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Seed Germination: Starting Seeds 2013, Part 3

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
7:13 AM

Post #9461081

We came from here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1298942/#top

Continuing to share methods and techniques, all welcome!

The last posts were on germination of Orlaya. Has anyone been successful? What worked? What didn't?

Thanks, everyone for all the great contributions so far!

Pam


This message was edited Mar 25, 2013 9:19 AM

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blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 25, 2013
9:02 AM

Post #9461252

Pam,
Here is link to germinating Orlaya. It is an annual

http://www.thompson-morgan.com/flowers/flower-seeds/hardy-annual-seeds/orlaya-grandiflora/7077TM

I would leave off covering with vermiculite if the seeds are tiny. Some of the info makes no sense.



This message was edited Mar 25, 2013 9:05 AM
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
10:50 AM

Post #9461390

Thanks! Another site mentioned they are tricky from seed but self-sow prolifically. I wonder if stratification would make a difference?

And I have another question, Kathy might know this one: Is it good to pinch snapdragons to promote fuller plants? I stopped growing the tall ones eczuse of sprawl/ staking, but maybe that would help?
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 25, 2013
11:41 AM

Post #9461457

I'm not Kathy, but "yes" it's good to pinch the snapdragons. They will be bushier, and you will get more blooms. However, they still may need to be staked. For me, snaps do very well early in the season, then, they take a break in the really hot weather and start blooming again in the fall. They are one of my favorite annuals.
I wanted to comment so I could keep following this educational thread. :)

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 25, 2013
12:14 PM

Post #9461490

Pfg wrote:Thanks! Another site mentioned they are tricky from seed but self-sow prolifically. I wonder if stratification would make a difference?


If that is the case, then they do need stratification. One I have never grown due to seed weediness.

I made the big mistake growing Malva sylvestris "Mystic Merlin" and M. "Zebrina". They bloom first year from seed. The following year I had seedlings come up all over. That Fall I pulled the main plants and the seedlings. It took 6 years to get rid of them all. Last year I found 2 more. They were planted along my link fence so had to watch over my neighbors so they wouldn't get established there.

I will not plant anything that I know will be weedy. Unfortunately, nursery company will never state that.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
1:20 PM

Post #9461564

Mmmm... Good point. I do love some volunteers, Nicotianas, Verbena Bonariensis especially, but there is a limit. I stopped using Cleomes a while ago. Now they are about gone, and I'm trying to decide if I miss them.

Thanks, Beth, I will pinch. This year I only have 10-12" and 20," not the really tall ones, so no staking, but bushier will still be nice. How early do you start yours? I know you usually WS, are you doing them inside this year? I'm a little late this year compared to others but because of all the perennials I got going early, I didn't have room until shifting things around recently. I really love the early blooms, hope I still get some. Although I think they last longer in my zone, snaps poop out here after a while too, but by then lots of other stuff has kicked in.

Pic is from 2011 with the Casablancas. Last year the lilies took over and the snaps got shaded out.

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blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 25, 2013
4:21 PM

Post #9461761

If you are planning to pinch plants, do it early when they are small so they will branch out low to the ground and won't be top heavy. Plants produce branches just under the axil where the cut is made.
sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2013
4:36 PM

Post #9461773

Oh My, seed germination thread & I'm sunk so bad! What is 'pinching' snapdragons, and what is stratification? I just learned via digging online that I need to cut back my monarda when it's grown about 12" tall. Is that pinching? No clue about stratification, though. I need a 2x4 betwixt the eyes to learn, please? Thanks!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 25, 2013
5:01 PM

Post #9461800

I usually WS and have wonderful results. I don't usually get a good stand of snaps by WS, but last year I had gobs. I believe the difference was a very early warm spring.

I did not WS this year. I am having terrific trouble with my knees. I squatted once too many times last Sept. trying to get all of my Winter Sown perennials tucked into the ground before winter. The ground was too wet for me to "sit" on the ground. I have a muscle disease, and my leg muscles didn't give my knees enough support. I have had PT for several weeks, and now it's been decided I will have to have something else done. Hopefully, I will get something done and will be able to plant my seedlings. Way more than you want to know.

So, this year, I have closely watched this thread trying to learn how to sow inside, because I am not able to get on my deck floor like I need to for the WS seeds. I followed the directions per this thread. I had good germination, but had to go to Fl. to see my son and wouldn't you know, the seeds germinated while I was gone (just 5 days) and the seedings were too lanky. I pulled out my snaps today and re-sowed them. I don't think they will do very well because I have some cells that were okay e.g. seedling aren't to lanky, and some I had to pull out like the snaps.

So, I am not sure if I should put the dome back on for the seeds, or leave it off for the seedlings that made it. It's always something isn't it? Oh well. Hope someone can advise me.

I have to go back to Fl. this week and will be gone for two weeks or so, but my daughter will be in our home and will try to watch the plants.

Because of trips to Fl., I don't think I will have good success this year with the inside seed starting. From my experience, I think snaps actually do better starting them inside. The same goes for heliotrope.

I have to say, for me, Winter Sowing is so much easier than doing it inside. The seedlings require so much more attention and babying inside.

I have tried the last two years to grow Nepeta. It requires darkness to germinate. You have to really watch it, or it germinates and gets leggy before you get it out into the light. I have a few seedlings that made it. I ordered my seed from Swallowtail Seeds. They call it Nepeta 'Select Blue'. In the past, they have described it as "less likely to entice cats". I am a backyard birder with cat neighbors so I chose this one for my garden. What's interesting is, I couldn't find anywhere else that has this Nepeta "Select Blue". http://www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com/perennials/nepeta.html
I think I will try to re-sow it again, but maybe wait until July and plant in the fall. Hopefully the trips to Fl. will end by then!

I really like Nepeta. I use it to "tie" my garden together spacing it apart here and there. I like Lavender too, but it doesn't bloom as long and is a little more formal looking. It has already green up. Awhile back--seems like forever now that we have had non accumulating snow for two days-- I cut off all of the dead twigs. I also took several cuttings and hope they will take off.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 25, 2013
5:14 PM

Post #9461815

Barb, stratification means the seeds have to have very cold temps before they will germinate.

When seeds sprout, they have two leaves that are called cotyledons. These are not true leaves but give the little seeds food (chlorophyll) until the true leaves grow. When the seedling has more than two sets of true leaves, you can "pinch out" the next set of leaves, and it will branch out into two stems - or more making it a bushier plant. This is also when you can pot up your seedlings to larger pots.

Here's a good website that explains stratification and other seed treatments:
http://www.backyardgardener.com/tm.html
Underneath the description, there is a brown high lighted line that gives you even more detail about stratification.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
6:20 PM

Post #9461894

Birder...if wanting to avoid the cats plant anything other than Nepeta cataria which is TRUE catnip, the others are considered as catmint.tho many still call them catnip but aren't (growers, venders etc.)..

And yes Pam, I have grown Orlaya but it's been atleast 10-15 years, got it when T&M first offered. I do remember the flowers are bigger in the umbel of Orlaya than on the Ammi majus or visagna. (Umbel is the style of flower, group of tiny flowers the make up one bigger flower, all on one major stem). But my seed germination book from back then disappeared so no info on how long to G.
And yes to the pinching of Snaps (Antirhinum), I begin pinching after the first or second true pair of leaves, and have been giving them regular haircuts along with the Dianthus too. Personally, I love the tall ones (36"). No need to stake if they've been pinched and other plants are somewhat close to them. That is why I grow my plants to be touching at mature age. And Snaps are a Hardy Annual..they may come back for consecutive years if they like their conditions and yes can reseed.
I do remember many a year ago...lol, that I was growing the tall ones and they flopped over, I didn't cut them back or prop them up..they developed new flower stems from every leaf node... made them nice and bushy. Sure would like to grow my favs. (in Pix below, the are antirhinum Black something or other, forgot name and tried to find some of my old seed. Did locate some, just not sure if this one tho as the leaves have a red tinge to them and these not so much). And when growing them in the garden, when deadheading or cutting for bouquets cut them low and the stems will regrow. They can bloom the whole season... this year I'm growing "The Bride" which are from T&M Seed and are the only ones that are fragrant, really looking forward to these, again 36".

