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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 43)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


March 23, 2013
6:43 AM

Post #9458899

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1299991/

Spring has officially arrived according to the calendar, but not so much according to the weather forecasts. Nevertheless, it is time for a new thread to usher in the new season. Around here, we have been on the go-go-go counting down the days to graduation and making college plans for the fall, but I'm also hankering for some traditional spring foods, especially asparagus and berries. (Not together :-). So what's for dinner at your house?

Thumbnail by Terry
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

March 23, 2013
7:21 AM

Post #9458951

Thanks, Terry.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 23, 2013
7:21 AM

Post #9458952

I'm in .

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2013
7:41 AM

Post #9458975

Evidently spring has eliminated Wisconsin from it's agenda as we are expecting yet another round of snow and cold. Last year it was 60* at this time. This has been the 5th coldest March since the 1800s. Gee, thanks mother nature.

However, being that cold inspired me to slow cook a couple of nice beef short ribs, which were reduced to tenderness after about 8 hours. The last hour I covered them in some leftover BBQ sauce I made before Christmas. Good to save those small portions that aren't enough to feed the mob. Made rice as a side and steamed up some fresh cauliflower. My old home ec. teacher told us we shouldn't serve two whites at a meal because it wouldn't look pleasing, so I drowned the cauliflower in a nice cheddar cheese sauce. So there, Miss O'Hare.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2013
8:13 AM

Post #9458999

M5, I need to root in the chest freezer... pretty sure I have some short ribs buried in there somewhere, and those will be good for the upcoming snow days here.

Here's the veal shanks for Osso Buco after only browning. I just cooked 3 shanks because there's only my sis and me... and she's not sure if she'll like it or not. The photo after cooking them in liquid (dry white wine, veal stock, mirepoix and herbs) is still waiting to be taken... they need to cook a little bit more to tenderness after being refrigerated overnight.

I think I may take Laurel's suggestion of serving it over creamy grits.

Thumbnail by darius
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 23, 2013
8:18 AM

Post #9459006

Now I so want to make these.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2013
9:06 AM

Post #9459036

Mmmm I bet the short ribs would have been good with grits...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 23, 2013
11:46 AM

Post #9459191

Here you go , Darius :

1 C. SELF RISING FLOUR
3 OZ.CORNMEAL
1/2 TSP SALT
2 TBS SUGAR WHISK ALL TOGETHER UNTIL WELL BLENDED

IN SEPARATE BOWL:
1/2 C. BUTTERMILK
1 EGG
1 STICK BUTTER (MELTED )
1 0Z CREAM CHEESE (MELTED )
3 OR 4 GREEN ONIONS (USE ALL ) WHISK TOGETHER AND ADD TOGETHER WITH DRY INGREDIENTS. MIX WELL AND
ADD:
12 OZ CRAB MEAT
1/3 C. SHREDDED SHARP CHEDDAR CHEESE
1 MINCED JALAPENO PEPPER ( OR 2 IF MILD)
1TBS MINCED GARLIC MIX WELL

HEAT PEANUT OIL IN POT FOR DEEP FRYING TO 350°

SCOOP INTO BALLS AND COOK IN HOT OIL UNTIL GOLDEN DRAIN WELL ON PAPER TOWELS , BLOT TOPS AND SERVE


THESE ARE LIGHT AND TENDER . IF JALAPENOS ARE NOT HOT ENOUGH , AND YOU WANT MORE SPICE,ADD CAYANNE PEPPER TO DRY INGREDIANTS
iF YOU DON'T USE SELF RISING FLOUR, ADD 1/2 TSP BAKING POWDER TO DRY INGREDIENTS


darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2013
11:55 AM

Post #9459196

Cool beans, Thanks Sally!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 23, 2013
2:24 PM

Post #9459324

Sorry it took so long .
I'm putting together the hush puppies , crab and shrimp salad , deep fried oysters .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2013
2:35 PM

Post #9459334

I could hate you! I haven't had fried oysters in so long that I've almost forgotten the taste.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 23, 2013
2:36 PM

Post #9459338

Thanks for the new thread Terry! I'm back from a long day visiting a nursery a few hours each way. Came home to DH working on clearing the living room. Big reno project is starting Tues with replumbing of hot water radiant heating to make demo etc easier the week after. I have about 3wks left with my kitchen, such as it is now.

We're doing a beef & broccoli stir fry for dinner. Your dinners all sound so good!
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2013
2:40 PM

Post #9459342

Tam, I may have to put you on my "almost hate" list (with Digger's fried oysters) for your hot water radiant heating! I'd do that in a heartbeat if I had the funds. :)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 23, 2013
3:04 PM

Post #9459366

Its not the under-foot radiant type. Its the radiator around the room periphery type. But still very nice! We're getting under the floor (tile) electric radiant heat for the new kitchen. DH has a problem with circulation and tile will be over a concrete slab (w/o basement underneath) so gets really cold. So its practically a medical purpose. :-) I'm so excited to have the warm floors!!!! (I'm kinda hoping the cats prefer the floor to the counters too)

Off to start dinner.
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2013
3:18 PM

Post #9459381

I have a DG friend in the very cold (higher elevation) NC mountains. Her husband installed the periphery-type hot water heating when they built the house many years ago. I've stayed there numerous times and always been comfortable. A year or two before he died, he tapped into the boiler and ran pipes to heat a GH for her. No extra heating costs except the initial materials, and a few extra chunks of wood for the boiler every winter.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 23, 2013
4:19 PM

Post #9459412

It is very comfortable!

The beef & broccoli was really good!
Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 23, 2013
7:46 PM

Post #9459623

We're going to a ham and fried oyster dinner at a nearby firehouse tomorrow night, so we will get our fill of oysters there. Yum!

Tonight we served the cassoulet to a friend who came over to attend a symphony with us afterwards. I made one-crust blackberry pie with crème fraîche topping for dessert. It was all very good. I think it's time to put the leftover cassoulet in the freezer for a bit, though. You can keep those things going forever if you can stand it to keep eating it!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 24, 2013
9:03 AM

Post #9460046

Fresh redfish and trout tonight . Getting our fill of seafood while we can . Don't have that stuff in N Georgia .
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2013
11:09 AM

Post #9460188

We had another blast of winter yesterday and last night. Tonight we are having a few friends over for a "spring" meal, ham with a pineapple, orange glaze, creamed new potatoes and peas and a German chocolate decadent brownie dessert. Debating whether try and do fresh dinner rolls, or slice last night's sour dough potato bread.
How did the osso bucco go over with your sister, Darius? It's one of our favorite foods when we can manage to find veal shanks.When we worked in Kansas City I could count of McGonigles having veal, but in small town Kansas it's a rarity.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2013
11:59 AM

Post #9460246

My sis hasn't tried the osso buco yet. She didn't get home from work until 11:30 last night, too late for me to fix a plate for her and I don't know her work hours for today or tomorrow. I'll need to make some fresh gremolata (and more grits) when she's ready, but she'd better hurry. Fortunately, my flat parsley has sprouted just enough to clip a few more tiny sprigs... Italian parsley is rare in the stores here.

I had family in Clay Center many, many years ago, and I'm sure it was a LOT smaller then! My grandfather graduated from the university in Manhattan, but most of my family was in Delphos. (I think we talked of this once before.)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 24, 2013
3:04 PM

Post #9460431

Bibimbap, if I'm ambitious, scallion pancakes.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2013
3:20 PM

Post #9460447

Hey guys...thought I was chopped! Took a few minutes to catch up once I found you. In brief, Sally I'm with Darius on the oyster envy. Ditto the redfish but you can definitely get world class trout in North Georgia streams. Those camps in our neighborhood that charge thousands to fish for a weekend are a testament to that. Maybe your DS needs to come fishing here. I wish SO would break out his waders and spend a day at Panther's Creek. He might need his new hip first.
M5, been lusting for short ribs so much that I've been considering taking already roasted beef ribs and braising them a la short ribs.
Darius, what did you think of the creamy grits as a side? Did you make cheese grits? That's what I do.
Tam, I've not been stir frying much lately. Beef and broccoli will undoubtedly be on the horizon with garden broccoli underway.
Leslie, I never tire of cassoulet. Maybe it's because I don't make it as often as you do.

We are having a chicken and vegetable pot pie with lots of mushrooms. With Passover starting tomorrow evening I am getting in all the grain dishes we won't be able to eat during the holiday. The lamb shanks are braised and done in a style similar to osso buco. They will get served with gremolata too. I used sweet vermouth instead of white wine. The chicken soup is done. Needs matzo balls. The ritual foods for the seder plate are finished. Will do a dressed room temp platter of roasted and grilled veggies including peppers, onions, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli. I'm going to make baked apples with a spiced matzo meal, pecan, brown sugar and maple syrup filling for dessert. Dollop of home Greek yogurt on top. We were going to have our seder at Maypop but decided to leave for Miami a few days earlier so not time to make a trip up to the cottage.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2013
4:25 PM

Post #9460515

Laurel, I adore cassoulet but you haven't seen the size of my pot, plus I keep adding to it to balance out the ingredients. I only make it once a year, and I didn't even do that last year so it's been a while. We had it twice in France this past fall, but I actually like my version best.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2013
5:20 PM

Post #9460591

Laurel, for the Osso Buco I made some creamy grits (using Anson Mills' Antebellum Coarse Yellow Grits) but without cheese. http://ansonmills.com/recipes/489?recipes_by=grain

I didn't miss the cheese...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 24, 2013
6:12 PM

Post #9460643

Laurel , there is a hole just below our place in the Chestatee that gives us 18 to 23" rainbows . My boy has never eaten fresh water trout ,I don't think . He used to fish the bass tournaments but when he went out and caught his first bull red , he was hooked on salt water fishing.Johnny caught a 26" rainbow out of that hole a few years ago , but the walk down and back up is so steep , he rarely goes anymore.
I like wade fishing and catching a limit of trout 18 to 24".speckled trout, that is. I have all my own gear but need new waders .May get him to try Panther creek

This message was edited Mar 25, 2013 6:25 PM
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2013
6:19 PM

Post #9460648

It's so beautiful there. We take a picnic. So much fun to sit in the rushing water. I collect flat river rocks to make markers for garden perennials. The water is cool even in August.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


March 24, 2013
7:31 PM

Post #9460722

I'm thinking chicken pot pie for tomorrow night - maybe it'll fight off the chilly temps...brrr! Then maybe some chili 3-way on Tuesday, just because I haven't made any this year and I've got a hankering - and the temperatures MIGHT become more springlike if I wait much longer.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
7:06 AM

Post #9461068

I've lived in and around the Appalachian mountains for so long that I forget not all trout are freshwater. I DO prefer the freshwater trout from our pristine mountain streams, but the last steelhead I had wasn't too shabby.

