepper)
1 medium size sweet onion, (Bermuda or Spanish), peeled and chopped fine

Dressing
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 cup cider vinegar
2/3 cup vegetable oil

With a sharp knife, slice each cabbage quarter very fine; combine with green pepper and onion in a large bowl and toss to mix.

Mix sugar, salt, mustard, and celery seeds in a small saucepan; add vinegar and oil and let come to a boil over moderate heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Pour over cabbage and toss well to mix. Cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

August 3, 2013
3:11 PM

Post #9620519

I just love that slaw. Since I had it bout 30 years ago, Ive not made the mayo kind at all.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2013
8:02 PM

Post #9620706

Euc, thanks for the cole slaw recipe. I usually just go to KFC for my slaw, but they were out of it my last two visits. Guess I need my own "go-to" recipe. I will try yours for sure. ~ pen

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

August 4, 2013
3:10 AM

Post #9620823

Pennzer, If you like the KFC slaw, you can find that recipe online. I've seen it a number of times. (If you can't find it, LMK and I'll post it for you.) My Mom got that recipe from one of the KFC workers many years ago. It's easy to make and uses only common staples.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

August 4, 2013
4:54 AM

Post #9620846

I don't love mayo, I'm totally making that slaw recipe this week. I have an Asian slaw that uses no mayo, it's kinda spicy and keeps for a week or so, it's similar.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

August 4, 2013
5:30 PM

Post #9621458

I don't eat meat, will that slaw go with glazed baked pork chops, green beans and parsley sweet potatoes?
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 5, 2013
10:49 AM

Post #9622146

DreamOfSpring, I have found many KFC recipes online. They are all different! I tried one, and it was pretty good but not at all like the KFC I love. Yes, send me a link to one you think is authentic and I'll compare with the one I tried. Thanks.
~ pen

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

August 16, 2013
12:02 PM

Post #9632553

Pennzer, I've been away for a week or so. I will find it for you and post it soon. I've seen many copies online of a recipe with lemon juice & celery seeds, neither of which were in the recipe given to my Mom by the KFC worker (ages ago). The recipe Mom got was very simple with only maybe 4 or 5 ingredients. As I recall the key to the flavor was the addition of a little white vinegar & sugar. I'll post the recipe soon. Does that sound like the one you tried so far?
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2013
1:43 PM

Post #9632642

DoS, here's the one I tried. It's quite good, but it's not KFC, which I find always tastes fresh and clean and not creamy.

COLE SLAW - KFC Clone
topsecretrecipes.com

Yield: 10-12 servings


1/2 C mayo
1/3 C sugar (or Splenda)
1/4 C milk
1/4 C buttermilk
1 1/2 T lemon juice
1 1/2 T white vinegar
2 T onion grated onion
1/2 tsp salt
1/8 tsp pepper
8-9 C finely chopped cabbage (~1 head)
1/4 C shredded carrot (1 med)
optional: shredded radish, 2 T diced green onion

Chop cabbage very fine or shred.

Combine dressing ingredients in large bowl and beat until smooth (use blender)

Add veggies and mix well.

Place in fridge overnight.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

August 16, 2013
1:50 PM

Post #9632651

Oh, definitely NOT. I will get it for you soon. Will try for later tonight.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 16, 2013
2:46 PM

Post #9632720

This became my "Go To" recipe this past growing season.

SPICY EGGPLANT (Original Recipe)

"Eggplant cubes are stir-fried until browned, then simmered in a spicy Asian-inspired sauce with onion and garlic until meltingly tender."

My adjustments are in ( ) The recipe only looks complicated. In a nutshell, saute the eggplants & remove; saute the onions, garlic and ginger, add the eggplants back, pour on the sauce, reduce heat and simmer...add the shrimp at the end & cook just 'til they start to curl into a parenthesis -- if they curl into a "C" they'll be tough...

INGREDIENTS:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I use Olive Oil)
4 Japanese eggplants, cut into 1-inch cubes (or, slice them on the diagonal, like plantains)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I use Olive Oil)
2 onions, thinly sliced (thin is better, too)
1 tablespoon minced garlic (I put LOTS of garlic)
2 tablespoons soy sauce (I adjust to my taste)
2 Tbs. water (I use about 2 cups of water. You can also use shrimp broth or rice wine vinegar; I use about 1/4 cup rice vinegar--no wine--and about 2 cups of water, because I like more sauce over my rice. Plus, it takes awhile to stew the okra down, and you need enough liquid so the eggplant doesn't stick...)
1 &1/2 tablespoons Oyster Sauce (or use 1/2 fish sauce & 1/2 Worcestershire -- I use a good bit of the Oyster sauce; The fish sauce is SALTY, and I've never used the Worcestershire sauce in this dish...)
1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce (adjust to your taste -- I use about 2 Tsps. in mine for a kick)
1 teaspoon white sugar (I've only used brown sugar, and I like it. I also tend to go on the sweeter side, because it cuts some of the eggplant bitterness, if you're a little past the prime. More like 2-3 teaspoons for me -- It balances with the salty, so it's not totally sweet. Once you add the shrimp, you can appreciate the sweet...)
Ground black pepper (or red pepper flakes, to taste)
1/2 teaspoon Asian (toasted) sesame oil (drizzled on the finished plate...)
Toasted Sesame Seeds for texture (optional - I've never used them, although you might consider toasting up some Ramen Noodles and garnishing for crunch)
Fresh Ginger (optional -- I LOVE the subtle ginger flavor; mince finely & saute with the onions and garlic)
Fresh Broccoli flowerettes (haven't added these, but I think I'll add some in the future)
Shrimp, chicken, beef, or firm Tofu for protein (I've used shrimp and chicken -- I prefer adding the shrimp, because it adds its sweetness to the eggplant; I'd consider adding some cubed pork or honey ham in the future, because these would also lend their sweetness to the eggplant.

DIRECTIONS:
1. Make your sauce FIRST. Mix the soy sauce, water, oyster sauce, chili garlic sauce, sugar,
and black pepper, and stir to form a smooth sauce. Adjust to your taste, and set aside.

2. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet or wok (I use my cast iron skillet) over medium
high heat until almost smoking. Cook and stir the eggplant cubes until they begin to brown, 3
to 5 minutes. Remove the eggplant with a slotted spoon, and set aside.

3. Heat 2 more tablespoons of oil in the skillet over medium-high heat, and cook and stir the
onions just until they begin to soften, about 30 seconds. Stir in the garlic, and cook and stir an
additional 30 seconds.

4. Return the eggplant to the skillet, pour on the sauce, lower the heat, and allow the
vegetables and sauce to simmer until the eggplant is tender and almost all the liquid has
been absorbed, about 10-15 minutes (If you do NOT add the extra water to your sauce, you
won't have a lot of sauce over your rice -- mostly a drier eggplant mixture). Drizzle sesame
oil over the dish, and give one final brief stir to combine. Careful with that Sesame Oil!

Here are some helpful Allrecipes.com reviews I printed out before I made this the first time, for add'l tips and warnings

►Used everything but oyster sauce to keep it vegetarian. Served over ramen noodles (without seasoning packet). I used ROSA BIANCA eggplant from Farmers' Market. It has a wonderfully firm texture and not watery as regular eggplant can be. Can't wait to have again.

►I followed the instructions making only a few slight modifications - I added in a splash of rice wine vinegar, brown sugar instead of white, a teaspoon of teriyaki sauce and a sprinkle of ginger. Also, I left out the sesame oil and sprinkled toasted sesame seeds on the top. I served alongside sticky rice, broccoli, and prawns made simply with butter and lemon. I will certainly make this dish again and found the inclusion of Japanese eggplant versus the standard variety larger headed eggplant to be the key

►Excellent! I add shrimp for my husband for protein, and I also double the sauce, definitely a keeper.