Pix 1 &2 are also both umbel style flowers, Achilea milifolium and A. filipendula (yarrow, common name)
Pix 3 is my groupng of snaps that i just love...

Have also grown Lavendula, can't remember if I gave darkness, but I do now have some reseeding in the garden, never got around to sowing more this year. Am also thinking about taking cutting to see if I can get them to root, but many drifts out there at the moment.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
6:23 PM

Post #9461897

Ooops. forgot pix. And Lavendula angustifolium Munsted, in pix 2 is from seed.

This message was edited Mar 25, 2013 6:26 PM

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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2013
7:10 PM

Post #9461962

>> what is stratification?

Think of it as "start - i - fication". Starting fussy seeds that need a song-and-dance before they will sprout.

Some perennial plants evolved methods of seed "dormancy" so they don't all sprout and die as soon as they fall to earth in the Fall ... or during the first warm spell in late winter, or first sprinkle of rain. Or they don't sprout their first year, at all! Some stay dormant until next year so there is always a crop of seeds waiting for good conditions to sprout.

They need coaxing. Fussy perennials are probably not the easiest seeds to START learning about INDOOR seed sprouting, or direct sowing. Vigorous annuals are easier to start indoors or direct in soil.

"Stratification" can be a several weeks of steady cold and wet (like winter or spring) before they are willing to sprout. Or cycles of cool and warm while damp but not soggy. I guess some seeds must need freezing temperatures. Or some other combination.

Because I'm a nerd, I'm tempted to read Dr. Deno's books and try to simulate all the needed conditions with a fridge and back porch and paper towels and lots of fussing around. Instead, up to now, I've ignored the directions and gotten by with 20-40% germination the indoor lazy way (sow and wait and hope).

But SMART gardeners use winter-sowing for seeds that need startification.

It's like outdoor sowing in a cold frame or sheltered seed bed. They give the seeds good, well-draining soilless mix and a "micro-greenhouse" or "mini-cold-frame". Namely, a milk jug or soda bottle cut in half, or a translucent sweater box with clear lid and lots of small pots in it.

Sow the seeds in the jugs or box, replace the lid, set outside in winter or very early spring.

Maybe keep it in the shade so it does not cook on clear days.

Wait for nature to provide the warm/cool/cold cycles.

Let them get a few inches tall in the jug, then gradually remove the lid over a period of time so they harden off.

Split them apart into individual seedlings, or tear it into four chunks, or plan t the whole big chunk of seedlings in on e place and let the strongest survive.

I was taught to have plenty of drainage and ventilation holes, so that snow melt and rain would water it for me. If the drain holes freeze solid, get them up off the gorund. Keep them from blowing away! Keep dogs from chewing them up. Take pictures of dozens of m ilk jugs lined up in rows and columns, like an army of dwarves with funny hats.

But the best perennial gardener I know (Jonna Sudenious) does her winter-sowing in sealed tubs with no drainage holes or air vents. Since they don't dry out, they need more water! For her soiless mix, she uses pure, coarse vermiculite. Check her web site, she starts LOTS of operennials this way! (She's in the DG Garden watchdog Top Five). http://www.seedsite.eu/

The WS jugs provide good, ventilated soil and steady moisture.
Steady temperatures, but enough variation to meet the seeds' needs.
Protection from extremes of temperature or wet and dry.

Protection from insects, weeds, slugs, birds, pets, worms, wash-away, rot, mold and mildew.

Like nature, but more protected.

BTW, when people say "winter-sowed", they might also mean "spring-sowed". The jugs or tubs are just like small cold frames. They let you start annuals outside in spring EARLIER than you could start them directly in soil.

... AS LONG AS you start them AFTER the cycles of prolonged hard frost and prolonged misleading warm spells are past. Even with WS tubs, annuals need you to avoid weeks of warmth that make them sprout ... followed b y a week of hard frost that kills them dead. Or maybe you could lug them inside during the cold snaps??

Let's see ... yes, DG has a whole WS forum! They can say it better and answer questions from experience.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/coldsow/all/

One year I killed every seed EXCEPT the very "difficult" Penstemon varieties I tried to WS. Those Penstemon fooled me. I thought they were dead, too, and I just didn't throw the soil into a bed until June. Then I saw the TINY P. seedlings. They kept growing SLOWLY through the rest of fall and the next winter, then finally died when I let them dry out (still less than 1" tall).




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blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 25, 2013
7:52 PM

Post #9462001

birder, and Mike
You are correct regarding cold for stratification. However cold alone won't do it. Nature provides moisture too. So, stratification is actually moist cold. However, it isn't just cold. The cold for many difficult seeds has to flunctuate. It is nature's way of assuring that seeds don't sprout when they can't survive. Usually there is a "clock" inside the seed that determines when the time is right for the seeds to safely sprout.

A great example is Iris seeds. They require 12 weeks of less than 40 degrees temperature that fluctuate to break dormancy. They will sprout during spring when temperature reaches 55 to 70 degrees. I sow them in plastic shoe boxes November. The seeding mix is moistened, the box is covered and stored on the North side of my house in a large bin

Unheated garage can also be used..

I fail to see the reason to WS annuals. Most sprout easily and don't need stratification. Also to sow them in jugs to me makes it difficult to get them out and seperate. It delays their growth since they have to get established growing new roots to anchor them. If WS, why not in plastic shoe boxes (Walmart cheap)

1] Iris seeds in bins November 2011
2] Iris seedlings April 1st, 2012
3] Iris seedlings in 6-pack acclimated on the east side of garage for morning sun before planted in nursery. April 22, 2012

Yes, Penstemons are difficult to sow. Most varieties require stratification. J Hudson seeds have a full page devoted to the different Penstemon and sowing.

This message was edited Mar 25, 2013 7:54 PM

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2013
9:46 PM

Post #9462083

SparklinBarb, welcome, and don't worry, we've all been there. Just keep asking questions and digging around the forums, and you'll be caught up in no time. Of course that doesn't mean knowing everything, lol. There's always more to learn...

Along with the websites mentioned above, and DG of course, I like http://tomclothier.hort.net/
With something new or tricky, I browse around until I get a feel for what works, then pick the method that best fits into my life and situation. Then over time I refine my methods based on my experience and what I continue to learn from others.

Of the annuals I sow every year, Petunias, Snapdragons, Nicotiana and Verbena Bonariensisare the slowest to get going, so I start them indoors first.

Birder, do you have your seeds set up on self-watering trays? That's one way to get around not being there all the time. For absentee germinating, Deno might be the way to go, instead of starting in soil. I was gone for 2 weeks in December, and left a number of seeds started that way. When I came back some had germinated quite strongly, and once planted they took off. For seeds already in cells, you can prop up the plastic cover so there is some air circulation, and even leave it under lights to prevent stretching. Thats good too if there is already some germination. Last year I tried laying a piece of plastic wrap loosely over cells I'd planted (under lights), reasoning that if seedlings emerged while I was away they'd push it up and get some air. That sort of worked, when I got back they weren't very far along and I just took the plastic off. I may try that again this year as we'll be away again a couple of times before planting out time.

There's more than one way to skin a cat, lol...

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 25, 2013
11:09 PM

Post #9462112

Pfg,
Since you sow Nicotiana, I am surprised that youj don't sow Mirabilis jalapa (Four-oclock) They are an easy perennial and blooms first year from seed. Sowing is easy. I have grown them and carried their root over the winter in a bag of damp peat moss. They bloom all summer and comes in many colors, even streaked.