I bought some used waders at a yard sale last year (too large, but cheap and still watertight) and I have a lovely small graphite rod I've owned for 30+ years... maybe this year I'll buy a license and a trout stamp and do some fishing. I'd like to try some fly fishing, but it's difficult here because all the creeks are narrow and have overhanging trees.

A DG friend and I bought several pieces of pork belly and I'm now curing them for bacon. I'm doing one small (about 2#) piece with a savory cure... crushed juniper berries, bay leaf, fresh thyme, garlic, and lots of black pepper (plus the salt cure itself). It should be interesting to use a chunk of it in a pot of beans.

I'm not inspired in the least about something for supper...

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2013
7:20 AM

Post #9461088

I was going to make deer steaks with mashed potatoes and salad for DH, DS and two DGDs. But it's snowing now and I think it calls for something heartier, so I've got crockpot chicken with black beans, corn and salsa simmering away instead.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 25, 2013
8:11 AM

Post #9461166

I've got some ground beef & roasted tomato sauce pulled from the freezer to go with some sauted cabbage & onions.
Its a winter wonderland here. Just sad its spring!

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
8:49 AM

Post #9461240

I think lots of us are having a white start to Spring!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2013
10:11 AM

Post #9461339

Amazing, isn't it? At least it's pretty, but I'm afraid that the peas that I planted so optimistically at the beginning of March are now rotting in the ground!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
12:18 PM

Post #9462724

Yikes! How did I ever overlook gremolata?? It was good with the Osso Buco I just made, but I never dreamed how good it could be on other dishes... I guess I had a deprived cooking upbringing!

It would be great on steamed asparagus (or almost any other green veggie), and any seafood, but I'm not sure I'd like it on scrambled breakfast eggs.

Thumbnail by darius   Thumbnail by darius         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
1:13 PM

Post #9462796

Tonight will be Pasta w/asparagus and mushrooms. Best with morel mushrooms, but as dry as our area is I don't think I'll "wait" for the morels this spring.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
1:31 PM

Post #9462844

Gads, I'd LOVE to find some morels in my woods!

i haven't seen even the tiniest tip of an asparagus spear poking up in my asparagus beds, but it shouldn't be long now.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 26, 2013
2:25 PM

Post #9462965

Darius, I've never made gremolata - or even tasted it to my knowledge. I'll have to check it out.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 26, 2013
2:29 PM

Post #9462969

Yep. Same here.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 26, 2013
3:14 PM

Post #9463011

Well now , after Consumer Report and a lot of shopping , around for Ninja products , I decided to go with the one advertised on T V .1500 watts and 2hp motor . Same price as the 1200watt that you find in stores . Called mega kitchen unit . 72 oz pitcher ,64 oz bowl , two single serve cups 6blade for pitcher,4blade for bowl ,single serve blade and dough blade for bowl . This is heavy duty and not a toy .Even makes ice cream , snow cones . I'm going to enjoy it . Can chop cabbage fine enough for coleslaw . ( I'm picky about that ).
Love it , love it , love it !
Porterhouse for Johnny tonight and think I'll have a peach smoothie .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 26, 2013
4:08 PM

Post #9463086

leftovers here w/roasted brussel sprouts. Today we lost the heat in the living room & the downstairs bathroom as we march towards the new kitchen/first floor reno.

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 26, 2013
4:41 PM

Post #9463126

I don't envy you all the hassle of renovating, Tammy, but a year from now it will all be a distant memory and you'll be so pleased!

We had leftover chicken and leftover blackberry pie for dinner. Nothing exciting!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 26, 2013
5:13 PM

Post #9463161

oh blackberry pie sounds exciting to me. :-)

Edited to add: gremolata sounds wonderful! Will be giving it a try in my new kitchen.

This message was edited Mar 26, 2013 7:16 PM

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 26, 2013
5:23 PM

Post #9463170

The blackberry pie is wonderful. It's a one-crust pie with a crème fraîche topping and it's very easy to make. Since I have lots of blackberries (and raspberries, which work in that recipe too) in my freezer it's become my go-to dessert.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


March 26, 2013
6:34 PM

Post #9463258

Do you use a crumb or traditional pastry crust for the single crust pie? That does sound wonderful :-) I stumbled over a recipe for an upside-down apple PIE (yes pie) with a sticky pecan bottom (that becomes the drippy top once you invert. That might be our downfall dessert later this week.

We had chicken and chicken - pot pie on Monday night, and enchiladas tonight. Tomorrow night is a beef tips-and-mushrooms over papardelle noodles, then something in the crockpot for Thursday and Friday meals. It snowed again today...most of the morning, although nothing stuck. Crazy weather. I finally took down the snow village in the dining room. Maybe if Bedford Falls is packed away until next winter, Mother Nature will pack it in until next winter, too.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 27, 2013
4:46 AM

Post #9463540

Terry, I confess that I have never been very successful with pie crusts, although we took a class recently at Sur la Table which included a tart, and their crust seemed pretty easy. I do plan to try it out in my own kitchen. But normally when I make pie I use Oronoque deep-dish frozen crusts, and so yes, it's a traditional crust. Here's the recipe. The crushed anise is my secret ingredient; used in any berry pie it seems to enhance the flavor without taking over and making its presence known.

Berry Pie à Ma Façon

1 qt. fresh or frozen raspberries or blackberries
2/3 cup sugar
4 tbsp Minute Tapioca (to add thickening to the juice)
1/2 tsp crushed anise
1 tbsp lemon juice

Mix ingredients together lightly; pour into 9 or 10" unbaked pie shell. Place upper crust over pie, sealing edges well. Cut steam vents. Bake 15 minutes at 450 and 40 minutes at 350 or until crust is golden. (I use crust protectors to prevent overcooking of the edges.)

One-crust Variation: Make the usual berry pie recipe, but chill the pie and filling once the lower crust is golden and then mix 1/4 cup of sugar in with 8 oz of crême fraîche and spread it over the top. Can be served with whipped cream on the top.

We had snow the other day, too. It was pretty but it's definitely getting old!

Do you have a good recipe for chicken enchiladas? We love them but they seem like a lot of bother to make!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


March 27, 2013
5:10 AM

Post #9463564

Thanks, GG!

I made some simple ones last night with flour tortillas (I prefer corn tortillas that have been flash-fried before rolling and stuffing), with a couple cups of shredded chicken and a cup of cheese.

The sauce for these is simple (if not authentic :-). Make a roux with 3 tablespoons butter + 3 tablespoons flour. Add 2 cups of chicken broth; allow it to thicken, reduce heat or move off heat and stir in a small can of diced green chiles and a cup of sour cream. Pour over the top of the enchiladas and sprinkle another cup (give or take) of shredded cheese. Bake for about 20-25 minutes, then broil for a minute to get the top good and golden. The cheese can be Monterey Jack or cheddar; I use whichever I have on hand, or a combo.

It makes a full 9x13 pan. As I said, they aren't my favorites, but they are simple and fast, since I almost always have a bag of frozen diced or shredded chicken on hand. And my family likes them.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 27, 2013
5:12 AM

Post #9463569

Aha, so you don't use tomato in your enchilada sauce? That does look really good - thanks!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


March 27, 2013
5:41 AM

Post #9463598

No. For the more traditional enchiladas (beef, chicken, cheese or some combination) with corn tortillas, I use a red chile sauce or green chile sauce, but I never a tomato-based sauce. This one is more of a homestyle dish - very American-ized version of enchiladas.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 27, 2013
4:05 PM

Post #9464223

Out of the freezer , venison stew and cornbread .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2013
4:13 PM

Post #9464232

Bacon, eggs and fried potatoes.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2013
4:42 PM

Post #9464264

veggie omelet for dinner here. My DH is cooking up some potatoes to go in his.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

March 27, 2013
4:44 PM

Post #9464266

Fresh Alaskan salmon in a salad of greens from my garden, and my first handful of fresh snap peas.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2013
4:47 PM

Post #9464271

Oh we're a long way from having anything from the garden. I've got some leeks, peppers & tomatoes just germinating. I should be able to sow lettuce and peas soon as the snow has largely melted now.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 27, 2013
5:52 PM

Post #9464372

Tammy, I have tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, basil, parsley, onions, chard, cabbage and Brussels sprouts coming up in flats but the English and sugar snap peas I planted the beginning of March haven't broken ground yet. I guess it's just been too cold for them to germinate.

We had some of the cassoulet for dinner tonight and the rest is going in the freezer and will help feed DH's old college friend when he comes to visit in mid-April.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2013
5:58 PM

Post #9464382

I should have a lot more going in flats but I just haven't had/made the time. Too much turmoil I suppose.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 28, 2013
4:55 AM

Post #9464688

With a house torn up? I'd think so!!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 28, 2013
5:16 AM

Post #9464702

Husband is gone till Sunday. I'm on vacation from cooking very much!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


March 28, 2013
6:25 AM

Post #9464757

A brisket will simmer all day, then get shredded and made into a heaping pan of beef hash. I haven't made a batch of beef hash in a very long time...when the boys both lived at home and were bottomless pits, it regularly appeared as a weeknight menu item (guess I got burned out on it, but every once in a while, they'll ask for it and I acquiesce.)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
9:52 AM

Post #9464970

Tam, I don't envy you having to do "camp cooking" while renovating, even though you'll love the eventual results.

I rented a huge old house in Asheville when I first moved there. I soon discovered the kitchen had a bad water leak going on for years and even the floor joists were rotted. After just a week of cooking on a hotplate and washing dishes in the bathroom sink, I made an agreement with the next-door neighbor.