►The only problem was that I didn't cook the eggplant long enough so it was a bit bitter.

►Add more chili paste to make it spicier. Cashews for crunch. Green onions for color. Serve on rice noodles.

►This was great! I omitted the oyster sauce, but everything else was the same. I spread it over pizza dough and sprinkled it with cheese (although it really didn't need it) and baked it. Absolutely LOVED it!

►This was an excellent dish. I added firm tofu which soaked up a lot of the flavor and made it more of a main dish for my family.

►I finally bought Japanese eggplant and wanted to make Basil Eggplant that I get at our favorite Thai restaurant. I decided to use this recipe and add basil. Recipe is outstanding! Don't be tempted to overcook the eggplant in the beginning. I mixed all of the sauce ingredients in a little bowl and added all at one time to the pan, increasing the sugar to 2 tsp. instead of 1. Added chopped basil (3-4 TBS of chopped) at the end. It is the very first time I cooked a sauce in a recipe that actually tasted like a sauce in a restaurant. Definitely a keeper for us. Next time I'm going to add chicken or shrimp...or both. Served with white and brown rice (choices) and sugar snap peas.

►Really good recipe. I used rice wine instead of water, brown sugar instead of white, and I added about a teaspoon of grated fresh ginger. Instead of adding the garlic and sesame oil at later stages in the recipe, I mixed both with the sauce. I diced the onion instead of slicing so everything would be the same shape. I used Lee Kum Kee Garlic Chili Sauce. It's really chunky and more of a paste than a sauce. I don't find it that spicy so I added red pepper flakes to the sauce to boost up the heat. I stir fried the eggplant in two batches using a 14" carbon steel wok, and added about 6 fresh basil leaves to the last batch. I returned the eggplant and onion back to the wok and then stirred in the sauce and let it cook for a minute or so. I kept stirring as it cooked to keep it from burning. I will make this again as it is a tasty and quick recipe for eggplant.

►I loved this recipe!! I actually didn't have SESAME OIL but I could see how it would just add more to the flavors. I also substituted Worcestershire sauce for the oyster sauce.

►Tasty! to make it easier, you can just cook the onion and the eggplant in the same pan, then add the sauce ingredients and stir it all together.

►This is a phenomenal way to use eggplant. I used Sriracha because I did not have any Garlic Chili sauce and it add a good amount of spice - also I added ginger and the garlic and sesame oil to the sauce as other reviews did and it's a great flavor blend. I suggest cooking everything together for much longer, almost 15 minutes, so the eggplant gets really creamy and absorbs all the sauce. Great, easy, fast recipe! Oh- I also added oyster mushrooms - great addition!

Enjoy!

Linda

From: http://www.Allrecipes.com



This message was edited Aug 16, 2013 4:58 PM

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DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 11, 2013
8:46 AM

Post #9657021

I was shredding cabbage last night when I suddenly remembered my promise to post the KFC coleslaw recipe (or links to it). Sorry it has taken me so long. My memory isn't always so dependable these days. You have to ping me.

I wasn't able to find my Mom's copy, but after years of making it, I know the ingredients well. Among those recipes online which have the right ingredients, there is some variance as to qty. My guess is these variances originate from the difficulty faced by cooking staff when attempting to convert from a crowd sized recipe calling for crates of cabbage and mayo and other ingredients by the massive, industrial sized container.

The only other difference I've seen frequently in the online recipes is that most call for tarragon vinegar, whereas we always used plain, white vinegar. There are a number of possible reasons for this dispute. The lady who gave it to my mom may have failed to tell her that it was actually tarragon vinegar, or my mom, always the frugal one, may have written and used white vinegar instead, thinking tarragon vinegar an unnecessary expense. It's even possible the recipe may have changed slightly over the years, or that some franchises may have added their own spin. I can only tell you that it tasted perfect to us with white vinegar. You might want to experiment, and try both to see which you find most authentic.

The recipe shown in pics 1&2 below comes from youtube - a rather interesting use of youtube with the attached recipe written below a blank video.

As to all those recipes out there which include ingredients like buttermilk, lemon juice, and such, those appear to be recipes created by people who tried to figure out the ingredients based on taste and appearance. For example, in the real recipe, water pulled from the cabbage thins the dressing so that it appears to contain milk or buttermilk.

Although I haven't made this or any coleslaw for quite some time, when I do make coleslaw I always use the basic ingredients given here, the same ones which were in the original recipe given to my mom by the KFC worker (except that I use white vinegar). I hope that you will enjoy this recipe as much as we have over the years. Sorry again for my delay.

Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 11, 2013
10:31 AM

Post #9657118

I have several go to recipes, but one of the easiest and most loved is Coca Cola Meatballs. Super easy and super tasty, no one can believe it only has three ingredients.

Coca Cola Meatballs

1 can Cream of Mushroom soup
1 can Coke
1 package frozen Italian meatballs

Pour soup into pan. Rinse out soup can with Coke and add all the Coke to the pan. Whisk the two together. Add the meatballs. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.
Serve over rice.
Perfect for a crockpot, and I always double the sauce because everyone loves it so. You can dress this up with fresh mushrooms, sautιed onions, make your own meatballs. But it is pretty awesome as is.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 11, 2013
11:49 AM

Post #9657178

I actually made this the other day and it didnt turn out at all. I think the key is the pre cooked italian meatballs. It had no flavor and it was way way to thin. Im sure it was the fat in the raw meatballs I used. I will for sure make it again, but I will make sure the meatballs are already seasoned well, and cooked. I ended up eating the 'sauce' as soup and ate the meatballs with mashed potatoes. They were delish, but I think pre coked meatballs are the key to keeping the flavor, and a good gravy consistancy. You just cant beat something that is this easy, and yummy as well.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 11, 2013
2:15 PM

Post #9657309

How large a can of soup for the meatballs? REgular size? Golden Mushroom or Regular Style Soup?
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 11, 2013
2:30 PM

Post #9657322

I used a regular can of both, that means there is more coke than soup. It was just way to thin. Im going to try it with a big can of soup and a regular can of coke. I used regular ole cream of mushroom.

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 11, 2013
3:22 PM

Post #9657365

The recipe I have made for years is a normal sized can of mushroom soup and a 12 oz. can of Coke. It is not a thick gravy, more of a sauce. The flavors meld together in that proportion. If you add more soup you will have mushroom soup not a blended sauce.
Golden mushroom would work, I guess, but I have made this for over 20 years with a regular can of soup and a regular can of Coke.
Yes you should use precooked meatballs, even if you put them in the crockpot. I got fancy once for a seminar and made meatballs,added sautιed Portabellas and onions, but I baked the meatballs first. The extra liquid and the grease would definitely affect the texture and the taste of the dish.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 11, 2013
4:02 PM

Post #9657383

I make this too.. I have started using the Armour turkey precooked meatballs, (get them at WM) they
are really good and about the only way I will eat ground turkey...

Larkie

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 11, 2013
4:08 PM

Post #9657387

Pennzer, I just made your Boursin and used it on two grassfed TBones and two ears of roasted corn. OMG, it is awesome!
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 11, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9657393

It does sound yummy. If it has garlic and or black olives, Im all over it.

I will just stick with the regular can of mushroom soup. No raw meat.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2013
10:42 AM

Post #9658883

DofS, thanks so much for your time is finding that KFC recipe. I will try it, but I'm skeptical. I've always liked the KFC version because it is not creamy--just clean and fresh tasting. The recipe you show has a whopping 1 1/2 C Miracle Whip. Also, I have always disliked Miracle Whip and never keep it on hand. Well, now I am curious..so will have to try your version.

