lahore, Pakistan(Zone 10b)

Hi,

This is flowering right now in our spring here. Very fragrant. Can some one suggest which viburnum it is, assuming that it is a viburnum.

Many thanks

Khabbab
www.lahoregardening.com

Thumbnail by khabbab
Jacksonville, FL(Zone 9a)

My eyes could be deceiving me, but it looks more like a Ficus elastica…Though I've never seen one in bloom.

Edit to ask…Can you give some idea of the size of the leaves?

This message was edited Mar 18, 2013 5:33 PM

Darwin, Australia

Definitely not a Ficus. There is a reason why you have never seen a Ficus with visible flowers, and that is that the flowers are tiny and are concealed inside the fig or syconium. In most Figs (except those that are parthenocarpic) the flowers are pollinated by a host specific species of wasp which gains access to the syconium through a small, natural opening called an ostiole. Figs and fig wasps have a very fascinating symbiotic relationship.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fig_wasp

Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

Reminds me of Ixora.

Bristol, United Kingdom

Osmanthus sp?

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 9a)

Very interesting info, Darwinensis. Never knew. The thing that made me think F.elastica, was simply the shape and possible size of the leaves. Having said that, I'm thinking Rlalique could be on to something here.

lahore, Pakistan(Zone 10b)

Well it is olive family for sure but not sure what it is. Not a viburnum though. It is not osmanthus fragrans.

Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Quote from Rlalique :
Osmanthus sp?


It can't be Osmanthus or anything else in the olive family, as they all have 4 petals, while your plant has 5 petals per flower.

Resin

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 9a)

Well then, I'd say growin had it all along….Ixora coccinea probably. ?

This message was edited Mar 19, 2013 9:50 AM

San Francisco, CA

I don't think it's Ixora; most have four-petaled flowers in terminal clusters. I don't have an idea of what it is yet, sorry.

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 9a)

Oh yeah, 5…Sorry

San Francisco, CA

for some reason it calls to mind Luculia, but I've never seen one like that. Perhaps it is a related plant in the Rubiaceae.

Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

How about Acokanthera oppositifolia http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/164982/
For some reason it still screams Ixora to me but.....

San Francisco, CA

That looks pretty good Growin.

Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Good call - the flowers do have that "ship's propellor" slight spiral turn typical of Apocynaceae (like Oleander), and Acokanthera is in that family.

If correct, highly toxic.

Resin

Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

You're right about the petal count so it's not Ixora. The "oppositifolia" of the OP's plant does kinda show that alternating opposite leaf arrangement. I was just trying to figure out if the bloom itself is right (centre).

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