Their flowers open in the late afternoon and stay open until the next morning, except on cloudy days when they open earlier. The fragrance of four-o'clocks is appealing, and is a major reason for their popularity. They also attract hummingbirds and moths to the garden.
sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 26, 2013
4:42 AM

Post #9462167

Thanks so much, you guys! When you all started out, did you ever think you just weren't gonna get it, discouraged? I'm grateful for your patience.
I take it "stretching" is when you don't have the seedlings under a light, and they get long, sprawling, and lean towards the natural light? That's what my Canterbury Bells are doing, all over the place.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 26, 2013
4:55 AM

Post #9462179

sparklinBarb wrote:Thanks so much, you guys! When you all started out, did you ever think you just weren't gonna get it, discouraged? I'm grateful for your patience.
I take it "stretching" is when you don't have the seedlings under a light, and they get long, sprawling, and lean towards the natural light? That's what my Canterbury Bells are doing, all over the place.


Another word is "lanky", and you are right. Discouraged? Never!! Just tried some more.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
5:05 AM

Post #9462187

Blomma, last year I had one 4 o'clock plant and fell in love. This year I have seeds (not from that plant, silly me). I'm just starting to look into how to start them. Some sites say easy, some say not so. What say you?

Edited for clarity

This message was edited Mar 26, 2013 9:17 AM

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 26, 2013
5:26 AM

Post #9462200

Love the SNAPS Kathy Do Snaps Need to be Planted Now to Bloom this season ? Getting more Snow today Love reading all the Info
sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 26, 2013
7:26 AM

Post #9462356

thank you, Blomma. I will persevere! :o)

shauna1219

shauna1219
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2013
7:58 AM

Post #9462410

Pfg,

I have a 4 o'clock bed and it grows and reseeds itself every year (attached are pics from last year). I collect seeds from my flower bed and soak them in a wet paper towel in the sun for a few days. For me, they seem to germinate better the warmer is gets.

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
10:36 AM

Post #9462643

Susie, yes, start the snaps now. I did mine last week for the same zone (I'm colder than it says, we're up higher and last to thaw out in the spring).

Thanks, shauna, great pics of a nice big colorful patch! My 4 o'clocks are soaking now, then they go on the mat, etc.

I'm trying something new... I read that seeds don't rot in vermiculite, and seedlings can survive longer than in the paper towels. Also, DH pretty much takes over the refrigerator (it's worth it, he's a great cook!) and my packets get thrown around and/or buried, so stratification isn't as easy as it should be. I have a couple of little mini-propagators hanging around, bought a package of 3 oz cups at the grocery store, and I have looooots of vermiculite and a handy open window in the living room.

... Et Voila!

Box 1: Salvia Transylvanica, Salvia Verticillata, Verbascum Chaixii Album, Veronica Fairytale (Pink), Veronica Goodness Grows

Box 2: Eryngium Miss Willmott's Ghost, Astrantia Major, Lily Formosiana Lancer, Orlaya Grandiflora, Verbena Bonariensis.

The Eryngium and Astrantia have been chilled, frozen, thawed and re-chilled ad infinitum. Directions for Orlaya are all over the place, the latest is Parks says 60 degrees, reason says chilling can't hurt. VB is always slow inside, Spring Sowing works well but they are really little at planting time, at least here it's out of the way. And as far as the decor is concerned, out of sight, out of mind, lol...

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
12:14 PM

Post #9462718

Pam, the Salvia verticillata is it the purple or white? Had the puprple many years ago and loved it, so unuual, am thinking I got the seed for white in the trades.

Susie, Can use Pam's advise..lol...I'm thinking she changed her name...lol...Only kidding.

I LOVE the Backyardgardener.com info on seed starting myself as it's all from Thompsen & Morgan Seed...first seed company I worked with and the info is great!!!!! One day I will print that off.. They (T&M), still give starting info within their catalog for each variety, but have discontinued many..they should bring back more goodies.. What great is there's pix to go with the starting info too...I always suggest that everyone get one of their catalog if they've never seen one. I do like the older catalogs tho, they were more book form and not just catalog form. (Stays nicer on the shelf, in fact I have more than 10 years of their catalogs in my book room for those seed they have discontinued and I still have). T&M is the first book I go to every time when looking for info. (tmseeds.com)

Haven't had much luck with the lilies this year...???? Can't figure that one out as I've done them in the past...Hmmm.
Am working on starting the Annuals today, so far am on #11. Will be starting Mirabilis inside also. I'm starting 3 packs of Salvia farinaceas, just love them, truely they should be perennial for me!!!! LOL. Also doing Ammi visagna, 40", (flower more dome shaped, (umbel form)), am also thinking the flower is more green tinged than the next: and Ammi majus Graceland, 40-56", (flower more flat, (umbel form)), got a new packet of seed this year from Select Seed, so I can compare the two as to which I like best...(not sure what happened to the old seed, disappeared somewhere in moving over the years.

Ok all will check back in later or tomorrow...Have a good day!!!

Pix Ammi visagna, last season sprouted in the garden and never got any taller than about 5-6" due to drought, hoping this year that is a thing of the past...the D.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 26, 2013
1:07 PM

Post #9462787

I had the self watering set up, "had" the domes on them while I was away. The problem was I did not have the lights on them yet. I started them about 3 days before I left and was only gone 5. I thought it would take longer than -gee-maybe 6 days before the seeds germinated, and I would put the lights on them when I returned. Actually, I was waiting on hubby to set up the lights-I am not very good at that kind of stuff--like Kathy. Wow!
Anyway, the little plants were stretching towards the window--bent over, skinny, long stems-especially the snapdragons. I surmised the snapdragon stems were too tall and skinny-literally "laying" on their sides. I pulled them out of the cells they were in and re-planted back in the same cells.
Question:
1. Should I put the dome back on so the new seeds can germinate even though I have some seedlings in the same kit? There were empty cells where I pulled out the snaps.
I s/h asked before I replanted.

Thanks for the tip on germinating Deno while absent. I have been stewing around for a week trying to figure out what to do about re-starting some of my seeds.

I have plenty of snapdragon seeds I saved from last years crops-mostly the 36"-40" ones. I can always start over with the snaps.
I need to plant lobelia seed - I think it would be next to impossible to go Deno with that seed. Man, talk about dust!
2. Advice?

Kathy, your dark red snapdragon is probably Antirrinum 'Black Prince'. It is a perennial for me. And, I agree with you about the Nepeta: catmint vs. catnip. The latter is the one I need to stay away from. I was drawn to the Nepeta 'Select Blue' by Swallowtail because they specifically said less likely to entice cats. I wish I had the early catalog of T&M. I have heard how great their instructions were. That was before I was doing much gardening.

Penstemon germinated very well for me. I had it growing like weeds last year-thick as grass in Winter Sown milk jugs. They love the fluctuation of temps.

I am in kind of a dilemma regarding seeds sowing and being absent. Any more suggestions are certainly welcome. I don't know if I should leave the domes: on or: off or: part way when I have seedlings. Plus, I think I messed up putting seeds and seedlings together. The seedlings are too small to pot up, and there's wasted cells and valuable space under the lights if I don't re-use the cells that I had to pull out due too lankiness. Indoor seed sowing is so much more hands on.

For me, one of the very easiest plant to start from seed is Digitalis-a biennial and so pretty when it blooms.

My mom always grew 4 o'clocks, but she lived in a different climate: Oklahoma. My brother grew 4 o'clocks in Missouri and said they were like weeds for him and found the roots very difficult to remove from the garden. Strange how some flowers work in some places and not others.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 26, 2013
4:00 PM

Post #9463077

Pfg wrote:Blomma, last year I had one 4 o'clock plant and fell in love. This year I have seeds (not from that plant, silly me). I'm just starting to look into how to start them. Some sites say easy, some say not so. What say you?


I say very easy. The seeds are large and easy to handle. I started plants for my daughter last year. I nicked the seeds, then soaked in hand hot water overnight. Did the Deno stick. Can't remember how long they took to sprout but it wasn't very long. It is one perennial that does not need stratification. They prefer warmth.

