Calling all "judges" for the annual DG County Fair! Vote for your favorites here!

Don't kill this bug!

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

I'm sure you know what an adult ladybeetle looks like, but how about their larvae, pupa and eggs? incidentally, ladybeetles (especially the Asian ladybeetle) BITE!

This is a link to a photo of an imature ladybeetle.

http://pendergardener.blogspot.com/2011/05/good-bug-bad-bug.html

This site has a nice photo of ladybeetle eggs.

http://www.biocontrol.entomology.cornell.edu/predators/ladybeetles.html

Here's what the pupa looks like

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/6507026

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks, once again for the pics. Its much easier to remember them when I've seen pictures. Very cool.

Madison, AL(Zone 7b)

My personal approach is that if I don't know what it is, I don't kill it. I might catch it and look it up, but with so many beneficial or neutral bugs out there that don't get a fraction of the attention the bad bugs do, I go with "innocent until proven guilty."

Monte Vista, CO(Zone 4a)

And to make life a little more confusing for us gardening folks, enter the Mexican Bean Beetle. "The Mexican bean beetle is one of the few harmful members of the lady beetle family. The copper-colored adults resemble large lady beetles."
http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/sheets/mexbeanbeetle.html

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I must be really lucky, the only bug I've ever seen is the Squash bug and it's eggs and pill bugs. I know i get Spider Mites and June Bug grubs but that's about it. Spider Mites are arachnids not bugs, so they don't count : ).

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Nicole - I use the same approach. Although, if I had recognized the squash vine borer moth when I first saw it a few summers ago, I might not have the problem with its offspring as I am having now. But that moth looked so pretty flitting around the garden...

Lisa - I call everything that crawls around in the dirt a bug, even though I know they are different species.

I think your garden must contain lots of great predator "bugs" because you don't spray harmful chemicals. Given time, predator "bugs" will keep bad bugs to manageable levels. They won't completely eliminate them, because if they did, they would starve - and we don't want that.

Burnt Chimney, VA(Zone 7a)

Oh, NO, I've killed both larva & pupa before! Bad plant momma, I am~ Thank you, Honeybee, for making me see the error of my ways! :o(

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Barb - the first time I saw an immature ladybeetle, it reminded of an alligator! From what I have read, they eat more aphids than the adults do.

Burnt Chimney, VA(Zone 7a)

LOL Now that just figures!! I won't make that mistake again, for sure!

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

More pictures of baby lady bugs for you from my garden.

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Burnt Chimney, VA(Zone 7a)

Dr, in your fourth picture, what are the little black thingamabobs in front of the baby, do you know?

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Great photos, drthor! The photo on the far right shows a baby ladybeetle changing into an adult.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

sparklinBarb
I think those are aphids.
The photo was taken on a "rat tail" radish pod and at that time they were done, the plant was weak and the aphids attacked.
Lots of lady bugs larva eating them.

The pictures below are also of lady bugs.
My husband pets eat a lot of Prickly Pear Cactus pads, so I have lots of them in his area. Sometimes I steal the pads and grill them for my self ... yummy.
Last year the cactus were all attacked my those kind of white scales ... very bad ... those black lady bugs arrived and started to take care and eat the aphids.
It was not enough. I had to scrape all of those scales and apply a mix of : soap and Murphy oil. They are ok now.

In the first picture you see the old skin of the larva.
In the second you see the larva and the lady bug.
In the third a lot of babies.

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Decatur, GA(Zone 7b)

Thanks for the great info. Honeybee, I really appreciate those links. And thanks for the caution about the Mexican Bean Beatle, Solace.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

I think this is drthor's ladybeetle:

http://www.biocontrol.entomology.cornell.edu/predators/Chilocoruss.html

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

It looks a lot like my black lady bug ...

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

We always have a healthy crop of baby ladybugs in the spring. They like to climb up the bricks on the front of our house and "molt" (?)/morph into their final stages.