BTW: A local KFC employee tells me they make this slaw in-house. I expect they get the shredded cabbage packaged from KFC but they make the dressing locally. He told me he would give me the recipe when they aren't busy, but I haven't seen him around since. Maybe I'll ask someone else there. This is becoming a quest. ~ pen



This message was edited Sep 13, 2013 1:07 PM
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2013
11:12 AM

Post #9658923

Joy, I had not thought to put the boursin cheese on steaks or corn. That sounds so good--can't wait to try it. Thanks! ~ pen

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2013
11:39 AM

Post #9658950

I, too, dislike Miracle Whip. Yuck!

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2013
12:08 PM

Post #9658968

Pennzer,

I will be interested to hear your response should you try the recipe posted. I would also love to see the recipe you get from your friend at KFC.

I was a bit confused by your comment that they make the slaw in house. I'm confused because, well, that's what I knew all along - unless I've misunderstood something. That they make it in house is the reason we have been able to get the recipe. Because they make it in house, the kitchen workers know what goes in it. I do think there is and has always been a problem, however, in getting accurate quantities. This is because of the challenge of converting between large, industrial sized quantities and normal kitchen quantities. They make a much larger qty than we would at home, and they use those giant, industrial containers, the huge containers they use in school lunch rooms (or used to), the kind you sometimes see at Costco. I'm sure you and I could do the conversion accurately, but it presents a challenge for some people, and I think that is where the discrepancies creep in.

I understand that the recipe doesn't sound like what you would expect. I cannot vouch for the exact quantities in the recipe, but those are the ingredients that were in the recipe given to my mom ages ago, and we did all agree that it tasted right to us. The ingredients are the same except that the recipe we got just called for vinegar, not tarragon vinegar. As I said, I don't know if Mom converted it to vinegar or if tarragon vinegar is incorrect or what. I'm not sure about that part, except to say that we always used ordinary, white vinegar and were happy with the result.

As I recall, our recipe called for a relatively large amount of mayonnaise (or Miracle Whip), an amount roughly equal to what you would use if you were only using mayonnaise (or Miracle Whip). To that we added a relatively small amount of vinegar and sugar, plus salt and pepper. The salt and sugar pulls water out of the cabbage. That water plus the vinegar thins the mayonnaise (or Miracle Whip) to a milk-like consistency. The vinegar and sugar are what give it the tangy flavor. I do recall that we (my Mom, Dad, and siblings) were surprised that the recipe was so simple but we did unanimously agree that the result was like that from KFC.

I look forward to hearing your response should you try it and/or seeing the recipe you get from your friend.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2013
12:22 PM

Post #9658984

I don't like Miracle Whip either. I don't hate it as you guys seem to, but I prefer mayo. I don't actually recall if our recipe said Miracle Whip or mayo. Until very recently, I've always thought of them as pretty much the same - until I realized recently that it was the Miracle Whip that was ruining my chicken salad.

Because I thought of MW & mayo as basically the same thing most of my life, I remembered the recipe as calling for mayo. However, my parents fell in love with MW when I was a young child. From then until I left home, they pretty much bought MW only, so it makes sense that we would have had MW on hand and used it to make the slaw. It also makes sense that since I grew up thinking of Miracle Whip as a type of mayo, I would not have distinguished between the 2 and thus would have remembered it as mayo.

I made the slaw many times as a teen. I remember the dressing recipe very distinctly as 'mayo', vinegar, sugar, salt, & pepper.

Even if you don't like MW, it doesn't seem impossible to me that you might like a dish which includes MW once it is mixed in with other ingredients.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2013
12:34 PM

Post #9658995

DofS, I had been told that the slaw is furnished to the franchises. I see now that it was not you who told me this. I bet there is quite a variance among franchises if they each make their own. I bet this accounts for all the variations that are all over the Net, and I'm eager to compare this local franchise's recipe with others I have found.

I just put cabbage, carrots and Miracle Whip on my grocery list. Yours will be the next version I try. Thanks again. ~ pen

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 13, 2013
12:35 PM

Post #9658997

Pen, just added some of your Boursin into a pan of scrambled eggs that I had overcooked. I don't like dry eggs. Threw a dollop on top and covered the pan for a minute, then I stirred it in,
Whoop! Totally awesome!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2013
1:18 PM

Post #9659030

This is my summer go-to pie. I have posted this recipe in the past, but I don't think anyone has tried it. I think I'll just keep posting it until someone tries it and reviews it here. It's that good--and it's easy to prepare.

STRAWBERRY ICE BOX PIE
Penny Willhite

This recipe was given to my mother by one of her friends when I was a child. I've never had this pie anywhere else, so it must be an original or at least an obscure or forgotten recipe. I think the original recipe called for fresh strawberries sprinkled with sugar and left until juices form.

1 pre-baked 9” pie shell
1 10-oz. Pkg. frozen strawberry halves
24 regular-size marshmallows
*1 C. heavy whipping cream + sweetener + vanilla


Remove frozen berries from package and thaw in a strainer and reserve the juice. Set berries aside.

Heat juice in a saucepan over medium heat. When hot, add marshmallows and stir constantly until marshmallows are completely melted. *Set aside to cool or refrigerate briefly.

Whip cream until fairly stiff (instructions below)

Stir the berries into the cooled marshmallow mixture and then gently fold in the whipped cream. Pour into a pre-baked pie shell. Place in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours or until set. Serve cold. Keep refrigerated after serving.

*Marshmallow mixture must be completely cool (but not cold) or it will melt the whipped cream, and the pie filling will not have enough body.

WHIPPED CREAM
• 1 cup heavy cream
• 1/4 cup sugar
• 1 teaspoon vanilla
Whip cream and sugar together in a chilled bowl until almost stiff. Add vanilla; beat until cream holds peaks.
LAS14
Albany, ME
(Zone 4b)

September 17, 2013
8:19 AM

Post #9662241

I love this thread. Here are the recipes that I've starred in my recipe notebook that goes back to 1964. These are definitely "go to" recipes because the notebook is in chronological order, and if I want to find something fairly regularly (at least once every two years), I need the stars to help me "go to" it.

FROM MY CHILDHOOD (really don't have to use recipe anymore for any but the last two)
Salmon cakes (canned salmon, saltines & eggs)
Cole slaw
Liver & onions
Wilted lettuce
Aunt Mil's hot German potato salad (hubby's childhood)
Prize winning meat loaf (Quaker oats box)

FOR DINNER PARTIES AND OTHER COMPANY
Julia Child's flank steak
Indian curry
Blender hollandaise
Blushing corn chowder
Christmas stuffed mushrooms
Blushing corn chowder

FOR PUTLUCKS
Mushroom egg potato bake
Barbara Morris' cabbage and meatballs (with canned spaghetti sauce and canned cranberry sauce)

DEPENDING ON SUMMER HARVESTS
Pesto Genovese
Caldo verde (kale, sausage, shin bone & kidney bean soup)
Pepperpot (kale, pork and habanero pepper stew)
Pennsylvania red cabbage
Freezer zucchini pickles
Sultan's eggplant (or The Imam Swooned or The Sultan Fainted)
Pasta with turnip greens
Southwestern potatoes
Green peppers with eggs and cheese (a custard)
Roasted garbanzo beans and garlic with Swiss chard
Dijon mustard chicken with green garlic
Red and green tomato spaghetti sauce
Tomato sandwiches (not actually in the cookbook :-) )
Julia Child's ratatouille
Tabouli (I use juice from drained tomatoes instead of water)


This message was edited Sep 17, 2013 11:43 AM

This message was edited Sep 21, 2013 6:59 PM
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 17, 2013
8:32 AM

Post #9662249

would you post the recipe to the Barbara Morris cabbage and meatballs.
Also the dijon chicken with green garlic?