She was a very busy real estate agent, divorced, grown kids living out of state, but she loved to eat. Our agreement was that she'd buy all the food (I made the lists), and I'd cook (supper only) and do the clean-up in her kitchen. Turned out to be a win-win situation, but not having my own kitchen for nearly 2 months was a real bear.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2013
10:00 AM

Post #9464974

I would happily swap cooking one night a week with another competent cook, just to get the variety and escape one more staring into the freezer event.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
10:26 AM

Post #9464995

I'm with you on that idea, Sheila!

Speaking of staring into the freezer, I need to do that to find something to cook for tonight...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 28, 2013
11:23 AM

Post #9465041

I struck up that sort of arrangement during Hurricane Ike! My DH and I had 8 HUGE pine trees felled, and spent a week from 7 a.m. until 6 p.m. daily, cutting them up and hauling trash to the front.

My industrious husband broke out this industrial-sized generator, and managed to keep three freezers full of food frozen for 3 weeks. Our neighbors directly across the street lost all their food, but they had gas appliances. I was trying to cook on a one-eye hotplate. Managed to do a whole dinner with that one-eye, too.

But, home girl across the street did NOT like to sweat, so she wasn't about to help with the tree-cutting job. She stayed inside with her emergency air conditioner. But, she DID like to cook!

Soooooooooooooooo...We provided the food, and she cooked it!

Each evening after we'd cleaned up and dressed, we'd walk out our front door and straight across the street into her front door. We walked into a different restaurant adventure each day! Candlelight, mood music, and salads and dinner service that looked like Martha Stewart put them together. And, we were eating off the GOOD china, LOL!

Ike brought many of us neighbors together in very special ways!

Linda

This message was edited Mar 28, 2013 1:47 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
11:28 AM

Post #9465050

Linda, that sounds superb!! Way to go, girl!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2013
11:32 AM

Post #9465055

What a great arrangement. Don't know if I'd want to have a hurricane in order to meet our neighbors.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 28, 2013
12:58 PM

Post #9465125

You, know, Meezersfive, I'm from New Orleans. When I grew up, everybody knew everybody for at least 10 blocks. When we were little and did something wrong away from home, our neighbors could grab us and beat our butts, and then our parents would get home, thank them, and beat our butts again!

We held "suppers" to raise money for relatives and neighbors who fell on hard times. I remember fish fries and card parties in our back yard to help someone raise some rent or bill money.

If you were sick, the neighbors came with soup AND medicine. We played games and ran up and down the street with our friends 'til we were dog tired. We played marbles in the dirt til it got too dark to see, skated on the newly poured concrete pads we could find, climbed trees, and fought, cried, and made up with each other, all in 20 minutes.

Not every place is like that...and, times have truly changed.

Now, people are too busy, distances are too far apart, homes are locked down like Fort Knox fortresses, and, everyone's suspicious of who lives in the house next door. Forget about kids playing together, if there are even kids in households to be played with!

I'm glad I had my time. And my neighbors. And my friends. And my family.

Linda

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
1:21 PM

Post #9465148

Linda, we were neighbors growing up, but living in different states!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
1:23 PM

Post #9465153

Anyone have a really good potato salad recipe, without eggs please, as I'm also making deviled eggs for Easter Dinner.

I haven't made potato salad in many years.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2013
1:52 PM

Post #9465173

Want German? I have a couple of good ones, My basic mayos vary with each version. As in, whatever is in the crisper..I've even thrown in zukes...

I grew up in neighborhoods like that, smaller towns etc. all the way through high school. When I moved after HS to a large city, I was stunned to realize you didn't talk to everyone. This subdivision, after 13 years, I know three neighbors to stop and chat with occasionally. The rest of them are locked in their homes or passing by in their vehicles. We could be dead for days before anyone noticed the mail box overflowing or the pets screaming for food.

However I still chat with people waiting in line, or sitting in a waiting room and if they don't like it they don't have to answer. Surprisingly, many do.

This message was edited Mar 28, 2013 2:54 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 28, 2013
3:29 PM

Post #9465241

Yep...

HAPPY EASTER, EVERYONE!

This message was edited Mar 28, 2013 4:29 PM

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 28, 2013
5:43 PM

Post #9465325

Happy Easter and Passover!

We had London broil, baked potatoes, and oven-roasted brussels sprouts for dinner - all organic. Our supermarket has been offering organic beef from Australia so I tried it. I brushed it with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic powder and coarse salt first, and it was excellent.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 28, 2013
5:52 PM

Post #9465332

We moved the freezer today so I can pull the wall paper out behind it & prep for the work in that area starting next week. The freezer is gonna have a place in the kitchen proper and we'll get a new pantry off the dining room where the freezer was. Leftovers for dinner here. I'm plotting all the meals that require several burners while I have 'em working and then will live out of that freezer for the rest of the reno.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 28, 2013
6:28 PM

Post #9465365

I'm having Chef Keith's fries. A nutritionally deplorable food in every way. Fresh cut, seasoned fries, sprinkled with chopped fresh jalapenos, sliced green onion, diced tomatoes, covered in colby jack cheese (not some canned sauce, actual cheese) and served with a side of homemade chipotle ranch. Because deep fried potatoes covered in cheese don't have enough fat.

Before my next door neighbor moved, we used to both cook enough for both families, and then split the food so we could cook every other night or every third night if we planned for some leftovers. I was so sorry when they moved away!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 29, 2013
11:31 AM

Post #9465939

I hate cooking . I paid my dues . Only enjoy baking pastries but don't unless someone is around to eat them . I have no resistance to sweets , so pretty much don't bake anymore .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2013
12:16 PM

Post #9465969

Oh, I love cooking - and eating! And I almost never bother with pastries except that somehow I have to use up a freezer full of blackberries, blueberries and raspberries!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
12:45 PM

Post #9466008

Most of my cooking is fair-to-middlin' except for breads and pastries. I make good biscotti and scones, but fall short at most of the other baking...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
1:38 PM

Post #9466061

Anyone eat quail or pheasant?

I never have (that I know of) but I'd like to sample some...

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2013
1:47 PM

Post #9466073

I've eaten both but don't remember being especially impressed. In fact I have some quail in the freezer and I should really cook them before they get freezer burn!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2013
4:36 PM

Post #9466212

I love berries in my smoothies! I ran through all that I'd frozen in a couple months and now am buying the frozen organics and they are pricey! I sure hope I find time to pick more raspberries this year.

We did a fridge clean up dinner. Split a pint of beef vegetable soup and the little bit of cabbage & beef. Weird to see how empty the fridge looks.

I love to cook. I love to eat. I would eat sweets / baked goods all day long if I didn't want to live a healthy long life!

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 29, 2013
5:31 PM

Post #9466255

I make a lot of smoothies .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2013
5:36 PM

Post #9466260

Forgive the OT post... but I just had to share a pic of one of my new cabinets. The wall oven/microwave cabinet and pantry in first and the corner cabinet next to the wall oven for cookie sheets & tray storage.

Thumbnail by Tammy   Thumbnail by Tammy         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 30, 2013
4:25 AM

Post #9466499

I picked up my meat package, and it has a cross section of a leg of lamb. How do you cook that? Is it tender enough to roast? If it is, I think a garlic-rosemary-lemon-ish marinade would be good, maybe?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 30, 2013
4:34 AM

Post #9466503

Leg of lamb is quite tender; it's a great cut. You don't need to marinate it, but brushing it with that mixture would be very nice.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 30, 2013
4:47 AM

Post #9466506

Thank you! I am thinking a gremolata with fresh mint, I have many sprouts, I can lose a few for this dish :)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2013
1:11 PM

Post #9466842

I've never seen cross-sections of leg of lamb. Sounds to me like they'd be more like lamb shanks than a leg of lamb (I LOVE leg of lamb!). I do buy lamb shanks occasionally, and cook them in a braise.

I'll have to try a gremolata with fresh mint. I always have plenty of mint from the volunteers in my garden.

Tam, cabinets are looking good. I love having a dedicated space for cookie sheets & trays.

No one responded with a potato salad recipe, so I guess I'll make a hot German potato salad with bacon, and a sweet and sour dressing tomorrow.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2013
1:58 PM

Post #9466892

I did but I guessed you didn't want another German recipe.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 30, 2013
2:59 PM

Post #9466942

I missed the potato salad request, here's mine if it's not too late...


* Exported from MasterCook *

Rosemary New Potato Salad With Roquefort

-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 lbs. new potatoes
1/4 lb. red onions -- minced
1/4 cup plus 1 Tbl. white wine vinegar
1 1/2 tsp. fresh rosemary -- crumbled and
chopped
1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup roquefort or feta cheese
1/4 lb. toasted and largely chopped walnut pieces

Rinse the new potatoes well and place in cold salted water. Bring to boil and boil til tender about 15 minutes. Drain and transfer to a large bowl and toss with 1/4 cup white wine vinegar and rosemary.

Combine the 1 tablespoon vinegar, Dijon and salt and pepper. Whisk or using blender, pour oil in a thin stream to emulsify.

Mix everything together and toss well and serve.

Note: I use more cheese and vinegar than the original recipe calls for.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2013
3:39 PM

Post #9466980

That sounds tasty, and I love rosemary!

I have everything needed, including some feta I made about 2 weeks ago. I need to ask my sister if she likes rosemary, though. My single rosemary plant has grown to almost 2 feet tall, first time one has lived more than one season in our winters... but ALL the growing tips are turning brown lately and I'm afraid it might be toast. Best to use what I can now...

I found a recipe that's a riff on gremolata, using pecans and Parmesan in addition to lemons and parsley. Want it?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 30, 2013
5:15 PM

Post #9467062

Yes, that sounds like it'd go well.

I kill a rosemary every year by bringing it in. My compromise this year is to get a Hill's Hardy rosemary and site it against a warm South wall and see if it'll overwinter well. If callas and cannas do, it *should*.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2013
5:29 PM

Post #9467073

My rosemary is in the best possible spot available here, a rock-walled bed that should retain some heat even though it gets scant winter sun. I've given up on bringing one inside.

Sorry I don't remember where I copied this recipe...

Pecan lemon topping:

A riff off traditional gremolata (parsley and lemon) with a contribution from pesto (nuts and Parmesan cheese). It’s great on pasta, chicken, tomato salad, polenta — you name it.