This message was edited Mar 26, 2013 5:12 PM

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 26, 2013
5:08 PM

Post #9463148

birder17,
Sow your Lobelia seeds in a container that is filled with damp peatmoss. Just sprinkle the seeds on top and lightly pinch in the seeds so there is contact beween the peat and the seeds. I use those clear round plastic containers that comes with salads from Albertson, or use containers that come with sandwich meat. If no lid, use saran wrap. Be sure that the peatmoss is damp, not wet. Be sure to squeeze out as much moisture that you can.

One they start to sprout, plant in a tray of seeding mix. You will be planting small chunks rather than single seedlings. When large enough you can seperate them, or snip out with scissor seedling to stand 1" apart. That is what I do since I hate to disturb plants any more than necessary.

I sowed Delosperma cooperi seeds 2 years ago and they were like dust. I read about the above method and it worked great.

Photo is of the dustlike seeds turned seedlings of D. cooperi (red Iceplant) At this point I planted the larger ones in a 6-pack.

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 26, 2013
6:28 PM

Post #9463245

Four O'Clocks are easy. They winter over against a south wall for me, but I generally save and start seed just in case. I used the Deno method the first time, after that I just plant them, they germinate anywhere.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2013
6:54 PM

Post #9463280

Great info about the 4 o'clocks, thanks! Mine are still soaking, in the morning I'll plant them and give them heat and light. Should I nick? Or not bother? Sounds like they are pretty straightforward.

For Lobeiia and Sweet Alyssum, I usually cluster sow cells 4 weeks before the frost date, and plant HOS, Hunk Of Seedlings, where ever I want them., usually around the edges of pots, but sometimes in the garden too. Whenever I've bought them in the past, they were always densely seeded in the cells, so I just kept doing it the same way.

Sorry Kathy if I stepped on your turf answering Susie about snaps (wink- how do you do that, anyway?) , lol! But it is one thing I have some experience with...

BTW, Are you having trouble with lilies Formosiana? I think mine rotted in the baggy in the frig, Clothier said 2 weeks and it's been much more than that, so I'm trying again.

I swore off the V's - Veronicas and Verbascums- after failing so miserably a few weeks ago, but just had to try one more time...

Beth, absentee gardening is an art in itself, but far from impossible, I'm here to tell you. As far as the partly sprouted cells, maye cut a piece of plastic wrap to go over the seeded cells so they keep surface moisture, and put the whole thing under lights so the sprouted seedlings get what they need. I guess just keep trying, some things work, some don't.

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 27, 2013
4:57 AM

Post #9463552

Thank you ladies .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 27, 2013
5:40 AM

Post #9463595

I can't deal with the jugs, I wintersow everything in flats with 96 count inserts, and a few odd things that resent transplanting in peat pots or inserts. I wintersow some annuals simply because I don't have room to start them indoors. Some annuals (and a few perennials) need warmth to germinate, but I have great luck with them outdoors. By the time I'm ready to transplant, the wintersown plants are not as tall as the plants started indoors, but they don't require hardening off. I have wintersown Verbena bonariensis every year for five? Maybe six? years and it wintersows well for me.

I have Orlaya wintersown already, I'll try some at 60 degrees, too. I really liked the plant, but Annie's Annuals doesn't even have it this year. If it reseeds here, it should wintersow.

Rick, I had the same experience with penstemons. I was ready to pitch the soil in the cells, when I noticed some green sprouts in mid-June. They really aren't large enough to plant out here the first year.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 27, 2013
11:27 AM

Post #9463906

You can set cells on top of cotton flannel in a tray. The flannel carries water to each c ell, like very shallow, continuous bottom-watering.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2013
11:56 AM

Post #9463948

Started Lobelia siphalitica and cardinalis this year using my method, nothing special done. Just surface sown and a light sprinkle of vermiculite just to let me know there was seed in the pot, then misted and under the dome and lights.
L. c. started 1/6 and Germination was 1/14, potted on into individual pots 3/23, got 42 out of my little 2 1/2" pot.
L. s. 'Great Blue', started 3/1 and germinated 3/7
L. s. started 3/1, germinated 3/5
L.s. perenn mix of blue and white started 3/1, germinated 3/7
These were obtained in some of the seed trades this season, Susies and the Rare seed trade. Since they didn't make a go of it the first round of the L. s. (in Jan.), I thought I should try a couple of sources, now they willl be coming out my ears...but that's ok...lol.

I wait til my babies are strong enough and then begin transplanting, when they are so young and spindly it's easy to mess them up or damage them. And it doesn't hurt them to wait til they grow...it's just like dividing your perenns in the garden, most don't have a problem with it... I was transplanting a Verbascum the other day and realized they were a bit too young and stopped in the middle of what I was doing and will give them another week or so and try again... If too many in a pots for them to stregthen up I may split those in that pot to several and then try again a few weeks later or more if needed.

I started out seeding in insert trays also years ago. Ya the empty cells are a bummer, and that's when I began switching over to the 2 1/2" pots. Then can remove them as needed or add more. (I even went so far as cutting up those little trays, lol.) Pix 1 is the second pot for them. I divided all the little clumps into several more pots for growing up a bit.

Lol, pam, just kidding with you... Ya, I would start now Susie. I've been giving mine haircuts to make them branch out a bit and many need transplanting into individual pots. Mine got some ichies for a while and lost some, but most are doing good now... I know ichies is not a good description but works for me...

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2013
12:11 PM

Post #9463960

I'm having a time of it uploading pix. What's up?

Hey birder, do you have any of the red snaps seed yet?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2013
12:47 PM

Post #9463983

Lol, Kathy...

Never too many L Siphilitica for me, glad to know they're so easy with good seed. They pop up here and there on their own in my garden, now I'd like to have a real clump. Hmmmm... I know the perfect place to plant them, I may just have to go ahead... I know it's late, but...

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 27, 2013
12:58 PM

Post #9464001

Hey Pam Hope your about ready to check out the NEXT Robin It is Loaded Hope to have it ready to go back out Next Monday . Red Snaps sound very pretty .
Kathy going to send you a dmail soon .
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2013
3:36 PM

Post #9464205

Oh boy, just what I need, more seeds, lol!! But I still want the robin, can't wait, actually. I'm sure it's full of stuff that wasn't there before, and I'm sure I'll be tempted to try more new stuff. Also, I have a pretty good stash I don't need any more to put in.

sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 27, 2013
4:34 PM

Post #9464251

So, oh-so-peagreen-newbie here starting seeds for the first time in my adult life. I need to have vermiculite on hand? No, let me rephrase, please. What do you recommend I have on hand for seed-starting, outside the pre-set, pre-filled trays I've purchased at Lowe's? (Sorry, Gitagal, but I'm COUNTRY, and Lowe's is much closer than the nearest HD, which does have a Lowe's directly across the street from it.)
I have to tell you, though, that I've sat here for three days :& created an XL spreadsheet containing everything from the type of plant, to the harvest/bloom time of the plant, with everything in-between listed on the sheet. I've got 99 seed packets diagrammed on the sheet, including notes. The point is my DH has listened to me fussing with myself that he's becoming interested, to the extent he's had me looking online at greenhouse pricing. I finally realized that's a pipe dream, and am continuing on my step-by-step, fitting into my current means style to propagate & plant. SO ... back to my question - yes, I can definitely be long-winded, sorry -
A) What should I have on hand?
And
B) can vermiculite be used rationally/logically/whatever in a garden with truly gross, clayish soil?
Thanks, guys; you're wonderful!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2013
5:11 PM

Post #9464313

Thanks, Blomma, for the info on Lobelia. I have always winter sowed it until this year and it comes up thick as grass.

Thanks, Pam for advice on the seed cells vs. seedlings. That's a good idea. I was hoping someone would suggest something. I couldn't come up with anything! :(

Kathy, I like the idea of the single pots. My problem is not enough area for the seeds to get light.