Las Vegas, NV(Zone 9a)

Thanks for the photos and heads up. This thread would have saved many babies a few years ago. I went out on the patio and they were everywhere. I started smashing and then the light went on and I stopped.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

We had ladybugs in the house. They were dropping from the ceiling and the fans. Even on to the kitchen table we just brushed them out of the way. My poor children. Lol

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

My Lady Bug is working !

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Oceanside, CA(Zone 10a)

Was gonna start a new thread but found this topic and figured it would be a good add-on to it.

My recent lesson learned...

I'm usually overrun with snails and slugs this time of year. But haven't seen many, and very little damage, if at all. Last week I started seeing some unusual snails, never seen these cool looking snails before. Thought they looked like oceanic snails that took residence in my yard for some reason. They had a conical shell formation, nothing like I've seen before. I found handfuls of them near my container'd potatoes. Thought the worst and tossed them far away lol Yesterday, I saw at least 50 as I was watering my tropicals. Alarmed me a bit, so I knew that they'd be hiding in the nasturtiums, like snails, slugs do. To my surprise, I found a lot of dead normal snail shells. Seeing this made me start googling "snails". What I found out was very interesting. These are the snails you want! They're called Dellocate Snails(I know snails aren't "bugs") But don't kill these either. They eat and control your regular snail problem. They must take care of the slug problem too, because I haven't seen but maybe 5-6 this spring. I usually see hundreds this time of year.

Not sure how they got here, but thinking about gathering and raising a few in a terrarium to keep adding a few hundred to the yard each spring.

Sounds like they are only allowed in certain parts of the country. A few different counties of SoCal, New Mexico, and Texas.

http://www.goodsnails.com/

http://www.pe.com/iguide/family/family-headlines/20120330-master-gardener-good-snails-vs.-bad-snails.ece





Madison, AL(Zone 7b)

I remember those, Ray. People pay good money to buy them. Unfortunately, if your garden is like mine was in Orange, you also probably have those flatheaded earthworm-eating worms. With the worldwide nursery trade, I'm sure we'll have them here in Alabama soon, if it's warm enough for them.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Ray - thanks for introducing us to this helpful snail. I've never heard of it before.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Ray-this is so strange I found the very same thing in my garden area today. I picked up a plastic tray and under it were some pill bugs and a weird looking slug in a shell, kind of looked like a Hermit Crab shell but it was one of these snails. I have no idea how it got there since nobody lives close and I start my own plants.

We never used to have snails bc of Fire Ants but the fire ants are gone and now we have snails. Still can't believe that I found out what the strange creature is, and I just saw it today.

It's probably not warm enough where Ray lives to for those flathead worms but it's warm enough here.

Oceanside, CA(Zone 10a)

Quote from NicoleC :
I remember those, Ray. People pay good money to buy them. Unfortunately, if your garden is like mine was in Orange, you also probably have those flatheaded earthworm-eating worms. With the worldwide nursery trade, I'm sure we'll have them here in Alabama soon, if it's warm enough for them.[/quote]

Ah Planarians! Thankfully, I don't have many. I have seen them under containers in the past when I'm cleaning up in the fall. Most containers have earthworms (even small salamanders) underneath. But I will find a hammerhead or 2 under a random container, living with beetles and spiders. No earthworms. I do see them a lot at work(Irvine) after it rains. Here, I don't have enough around to be a problem.......yet.


[quote="HoneybeeNC"]Ray - thanks for introducing us to this helpful snail. I've never heard of it before.


I'm happy you started this thread, at a perfect time too. Interesting that they're only allowed in certain parts of the southwest.

Oceanside, CA(Zone 10a)

Quote from 1lisac :
Ray-this is so strange I found the very same thing in my garden area today. I picked up a plastic tray and under it were some pill bugs and a weird looking slug in a shell, kind of looked like a Hermit Crab shell but it was one of these snails. I have no idea how it got there since nobody lives close and I start my own plants.

