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Vegetable Gardening: Spring planting

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Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 38, Views: 338
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nancynursez637
Madras, OR

March 24, 2013
10:28 PM

Post #9460837

It is early for our area, but the weeds are way ahead of schedule, so I was tempted to plant snow peas and carrots today. The carrot decision was made as I drove back from a neighboring community, and saw all teh commercial carrot seed farms already sprouted. They cover the male carrots with row cover then seed the crop. When the crop sprouts then they uncover the male pollinators. So if their stuff is doing well, I am hopeful, but I saved back enough see just in case.

The snow peas, that went to seed last year, actually sprouted this year and so I figured I could do the first planting of those,. I plant those along the fence lines, every two weeks all summer until the farmers markets are over. They are real popular.

The rest of the beds are close to being ready, after being broadforked, and minerals added.
Have 250 tomatoes of various varieties started and up in the greenhouse, so the should be good size in 2 months when the market starts again.

Do any of you wrap your trees for winter, (fruit trees) to prevent winter damage? This is my second year of doing that after losing a few trees to freezing and thawing. The bark cracked badly and the trees died. So far last two years things are looking up
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 26, 2013
7:54 AM

Post #9462405

That is a good point about the bark cracking after thaws and freezes. I did loose a few apple trees and wondered what it did wrong, but now that you mention it--that is exactly what happened. I think i will start looking at wraping the trunks in late fall (after first freeze?).

I've planted English peas in winter during a warm spell, they've sprouted and then snow flew. They did fine as long as they was just flurries and the temps didn't go too low.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 26, 2013
8:42 AM

Post #9462482

English peas handle the cold temps fine but once they start to set fruit be sure to pick them before frosts. The fruit is still edible but it gets freezer burned.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 27, 2013
4:53 AM

Post #9463546

Humph, I planted my English peas in the beginning of March and they're not even up yet!

We used to wrap our fig trees but it's a huge hassle so we're trying to avoid it. We put up a wall on their northern side and we're hoping that will protect them. The winters have been fairly mild and last year they did well, but of course we don't know how they'll be this year.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 27, 2013
5:18 AM

Post #9463575

Yeah, peas are reluctant to sprout and grow when it's cold, but once they are up they are fine in the cold.

Usually I'd be eating peas by this time, but I think the biggest plants I have at just a few inches tall. We just haven't had our normal warm spells to give them a change to grow and flower.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2013
11:56 AM

Post #9463949

I just planted some peas on March 21st. It was cold but now it should warm up some. Plus I have lots more peas to plant and will be planting by the end of the week.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 27, 2013
12:06 PM

Post #9463955

I sowed English peas on March 11th. They sprouted March 25th. They're under hoops and remay this year in the hopes the birds don't eat them.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 27, 2013
3:17 PM

Post #9464195

That's an interesting point I have found many plants need a high temp. to germinate but not to grow. What month is it anyway? Lol
grits74571
Talihina, OK

March 27, 2013
6:46 PM

Post #9464444

I had 5 peas come up from volunteer seed in other words I don't have a clue where they may have been hiding so I took that as a sign that it was the right time to plant peas seems to have worked out ok ,I then plant some sugar snaps (cascadia) anyone ever heard of that variety what ever they all are up

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2013
6:56 PM

Post #9464449

I have some Cascadia seeds but haven't planted them as yet. I grew some last fall also, nice sugar snap peas.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

March 27, 2013
10:21 PM

Post #9464576

Hi, newyorkrita! Been missing your posts. Glad to see you.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2013
6:55 AM

Post #9464781

I've got the same, volunteer peas coming up. Also, I broadcast a forage mix on one of the goat pastures late last fall. The mix includes peas and vetch. Both are coming up now so whatever the conditions these two require--now is the time they are getting what they want to grow.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

March 28, 2013
7:56 AM

Post #9464840

Not much going on in my garden. But I can't wait for nicer weather and gardening season once again. I am not a winter person. Give me spring or summer when I love to be outside in the garden.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 28, 2013
8:31 AM

Post #9464876

Me too. We just assembled a new bird bath by the greenhouse; DH is now spreading chips along the paths between the rows of our vegetable garden and I was going to transplant some seedlings into individual cells, but it's STILL too chilly, even on the porch!
grits74571
Talihina, OK

March 28, 2013
1:28 PM

Post #9465157

repotted some flowers today one is an unknown LOL a very nice lady gave the seeds to my garden class and just said that they were very lovely to tell the truth they look much like some 4 O clocks but the seeds were tiny I am certainly going to keep a close watch on them

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 28, 2013
1:45 PM

Post #9465170

This morning we put together a clay birdbath that I ordered for the patio by the greenhouse and then I planted some more Piment d'Espelette seeds in my indoor flats, since none of the first batch has come up. Then I transplanted all my lettuce and salad greens shoots, which I'd sown in plastic lidded take-out containers, in some of the cells in a 72-compartment flat on the porch. After that I transplanted some of the chard, brussels sprouts, cabbage and basil from the indoor setup into the rest of the cells. I still have some of those veggies inside, too, but now they're not so crowded.