I also love to see peoples go to recipes. So varied and interesting.
LAS14
Albany, ME
(Zone 4b)

September 17, 2013
9:01 AM

Post #9662272

Gardenglory, here's the meatballs:

Cook a long time:
1 jar spaghetti sauce
1 can cranberry sauce
1 head cabbage, shredded
1 lb meatballs (I use frozen pre-cooked. Don't think it matters)

I got no info about sizes of cans from Barbara.

Here's the Dijon chicken:

http://www.mykitchenintherockies.com/2011/05/14/dijon-mustard-chicken-with-green-garlic/

Happy cooking!
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 17, 2013
10:12 AM

Post #9662311

sounds delish. Im going to have to find a good substitute for green garlic tho. I have never seen it around here.
LAS14
Albany, ME
(Zone 4b)

September 17, 2013
11:38 AM

Post #9662386

I've never seen it in the stores. It's a garden thing for me. Just early garlic, before the heads or scapes form.
IO1
Waaaay Down South, GA

September 17, 2013
12:28 PM

Post #9662428

I love this thread. So glad I stumbled on it!

Laus, would you please post your recipe for the Indian Curry?

celene, I'm going to try your recipe for the honey mustard chicken. That sounds wonderful! Thanks for posting it.

Actually, there's a lot of these that sound wonderful! I make a variation of the slaw recipe along with a variation of the Chinese salad. You can't go wrong with those!
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

September 18, 2013
6:12 AM

Post #9662979

Jambalaya

This is simple and you can vary it depending on what you like or what you have on hand. It is also very economical for hard times and very filling. I don't measure anything so i will just tell you what I do.

Dice a large yellow onion, a medium sweet pepper such as a bell, and a few cloves of garlic. We love garlic so I use a lot but you can adjust it to your taste. Saute' these in some olive oil or bacon grease whichever you prefer. They are both tastey. I also dice up eggplant and you can use celery if if you like. The eggplant acts as "meat" if you don't have any or don't have much. This is also the time to add any other spices you like. They can be dried or fresh. I like basil, sage, cummin, thyme and parsely. Add your meat now if you want to use any and cook until it is browned well. Nearly any meat will do as well as seafood.

When all this is sweated down and tender and your meat is browned, add two cups of raw long grain rice. Be sure it is long grain or it tends to get mushy as it cooks.. I use Zatterains parboiled. Saute this a few minutes with the veggies and meat until it "toasts" then add 2 cups of chicken broth and 2 cups water. Stir well and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer, cover tightly and cook for about 25 minutes. Don't lift the lid earlier than that. It is done when all the liquid is absorbed and the rice is tender. Be sure to use a heavy bottomed pot so it won't burn. I use cast iron.

I hope you all enjoy
LAS14
Albany, ME
(Zone 4b)

September 18, 2013
6:45 AM

Post #9663017

IO1, here's the recipe for the curry. It went into the notebook in 1969. I got it from Gourmet Magazine, which got it from the Indian embassy in D.C. I triple the recipe and freeze the extra sauce before adding the meat and cream.

In a saucepan sautι 4 slices of baco, chopped, 1/4 cup each of thinly sliced celery and chopped onion, and 1/2 garlic clove. (I use a couple of cloves... would never use 1/2 :-) ), minced, in 2 tablespoons vegetable oil for about 10 minutes. Sprinkle in 1/4 cup flour and cook the mixture over low heat, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. Add 1/2 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup curry powder, 3 tablespoons tomato paste, 1 tablespoon each of sugar and lemon juice, 2 bouillon cubes, 1 1/4 cups water, and salt to taste. Cook the mixture, covered, over low heat for 45 minutes. If the sauce is not to be used at once, it can be cooled and either refrigerated or frozen. To serve the curry, combine 1 cup of the sauce with 1 cup milk or light cream, add cooked and cubed meat, poultry, or shrimps, and heat the mixture through. Server the curry over steamed rice and with the usual condiments.

My condiments are coconut, crushed peanuts and chutney.

IO1
Waaaay Down South, GA

September 21, 2013
7:38 AM

Post #9665950

Celene, we had the honey mustard chicken last night, and I could have eaten the sauce right out of the bowl before I tossed the chicken in it. I served it with Jasmine rice and broccoli. It was *wonderful! That's definitely a winner in my house!

Las, I Can't wait to try your recipe next! I love curry. Thanks for posting it for me.

~Susan

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 21, 2013
1:53 PM

Post #9666283

So glad you enjoyed it!!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2013
10:10 AM

Post #9694644

My son and my granddaughter-in-law both requested carrot cakes for their birthdays this year. They prefer the kind that is not "chunky," as they say...i.e., no nuts, raisins, pineapple, coconut or such. They like just a spicy, nicely textured cake.

I turned to Alton Brown's recipe, who also likes his this way. I had to order the baking pan he calls for, a 3x9, and I love this size! I'm going to start making all cakes in this pan that I used to layer in (2) 1 1/2 x 9's. You still get a lot of frosting coverage, but none of the fussiness of a layered cake. I will use the ingredient ratios in his recipe to modify my others.

Everyone loved this cake at our recent b'day get-together, and everyone asked for the recipe--ergo, it is now our go-to carrot cake.

Note that I call for sour cream frosting where AB had called for and included a cream cheese frosting. My recipe follows in the next post.

Another note: I did not use a food processor at all. I sifted the dry ingredients and used a stand mixer for the wet ones. As in all cake batter preparation, do not over-mix when combining the dry and wet ingredients. Just stir till well combined.

CARROT CAKE
Alton Brown

Ingredients
• Unsalted butter, for the pan
• 12 ounces, approximately 2 1/2 cups, all-purpose flour, plus extra for pan
• 12 ounces grated carrots, medium grate, approximately 6 medium
• 1 teaspoon baking powder
• 1 teaspoon baking soda
• 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
• 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 10 ounces sugar, approximately 1 1/3 cups
• 2 ounces dark brown sugar, approximately 1/4 cup firmly packed
• 3 large eggs
• 6 ounces plain yogurt
• 6 ounces vegetable oil
• Sour Cream Frosting, recipe follows
Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Butter and flour a 9-inch round and 3-inch deep cake pan. Line the bottom with parchment paper. Set aside.
Put the carrots into a large mixing bowl and set aside.
Put the flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices, and salt in the bowl of a food processor and process for 5 seconds. Add this mixture to the carrots and toss until they are well-coated with the flour.
In the bowl of the food processor combine the sugar, brown sugar, eggs, and yogurt.
With the processor still running drizzle in the vegetable oil. Pour this mixture into the carrot mixture and stir until just combined. Pour into the prepared cake pan and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 45 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees F and bake for another 20 minutes or until the cake reaches 205 to 210 degrees F in the center.
Remove the pan from the oven and allow cake to cool 15 minutes in the pan. After 15 minutes, turn the cake out onto a rack and allow cake to cool completely. Frost with sour cream frosting after cake has cooled completely.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2013
10:50 AM

Post #9694679

I'd love to see your sour cream frosting recipe!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2013
12:13 PM

Post #9694724

Here is a great all-purpose sour cream frosting that is especially good with the carrot cake recipe posted above. It is my own, and I tinkered with it quite a bit to get the tang of a sour cream frosting with the body of a cream cheese frosting. Try it with cakes or cupcakes, and leave out the cream cheese to make a thinner version for glazing pound cake, sweet breads and cinnamon rolls.