Doing the seeds indoors is a whole new ballgame

Kathy, Yes, I have red snapdragon seeds:
Antirrhinum majus 'Black Prince'--gets about 18"
Antirrhinum majus 'Ruby'--gets about 36"
Antirrhinum majus 'Plumblossum'--gets about 36"
It would be good for you to look up these up and check on the colors.

I am thinking about doing some Deno seeds while in Fl. I feel like I'm running out of time, even though, the temps have been cold. When Spring does come, it will come and go quickly. :(

So, how does one get in on these "Robins"? I have sooo many seeds.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 27, 2013
5:26 PM

Post #9464334

Birder, check out the Seed Trading forum for swaps and Round Robins. If no one is starting one up right at the moment, you can start one yourself!

Barb,

>> a garden with truly gross, clayish soil?

Compost is only real cure for clay. Start out by adding a lot (like a layer 2-3 INCHES deep, preferably turned under with a fork or spade or Roto-tiller. Then add another inch every fall (or spring AND fall). After the soil is decent, you won 't need to turn it under: worms and rain will do that for you.

Pine bark fines, sand and grit last longer than compost. However, adding coarse stuff alone to clay won't do anywhere near as much good as compost. I think the combination of compost plus bark shreds plus sand or grit is better than compost alone.

If your soil improvement budget is limited, spend most of it on manure or com post, and a little on fine bark mulch (and maybe chew it up some with a lawn mower.)


This message was edited Mar 27, 2013 5:27 PM

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 27, 2013
5:33 PM

Post #9464347

Barb,

I'm not a fan of vermiculite as a soil improver. It is very fragile and breaks down in weeks or months into powder. Sand and grit last forever.

Bark fines last a few years, and bark nuggets last 3-4 years. As bark breaks down (rather slowly) it feeds the soil life.

Compost only lasts one season if your soil is "hungry" and needs organic matter badly, like most unimproved soil. But it improves the soil's water-holding ability, and structure (aeration and drainage, mainly) a lot.

"Feeding the soil life" is what compost is best at. The worms, fungi and bacteria that soil needs, need food.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 27, 2013
6:04 PM

Post #9464392

With all the energy, time, and equipment spent on sowing seeds for a beautiful garden, I hope you all know that any plant that is a hybrid will not come true from seeds. Only those that are not hybrids will. Off hand I can mention hybrids such as Petunias, Datura, Nicotianas, Iris , Daylily, Penstemon, Snaps, Four O'Clocks , Veronicas, florist geraniums (Pelagonium) and many of the plants mentioned here. Can't forget Tomatoes, Peppers, etc. They are hand polllinated by hybridizers to produce new varieties. If bee pollinated, they may resemble its parent in some ways. In general, hybrids come in different colors of blooms. Non-hybrids are usually limited that way. Only plants in the same genera will cross.

Blue Salvia is not a hybrid. However, I collected seed from a white form of Salvia and got blue. Also, it is very possible that seeds not true from hybrids can be more difficult to sprout. That is only a thought.

sparklinBarb, Mike
I have clay soil and all I amend the soil with is peatmoss, grass clipping, kitchen scraps (no meat), and horse manure. I am lucky since my daughter and SIL owns 6 horses. Their soil is sandy so I get some of that also. One year, I did buy a bag of "Clay Buster from HD for I was curious. Turned out that it is a glorifies form of bark with soil. I was not impressed since it wasn't cheap.

This message was edited Mar 27, 2013 6:15 PM

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 27, 2013
6:07 PM

Post #9464397

Mike
Vermiculite is good for adding drainage to potting soil for moisture loving house plants. I have never had it break down. It would not be cost effective for a garden.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 27, 2013
6:10 PM

Post #9464403

I have clay soil as well, I try to add 10-20 bags of sand each year, I mulch with 20-30 bags of shredded maple leaves, add compost from yard, kitchen and garden waste. The soil isn't super fabulous, but it's not pure clay like it was 10 years ago.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2013
9:32 PM

Post #9464559

After 30 hours of soaking my 6 Mirabilis Jalapa seeds (4 O'Clocks), since I had so few, I planted them in a 6-pack in seed starting mix.

Better late than never, I did start Lobelia Siphilitica, in vermiculite in a little cup, and put it under the dome. Nothing else new... Salvia Victoria Blue. Snaps and Nicotianas separated a few days ago all growing well, everything else looks fine...

Good point about hybrids, Blomma. I buy new seeds for many annuals, particularly Petunias and Snaps where I know I want the characteristics to come true (not to mention how hard it is to collect those minuscule seeds!). Nicotianas Sylvestris and Langsdorfii are not hybrids, but many, if not most others on the market are. N Nicki Pink has come up the expected color from gathered seed, at least so far. This is the first year I'm growing Fragrant Cloud from my seed, I'll know soon enough how that works. I do try to keep the plants I want to collect from separate from other colors, so far so good.

I wonder if the Veronicas I'm trying so hard to germinate are sterile? They are all hybrids, and gathered, not newly bought seeds. Has anyone had any luck with them? They are all hybrids, are they not? Maybe they can only be propagated vegetatively? If that's the case, I'd still be disappointed, but at least know it wasn't my failure.

Hmmmm... Always something...

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 27, 2013
11:02 PM

Post #9464596

Pfg
I have grown V. spicata for a number of years and finally gave them away because they need more water than I am willing to give them. I had 2 different types both were blue, but one was 3 feet , the other shorter. I believe S. spicata blue is not a hybrid.

I also grew the pink and white types. All were from seeds purchased from Parks Seeds.

1] Veronica spicata short at 2ft.
2] V. spicata "Sightseeing"
3] V. spicata tall blue at 3 ft.

I do have other Veronicas but they are groundcovers only obtained by plants, no seeds that I have come across.

If stored right, old seeds will still sprout. Last year I tested perennial seeds that were from 2002 and they still sprouted.

I can't remember how I did Veronicas as it was years ago. Most likely in soil and then under light. It ws before I knoew of Deno. Check Hudson or the other for information on sowing.

Edited to add that I grew the Veronicas on the north side of my house. They got part sun which suited them.

This message was edited Mar 27, 2013 11:04 PM

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 28, 2013
2:55 AM

Post #9464641

Fragrant Cloud comes true from seed for me. I haven't planted it in years, I bought plants a few years ago, and it reseeds here and there.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
6:44 AM

Post #9464771

Whoopee!!!!!!! Look what I saw this morning! Buds on Platy Permutter! Soooo excited...

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schaff20
Raleigh, NC

March 28, 2013
9:06 AM

Post #9464918

My indoor seedlings are being eaten by something. Can anyone please tell me what this is and how to treat it? Thanks!

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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2013
11:54 AM

Post #9465073

Schaff20,

Yellow splotches and edges? Are you sure it's something eating the leaves?

Could it be excessive fertilizer or salts? ("burn"?)

Are they plants that could have a virus infection , like Tomato mosaic virus?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
12:02 PM

Post #9465081

Birder, looked up the Black Prince and they are listed at 18 or 30-36" from various different places..wonder why there is such a difference in heights. I am sure the ones I grew were Black Prince at 36". If you'ld like to do a trade on the Plum Blossim seed let me know I could probably find something you might like...lol. I'd be happy to share seed with you, I am in the process of getting a package together that will be sent off to S. Africa Fri. or Sat.

And blomma, do you happpen to any and seed for the Veronica, sightseeing. I have the blue in my garden but had lost the white and pink forms, altho I might have a babie of the pink, not sure will have to see if it comes back this year, came up just out of the blue I guess. I had origonally gotten mine from England more than 15 years ago. In fact I have alot of old seed, some as much as 15+ years and wouldn't think of getting rid of any of it... And I still collect when I get the chance, most new went into 2 different seed trades the past few months.