But my peas STILL aren't up! It's cold today, too.

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
9:33 AM

Post #9465849

Grits - I grow Cascadia snap peas as my major crop. They don't get as tall as Sugar Snap, but set lots of nice sized pods. Most of the shorter vining snap peas I've grown also tend to have smaller pods. Normally I'd have them planted now too, but since we've had a cold March, I'm going to wait and let the soil warm up another week before I plant them.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2013
12:17 PM

Post #9465972

I just put in a double row of fava beans, and thank heavens I can finally see tiny bits of green in my pea rows!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2013
1:13 PM

Post #9466027

Mostly I don't like the shorter vining snap peas because they do have smaller pods but Cascadia seems to be a good variety. I do really love Super Sugar Snap, it was my favorite pea last year. So I planted it again this year.

Today I planted four large pots of Sugar Lace II snap peas. I had peas in these pots (different kind) last fall. I have found that peas do really well in large pots. I still have seeds left of the Sugar Lace so I will probably plant another pot or two, Not today though. I have decided I will place my Cascadia snap peas in ground, maybe I will do that tomorrow. And I watered the Super Sugar Snap peas I planted last week.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

March 30, 2013
10:08 AM

Post #9466752

I am planting peas again today. Changed my mind and decided to plant the Cascada peas in four pots I have instead of that in ground spot. Instead I will plant some Norli snaps in ground. I thought I had those seeds and checked this morning and I did. I had planted the Norli in pots last fall, didn't think they produced well at all. Maybe they will be better in ground. Will plant those this afternoon. Meantime I planted four more pots already. I thought I had Cascada seeds but after I was finished I look at the bags (left over from last fall) and I see that they are not snap peas, Cascada or otherwise. They are Mammouth Melting Snow peas. Oh well. I like snow peas, grew them last year. So now I have four pots of snow peas planted. That will be it for snow peas for me this spring. I guess I will just put the rest of those Sugar Lace II snap peas I have in those last two big pots. Not today, I want to get this Norli peas planted in ground. They are shap peas.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

March 30, 2013
5:42 PM

Post #9467085

I have a pot of Achimenes that I was so afraid were goners but today I counted 7 little tiny sprouts coming up last fall I saved a lot of the Achimenes tubers but they molded so have really been in a sweat over this plant it has been in our family for more than 50 years and now it seems I am the last caretaker of it It was given to me by my late mother in law and now I have at least a goodly share of her plants ..One of my prizes is a Quachita Spider-wort which she really loved so some of that is planted at her grave it is a very common wildflower hereabouts ..For years I have spelled Achimenes as Achemenes and spell checker says both are wrong LOL
grits74571
Talihina, OK

March 30, 2013
5:50 PM

Post #9467089

Here is an old picture of the Achemenes

Thumbnail by grits74571
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

March 30, 2013
7:33 PM

Post #9467176

I'm glad you could save the Achimenes, grits. It's lovely. I'm sure they mean so much to you, having been your mother-in-law's.

I am seeing so much rapid growth of the Romano beans that I test planted in vermiculite/perlite mix, that I planted a bunch more, today, in addition to some more English peas. I'm trying to get all of the 2011 and 2012 seeds planted before I break into this year's order that I received last week. Still don't have potatoes nor sweet potatoes yet.

Here's what I've planted, so far:
1. The main light table has tomatoes, okra, eggplant, squash, Romano and Kentucky Wonder green beans, lettuce, and brocolli.
2. A closer look at the light table (the light really helps, but now I need a bigger light, so will probably go with 200 watt cfl's in here. I figure I need about four. I figured up the vegetable budget, to include things that I'm growing but don't buy at the store, and the lights will pay for themselves in less than one month, plus not buying these veggies at the store will pay for the electric for the lights three times over.)
3. More from the light table- tomatoes, okra, Romano beans
4. The table on the south window- corn, avocado trees, a pineapple plant, and some other assorted veggies further down.
5. Onions I replanted, after eating the tops, lol. They did well in water, now I'm trying the Vermiculite/Perlite mix

I'm very happy with how the mix is doing, and the hydroponic liquid fertilizer. I have a lot of transplanting to do already, after about 3 weeks from planting seeds. The indoor GH wall is obviously up, but I have to build some more (and better tables). The cement blocks are good for now because I can reconfigure everything - and I'll have to compress everything to accomodate the few lights I will have. A lot of these plants will go out into the greenhouse as soon as the nights start warming up. The light in these pictures is mounted on a 2x4 which is temperarily taped to another one and spanning two cement blocks on either end of the door blank table.