SOUR CREAM FROSTING

Makes a lot. Maybe halve the recipe for most uses.

Ingredients
• 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
• 1 8-ounce carton sour cream
• 2 T cream cheese, room temp (or more to desired consistency)
• 2 lbs powdered sugar
• 1/2 tsp vanilla
• 1/2 tsp lemon extract
• 1 tablespoon lemon juice
Directions
1. In large mixing bowl beat butter with mixer 30 seconds; beat in sour cream and cream cheese. Gradually beat in powdered sugar. Beat in vanilla, lemon extract and lemon juice. Use at once or refrigerate up to 3 days. Remove from refrigerator 30 minutes before using.
Add milk to thin or omit the cream cheese if glaze or icing consistency is preferred.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2013
12:18 PM

Post #9694733

One more note regarding the consistency of the sour cream frosting:
Do not try adding more powdered sugar to thicken this. It will destroy the flavor profile. Thicken, if desired, by adding more cream cheese. We LOVE this frosting, and it is now our go-to!
~ pen
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2013
2:11 PM

Post #9694798

It sounds great. Can yogurt substitute for the sour cream?
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2013
6:49 PM

Post #9694927

happy, I don't see any reason why you couldn't sub yogurt. Might try that myself.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 29, 2013
7:45 PM

Post #9697903

While on the subject of frostings, here is our go-to chocolate...

CHOCOLATE FROSTING

For glaze ...
6 oz. unsweetened chocolate (or dark choc chips)
3/4 C unsalted butter (I use salted)
3 C powdered sugar
1/2 C sour cream, at room temp
1/4 C strong brewed coffee, cooled (can use instant)

For frosting ...
Add 2 oz. chocolate and enough cream cheese(2-3 TB room temp) to desired frosting consistency.


Chop the chocolate into small pieces and place them in a heatproof bowl (or a double boiler), and set the bowl over a pot of barely simmering water. Be sure that the bottom of the bowl does not touch the boiling water. Remove the bowl from the heat when all of the chocolate bits have melted.

Melt the butter in a separate pan or in the microwave. Whisk the melted butter into the melted chocolate until thoroughly incorporated. Sift in half the powdered sugar. Add the sour cream and whisk to combine. Sift in remaining powdered sugar and whisk until smooth. The glaze should be thick and shiny. Lastly, add the coffee and whisk to create a glossy glaze.

Pour the glaze over a bundt cake, covering it completely, or frost a layer or sheet cake with a thickened version. Leave at room temp until ready to serve.

~ pen
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 30, 2013
6:02 AM

Post #9698124

Sounds great -- thanks! Coffee brings out the flavor of chocolate beautifully.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

October 30, 2013
6:25 AM

Post #9698154

Flavoring frosting and baked goods is a great use for instant coffee, which I find otherwise undrinkable.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 30, 2013
8:04 AM

Post #9698227

Can't disagree!
IO1
Waaaay Down South, GA

October 30, 2013
8:18 PM

Post #9698747

This is exactly what was on the chocolate cake that was made for my Mom's 80th Bday party a couple of weeks ago. It's sooo awesome and yummy!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
8:40 AM

Post #9699015

A bowl of Blue Bell "Red Velvet Cake" Ice Cream, with fresh crushed coffee grinds sprinkled over it.

I couldn't help but think how wonderful a cup of coffee would be with that delicious Red Velvet Cake ice cream, so, with necessity being the mother of invention, and with a suitcase full of "Master Chef," "Chopped," and "Iron Chef," episodes behind me, I got creative...

Uh, my "go-to" dessert!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 31, 2013
9:08 AM

Post #9699025

Gg, you mean like freshly ground coffee beans? Wow, that really is creative. I must try this. LOVE Blue Bell ice cream, and just to show how dull I really am, my fave flavor in their line is Homemade Vanilla. Especially in root beer. :))
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 31, 2013
9:33 AM

Post #9699041

That's really interesting. I would have thought the grinds would be gritty, and that it would be better to use a good instant coffee. But then again, I like whole coffee beans when suspended in Sambuca...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
9:41 AM

Post #9699050

Pennzer,

Yes, I mean like freshly ground coffee beans! Actually, I had some Folgers coffee grinds, which would have been too gritty, so, I put them in a sandwich baggie and pounded them into a finer powder.

And, now that ya'll are contributing to this dessert, I could really see breaking up some whole beans to add a coffee "nuttiness" to the chunky cake in the ice cream.

This dessert is getting better and better!

And, let's not discount those whole, chocolate covered coffee beans from Starwar...er...Bucks, LOL!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 31, 2013
9:51 AM

Post #9699056

Gg, you are a girl after my own heart. Love ice cream and love coffee. I NEVER would have thought to add raw coffee beans--ground, powdered or otherwise--to ice cream, but now I must try that.

Hey, have you tried the cappuccino jelly beans? I don't usually care for jellied candies, but I love the cappuccino ones! ~ pen

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
10:30 AM

Post #9699074

It's those Food Network TV shows!

I'm watching Master Chef Junior on Friday nights now, and, it is UNBELIEVABLE what 9-13 year old kids are cooking on their own!

The think-on-your-feet shows have made me rethink how I cook. I'm getting more bold with reaching for something and saying, "Ok, let's see how this will work together!"

One evening I broiled some Tilapia and didn't have a lemon in sight, to save my soul! But, I kept hearing the TV chefs in my head saying, "it needs some acid to bring out the flavor..."

I tore through my kitchen looking for some "acid," ANY acid, LOL!

And, then, I spied an orange...and it was acid...and it was good...it was very, very good...

...and, then, she rested, LOL!

^:-)^
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 31, 2013
11:06 AM

Post #9699100

Hmmmm...the cappuccino jelly beans might be good in vanilla ice cream. Maybe put them through the food processor. I watch the TV cook shows, too (and yes, those juniors!), but I haven't been enabled as much as you have by them------yet. You give me courage. ~ pen

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
11:39 AM

Post #9699118

Thank you, Penn!

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
12:19 PM

Post #9699141

That IS an interesting idea, freshly ground coffee beans on ice cream. Something just shy of espresso grind would be good for this use - or Gevalia ground coffee, since their regular grind is very fine, almost a powder.

I had an interesting & surprisingly tasty culinary experience not so long ago involving the addition of ground coffee beans to a recipe. After a lifetime of making chili with ground beef, tomato sauce, and the contents of a packet labeled 'chili', I decided to make chili from the scratch, right down to grinding the fresh chili peppers, grinding star anise & cloves, and adding chopped beef (not ground) and even chocolate. The recipe took a bit of work as it required grinding a number of herbs, spices, peppers, and other flavorings including even freshly ground coffee. I love those chocolate covered espresso beans, but this was the 1st time I had ever even considered adding coffee beans to a recipe. I used the Gevalia ground Kona in my chili.

Incidentally, that was the most awesome chili I have EVER tasted! There was no comparing that to any chili I had ever eaten before. It had such complexity and layers of flavor. A bit of work but definitely a winner. I ended up with a huge qty, so I put some in the freezer in individual servings. When I warmed those frozen servings later, I fell in love with the stuff all over again.

As to jelly beans, while I do like the espresso ones, my all time favorite flavor is popped corn. If you haven't tried the popcorn jelly beans, you are missing out. I can eat a vat of those things.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
12:52 PM

Post #9699156

Dream,
Do they sell the popcorn jelly beans at Megabu...er...Starbucks?
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 31, 2013
1:34 PM

Post #9699185

Gg, they usually have them at HEB.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
2:33 PM

Post #9699232

GREAT!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 31, 2013
3:38 PM

Post #9699264

HEB?
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 31, 2013
5:16 PM

Post #9699310

HEB is a regional super market chain--Texas and New Mexico.