¾ cup pecans
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese (about 1 ounce)
½ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon peel
1 small garlic clove, minced
½ teaspoon salt

To make the topping: Toast the pecans 5 to 10 minutes, until a shade darker and fragrant (you can do this in the oven).

Pulse them in a food processor until coarsely ground. Add cheese, parsley, half the lemon juice, lemon peel, garlic and salt and process again to mix.

Drizzle some roasted vegetables with remaining olive oil/ lemon juice dressing, and sprinkle topping over vegetables before serving. Serve vegetables warm or at room temperature.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 30, 2013
7:00 PM

Post #9467157

Rosemary Arp is supposed to be the hardiest. I have one in the herb garden and it looks like it's still alive after the winter's stresses. I also have a different variety in a rectangular clay planter, which I bring into the closed-in porch every winter along with parsley and thyme. This year the parsley hung on, although it was never lush, but the thyme succumbed. The rosemary always does well and it's so nice to be able to step out of the kitchen for some fresh rosemary whenever I want it! My outdoor thyme plant often gives me fresh herbs almost throughout the winter, because it gets covered with leaves which protect it. I'm curious to see how that and my chervil withstood the cold. Last year I was very surprised to see the chervil bounce back, green as ever. Now if I only knew what to do with it!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 31, 2013
4:28 AM

Post #9467353

I love chervil--heck I always thought it was an annual!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 31, 2013
5:46 AM

Post #9467406

I think it IS supposed to be an annual, but mine didn't know that. What do you use it for?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 31, 2013
5:58 AM

Post #9467414

I love chervil, it's like mild parsley plus a touch of anise. I cut anise and chervil leaves and toss them in salad, or use them in light soups--like a cream of asparagus soup, or make pasta with butter, poppy seeds, and chervil. You can chop it and add it to biscuits, savory muffins or savory biscotti, too. It has zero flavor dried, so it's always a springtime treat to have chervil and anise.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 31, 2013
6:30 AM

Post #9467447

I don't remember ever having chervil! Gremolata & chervil are now both on my list of "must try" for this spring!

Tam
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

March 31, 2013
6:41 AM

Post #9467465

Darius, we hunted and ate many pheasant when we lived in S.MN. And here in TX quail is on many restaurant menus.

DW often orders the quail, but when 2 or 3 are in the order, I get about 1/2 - lol - wonderful flavor.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 31, 2013
6:43 AM

Post #9467468

Totally try chervil. It reseeds (not in a bad way), so you don't have to replant, it has attractive lacy foliage on a small plant that you can tuck anywhere. Mine fills in around the rocks that line my flower beds.

I forgot to add, it makes good mayo, too. Cucumber sandwiches with chervil and lemon mayo-mmm.

This message was edited Mar 31, 2013 8:44 AM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2013
8:58 AM

Post #9467569

I tried growing some chervil from seed last year. Must have had bad seeds... my thumb isn't very green, but it's not THAT brown either!

Leslie, one of my flat-leaf parsley plants has managed to survive the winter, but just barely. New growth is about 4" tall right now, but I'll need to replant as it is a biennial. I'd love to have fresh herbs growing all winter long but my zone is just too cold and I have no indoor space applicable. I miss fresh thyme a lot.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2013
9:31 AM

Post #9467598

My flat leaf came back two years in succession, planted on the north side of the house, my jaw dropped when I saw it coming up. Rosemary never survives, even though I take it into the garage. I usually have a big planter full of herbs on the deck where I can step out and clip what I want. Might have to try Chervil.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 31, 2013
9:55 AM

Post #9467617

You'll want to plant chervil where you want it to grow, it doesn't like root disturbance.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 31, 2013
12:59 PM

Post #9467759

When I was young married , I used to raise both chukker and bob white quail . We raised phesants too . They are like turkeys , if it rains and they can't get under the mother , they stick the beak straight up and drown .The phesant won't live long in the wild in N Texas where we were .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2013
1:31 PM

Post #9467781

Interesting, Sally. I had no idea pheasants were as dumb as turkeys in the rain.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

March 31, 2013
7:39 PM

Post #9468077

Yep , we went to town and it showered . Got home and had lost all my P's in one pen . 15, I think .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
8:29 AM

Post #9468532

My Easter Dinner was a bust.

I put too much dijon in the deviled eggs, overcooked the potatoes for the potato salad, but at least the ham was okay.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 1, 2013
8:34 AM

Post #9468539

Mine was low-key but okay. Belle stole three deviled eggs and we're all paying the price today. Ugh. We're having leftovers tonight.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 1, 2013
8:57 AM

Post #9468564

Don't feel bad, I'm trying to make English Muffin Bread, the packet of dry yeast which was not even close to expiration wouldn't proof so I got out some frozen fresh yeast and tried that, doesn't look a whole lot better, stirred another packet of dry yeast into the dough and if it doesn't rise this time, it's hitting the trash.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2013
9:20 AM

Post #9468578

Oh dear! Doesn't sound like you all had a very good Easter! My leg of lamb turned out really well; I inserted garlic slivers into the fat, brushed it with mustard and covered it lightly with oil and breadcrumbs and then added some chopped rosemary and some garlic powder. It was delicious. Along with that I had oven-roasted potato wedges and a salad with avocado. No dessert since everyone had plenty of candy!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 1, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9468585

We had a quick-fix afternoon dinner of ham (a pre-sliced one slathered with a dollop of apple butter before I slid it in the oven to bake), homemade mac-n-cheese, deviled eggs, heat-n-serve rolls (WHAT is the world coming to when I let Sister Shubert into my kitchen???) and strawberry shortcake. We were definitely deficient in greens this year - I would have liked some asparagus or fresh peas.or at least a green bean or broccoli dish, but I spent Saturday pulling weeds and barely squeaked in a grocery store run before bedtime that night. The two resident offspring awoke to find their baskets filled with candy. Some things never change.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2013
10:02 AM

Post #9468645

I still do baskets for kids and grandkids, too, although this year I cut back. I used to get them each one or two spring-like tops - Marshall's is always a good source of Ralph Lauren polos at a decent price. But this year I just did some candy, little toys for the toddler, and some eggs that we dyed with sixteen-year-old DGD.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
10:28 AM

Post #9468670

I think the last Easter Basket I ever got was when I was about 7, and living in a foster home in California. My mother and her boyfriend came to visit and brought an Easter Basket that had a Brownie camera nestled in among the edible goodies.

Growing up, we always got new dresses or dressy outfits, hats and short white gloves for Easter. Not much emphasis on candy, thankfully.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2013
2:24 PM

Post #9468920

That sounds like a very nice Easter basket for a seven-year-old. Did you use the camera much?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
2:46 PM

Post #9468936

Darn near wore the camera out before I was 14 and got a new Brownie Hawkeye. LOL. I still love taking photos, but never became much of a photographer.

I guess mothers who put a kid in a foster home try to make up for it in some occasional over-indulgence, and that's the one I remember.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 1, 2013
4:11 PM

Post #9469042

Sad memories . I have a few , but a loving father that thought I hung the moon . He loved cooking for me and provided me with all the watermelon I could eat each summer . My saddest Christmas was when he got me a tree and couldn't buy me more than a plastic whistle to hang on it . I was about seven and even back then , I felt so bad for him .
Having deep fried speckled trout and red fish . I'm trying to get things out of the freezer so I have room to pack the rest in another freezer ( 5 cubic ft) for the trip back to Georgia . I found out a freezer that went on the blink makes the food stay frozen , rather than using coolers .Re purpose

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2013
5:38 PM

Post #9469137

I guess mothers who put their kid in a foster home are feeling pretty guilty. It must have been a lot tougher for you, though.

We had Tuscan sausage with beans and fennel for dinner. The two kids both like it and we had them over tonight. It's a nice meal; served a green salad with avocado along with it. I had some matzoh ball soup that I wanted to use up but it seemed like there was already enough to eat and I didn't want to complicate things anymore!
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
5:44 PM

Post #9469143

Okay, after prime rib, twice baked potatoes, asparagus and banana cream pie over the weekend (Sat. night rather than Sunday) to fit schedules, tonight we are doing shepherd's pie. I thin sliced the remaining rib-eye and froze it and since the day was only 42 degrees and the wind is certainly nippy, we rotated between spring type menus and winter comfort foods. We had friends over the week end before and did the traditional ham, new potatoes and peas..etc. after the last snow storm in March. I think I have some confusion between winter and spring! That is Kansas weather for you.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 2, 2013
4:32 PM

Post #9470073

We had pan-fried wild-caught alaskan salmon & green beans from last years' harvest.

Counting down the days with a working cook top. The estimate is 4/15 they will disconnect the gas and take out the rest of the kitchen. Its exciting to have action here - there is progress in just the two days the crew has been here. Lots of prep work on other areas first so I have the most time with my partial kitchen.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 2, 2013
4:53 PM

Post #9470086

Now reviewing posts since being away I've learned there are others who have not had perfect lives and those with disappointments. I've had a far from a perfect life and a fair share of disappointments. At the end of the day life is a job...vita est lavorum. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AKvRvL5r3A I might as well have been fostered as I was brought up by the help and educated as a social accessory. I'm grateful that I succeeded when considering others I loved and respected did not. That makes it important to me to bring it forward by mentoring.

We are in Miami. The house is still standing. Passover has just ended. I have dinner to celebrate with much bread and pasta but am lobbying for Chinese take in.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 2, 2013
7:15 PM

Post #9470247

Laurel, your characterization of being brought up by the help and educated as a social accessory certainly strikes a chord with me. I'm sure my mother wouldn't have viewed it that way, but it seemed to be what was happening from my standpoint. My mother was always busy playing bridge and I spent a lot of time with the live-in help; also I wasn't supposed to wear glasses because it didn't look pretty on a girl, and I was supposed to attend a playgirl's college and get married after my sophomore year!

We went over to the home of some friends tonight and feasted on fresh shad. I brought ice cream with salty caramel sauce for dessert. Lovely time catching up with them, and at their house our pup is welcome so she was very glad to go visiting too.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 2, 2013
7:16 PM

Post #9470248

Laurel, glad you're back - hope your week was good :-)

Regarding the rosemary - I should share whatever behemoth grows on the west side of our house. I pulled it up when we moved and it has decided it really likes its new home. It has spilled out of the bed and is sprawling over half the sidewalk. Hot and dry or cold and wet, it just gets greener and happier by the month.