Thumbnail by Solace   Thumbnail by Solace   Thumbnail by Solace   Thumbnail by Solace   Thumbnail by Solace
Click an image for an enlarged view.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 30, 2013
9:08 PM

Post #9467246

Cinder blocks, plastic coffee cans...,whatever works.

Solace:when is your last frost? You have a lot started...

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

March 30, 2013
9:16 PM

Post #9467256

Last frost is June 15. Outside, that is. This is the first spring with the new greenhouse (the outside one) so it's already getting over 100 in there during midday with the flap closed. I figure I can probably start transplanting by mid or late April. Depends on the night temps. I am not going to run heaters. I'm counting on the 55 gallon drums to do their thermal mass thing again, so they should help stabilize the night temps, as long as it's not freezing. Many of the tomatoes, lettuce, eggplant, and other salad/fresh kind of stuff will remain inside the little GH for winter. I have to heat the place anyway. Might as well get some food from it.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 30, 2013
9:25 PM

Post #9467262

Yes, if your going to heat the place you might as well grow food. Do you plant in containers and then move them out when the weather warms up?

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

March 30, 2013
10:11 PM

Post #9467275

I don't heat the outside greenhouse, (tried that last winter but the greenhouse isn't tight enough) the little one in the pictures is in the house, so have to heat the house anyway... just clarifying. I will transplant the corn into raised beds in the big greenhouse outside when nights warm enough, and will grow corn in other places outside, maybe in straw bales. It's all still in the planning stage. I will transplant other things that I can harvest and can, freeze, or dry so I won't have to move them. I will probably keep some squash, tomatoes, lettuce, radishes, herbs, etc. (salad stuff) in the house and everything else will either be outside or in the greenhouse out there. It will stay pretty warm in there until the end of October, and then, if I have the rocket mass heater built, then I'll grow all year. Will have to have lights out there, though, so... I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 31, 2013
5:50 AM

Post #9467407

Solace, that's interesting; we use big drums painted black and filled with water to stabilize the temperature in our outside greenhouse too, but I'm not sure that they really make a difference. And ours, too, is rather drafty to heat, but we do run a small heater at night near the flats if it's going to go below freezing outside. I like to put my plants out there as soon as they get their first true leaves so they don't get spindly looking for the light. We don't have anything out there yet; everything is still either in the house or on the closed-in porch.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2013
10:50 AM

Post #9467655

It is so interesting to hear how others garden, under such different conditions..My GH is also in a regular room in the garage. So I understand that part. I always plan I go too.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 2, 2013
3:56 PM

Post #9470034

I saw a program once that used bubble wrap to insulate a greenhouse.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

April 4, 2013
4:12 PM

Post #9472064

The peas I have in pots are sprouting!!! So far I don't see anything starting on the ones planted in ground.

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

April 4, 2013
6:10 PM

Post #9472159

Planted snap peas, lettuce and radish today.
Last year I planted them mid-March. But that was an early spring - led to long dry summer.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

April 4, 2013
6:48 PM

Post #9472198

I should plant my radishes.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

April 5, 2013
11:31 AM

Post #9472778

Those peas in pots are doing so well that I planted two more pots. Used up the leftover Sugar Lace II seeds that I had. So I had four pots of Sugar Lace II and four pots of Snow peas. Now I will have six pots of Sugar Lace II.

I always have good luck planting peas in pots, I planted them in pots last spring. None in ground. Then last fall I planted them in pots again but did put some in ground. This fall I will be planing peas in pots also.

I watered all my peas including the inground ones. Those early inground ones (Super Sugar Snap) I planted March 21 and I don't see anything sprouting yet. But the pots I planted March 29 and March 30. So they sprouted quickly.

Hurray for spring peas.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 5, 2013
3:46 PM

Post #9472996

Peas dont do so well here. Purplehull blackeyes grow like krazy though. I loke sugar snaps
grits74571
Talihina, OK

April 5, 2013
6:09 PM

Post #9473139

How does the saying go Hope spring eternal and so it is with gardeners I never have much luck with growing sugar snaps but I keep on trying ..Today I transplanted all of my cascadia snap peas it was a case of now or never they were root bound pretty bad ,I checked on them just before dark and they were not even droopy GRITS
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

April 6, 2013
9:01 AM

Post #9473620

This week I have set out the Candy onions, planted Super Sugar Snap Peas, set out spinach and a couple lettuce plants, and my son planted Fife red wheat and a bit of barley and spelt in a bed...40 x 7 feet. The barley and spelt are for juicing.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2013
9:12 AM

Post #9473627

I wanna get hommme! Drat.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

April 6, 2013
9:58 AM

Post #9473667

peas in pot sprouting.

Thumbnail by newyorkrita
Click the image for an enlarged view.

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