Hey, Gg, I went to HEB this evening, and guess what I got? Yup, popcorn jelly beans! But they didn't have cappuccino. :(

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 31, 2013
7:05 PM

Post #9699373

LOL!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 5, 2013
8:00 PM

Post #9702970

Thought I'd come in and dust off this board--rattle some pots and pans. See if anyone wants to join me. You see, it's that time--holiday go-to-recipes. I'll start.

This is my fave broc recipe of all time. I've probably posted it before, but I don't think anyone has tried it. Don't be put off because it has canned soup and Velveeta. It's a great little casserole of broc with garlicky, melty cheese and a crunchy topping. And no rice. And it's easy. And it's a great addition to special menus.

BROC & GARLIC CHEESE CASSEROLE

2 pkg frozen broccoli florets (20 oz total), cooked and drained

½ stick butter
1 can cream of mushroom soup
5 oz Velveeta cheese
1.5 oz cream cheese
½ medium onion, grated or finely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
garlic powder or granules to taste (start with Ό tsp)

Topping
Crushed Ritz Crackers
Ό to ½ C slivered almonds (I use chopped pecans--pw)


Cook broccoli according to package directions. Do not under cook. Drain well.

Heat butter till beginning to brown. Add onions and saute' just till soft. Add minced garlic and saute' ~1 minute more. Add soup and cheeses and stir well. Heat through. Taste and add garlic granules as desired for more intense garlic flavor.

Place drained broccoli in a greased casserole dish. You might want to cut the florets into smaller pieces. Cover with cheese and soup mix.

Top with crushed crackers and nuts.

Bake in preheated 350° oven 20-25 minutes or until heated through and bubbling.

You can prepare (but not bake) ahead and refrigerate. Do not add cracker/nut topping until ready to bake. Add baking time if starting with a cold casserole.
texasbelle
Mid Gulf Coast, TX
(Zone 9b)

November 6, 2013
6:03 AM

Post #9703157

Good Morning!

My favorite "go to" recipe is your toffee recipe, Pennzer, that you so generously shared with me several years ago. In fact, we call it PennzerToffee (all one word!!!)...it is the BEST toffee recipe I have ever made. Thank you, again, for sharing.

TB
IO1
Waaaay Down South, GA

November 6, 2013
6:06 AM

Post #9703159

Okay ... you gotta share that toffee recipe! LOL

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 6, 2013
6:42 AM

Post #9703198

Penn,
Would you mind starting a new thread for the "HOLIDAY Go-To Recipes"? That way, there'd be a whole thread devoted to just those, and people could spot it more easily under the dedicated topic.

Hugs!

P.S. Cut and paste your recipe there! I want to try it!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 6, 2013
8:57 AM

Post #9703317

Good idea, Gg. I started the new thread you requested.

TB, I am so honored to have a candy named for me in your household and pleased that you have enjoyed this recipe. I just posted it as the first entry on our holiday thread.

~ pen
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 13, 2013
3:40 PM

Post #9708482

My son is a very good cook. Never studied anywhere--didn't learn much from me 'cause we ate out more often than we ate in while he was growing up and I was working long hours. Don't know how it happened that he developed this interest and has so much talent. My mother was also a very good cook. Maybe it skips a generation. Anyway, he is single and cooks a lot of guy things--grilling, smoking, spicy hot things. He is a big fan of Alton Brown and does many of his recipes, but he is also creative and adventurous and makes up a lot of his own.

This is his go-to recipe for essence. We smoked chickens last time I was with him. He brined them and then slathered them in this essence and then smoked them using pecan wood for many hours. OMG were they good! He uses this essence for all sorts of BBQ and who knows what else.

ESSENCE

2 Tbl Smoked Paprika
2 Tbl Salt
2 Tbl Granulated Garlic
1 Tbl Seasoned Pepper
1 Tbl Granulated Onion
1 Tbl Cayenne Pepper
1 Tbl Dried Mexican Oregano
1 Tbl Dried Thyme

Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2013
10:03 AM

Post #9715639

BROWNED SEASONED GROUND BEEF

l lb lean ground beef
1 small onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp cumin
cooking oil
salt and pepper to taste

Saute onion in a small amount of oil for ~ 5 min or just till translucent. Add garlic and saute' another 30 seconds. Add ground beef and cumin and salt and pepper and cook till browned. Drain.

Add to recipes calling for browned ground beef--enchiladas, spaghetti sauce, stuffed bell peppers and such. I made this when helping my son, the cook, make enchiladas one day. He asked me to brown the ground beef. He tasted it and said OMG, I'll just have a bowl of this!
~ pen

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 24, 2013
11:19 AM

Post #9715689

I love cumin!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 24, 2013
1:11 PM

Post #9715767

I love cumin, too!

This time of year, corn pudding is one of my go-to recipes. It's too sweet for me personally, but everyone (except me) loves it. My six year old niece wanted her own mini casserole this year, she felt that she got shorted last year. I sometimes add chopped red and green jalapenos to this.



Corn Pudding

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
4 cups frozen corn kernels (about 19 ounces) -- thawed
4 large eggs
1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup whole milk
4 tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup butter -- (1/2 stick) room temperature
2 tablespoons all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350Β°F. Butter 8x8x2-inch glass baking dish. Blend all ingredients in processor until almost smooth. Pour batter into prepared dish. Bake pudding until brown and center is just set, about 45 minutes. Cool 10 minutes; serve.

Note: I saved out half the corn and added after it was blended for texture. Added two green onions to the blender as well.

DH says to have a slice of ham or turkey over a big spoon of this casserole, then an over easy egg, and gravy. I would never ever eat any of those things, but everyone else loves it and it uses up leftovers like crazy.




Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2013
7:32 PM

Post #9715956

DofS, I made your version of KFC cole slaw this evening. I LOVE it!! It is definitely the KFC taste, but mine came out oilier than theirs. They probably just use less of it.

Here it is...

COLE SLAW KFC
DreamofSpring

1 head of green cabbage
2 carrots
1 1/2 C Miracle Whip (couldn't do it--I used mayo)
4 T tarragon
1 1/2 C canola oil (I used a blend of canola and coconut oils)
1/2 C sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

I made the dressing first and stored in the fridge all day. Shredded and mixed the veggies and then dressed. Will probably be even better tomorrow.

The dressing part makes a huge amount--much more than needed for a large head of cabbage. Will cut by 1/3 next time. And there will be many next times. It's my new go-to! Thank-you DofS!!

~ pen
















rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 25, 2013
5:44 AM

Post #9716138

Made this last night. My boys loved it growing up and I could make it in my sleep. Sometimes I added leftover chicken or roast for a complete meal.

Broccoli Cheese Cornbread

10 oz frozen chopped broccoli
3/4 cup cottage cheese
3/4 cup chopped onion
4 eggs, beaten
1 box Jiffy cornbread mix
1/2 stick melted butter or marg.
1 tsp. salt

Grease an 8 X 8 or 9 X 9 pan. Preheat oven to 425.
Mix all ingredients together and spoon into pan.
Bake for 35 to 45 minutes, till puffy, lightly browned.
Options I know of, sprinkle the top with shredded cheese, add leftover cooked meats, add chopped mushrooms.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2014
12:31 PM

Post #9759523

Uh oh. This thread is slipping out of sight. Need to bump it with another recipe. I was hoping to get more recipes from all of you.