My goodness Pam...what in the world are you feeding them? I don't even have any blossoms on those huge tomatoes of mine.

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy
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schaff20
Raleigh, NC

March 28, 2013
12:49 PM

Post #9465113

RickCorey_WA wrote:Schaff20,

Yellow splotches and edges? Are you sure it's something eating the leaves?

Could it be excessive fertilizer or salts? ("burn"?)

Are they plants that could have a virus infection , like Tomato mosaic virus?


Not sure of anything really. First time growing. :) I've been watering every few days with a mixture of Superthrive and Hydrogen Peroxide as per someone's suggestion. Could it be that?

They could be infected. It is definitely on a tomato plant or two but also on cucumbers.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
1:27 PM

Post #9465156

Too strong of a solution, back off a bit on quantity, mine did the same thing a few weeks back and went to just once per week...looking much better now.
schaff20
Raleigh, NC

March 28, 2013
2:37 PM

Post #9465197

thanks! Hopefully they can withstand the watering from this morning. oops. I'll back off and see what happens.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2013
6:03 PM

Post #9465342

You might try all-water for a few waterings.

(Also, I thought Super-Thrive was just for getting seedlings roote4d. Do you have to add more after the first few waterings? I don't really kn ow either way.)

I also wonder - besides excess fertilizer, could you be over-watering?

If the mix is fine and peaty, it will hold more water than the roots really want. Ideally, any excess water would run right out the bottom of the pot. But most seed-start mixes and many potting mixes hold too much water.

Too much water in a fine mix can exclude air, which drowns the roots. Maybe after one all-water watering, don't water again until they have drunk most of the water in the pot (gauged b y its weight).

Better yet, set them on top of something that will wick excess water OUT of the cells. As it pulls out excessive water, that will leave room behind for air to enter. (So the roots can breath.) Then, if you n ed to "flush away" excess fertilizer, excess water will run out as fast as you add it.

(BTW, some people are careful to avoid watering young plants with too-cold water. I don't think it needs to be "warm", just not-cold.

Roots need air, and so do beneficial soil bacteria and fungi. "Bad" soil mic robes tend to be anaerobic.

If you come to think root drowning / overwatering was the problem, next year try a lighter, more open mix, by mixing in more Perlite or grit or pine bark shreds. Add coarse stuff with grain sizes like 2-5 mm or BBs to 1/5".

When you re-pot these next time, try adding a SOMEWHAT more open mix. But you should not change TOO abruptly from pure peat to coarse chunks - water won't form a capillary connection if the change is too abrupt.



RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2013
6:04 PM

Post #9465344

Please let us know how they do! That's how everyone learns.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
8:45 PM

Post #9465472

Schaff, I have everything on self-watering trays, so my seedlings are always wet. Because of the extra oxygen molecule in peroxide, overwatering shouldn't be an issue. I use 1 or 2 drops of Superthrive at the most per 1/2 gallon of water/peroxide 10:1 to fill my trays. Too high concentrations of either or both could be a problem maybe? I do agree that it looks more like something systemic, disease or too much of something, rather than chewing.

Last year I had Black Prince snaps, and they were short, pics below, with Stachys Hummelo. Kind of a disappointment, actually, not what I expected.

Teehee, Kathy, I dunno... Funny though, last year the blue ones bloomed at that height in the garden. I wonder if these will get taller this year? I'm going to pot them up early next week, maybe that will help. I'll have room because I'm taking some plants to CT, and DD will be taking some of hers next week too. Of course I've been trimming them, which might have something to do with why they're not taller...duh...

Whoopee... CT tomorrow! Finally! I wonder if we still have snow?!

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2013
8:49 PM

Post #9465476

I just did a little Google on Black Prince Snapdragons, and it looks like I didn't get the real thing. While browsing, though, I came across this:

This snippet from D.H. Lawrence's poem "Snap-Dragon" seems especially suited to the Black Prince snapdragon:

She laughed, she reached her hand out to the flower
Closing its crimson throat; my own throat in her power
Strangled, my heart swelled up so full
As if it would burst its wineskin in my throat
Choke me in my own crimson; I watched her pull
The gorge of the gaping flower, till the blood did float
Over my eyes and I was blind...

http://www.alchemy-works.com/antirrhinum.html


This message was edited Mar 28, 2013 10:51 PM

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

March 28, 2013
8:50 PM

Post #9465479

Kathy,
I am sorry but no, I have no seeds from V. Sightseeing. Actually no Veronica seeds at all. I bought my seeds from Park seed company years ago. Check Walmart, etc, they may have it.

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 29, 2013
5:16 AM

Post #9465619

Ok as for the Snaps Is it best to give the heat or light to Germinate ? also foxglove , & Lupines never done these before best to wait & Plant right where I want them to grow or plant them NOW ?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 29, 2013
6:25 AM

Post #9465667

I wintersow snaps and foxglove, I've never grown lupine till this year, and I have some WS seed, I'll update with how it works out :)
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
6:59 AM

Post #9465685

Craziness this am, heading out!

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schaff20
Raleigh, NC

March 29, 2013
9:04 AM

Post #9465827

update this morning:

plants are no longer wilted. yeah! there are about 6 plants that have the spots on at least one leaf. I picked off a few of the leaves because they were completely destroyed. an interesting thing I notice is that the infected plants are near each other in the middle of the table, in the middle of the growing lights. coincidence?

Rick, the soil is fairly coarse and dry. I was able to easily wiggle my finger straight to the bottom of the pot. It's a cheaper priced garden soil with a fertilizer (and lots of twigs!). I accidentally bought it instead of potting soil.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
9:28 AM

Post #9465844

Snaps and Foxgloves should germinate fine with no heat, faster with. Lupines need chilling, in 2011 it took 3-4 weeks Deno in the fridge before they germinated. They only need light after they sprout.

Good news, Schaff...

Our Internet won't be connected at the house until after the weekend, so this is it until for a couple of days unless we go to a friends house.

Happy gardening, everyone!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
12:11 PM

Post #9465964

Thanks blomma, I willl try to find.

Susie, which foxglove are you wanting to start? If it's something I already have, I can ship some in Mayish with the others that will be coming your way. And mine would be months ahead of yours... I'm thinking I over did it with the foxglove..lol... Just doing my method, I've had germination on the Lupine, tho not 100%. And Susie my method uses no heat. So you have to decide which to try... lol.. Yup, we gotta make it difficult for you...

Just got these sprouts in 2 days...could hardly believe it... Here's a list of newbies as of this morning:
Salvia turkestanika Pink
Salvia farinacea Blue Bedder
Reseda oderata, I still believe everyone should be growing these little annuals, yum, sooo sweet!!!
Salvia claryssa
Lavatera trimestris Loveliness Mix

Ok , I'll check in later or tomorrow, when I get home I'll check to see what other goodies have sprouted yet today...

Pam, safe trip!!!


RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2013
1:28 PM

Post #9466050

Schaff20,

>> no longer wilted. yeah!

Excellent! Whatever you chn aged (less fertilizer?) ... keep doing that!

>> Rick, the soil is fairly coarse and dry.

That should rule out over-watering, root-drowning and anaerobic soil.

>> It's a cheaper priced garden soil with a fertilizer (and lots of twigs!).

Wow. Where I am, anything with the word "soil" in the name is far too heavy and clayey to be used in pots.

But it's good for you if you can buy a LESS expensive mix and still get good drainage and aeration.

Many people pay for a soilless mix to get "sterile" conditions for seedlings, to protect against damping off,but others don't have to bother. Looks like you're in luck.


>> an interesting thing I notice is that the infected plants are near each other in the middle of the table, in the middle of the growing lights. coincidence?

Unnh-oh. I never heard before of anyone able to give seedlings TOO MUCH light! Now that I go back and look at your third photo, the seedlings around the edges show normal low-light leaning and stretching. The ones in the center look very bright in the photo.