Tonight was a beef and mushroom stroganoff over those big chewy pappardelle noodles. The sweet finish was the upside apple pie, which was declared a winner by Mr. Official and Middle Son. (Swimmer Girl is cabin-camping with a group of friends until Thursday, then home in time to wash clothes and repack for a weekend retreat with her church youth group.)

I might just be cajoled into frying catfish before the week is out but tomorrow is a crockpot BBQ chicken dish I've been wanting to try.

My prediction for next week is seafood and plenty of it. We'll be in Myrtle Beach by Sunday evening, and hopefully enjoying some local-caught fare all week long.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 3, 2013
5:24 AM

Post #9470452

Interesting - I was raised by two very "nerdy" academics. Mom wanted her kids to be have all essential life skills (sewing, cooking, typing, cleaning & playing a musical instrument) but she was a far from a socialite as you could be so there was no hope of being a social accessory. And no help in the household. It was a "fend for yourself" environment.

Tonight I'm making some ground beef w/roasted tomato sauce over whole wheat pasta and maybe a side of green beans again. We have a lot of produce from last summer to eat through. :-)

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 3, 2013
5:59 AM

Post #9470490

My mother was 16 when I was born, she wanted a girly baby doll and got me--what a disappointment that must have been. lol I would have been the worst social accessory ever.

I redid roast lamb from Sunday into lamb rogan josh, with some paneer makhani and dal (from the freezer). Made a pilau and a salad of halved cherry tomatoes, sliced Persian cucumbers, mint, cilantro, lime, and ginger.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 3, 2013
7:56 AM

Post #9470593

"Social Accessory"... LOL, that cracked me up!

I need to be chompin' my way through more of the home-canned goods still on the shelf, but Oh... fresh salads! I am SO anticipating the emergence of salad greens around here. (I can forage wild greens from the yard in a few more days, some of the dandelions already have blooms.) There probably won't be tomatoes before July since the ground is/has been so cold.

One of my asparagus beds is alongside the walkway to the house, and I'm eagerly checking it every day now for signs of spear tips emerging. (I should quit looking... all kinds of things happen when we're not looking!) The french sorrel is putting out new growth, and some of my fruiting shrubs have buds!

My neighbor-friend Buster asked me yesterday if he could come and pick a mess of watercress out of the spring overflow "pond". The water from the spring is really, really cold, but clean and clear, and never freezes. I haven't even been over to that part of the yard since Fall, but I need to see how it's doing. I hope there's enough for him, plus some for me to use in a cream of watercress soup. It will grow better if we pick a bunch of it.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 3, 2013
12:28 PM

Post #9470828

I had no idea what watercress was when I moved here. I cleaned out the spring fed pond and it is no more. My neighbor had asked me about it a few years after I'd done this. Oh well. Should probably buy some to get it going again as it is also very clean and never freezes like yours Darius

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 3, 2013
1:36 PM

Post #9470888

Tam, I don't know if it can be reliably transplanted, but I'll ask Buster. If so, maybe I can send you some...

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 3, 2013
2:32 PM

Post #9470932

:-)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 3, 2013
2:40 PM

Post #9470943

Pooh. Buster wasn't home so I let my fingers do some walking on Google.

eHow has a pretty good (basic) post on growing watercress, but the suggestion is to start seeds in the fall and transplant in February-March to a pond or marshy area. The seeds (and the plants when they sprout) have to remain in water.

I think it's probably too late in the season to dig some to send to you. Sorry.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 3, 2013
4:10 PM

Post #9471058

No problem. That's good info on the seeds. I'll have to make a note and get them going next fall! Thanks for the info.

I used up a box of whole wheat shells, a jar of tomato sauce & a pint of my own roasted tomato sauce. It was very good!

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 3, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9471069

When we bought Maypop I went to the local farmer's market and bought a bag of watercress. I tossed it along the spring fed creek that feeds Maypop pond and anchored some among the rocks. It grew for years until several years of drought dried up the spring creek and the watercress died. I've wanted to get some more going and would try finding water cress with roots still attached.

I brought a veggie pot pie from our freezer and have a salad made. Will add hard boiled eggs, olives and marinated artichokes to the salad.

Thanks for the welcome back. :)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 3, 2013
5:54 PM

Post #9471152

I made the crust for a leek and mushroom galette with gorgonzola. We'll have that and a salad Friday, we're having Indian leftovers tomorrow.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 5, 2013
5:24 AM

Post #9472466

I made lentils & rice last night and they were just fabulous! The last batch were awful as I think the onions were going bad. I should have pitched them but tried to peal off the bad parts 'cause I didn't have enough otherwise.

We're having left overs tonight.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2013
5:56 AM

Post #9472492


We had lentils and rice too. I made a curry with yellow lentils, peppers, onions and green beans. We had a salad too. My sister came down from Vero Beach to spend a few days. She is vegan.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 5, 2013
7:10 AM

Post #9472561

Baking the galette now...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 5, 2013
7:29 AM

Post #9472580

the Dukan galette? It's actually kinda ok.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 5, 2013
7:53 AM

Post #9472607

that galette sounds really good to me.

The plan is to take our gas cook top down next week. So it'll be just one burner meals from here on using a caterer's single gas burner a friend loaned us. (Or freezer meals - I've been stocking up so there's a good variety of options there too).

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 5, 2013
8:18 AM

Post #9472641

On the countdown to pull out for Ga home Sat AM . Cooking over for the next few days . Yipppeee ! G G , your rum cake is mellowing in the fridge . Sauce on the side .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 5, 2013
10:44 AM

Post #9472749

LOL!

Don't get all excited, but Wanda and I are loosely plotting a trip to Dahlonega. Very loosely, since I have to clear all kinds of schedules!

But, I'm trying!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2013
4:23 PM

Post #9473031

We will begin our return to Atlanta next Wednesday. Hoping to get up to Maypop and the garden by the coming weekend. Got the house signed with a new agent today after a very bad experience with our last agent. The owner of the company will represent the property.

I took my sister out to lunch for her first time try of roti. She had a veggie roti and I had curried goat. The stuff of dreams! When we were finished eating a man came in the front door, walked over to the table, scooped up our dishes, and asked how everything was. I asked if he was the chef. He said he was the roti baker. This roti shop is Trini (Trinidadian) style. http://www.yelp.com/biz/l-c-roti-shop-miami-gardens Before we left we chatted with the owner, LC, about growing our hot peppers. There's a Jamaican patty shop next door that we like. I'll return in a few days for another roti and maybe patties for the road(i).

Still somewhat full from lunch but there is a lot of food in the fridge needing eating.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 6, 2013
6:03 PM

Post #9474082

Stupid me . Said Sat above , meant Sun . A M
G G , I guess we'll just see you at your house unless you tell me different . We're leaving around 8:oo am in the morning . If we get there first and I don't think we will , we can just wait ,no problem .

This message was edited Apr 6, 2013 8:08 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
1:27 PM

Post #9476298

There's a VERY interesting read in the NYT a day or two ago on spices that has me really re-thinking them. If you like and use spices, you might enjoy the article.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/07/magazine/the-spice-is-right.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20130407&_r=1&

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2013
1:55 PM

Post #9476359

I didn't even want to read that article when I saw it, Darius. I have no chance of getting the fresh, potent spices he talks about, so why make myself dissatisfied with what I've got!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 8, 2013
2:17 PM

Post #9476380

Ok. I read the article. Very informative.

I'd love to use different spices in foods. Soon as I learn to cook more of ya'lls recipes here, I'm sure I'll be visiting the spice mong...er...markets!

LOL!

Hugs!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
2:46 PM

Post #9476415

Leslie, I don't have a snowballs chance in h*** of getting the quality he is able to get, but maybe at some point I can purchase a pittance from him (if he sells to the public) and see how I like them. Most of us may never be able to purchase such fresh and authentic spices as he gets.

I would hope the difference is at least as great as going from "boughten" dried herbs like thyme, to growing and using the real thing... fresh thyme!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 8, 2013
2:56 PM

Post #9476430

I missed that article. Thanks for bringing it to our attention Darius.

We will have a cook top 'til Wed or maybe Thurs and then its life from our makeshift/temporary kitchen.
I'm making another batch of lentils & rice 'cause the last ones were just so good!

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
3:00 PM

Post #9476438

Tam, since you seem to like beans a lot, are you familiar with heirloom arikara beans, or heirloom rockwell beans?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 8, 2013
3:51 PM

Post #9476504

Good article, Darius. I have brought spices home from all over the world and have to say we have a fine selection right in Atlanta. A large Indo-Pak, Asian (Korean, Japanese, Chinese), Eastern European (former Soviet bloc countries) and Caribbean communities keep the flavors flowing. I really don't see how a shop like Penzeys will survive in Atlanta. There is one blocks from our house but with so many ethnic purveyors selling large quantities of very fresh spices they can't possibly compete with selection or freshness. I know you have fond memories of the Dekalb International Market. That is one of many options today and not necessarily the best.

For peppers I usually have four or more kinds of whole peppercorns and grind them as I use them in a mortar; Tellicherry, Malabar, green, white and pink (which is really not a pepper and I use whole). For general use I keep Tellicherry course ground on hand. I've met many people who don't like black pepper. If it's ground instead of cracked or course and comes from that big company carried in your favorite grocery store I can understand why. Ground pepper tastes like dirt. It may mostly be dirt since the mass produced berries are harvested and left by the side of roads for later processing. Varietal paprikas are important in my cooking too. You know the Spanish smoked I sent you and then there is the hot Spanish smoked, the hot or sweet Hungarian and the various Mexican chilies that are smoked and ground. Salt...I love cooking with and getting special salts as a gift. We love our spices! I buy most whole and make mixes for everything from chai spices for iced tea blends to blends for Latin-style yellow rice dishes. BTW, excellent, fresh whole Tellicherry peppercorns are available at most Costcos in bulk.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 8, 2013
4:05 PM

Post #9476521

I'm a relative newby to spices. Growing up, it was salt & pepper but we never really used the pepper. lol

And same for beans Darius! Nope - have not had either of those beans.