Easy to make and quite good. Keep canned applie pie filling in the pantry and nuts in the freezer, and you will always have the ingredients on hand to mix this up on short notice.

SPICE BUNDT CAKE
adapted from allrecipes.com

Yield: (1) 10" Tube or Bundt Cake

Preheat oven to 350°. Grease and flour well (or spray with Baker's Joy or such) a 10" tube or bundt pan.

With a hand whisk, mix dry ingredients together in the bowl of an electric stand mixer...

*2 C AP flour (9 oz, unsifted)
*2 C sugar (14 oz)
*2 tsp baking soda
*2 tsp ground cinnamon
*1 tsp table salt
*1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
*1/2 tsp ground cloves
*1/4 tsp ground ginger

Turn mixer on low speed (paddle attachment) and add...

*1/2 C vegetable oil (I use canola/coconut blend)
*2 eggs
*(1) 20-oz can apple pie filling
*1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Mix on medium speed just until combined well. Do not over mix.

Stir in...

*1 C rough chopped walnuts (I use pecans)

Pour batter into prepared pan and bake in a preheated oven 50-60 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean or with moist crumbs.

Cool cake 10 minutes and invert onto a plate. Cool before cutting.

Serve as is or sprinkled with powdered sugar or with a dollop of cinnamon whipped cream.

Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

January 31, 2014
1:24 PM

Post #9759543

This is a definitely must try recipe. I have several can of apple pie filling I purchased on sale, and this will be a great way to use them.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2014
3:04 PM

Post #9759632

My family's old all-time fave dip. Thought I'd dust off the recipe and send to my daughter for her Super Bowl party. Found this updated version on allrecipes.com. Want to share with you but haven't tried it yet.

7-LAYER DIP
allrecipes.com (Manda's Seven-Layer Taco Dip)

Yield: 16 servings
• 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese at room temperature
• 1 (8 ounce) container sour cream
• 1 (1 ounce) packet dry taco seasoning mix
• 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
• 2 avocados - peeled, pitted, and diced
• 1/4 cup red onion, minced
• 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
• 1 (15 ounce) can refried black beans
• 1 1/4 cups salsa
• 1 (8 ounce) package shredded Mexican blend cheese
• 1 1/2 cups shredded iceberg lettuce
• 1/3 cup pickled jalapeno pepper slices
Directions
1. With a handheld or standing mixer, beat together cream cheese, sour cream, and taco seasoning in bowl until light and fluffy; set aside.
2. In a separate bowl, stir together the cherry tomatoes, avocados, red onion, lime juice, salt, and black pepper; set aside.
3. Spread the refried black beans out into the bottom of a 9x13-inch glass baking dish in an even layer. Spread the cream cheese mixture over the black beans; top with layers of salsa, Mexican cheese blend, lettuce, cherry tomato mixture, and jalapeno slices.
4. Cover the dish tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate until serving time. Serve cold or at room temperature.
______________________________________________________________________________
Be sure to use a chunky style salsa or it will make the dip too runny.
Add black olives if you like them.


This message was edited Jan 31, 2014 5:10 PM

This message was edited Jan 31, 2014 5:11 PM
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2014
3:14 PM

Post #9759646

You can use packaged taco seasoning for your 7-Layer Dip, but this is better. Of course it is. It is AB's. BTW: I keep mine in the freezer, and it keeps for a long, long time.

TACO SEASONING (Taco Potion #19)
Alton Brown

Ingredients
• 2 tablespoons chili powder
• 1 tablespoon ground cumin
• 2 teaspoons cornstarch
• 2 teaspoons kosher salt
• 1 1/2 teaspoons hot smoked paprika
• 1 teaspoon ground coriander
• 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Directions
Put all of the ingredients in a small jar and shake to combine. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 month.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 31, 2014
5:49 PM

Post #9759731

What does the cornstarch do? (Asks the non-meat-eater)
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2014
7:29 PM

Post #9759791

I expect it just helps mix together better--like putting tiny seeds in cornmeal.

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 1, 2014
5:10 AM

Post #9759924

The cornstarch actually helps thicken the "sauce" so it sticks to the meat better.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 1, 2014
6:11 AM

Post #9759963

Good to know, thank you!
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

February 3, 2014
5:44 AM

Post #9761238

I made the 7 Layer Dip, and it was well received by all. Thanks for sharing.
plantnutz
Austell, GA
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2014
3:30 PM

Post #9762476

The apple spice cake sounds yummy!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 4, 2014
3:42 PM

Post #9762488

plantnutz, my daughter just made this cake and opted to cut up the apples in the canned apple pie filling before adding to batter. She didn't like the idea of the big pieces of apple, and I think I will make it that way from now on also.

I love making one-bowl cakes like this. I used to have a strawberry one-bowl that did not need icing, and it was so moist and wonderful. Now I can't find the recipe. Does anyone have a recipe for such a cake? ~ pen

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 4, 2014
3:57 PM

Post #9762494

Is this it Penn?
Rosalyn Carter's Strawberry Cake

1 (18.25-ounce) box yellow cake mix (I used white to achieve a nicer color)
1 small box strawberry gelatin
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 cup chopped pecans
4 eggs
2 tablespoons flour
1 (10-ounce) package frozen sliced strawberries, thawed,
or 1 pint sliced fresh berries sprinkled with 1/2 cup sugar
Topping
1/2 pint heavy cream, whipped
Powdered sugar for dusting finished cake
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 10″ tube pan or Bundt pan. In bowl of stand mixer, combine cake mix, gelatin, oil, eggs, flour and strawberries. Beat on medium speed until blended. Gently stir in pecans. Pour batter into pan and bake for 50 minutes – one hour, or until tester comes out clean. Cool for 15 minutes, invert onto rack. Dust with powdered sugar, and (if desired) top with lightly sweetened whipped cream.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

February 5, 2014
6:21 AM

Post #9762827

Yum. I making that for sure. I dont like nuts in something as light as a cake, but Ill just leave them out.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 5, 2014
9:54 AM

Post #9762953

roux, the recipe I had did not use a cake mix and did not call for pecans. But I shall certainly try this version. Thanks for posting. ~ pen

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2014
2:39 PM

Post #9763105

Penn, was it a chocolate cake? I have a scratch recipe for a chocolate strawberry cake as well.

When the boys were little, I made a white cake, split the layers with dental floss, spooned frozen sliced strawberries in the two splits with a whipped cream frosting. Topped with strawberries. It was such a simple recipe that was a twist on shortcake.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 5, 2014
9:21 PM

Post #9763371

No chocolate. My Italian roomie taught me to make it a long, long time ago. I had it written on a yellowed index card all these years, and now I can't find it. Everything went into one bowl, no sifting, and we hand mixed it (didn't have an electric mixer of any kind). Any time we knew company was coming, we would dash out and buy strawberries. We always had everything else on hand.

Your layer cake sounds good, and I don't need to write that one down. I bet it would be good with some custard layered in with the strawberries. ~ pen

rouxcrew

rouxcrew
(Joy) Hempstead, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2014
5:49 AM

Post #9763493

Ooooo, never even thought of that. I may have to change my cake making plans this weekend. I was going to make my grandma's carrot pineapple cake but now I might have to do a strawberry cake.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2014
11:07 AM

Post #9763722

My son asked me to send him directions for making my chicken stock, so I did so in recipe form. I know that most of you know how to make chicken stock, but I bet each and every one of us makes it a bit differently. While I am not usually a confident cook, I will tell you that my stock is very, very good. Note that it is stock--not broth. I cook the bones long enough to release the gelatin, and it is rich. If you choose to try my version, do not fail to add the peppercorns and cloves, and do not be shy about adding the quantity of sugar called for. When it comes to stock, a rough guide is to add the same amount of sugar as salt.