What kind of fixture do you have? I can only see part of the end of the fixture. If it is incandescent, or quartz halide (tungsten filament, not arc discharge), you might have a plain old heat problem, and the leaves are cooking! Incandescent bulbs are great for heating, but not so good for illuminating leaves.

If you have plenty of light intensity in the center but too much heat, you could raise the fixture even higher. That will give the seedlings on the edges more light and the center seedlings less light (and less HEAT).

Or maybe rotate a few of the crispy plants to the edges, and move a few of the "green leaners" to the center. If the leaves that are now green turn yellow and die, then yes it's probably too hot.

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 29, 2013
3:18 PM

Post #9466149

Kathy would Love some I Have a Pk Of seeds but it just ssays Foxglove No other Info so yes would like some & These I will still Plant Out Back after the frost sure not Blooms this year but maybe Next year.
what type of the Reseda oderata, did you plant I see there is two types when i goggled it. they look very interesting .
Was outside Weeding today & My Legs & arm's will let me know in the morning Maybe even leg gramps'in the Night I can already feel the aches :) got to get a shower, super then off to lay back with a Movie .
GN all
schaff20
Raleigh, NC

March 29, 2013
4:53 PM

Post #9466228

Rick,

Thanks. I rotated the plants as you suggested and put more separation between the middle rows. There are 4 fluorescent bulbs in the fixture. When I put my hand on them after being on all day, they are only slightly warm so there is a tiny bit of heat. Today I moved the light up another notch and didn't water. Will go back to watering (without solution) tomorrow and will also turn the fan back on for air circulation. So far there are no new cases of spots.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2013
7:47 PM

Post #9466362

Yeah, florescent tubes won't scorch leaves that bad, even in direct contact. Hopefully, having FOUR tubes gives you enough light intensity that it will be OK to hang it even higher. Are they 4 feet long tubes?

So far it does sound like fertilizer/salt burn. Certainly most seedlings don't want much if any added fertilizer, and even then, 1/4 the "recommended strength for houseplants" is the upper limit.

Maybe, being a "soil" mix, they put in enough fertilizer for you to grow a lawn of adult crops with it. Then you added more, and "ouchie". Maybe.

One way that too much fertilizer kills, is to make the soil moisture too salty, meaning ionic strength or osmotic pressure. It literally salinizes a pot, the way a field can become saline if you keep adding fertilizer when there is not enough rain to carry it away. Next step, salt flats.

The plant tries to pull the (fresh) water it needs out of the salty soil, and it just can't, because that would be like "reverse osmosis". Analogous to a human trying to quench thirst with seawater.

can you actually flush water THROUGH the pots, and remove it from the tray with a turkey baster or wet-dry-vac?

Now here is a guess stacked on top of the "maybe", to try to explain why the leaves yellowed first in the center. It was SOMEWHAT warmer there, and also the plants grew faster there and had more leaf area.

Dry air plus leaves = transpiration. The bigger leaves evaporated more water into the air, and pulled more water out of their pots. Then when you watered the dry pots with fertilizer, it made their soil even more salty.

Just a guess. Either way, it sounds like "more water, less fertilizer" for a while is a good direction to keep going. And later, start fertilizing with 1/8th or 1/4 the strength, every other watering or every third. If they need more N,l they'll slow their growth and turn a lighter green./ They recover from that very easily. But recovery from too-much fertilizer is much harder, as dead-spots-on-leaves suggests.

Anyway, if you run the fan and things start wilting, go easy on the fan and think about how to give them cooler air!

BTW, there is also such a thing as nitrogen toxicity for plants. I thought it showed up as twisted leaves, b ut I can't find that online. But don't let any cows graze exclusively on those seedling until they look better! ;-)
"Symptoms of lethal nitrate poisoning include labored breathing, frothing at the mouth, rapid pulse, weakness, diarrhea, frequent urination, muscle tremors, in-coordination and convulsions, collapse and death."

Also, different forms of nitrogen in fertilizer have different effect and toxic thresholds: urea, ammonia, nitrates. Probably the problem is just TOO MUCH fertilizer, but you might look at the label on your soluble fertilizer and see where most of the N comes from. But then I don't know which kind is worst!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
8:46 PM

Post #9466394

Susie, I got mine from Select Seed. Reseda odorata, Mignonette 'Machet', 12-24"X6">. Seeing your post reminded me that there are two different heights, but can't remember much more than that, origonally I got them from T&M Seed, more than 15 years ago. Could you tell me the nursery.com as I would like to find them also... And ref. the foxglove, does the packet say perennial or biennial. If perennial might very well be Foxy, if not is probably biennial and do they show color or list height. (There is another foxglove that is perennial, it's Digitalis grandiflora (I have had the pink in the garden for several years, at 12-18". This year got seedlings of another D.grandiflora, and they are yellow at 30".) but you usually don't see these as that readily available, it's probably the above). Who's the vendor?

I need to correct my above post to 3 days instead of 2 days, sorry, I boofed.
More babies up today, checked when I got home tonight:
Nemisia moederskoent Jies dwarf mix (from S. Africa)
Osteospermum paste mix (from S. Africa)
Ammi visagna
Cynoglossum amabile Chinese Forget-Me-Not 'Mystery Rose'
Salvia claryssa
Scabiosa 'Beaujolais Bonnets'
Centaurea scabiosa



warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2013
8:53 PM

Post #9466402

Pix is Digitalis grandiflora...(it has never reseed in the garden), started under lights many moons ago..

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2013
3:45 PM

Post #9466985

Newly germinated as of today: (4 days)
Centaurea imperiallis Sweet Sultan
Lavatera trimestris Pink Blush
Heliotrope arorescens Deep Marine Blue

Hey Susie, does that package have a pix on it, mix colors orm all the same?

And Rick, when are you going to start your babies this season?

Schaff, hope thing are doing good now!

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2013
3:54 PM

Post #9466995

nope Nothing just says foxglove looks as someone had allot in their garden so there was No info on the pack except FOXGLOVE so I will just Plant a few & see if they grow :)

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2013
4:00 PM

Post #9467001

Oh, Ok they were from a trade, duh, I should have figured that one out for myself>>>> Lol. :)

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2013
5:20 AM

Post #9467383

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ HAPPY EASTER ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 31, 2013
5:51 AM

Post #9467408

Happy Easter!

The Easter Bunny brought me some new plants! I have several species of Dianthus, several Nicotiana, Sedums (I move them inside after they germinate), Nigella, and two colors of Nemophila.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2013
3:41 PM

Post #9467866

In CT, there is still a ton of snow compared to the neighbrs, who have none, and everything is frozen. The kid we met last fall at a local festival actually came and worked while we were away. We never heard from him so assumed he didn't come, what a nice surprise. He repaired a stone wall, but best of all, he made a base for a cement birdbath that for years was at my Mom's. I love what he did-- at first I thought it looked like a sculpture of a head and got my feet wet tramping through snow and ice to get closer. Very cool.

I set up my lights and transplanted almost everything from the 1 flat I brought out, Ceratotheca triloba, Campanula White Clips, Alchemilla Mollis , and Digitalis Camelot White and Pam's Split.

We got home tonight and all is good. The lowgrowing Astra Platycodons are the ones that are about to bloom, some blue, some pink. Kathy, how about yours? They must not be far behind.

BTW, I have yellow Digitalis Grandiflora all over the place, if you want some plants. And I'd love some pink...

Happy Easter!!!

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2013
8:17 PM

Post #9468104

HI...Glad you made it home...nope not on the pllatties yet, am getting ready to transplant and clip...but I do have a Petunis the has an almost open bloom on it. Sorry, I need to get some batteries for the camera...so no pix for a few days.. Was beautiful here today, mid 60s.I started the yellow grandiflora this winter but I might trade for one that could bloom this season>>>>>. and I can send you a piece of my pink which is also a perenn grandiflora. Info says the yellow is 30"...? The pink is 18-24".