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
4:11 PM

Post #9476528

Laurel, Tellicherry are my favorite peppercorns, and the ones I use the most. I love them! I do use a few other peppercorns, but one of my grinders stays full of Tellicherry peppercorns. I just took 30 pounds of bacon out of the curing containers. One piece of about 3 pounds was cured with lots of herbs, garlic, and freshly-ground Tellicherry pepper. It should be great in beans, soups and stews.

I'm not nearly as familiar with paprikas as you are, but I'm slowly learning a little bit. I'll never be as adept as you, though. Impossible at my age to replicate your many, many years' experience with various cuisines.

My digestive system doesn't do heat well at all, so sometimes I don't experiment when I probably should.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 8, 2013
4:28 PM

Post #9476551

I met my future MIL when I was a late teen and used to cook for future SO's family. She thought it funny that I would wave my hands from the pots to my nose. I was not aware I was doing it but it was/is something I do every time I approach a pot; lift the lid and wave the smells toward my nose. Tasting is important but I can tell a lot about what's going on before I taste. A physician friend has argued with me that humans can't smell salt. It can't be true. I can smell the salty ocean very far away and smell the salt in food. I can tell as soon as the food hits the table if it's been over salted but not if there is too little. I can tell many different kinds of salt and can no longer eat commercially fine grained salt like Morton's. It is way too salty for me compared to sea salts or kosher salt.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2013
5:05 PM

Post #9476607

I use Kosher salt at the table and for much of my cooking, and sea salt and various peppercorns also. People used to think I was strange having so many different salts and peppers and vinegars and such but I may have been ahead of my time. I am very pleased with Penzey's products, Bill shops all over the world himself to buy the best of what he can find. They offer many benefits that Asian markets don't, free samples regularly in good size containers, and I've never been disappointed in any of their herbs or spices. And their turnover is rapid enough that nothing sits on the shelves or in the warehouse for long. They may not survive in Atlanta, but they are going gangbusters everywhere else.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 8, 2013
5:17 PM

Post #9476619

We don't use much salt at all, and I almost can't use store-bought spice mixtures, because of too much salt. I make my own rubs and marinades, as well as salad dressings, etc. because of our dislike of strong salt taste. Tonight I made a pork tenderloin that my wonderful husband grilled, and we had a black bean, mango and quinoa salad with it. Recipe from Skinnytaste.com

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 8, 2013
5:22 PM

Post #9476624

I used two huge vidalia onions for the lentils & rice and oh it was so sweet! I was a little heavy with the cayenne but thankfully I can handle the heat. :-)

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
5:50 PM

Post #9476658

I had oven-baked BBQ ribs and a couple of steamed veggie sides (spinach, and baby carrots), plus some so-so herb and garlic focaccia bread sticks. Middlin' but not great.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
7:02 PM

Post #9476716

Cream of mushroom soup tonight, (needed to use the mushrooms) and fresh loaf of homemade bread. Have a rack of baby back ribs, but if we get the "April" snow mid week, they may be around for several days before we fire up the grill. Found a different recipe for shrimp and grits that we will try this week some time. I find the "spice" information interesting, here in the mid-west the spices come from those who ship from other parts of the US, the nearest we have is Penzey's in Kansas City.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2013
7:14 PM

Post #9476730

Penzey's does mail order, you can go to their website and then also get the magazine which is free and often has a coupon for a free or discount sample.

The first time I saw one of those little packets of spices, maybe Durkee's??, which has a mix of spices in separate little compartments at a hefty price for what you get, I thought "What???" Enough to make one dish ...is this what passes for cooking these days?? If it's not prepackaged or measured out, or you just add water, nobody wants to cook?

I still do the hand wave to pick up the aromas of what I'm cooking. The nose knows. I can smell sugar, salt, and lots of other things in the supermarket and I don't think I have a particularly sensitive nose but those are distinct to me. I avoid the powdered detergent area...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 8, 2013
7:20 PM

Post #9476742

I buy sea salt in 100 lb. bags, so I use mostly sea salt. I love smoked salt!

I have several vinegars, oils, flours, and peppers. Not everyone thinks it is normal, but I know you guys will understand why you need self-rising, all purpose, whole wheat, and cake flour.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
8:06 PM

Post #9476818

Where do you get sea salt in 100# bags? I really like the Sel Gris From Guerande, Brittany as a finishing salt.

I keep around 25-30# or so each of salt and cane sugar on hand, plus a smaller assortment of brown and confectioners sugars... and a good bit of molasses and local honey. The salt I store is just iodized salt, which I use mostly in charcuterie. I'd like to store more of the salts I use in cooking and finishing but they are SO expensive.

Just 25 miles from me is a town named Saltville, and they supplied the Confederate Army with salt from ancient deposits, despite frequent battles with the Union Army for control. They are now defunct and I don't know if the deposits ran out, or it just wasn't economically feasible to continue.

Celene, I probably have 20+ kinds of vinegar on my shelves. Not so much in flours as I don't bake much anymore,








Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 9, 2013
4:23 AM

Post #9477047

I get sea salt from our local Korean store. It's perfectly regular, chunky crystals and bright white. I use it for bath salts and food.

Vinegars: ACV, balsamic, white balsamic, champagne, red wine, and rice wine. I have flavored ACV in lemon, raspberry, and hot pepper.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 9, 2013
4:26 AM

Post #9477051

I haven't used iodized salt in years; I keep fine sea salt in a little ceramic lidded box that I made, so it's handy when a recipe calls for a pinch or a teaspoonful. How do you use Guérande salt for finishing? I've never done that, but I have several small boxes of it from visits to France.

I've been raking the leaves out of my herb garden to see what's survived. I still have rosemary and parsley that overwintered on the porch, but the thyme I had in that planter died. I'm hoping that the outside plant will revive!

Did you all know that raw sugar and raw honey are alkaline, compared to the regular kind? They don't seem to sweeten quite as much but I use them for my tea because it's hard to find other alkaline foods to balance your system.

Last night I made the lamb merguez sausage and couscous dish for some friends; their enthusiasm was very heart-warming!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 9, 2013
5:06 AM

Post #9477080

I have a veritable flour collection! I keep it in the small freezer above my seed & bulb fridge. All sorts of flours, including teff, almond, pecan, whole wheat: pastry, AP & bread, white pastry, AP & bread and a few other specials. And I don't bake all that much - its just nice to have all those options for when the mood hits.

Tam

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 9, 2013
9:08 AM

Post #9477446

I cooked 4 lbs. of Camelia Brand RED KIDNEY BEANS with sausage for my class last night. Cooked 3 lbs. of long-grained white rice. Should 'a went ahead and cooked up some plantains or fried bananas on the side, but, no time.

Most of them managed to stay awake, and I heard someone mention bringing his own Tupperware to class next week...

Long time since I had cooked red beans from scratch, and, seems like I haven't lost my touch!

Hugs!

Maybe spaghetti and meat sauce next week -- WITH the fried bananas...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 9, 2013
9:45 AM

Post #9477497

I have a salt grinder filled with the salt from Guerande that I keep handy to add a grind on top of anything on my plate that needs a touch. Occasionally I'll add some without grinding it... it's rather chunky and looks pretty on things like sliced tomatoes.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 11, 2013
7:10 PM

Post #9480715

I found a good website for some new, fresh recipes, and I have tried several, and been very pleased. It is Skinnytaste.com

Just thought someone else might like to check it out!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 12, 2013
5:04 AM

Post #9481010

Thanks Happytail - it does look interesting.

I'm now working in our temporary kitchen. It'll be freezer diving for us for a couple months. Or slow cooker & very simple meals in toaster oven / single burner.

Tam

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2013
7:37 AM

Post #9481172

I am just LOVING these Avatars! LOL!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 12, 2013
8:11 PM

Post #9482037

I had jalapeno and cilantro hummus with triscuits, and a big side of shkug.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
5:05 AM

Post #9482176

I made corned beef and cabbage, with potatoes and carrots, in the crockpot. I got two nitrate-free corned beefs at Trader Joe's, but when I cooked the first one I left all of the peppercorns and other spices in the liquid, as the package advised, and they were a real pain in the neck when we were eating it. So this time we rinsed them off before I put the meat in the crockpot and it was a much better experience. DS called yesterday morning and asked if he could bring littlest DGD over for dinner. I was getting ready to leave for a meeting an hour away but I raced around and stuck the meat in the crockpot so it could cook while I was gone. Then when I got back at 1 I took it out and sliced it, and then added the veggies. That worked out very well. I've found if I wait until it's done to slice it, it shreds terribly.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
7:17 AM

Post #9482322

I drove up to Roanoke yesterday to trade plants (I got cipollini onion starts, far too many) with a DG friend, and we went to a lovely little gourmet place for lunch. First time in a long time that I've had difficulty in choosing, but it was an extensive menu (just the lunch menu). I ended up with fried NC oysters. Turned out not to be the best choice as they were heavily breaded, although jumbo size even after I took off most of the breading. Tasty though.

After lunch we went to one of her favorite nurseries and I picked up a couple of thyme plants. Mine seldom make it through the winter here. Most of their herbs were not put out yet because the weather has been so iffy.

I brought home some really great looking greens from The Fresh Market in Roanoke (like a smaller Whole Foods): lacinto kale and some rapini (broccoli rabe) plus a sourdough boule. Oh... and some baby zucchini about 3½" long! Then I stopped in the Asian market in Blacksburg on the way home and picked up a bunch of pea shoots to go in a salad with some avocado and goat cheese. That market carries a lot of local organic veggies and grass-fed meats.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
7:29 AM

Post #9482339

What a great day, Darius!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
8:22 AM

Post #9482375

Yep, it was a good day, and I needed it after another hospital stay last week.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
9:04 AM

Post #9482413

Oh no. Did they ever figure out what's going on?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
9:11 AM

Post #9482417

Not yet. I had high ammonia levels in the blood this time, but they also found a lesion on my left kidney and a growth on my pancreas. I'll have an MRI soon to get better definition of them.