CHICKEN STOCK

Yield: 3-4 quarts

*3 1/2-4 lbs chicken parts (I use thighs)
1-2 onions, quartered
3-4 celery stalks, cut in half
handful of celery tops
3-4 large carrots, cut in half
palm full each of peppercorns and whole cloves (~18 each)
2 T salt (plus more for final seasoning)
2 T sugar (plus more for final seasoning)
2 tsp garlic granules
2 tsp onion granules

Place all ingredients in a stock pot and add water to cover plus a couple inches (you can reduce down later). Place lid on the stock pot.

Bring to a boil and simmer until chicken is done (30-45 minutes after the boil).

Remove chicken to a platter and allow to cool. Keep broth and vegetables simmering. When cool enough to handle, debone the chicken. Cut meat up and refrigerate. Place all remaining chicken scraps (bone, skin, fat) back into the simmering broth. Continue cooking 1-2 hours. Remove the lid toward the end to reduce a bit. Taste after reduced. Add more garlic/onion granules, salt and sugar as needed. If adding fresh garlic, cook a while longer until garlic is soft.

Remove from heat. Remove bones and larger vegetable pieces with tongs and discard.

Place another large pot next to the stock pot and place a large, fine-mesh strainer over the second pot. Dip stock (I use a long handled measuring cup) through the strainer into the clean pot, cleaning out the strainer into a scrap bowl as needed. Place second pot, now full of strained stock, into a sink of cold water. Add ice cubes as needed to keep the water surrounding the pot cold.

When stock is cooled a bit, remove pot from sink and ladle the stock into refrigerator dishes with tight fitting lids. (I use Gladware type containers). Use some small and some larger for use in various recipes. I put most of mine in 2 1/2 C containers. When cooled enough to refrigerate, cover and place in refrigerator overnight and skim all or some of fat off the top the next day, then put containers in freezer.

Do not discard that fat! Place the fat in a separate container, label and freeze for making roux.
___________________________________________________________________________

*I use turkey legs when available. Very good! Can sub in any recipe calling for chicken stock. Do not use breasts--not enough bone and not enough flavor. Recommend turkey legs or chicken thighs.

For chicken soup, slice carrots and celery and add to the strained stock along with some parsely and cook until vegetables are tender. Can add noodles or dumplings toward the end of cooking. Or...add cooked roux (do not add raw flour), frozen peas and a splash of cream. Stir and cook until thickened. Place in a casserole dish and top with biscuits or a sheet of pastry and bake until browned for chicken pie.
___________________________________________________________________________

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

February 6, 2014
11:16 AM

Post #9763734

Pen, I make and can a LOT of gelatinous stock of all kinds of meats but I never add garlic because I never know how I may want to use it.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2014
12:02 PM

Post #9763767

darius, I only use chicken stock in savory dishes, of course, and I can't think of anything I've ever used it in where I would not welcome a bit of garlic flavor. I will say that when garlic cooks as long as this stock does, it loses quite a bit of flavor. That is why I suggest adding more at the end if one wants more. Give me an example of something you use your stock for where you would not want garlic. I'm certain that your repertoire of uses is greater than mine. ~ pen

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

February 6, 2014
12:09 PM

Post #9763772

egads Pen... I use stock in everything, including morning egg dishes where I'd prefer not to have garlic. I'm heavy-handed with garlic in most dishes except those I might eat early in the day. Imagine garlic-flavored coffee and you'll get the gist.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2014
2:47 PM

Post #9763878

Hmmmm...garlic in eggs? Why not? I frequently put chives in mine. But I rarely eat breakfast. It would be lunch or dinner. Garlic in breakfast gravy? Definitely! You ever eat sausage for breakfast? Garlic for sure. Pork chops and gravy for breakfast? I would make the gravy with stock and Half & Half. Oh yez! :))

Hey, that reminds me of my fave gravy tip, which follows. ~pen
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2014
3:05 PM

Post #9763900

GRAVY

Necessity is surely the mother of invention. The best gravy I ever made was on a camping trip with my family. My SIL's bro was with us and was going to fry pork chops to go with our breakfast eggs and asked me to make gravy. Well, what he did was grill them in a nearly dry pan, and there were no drippings. I was wringing my hands over having no drippings for the gravy, and son, who is very clever in the kitchen, came to my rescue. He got out a ribeye steak left over from dinner the night before, and he rendered that steak in a skillet. Just cooked it do death, all the while pressing on it to get all the fat and juices out of it he could. I didn't think that would help much, but I added butter and flour to it and proceeded to make a roux and then added milk and seasonings. OMG...best gravy I ever made!

So, ever since, I get fat trimmings from prime rib from the butcher at the grocery store (it's free). I make little plastic wrapped packets of it and keep in the freezer. It gets rendered and added to the roux of all gravies that I make--white or brown. Excellent flavor enhancer!!

Happy_1, I read on another thread that you excel in gravy making. Please chime in here and give us your tips. I, too, love making gravy (and eating it!) ~ pen

(I'm going to cross post this to the Homemaker Tips thread.)
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 14, 2014
11:36 AM

Post #9769197

There was a discussion of onion rings on the "Dinner" thread, and it reminded me that this is one of my most reliable go-to recipes. So good with hamburgers or steak or just as a yummy appetizer. Tastes very much like Outback's Bloomin' Onion, especially when served with the horseradish dipping sauce.

ONION PEELS

Serves 8-12

2 large, sweet white onions (Vildalia is best)
6-10 C Crisco vegetable shortening (depending on fryer capacity)

BATTER
1 C A-P flour
1 C Progresso plain bread crumbs
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
3 C milk

Horseradish Dipping Sauce (recipe below)

Heat shortening to 350°

Peel onions and cut off bottoms and tops. Place onion down on a cut side and cut down through the onion, slicing it in half (pole to pole). Place flat side of each half down and cut each half 4-5 more times in a spoke fashion to create wedges of onion. Separate the onion layers of the wedges into peels.

When shortening reaches temp, dip each onion peel into the batter. Let some of the batter drip off and then drop into the hot oil. Fry 8-12 peels at a time for 1-2 minutes or until lightly browned. Drain on a rack.

Serve with horseradish sauce for dipping.


HORSERADISH DIPPING SAUCE

1 C mayo
1 T prepared horseradish
4 tsp white vinegar
2 tsp water
2 tsp ketchup (or more for more color)
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp dried oregano or 1/2 tsp fresh
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (and/or a good splash of sriracha)
1/4 tsp garlic granules
1/4 tsp onion granules

Whisk all ingredients together and chill.
Serve with onion rings/peels or prime rib. Add a bit to your fave mayo based dip.


Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 14, 2014
5:14 PM

Post #9769388

Sounds fantastic, thank you!

badcat

badcat
BELLEVILLE, IL
(Zone 6b)

April 10, 2014
11:51 AM

Post #9809211

This is my fav dish for cold yucky days :)

Chop potatoes, onions, carrots, and smoked sausage. Chuck it all in the crock pot. Add 1 can of cream of mushroom soup and let it go all day on low. Dont add any water. Everyone is starving by dinner time after smelling it all day :)
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 10, 2014
5:42 PM

Post #9809458

badcat, easy, aromatic and yummy sounds like something I will have to try. Thanks for posting.
~ pen
greenwood46
Milwaukee, WI

July 12, 2014
11:07 AM

Post #9891787

Does anyone have a recipe for a Carrot Cake that used
baby jar carrots? If so please pass it along. thanks

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