We never used to have snails bc of Fire Ants but the fire ants are gone and now we have snails. Still can't believe that I found out what the strange creature is, and I just saw it today.

It's probably not warm enough where Ray lives to for those flathead worms but it's warm enough here.


I have no idea how they found my yard either, but I'm sure they've had fun munching on the tons of regular snails.

Unfortunately I have hammerheads here. Just haven't had a problem with them yet. They are pretty cool creatures, even if they're bad.



Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I thought I had killed the one I found, but I went back and looked and it was still there alive but stuck in the dirt. I stepped on it before I knew what it was. All I managed to do was stick it deeper in the dirt. I was trying to rescue a large lizard from the cat so I was rather distracted.

Now I have to look up hammerhead worms.

Madison, AL(Zone 7b)

I know the common garden snail can heal a broken shell. Snails are harder to kill than you think. And no, "The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating" did not make me like the snails eating my garden any better.

Before I knew what the hammerheads were, I used to save them from sidewalks after a rain. *sigh*

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Hammerhead worms! Oh, my! I just read up on these and the article said they eat earthworms. It also said that cutting them in two will make them into two worms!

If (when) I see these creatures, they are going into the waste disposal! We can't have them wiping out our earthworm population.

Las Vegas, NV(Zone 9a)

I have not seen any but if they are here I will see them. I am always digging in my soil. Thanks for the info that they do not die easy.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Nichole- you mentioned above that you used to rescue the hammerheads from the sidewalk after a rain, do all worms get on the side walk or just this type and don't earthworms, if cut in two also make 2 worms? I have to see what they look like, I don't know if I have them or not.

Still find it so strange that yesterday was the first time I had seen one of those strange snails and then Ray mentioned it here. Still wondering where it came from.

Madras, OR

Lady bug larvae can often be found on the under side of potato leaves eating the eggs and tiny larva of the Colorado potato beetle. I had to bring one to the house and look it up to be sure.

Madison, AL(Zone 7b)

Quote from 1lisac :
Nichole- you mentioned above that you used to rescue the hammerheads from the sidewalk after a rain, do all worms get on the side walk or just this type and don't earthworms, if cut in two also make 2 worms? I have to see what they look like, I don't know if I have them or not.


Earthworms get on sidewalks after a rain, too. (And in my basement.) I think they are tryingto escape drowning but end up drying out on the sidewalk when the sun comes out. It's a myth that earthworms become two worms if you cut them in half, although the front part sometimes survives.

Since the hammerheads are flatworms and most flatworms can reproduce by fragmentation, my guess would be that these guys do survive if cut into pieces.

P.S. The University of Florida says yes: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/Creatures/misc/land_planarians.htm

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Flatworms, ok now I know what they are. I haven't seen them here but I do know what they are. Still trying to figure out how that snail eating snail got here. Thank you, everyone! This is a great thread.

Oceanside, CA(Zone 10a)

There's some good pics of them here http://davesgarden.com/guides/bf/showimage/5695/

They can reproduce by splitting(purposely or against their will) and lay eggs/cocoon. Planarians are kinda cool, but definitely don't want a lot of them. They do eat other things besides earthworms. Slugs are easier prey for them. Another link http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/beneficials/beneficial-57%28partial%29_land_planarian.htm

Pueblo, CO(Zone 5b)

Another beneficial insect that has babies that look like alligators is Lacewings. Larva are predators like Ladybug larva.
http://ipm.ncsu.edu/cotton/insectcorner/photos/beneficial.htm

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Thanks for the link, pollengarden.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

Lots of Lady Bugs babies right now in my garden ... they are everywhere

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

Here you can see their metamorphoses ... they love to hide in between the rocks.

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor

Post a Reply to this Thread

You cannot post until you , sign up and subscribe. to post.
BACK TO TOP