Getting old is the pits.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
9:53 AM

Post #9482444

Yes, it is, but it's better than the alternative. Hope the MRI gives you some good news...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 13, 2013
10:42 AM

Post #9482500

Homemade pastrami and cole slaw. I'll have some spinach and garbanzo patties.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 13, 2013
10:54 AM

Post #9482513

Mexican restaurant tonight with my step kids and grand kids . I love those kids of Johnnys . They always treat me like blood .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 13, 2013
11:00 AM

Post #9482519

Darius - there's a good recipe for a broccoli rabe pesto with pistaschios on pasta on Fine Cooking site. I froze part of it and it wonderful the second time around as well.

I've got peppers & tomatoes germinating. Transplanted a few more today. Its still way too wet to plant anything more though I did get some cipollini onions in last weekend.-i

Went to a somewhat new little hole-in-the wall Mediterranean restaurant for lunch yesterday. The cauliflower wrap was to die for! Great menu. Definitely heading back there again.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
1:52 PM

Post #9482687

Thanks, Tam. I didn't find that recipe, but did find many others, including a few from Bone Up and Eat...

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 13, 2013
3:15 PM

Post #9482759

One last night to enjoy fresh seafood before we head back to Tennessee. It's been a wonderful week in SC but our children are all getting a little anxious, wondering if we are coming home this time, or if we are just going to stay here *grin*. I'll start a new thread for us on Monday when I'm back at my actual desk :-).

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
4:05 PM

Post #9482802

Whew, doubt I'll want any supper. The recent Arby's ads for Reubens have hooked me into having a Reuben again (it's been years), and the Amish Pantry in Rural Retreat makes a GREAT Reuben so I got one this afternoon. It's large enough for 2 meals, and quite tasty!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 13, 2013
4:42 PM

Post #9482850

I'm a bit out of sync but so happy to be home I can't express. We traveled down and back with food in tow and are trying to create meals from what's on hand rather than create compost. It would be great to purge the current contents of the fridge and move on to the farmer's market.

I will be putting in the first twenty tomatoes this week. Our temps are good. I planted a bunch of greens before we left for Miami. Will see if the deer stayed away when we return. I also have red and green cabbage seedlings and broccoli to plant out. It will be a very busy few weeks.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
5:23 PM

Post #9482886

Laurel, I'm a bit behind you in planting... zonal differences. I did manage to get some seeds into flats today: 4 kinds of beans, and both yellow and zuke summer squash.

The DG friend I meet up in Roanoke gave me some seeds last month of a black KY Wonder pole bean. I'd never seen them. I also sowed some scarlet runners on my tall trellis just for the color.

Many more seeds to start, but when I opened the box for the small GH a friend gave me last year, there were a zillion parts and NO directions (nor fasteners). I'll figure it out, but it's just frustrating how little attention companies give to their products.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 13, 2013
6:11 PM

Post #9482925

Dinner at Indigo's Coastal Shanty, in downtown Brunswick. Outstanding! I had Sesame Catfish with Isla Coleslaw and rice, homemade tartar sauce, and a plum wine sauce. Hubby had MahiMahi with black beans, corn cakes and pica de gallo. I love that place!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
7:01 PM

Post #9483007

Gads, I haven't had a meal in Brunswick for more than 30 years although I drove through it often before I-95 was finished. Lovely town.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 14, 2013
3:23 PM

Post #9483842

And tonight, I'm smoking some tuna to sear on the grill, and serving with a spinach, avocado and grapefruit salad with citrus vinegarette.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 14, 2013
4:23 PM

Post #9483915

Ooh that sounds good!

I had some pasta made with my roasted tomato sauce & the beef I got from a family friend (grass fed / hormone free). From the freezer.

Tam

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 14, 2013
4:36 PM

Post #9483932

I've been working today (Ace Garden Center) and straightening the herb table, and smelling the different basil, I was thinking how good spaghetti would be!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 14, 2013
5:36 PM

Post #9484014

I took my 80 year old aunt to an Indian buffet for lunch, then worked in the yard all day, so I had a BLT&A for dinner. Veggie bacon ;)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 14, 2013
6:02 PM

Post #9484054

Do I even want to know what "veggie bacon" is??

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 14, 2013
6:31 PM

Post #9484094

It's TVP, I like Morningstar brand. My husband calls it Beggin' Strips.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 14, 2013
7:12 PM

Post #9484159

I came home with a yummy-sounding assortment of tomato plugs to get planted next weekend. Hoping the weather cooperates so we can get them in on Saturday...and hoping I keep them watered and healthy until then!
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

April 15, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9484853

Went to King's Biergarten in Pearland on Sunday. Was surprised to discover it was their 2nd anniversary - German bands we knew were playing, beer prices were reduced and all menu food items were half-price. Had a great time and wonderful food.

Plan on going back this evening for the Ham Shank dinner for 2 - the sign quoted $15 on Monday.

Saw one served while we were there - already salivating thinking about it.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 15, 2013
10:08 AM

Post #9484894

I made a blackeyed pea salad and SO is going to grill fresh veggies. There will be cornmeal crusted talapia with that. I dip the fish in yogurt first. It does the same thing as buttermilk. Lots of veggies in salads, soups and lighter fare is welcome after being away these last weeks.

Personally I'd rather not eat flesh foods than eat soy foods made to look like flesh foods. My sister lives on fake eggs, cheese, hot dogs, shrimp, poultry, etc.. She's vegan because of animal rights issues and doesn't really care about the health component of her diet. Juicing is another thing I don't get. If concentrating fructose and other foods is bad for you, and I believe it is, why is concentrating vegetable juice and throwing out the roughage good? I've heard the arguments but I'd rather eat whole foods thanks.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2013
10:40 AM

Post #9484940

I eat fake meat occasionally, but for the most part, I'd rather eat a vegetarian dish that is genuinely good on its own instead. Every now and again, I do like the veggie bacon or veggie hot dogs. For me, not eating meat is moral, but I am not one of "those" vegetarians.

This message was edited Apr 15, 2013 12:40 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
11:05 AM

Post #9484986

Don't these look good? (Fresh pea shoots)

Thumbnail by darius
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 15, 2013
11:51 AM

Post #9485047

Laurel - I was with you on juicing until I read recently about how nutrients are released when cell walls are broken down and mixed in... can't recall the whole deal but for veggies like kale & other greens, bruising or juicing increases the amount of nutrients available/absorb-able.

We have a completely clear first floor now. They jack hammered out the tile after pulling the sink & its cabinet. All deconstruction is complete and its all construction from here on. I may have fried eggs & toast for dinner. I pulled some cabbage & beef (with my roasted tomato sauce) from teh freezer but we have a lot of eggs and I'm in the mood for the nice runny yolks on toast.

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
12:18 PM

Post #9485077

Oooh, runny yolks on toast sound delish!

I need to get back into some creative meals, but for now my docs have me on a plan with tons of greens (spinach, kale, etc,) to help my low red blood cell count. The other item is grass-fed meats and I'm limited because of chewing ability to mostly ground meats... or long, slow cooked meats that are tender. Those slow cooked meats mean planing ahead.

I do a little juicing, and probably should do more since my chewing ability is so poor. I seldom juice things high in sugars (like carrots and fruits), though.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 15, 2013
1:05 PM

Post #9485131

Nutribullet...started using it last Tuesday...

lovin' it...

and, I WILL be growing my own kale and arugula from now until I die!

'nuff said...

http://www.nutribullet.com/


darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
5:15 PM

Post #9485259

I want to start growing some arugula, but haven't found any seeds (nor starter plants) locally. I did buy two 4-paks of lacinto kale on Saturday. Just need to get the garden tilled.

edited for a typo

This message was edited Apr 15, 2013 8:15 PM

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 15, 2013
5:20 PM

Post #9485266

Angus Beef patty melts on pumpernickel rye, Trader Joe's Garlic Fries, Tossed salad with pumpkin seeds and artichoke hearts.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 15, 2013
5:45 PM

Post #9485294

Our garden has included arugula for over twenty years. Once you plant it you can't get rid of it. Darius, get some seed now and just broadcast. You will have it forever. We have grown kale for even longer. I remember having to order from specialty companies to get kale seed and it was described as an exotic European vegetable.

Darius, love your right to the left avatar though I reserve the right and left to agree/disagree.

The resolution on the avatars is awful. I'm not doing it until that's fixed.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
6:24 PM

Post #9485354

Laurel, I think lots of folks still consider kale to be exotic!

I just took the stems out of a bunch of kale (lacinto), and soaked them in icy water to revive them just a touch. I'll sauté them tomorrow, probably in coconut oil with shallots and a touch of garlic.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2013
6:33 PM

Post #9485366

I'm in a kale-coleslaw phase. Laurel, does the arugula and the kale reseed for you? I generally don't let it go to seed, I might if it'd reseed. Cilantro certainly does!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 15, 2013
6:50 PM

Post #9485392

Celene, kale is good to save seed if you can assure purity but I don't go for reseed because I grow a lot of crossover greens. However, arugula readily reseeds. I let it flower (the flowers are white and look like mustards). I harvest the flower stalks and let them spend time drying in a hollowed log as a dried arrangement. I can winnow the seed and leave the stalks strewn where I want it to grow and still have tons from the scrap stalks. The remaining seed allows me to broadcast throughout the cooler planting months. The later planted seed delays flowering by many weeks and allows for a later harvest. Arugula is very temp controlled so once the heat ramps up there is no way to delay flowering but later planted seed will delay flowering by three or four weeks. It is more heat tolerant than cilantro but grows in a similar fashion.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2013
7:13 PM

Post #9485425

I will let some go to seed and see how it goes. I'm more of a "rattle those seed pods over the row" kinda gardener, I'm excited to see if they overwinter. I grow too many plants in the kale family, I agree that they'd probably cross.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2013
4:00 AM

Post #9485662

Try reloading your avatar; the tech department supposedly fixed it so that it can be rendered more clearly. My computer's on the fritz; I'll try that when it's back up.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 16, 2013
6:41 AM

Post #9485813

Tonight is Pork Chops in a Dijon Herb Sauce, and a salad with spinach, butternut squash, dried cherries, Gorgonzola and pumpkin seeds. Yummy!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 16, 2013
6:58 AM

Post #9485827

That sounds like a fantastic salad! Is the squash warm or cold?

I made honey mustard salmon, mixed rice and grain pilaf with goji raisins and pumpkin seeds, and roasted vegetables.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2013
9:50 AM

Post #9486036

Leslie, I saw your much too cute cupcakes in a notification from Facebook. Thankfully they enclosed a photo, since I refuse to go to Facebook. (It sucks the energy right out of me.)

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 16, 2013
12:02 PM

Post #9486165

Last night we had pasta alla vodka, green beans and garlic-buttered toasted French baguette rounds - it was a quick (and somber) meal after a late afternoon of gardening, and we kept the tv on to catch up on the bombing news, since none of us knew much about it.

Tonight is looking like meatloaf meets Salisbury steak, with the obligatory mashed potatoes and a veggie on the side. If I really get motivated, I might throw in some banana bread bars with browned butter frosting for dessert.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2013
12:21 PM

Post #9486177

Darius, that's one good thing about Facebook. I loved that picture because the dog is a lot like mine except that mine is black; those cupcakes looked yummy, too.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9486244

Well pooh, Leslie. I thought they were YOUR cupcakes!

My supper will be some sautéed kale and a burger patty. Maybe some sweet potato fries if the SP's are still good in storage. I have a new bag of Charleston Gold Rice, gift from a friend, but it needs something other than a burger with it.

My sis is off tomorrow and we have planned a trip to visit an antique/junk shop in the middle of Nowhere (Mouth of Wilson, VA), then a cheese factory across the line a few miles into NC for fresh cheese curds (I hope they squeak like fresh ones from Wisconsin do), and then a couple of fabric outlets back 2 hours north, into VA. We'll pass by an award-winning artisan cheesemaker in Galax, VA but I just found they only have fresh cheese June-October, so we won't stop. Rats.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 16, 2013
2:45 PM

Post #9486339

Celene, the squash is cooled to room temp.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2013
5:43 PM

Post #9486530

Nope, can't take credit for those cupcakes!

We had the three-year-old and the sixteen-year-old DGDs over for the afternoon and dinner tonight, so I made tortellini with pesto and a big green salad for dinner, with leftover blackberry pie with crème fraîche topping for dessert.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 17, 2013
3:11 PM

Post #9487650

We've been in and out of the garden all day. The out part is because we are in terrible gardening shape and had to keep taking breaks. At several points I came in and sprawled on the floor. Pitiful. The first of the tomatoes went in and all the red and green cabbage seedlings. The kale is up and looking good. I seeded in more chard. Carrots are sprouting. Young arugula can be picked. I'll thin pea sprouts and greens tomorrow for a crossover chicken soup/pho. I planted radishes before we went to Miami. There were eight or ten marble-sized ones for our salad tonight. We planned a nice fire in the fire pit and were going to cook salmon over a wood fire but weird weather has moved in with big thunder boomers. While imbibing in a little liquid pain reliever I'll rethink the dinner plan.

I have arugula from last fall going to seed now as well as new spring seedlings. Meant to take photos for those interested. Will try to get some shots tomorrow.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 17, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9487743

I checked my garden - I need to spend days to get it ready to plant!

The kale from last year is sprouting from the stubbles of last year. Onions & Garlic look good. No signs of asparagus at all! I have a lot of tomato & peppers going in the greenhouse. Tomorrow I'll bring some bales of potting soil & grow bags for the kids at the Allentown middle school garden club. We're going to try growing potatoes in grow bags, hale bales and the garden.

We had chili for dinner.
Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 17, 2013
4:31 PM

Post #9487786

Think I'll have leftover stew for me, and D H said he'd eat a Subway sandwich ,he had the other half for lunch while we were burning pine tops .BLT .

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

April 17, 2013
4:32 PM

Post #9487789

Chicken tacos.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 17, 2013
6:04 PM

Post #9487882

Tonight I had a hummus wrap. I am making turkey smoked sausage with mac and cheese and a side of steamed cauliflower. I will cut up a big bowl of fruit for dessert.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 18, 2013
6:39 AM

Post #9488335

I didn't get any supper last night, just a couple pieces of cheese and a slice of sourdough, and then conked out about 7:30. Slept 13 hours.

My sis and did a very long jaunt all over the mountains yesterday, first down to NC to a cheese factory (with typical factory cheese), then back up to VA through Galax. The artisinal cheese dairy (Meadow Creek Dairy) doesn't sell their national award-winning cheese until the summer months (when it's made using milk from their grass-fed Jersey cows) so we didn't try to stop there.

Hit 2 fabric stores 50-75 miles apart. First one was an outlet for fabric and pottery along the interstate... junk. The 2nd one was one in Floyd I had driven by many times but never stopped, and it turned out to be a real find (for this area at least, but certainly not haute couture fabrics). I'd guess we drove around 250 miles, maybe even 300.

Night before last, I sautéed some lacinto kale with shallots as a side dish, but it was tough even with the ribs removed. I think I'll make the rest of it into kale chips. Looking forward to fresh pea shoots with goat cheese tonight, and I think I still have a small piece of ham steak in the freezer. It will have to suffice.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 18, 2013
3:43 PM

Post #9488876

The weather turned foul last night. We thought all gardening plans were quashed but it cleared this morning. While we were running garden errands and enjoying a drive on our country roads, the spring breezes dried the garden out nicely. I was back to planting by noon. The first round of tomatoes are in; all twenty three. I got beets planted, weeded the carrot seedlings and transplanted cucumber seedlings that are popping up everywhere. No need to start anew. Unfortunately the weather is not to hold so this may be it for this trip. Very disappointed since we were originally supposed to have a week of good weather.

We are going to throw the two salmon fillets that did not get cooked onto the grill tonight. I jerked it with some of our homemade jerk sauce. I'm making smashed garlicky potatoes with garden parsley and topped with grilled onions. Lots of parsley has overwintered. A salad with more radishes from the garden and there is now enough arugula to start picking.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 18, 2013
5:37 PM

Post #9489017

We were supposed to have a nice day today and the rain tomorrow. Came early!

Dinner from the freezer tonight was summer vegetable pasta. DH is having beef stew.

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 18, 2013
6:02 PM

Post #9489042

Wild-caught salmon filets with a light herb-cream sauce, and a couple of mixed vegetable sides.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2013
7:35 PM

Post #9489130

Oh, that sauce sounds good! How did you make it? We had wild-caught salmon, too, but I just cooked it in foil with a bit of butter and teriyaki sauce. Along with that we had baked potatoes and peas from last year's garden. I love salmon but I'd also like some better recipes for it.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 18, 2013
8:15 PM

Post #9489162

GG, it was a throw-together: a couple tablespoons of butter with a dash of lemon juice and white wine (probably a tablespoon each - feel free to more if you want a little more lemon or tang from the wine.)

I tossed in a handful (probably 1/8 of a cup) of Parmesan, let it melt, then stirred in a tablespoon or so of flour, a bit of dried dill, a little dried basil and a little parsley. Let that bubble a bit then add half and half until I got the consistency I wanted, which was thick enough to not slide off the filets, but thin enough to pour.

Your mileage may vary. If had had fresh herbs at my disposal, I would have used them :-)

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 19, 2013
3:50 AM

Post #9489287

That sounds really nice; I'll have to try it. I like the addition of the cheese.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 19, 2013
9:35 AM

Post #9489605

Uh, ya'll, do NOT buy a Nutribullet...

Read the reviews on the Nutribullet.com website...you stand a better chance of getting an audience with the new Pope than you do getting the customer service line to answer -- EVER!

Don't get me wrong. I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE my Nutribullet. It's just that, according to the reviews I've read (after the fact), it will not last me more than 6 mos. to a year, if that long. And, even though I bought the 26-year extended warranty that guarantees a replacement if ANYTHING goes wrong with it, Customer Service will NEVER, EVER, answer the phone so I can file a claim.

Very bad online business... Be forewarned.

buy a Ninga instead...

Hugs!

Linda

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 19, 2013
9:36 AM

Post #9489609

It added a little different texture and flavor - we liked it :-)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 19, 2013
10:03 AM

Post #9489636

After checking all the ninjas , I bought the one on T V . more horspower and 1500 kw . I am so happy with it .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 19, 2013
10:07 AM

Post #9489641

Sally,
You have a NINJA???!!!! Wow!

Which model number?
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 19, 2013
11:26 AM

Post #9489691

It's the Mega Kitchen System 1500. It cost the same as the 1200 in the Wal Mart , plus shipping . I looked everywhere for the 1200 and found it in W M . Then went to the advertised one on T V and it's stronger and has more "stuff" . for use . Even a dough blade .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 19, 2013
12:02 PM

Post #9489721

Consumer Reports really liked one of the Ninjas; it was a best buy.

We had moules and frites for lunch today. The supermarket had mussels on sale and they looked good so I bought a bag. And I made oven-fried potatoes with them. I wish I knew how to stop the potatoes from sticking to the aluminum foil, though. I brushed them with olive oil but some still stuck.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 19, 2013
12:10 PM

Post #9489729

I bought a box (18 pcs) of Champagne Mangoes (Ataulfo variety) yesterday, and I'm busy peeling and slicing a few at a time to freeze. My freezers are so full that I can only get 1 cookie sheet in at a time.
http://www.champagnemango.com/

They taste mostly like a Florida mango with some lime juice on them.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 19, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9489813

Never heard of those but they sound wonderful!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 19, 2013
1:57 PM

Post #9489831

I've had that freezer problem often, Darius.

The rain has stopped and it's now cooling off. I'm making a creamy potato, carrot and fennel soup topped with cheddar. It's great how long fennel bulbs store 'cause this one was accidentally left here five weeks ago and still looks perfect.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 19, 2013
4:03 PM

Post #9489970

I take C Report too . It was a blender that they reported . It's built into the system I got . Makes sno cones out of ice cubes .
Had ho made chicken strips with cream gravy to dip in and found some corn on cob in freezer . My dil furnished us with her perfect biscuits a few days ago , so I rescued them from the freezer also. Garden salad with three lettuces , dried dates , pecans ,frozen english peas, cranberries , carrots, grated squash and poppy seed dressing.Johnny ate some of everything . I'll have the salad again tomorrow and add some diced chicken .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 19, 2013
4:13 PM

Post #9489980

Okay. No comment on anything ho made , especially strips, but this must be a kitchen inspiration.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 19, 2013
4:17 PM

Post #9489985

LOL Laurel!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 19, 2013
4:17 PM

Post #9489987

New thread here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1308241/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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