Celene...wow...sounds like the Easter bunny was nice!!! LOL.

New sprouts today:
Felicia True Blue Daisy
Papaver orientalis 'Brilliant Red', with a name like that sounds like it suppose to be a true red...it isn't ..it will be a orange red...

Hope everyone had a good one today!!!

Pix: Delphinium grandiflora, 18", all season, got a bunch of these this season from seed, (cause I wanted pink too...lol.)

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2013
8:50 PM

Post #9468129

Dianthus Zing germinated...

I can send a clump of yellow, I have lots, just love it...

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 1, 2013
2:49 AM

Post #9468214

That's a lovely soft yellow. I have purple, as well as D. thapsii, which grows better in some of my less amended, dryer clay areas. That yellow tempts me.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
3:21 AM

Post #9468221

Ooh, Celene, purple? We should talk!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 1, 2013
5:21 AM

Post #9468302

We should ;) I def have at least a couple hundred saved seed, I want to see what comes up. We put in a fence last year, and the fence installer had some personal emergency, so he installed 2-3 weeks late, and stomped some plants that were not so happy about it.
schaff20
Raleigh, NC

April 1, 2013
7:05 AM

Post #9468433

Rick, I won't let any cows graze on them. ;)

Seedlings are all doing fine with just the watering, no superthrive or hydrogen peroxide for a few days. There is supposed to be fertilizer in this soil so maybe it was too much of an adjustment too quickly. Should I still try to add a fertilizer? Which ones do you like?

Next issue --- I can't get any of the marigold seeds to germinate and very few of the poppy seeds. I started them in 25-coir pellet trays with plastic domes. Of the 3 trays I started (so 75 coirs), only 3-5 coirs have shown any germination whatsoever. Ugh. What should I do differently?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 1, 2013
7:09 AM

Post #9468434

Poppies need cold to germinate, I just throw seeds on the ground and they come up in the spring. For pricey fancy poppies, I wintersow in peat cups and set them out when the seedlings germinate.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
7:21 AM

Post #9468447

If there's fertilizer in the mix, don't add any, it's enough until they go out into the garden. If you're not having any problems with damping off and your seedlings otherwise look healthy, you're probably fine without anything else. I started using it because of fungusy plants and still like my results enough to keep it up even though I've fixed the other causes (too cold, not enough light). I do think that the peroxide plus a drop of Superthrive give my plants a boost, but that doesn't mean you won't get results any other way. Plants want to grow, after all.

I had a lot of trouble with coir earlier this spring. Try a different seed starting mix. I've been adding lots of vermiculite to Miracle Grow (not liked much on this thread, but all I could find locally), which has helped a lot to lighten it. Look up the thread, follow links to previous posts, and you will see lots of info on what people are using, Good luck!!!!!

Celene, plenty of yellow... do I have anything else you want? :)

Pic, Platycodon Astra Blue, oh happy day!

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 1, 2013
7:52 AM

Post #9468494

I will send you some seed for the purple now, and I will probably have some Impatiens balfourii, it reseeds so I don't intentionally plant it, and always have to weed some out. I may have I. sodenii, I'll see what comes up.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
10:46 AM

Post #9468695

My poppies (oriental) germinated in 5 days with my method...peat/peralite mix, surface sown and domed tray with lights... Will be starting my annuals in a few weeks.

Pam, I have some with your names sake, Digitalis p. 'Pam's Choice' (find pix), many many babies to share, are you making your list? LOL... And wow, your Platy looks great, looked at mine this morning, no buds yet, but then again it's another that needs potting on... I'm afraid I'm going to run out of room in the house pretty soon... Need to get a few more lights so I have more shelves that I can use. Was going to make a pot run today but they are saying possible rain turning to snow so might be later in the week. Oh, one thing I did notice this morning was a small shrub rose that I grew from seed, (4 or 5 seeds and I got 1 plant), Rosa China was on the packet(seed trade), it's got several buds on it already. The only thing I know about it is it's a groundcover type.

Boy, you have all scared me away from using the coir method, am thinking I like my peat/perlite mix. I'm sorry but I would have given up years ago if I had had such dismal % of germination... I have had a few failures this season but a very low %, most probably from not the correct method used, (ie, needing cold for x amount of weeks, maybe bad seed and some who knows). I had germination on a pot of daylily seed ( from susies seed trade this winter, maybe those from czimm.) anyway hers are all germinating without any special treatment at all, yet another pot (seeds from Fruity) are just sitting there. I can see they are taking on moisture and plumping up but no sprouts yet. So if they don't sprout in a week or so I will place them in the fridge. Another failure was my Cephalarias. not a thing...phooey. I had germination on Campanula latifolia Alba, but not the Purple, so who knows... And my Persicaria was a failure, both bistorta and polymorpha. And there's probably a few more, but all in all, I'm very pleased with my crop of flowers this season. I may have to give a bunch away but that's better than the opposite, ( I guess). Hang on til you see new pix!!! This is my first crop of flowers in 3 years. I did a few last year but only what I could do in a couple of trays in the bathroom, (let me tell ya that wasn't much at all). Later all, Kathy...
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2013
12:36 PM

Post #9468819

Kathy, you are such a dynamo! I'm pretty happy with my over-all this year, also a few disappointments, but you are the big winner here just in volume. And you're running out of room?! Hard to believe! Btw, I will have a piece of Cephalaria for you (I hope!) once things thaw out. My D Pam's Split did well this year, but I have been keeping a list of various things we've mentioned, will dmail you...

In CT I found small bags of peat moss/perlite seed starting mix, brought them to the city for the annuals :-)

Celene, thanks for the purple seeds. I can send you a clump of the yellow once things thaw out.

Do you think the I balfourii will get the same blight that's been killing the I wallerianas? My I w's were destroyed last year, but I had a few volunteer balfouriis not far from them that were fine. I read that the New Guineas now get the blight too, and so I'm a little worried about counting on the balfouriis to fill in, in case they get it too.

Hmmmm... Always something...
I still have a few coir pellets, and plan to use them for tomatoes. They did fine in them last year, I think they'll grow in anything! But that will be the end of coir for me. Meanwhile, just out of curiosity, I tried damp vermiculite in cups under the dome for a few things, and Dianthus Zing is the first to tell me it likes it.

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schaff20
Raleigh, NC

April 1, 2013
12:45 PM

Post #9468832

Pfg, the Platycodon is beautiful!

I'll try the poppies and marigolds in the ground. If the marigolds don't germinate, at least I can buy them at the local store and plop them in the veggie garden for pest control.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 1, 2013
5:19 PM

Post #9469121

>> And Rick, when are you going to start your babies this season?

You noticed that I'm still procrastinating? I'm about 1-2 weeks before my avg last frost date, so I'm about 10 weeks late starting Lobelia, Petunias and Salvia indoors. I'm so late that I'm considering starting no flowers indoors this year, only Brassicas. Maybe even start most seeds outdoors this year, since it's been amazingly dry lately.

The two-week forecast predicts a low of 36 one night, and 37 another night. All the rest are warmer.

I finally kicked my butt into the garden for the last two weekends: serious weeding on two beds that had been taken over by Ranunculus and Snapdragons-from-Heck. My legs HURT!


schaff20,

I wouldn't add any more fertilizer until I was SURE they needed it. Like, widespread turning pale green and slowed growth. Even then, I would ask: "Do they want more fertilizer, or a bigger pot?" If they have 3-4 pairs of leaves, they might want a pot bigger than 2-3".

Or listen to them at night: are they scratching at the door, trying to get outside and put their roots in the ground?

I tend to use very dilute Miracle-Gro soluble chemical fertilizer, if I add any to seedling trays at all. Mostly, if I keep them indoors so long that they can "take" or want any fertilizer, I've been keeping them indoors too long.

But the people who use fish or kelp emulsion instead of soluble chemicals may have a better idea. It is harder to kill plants with organic fertilizer!


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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 2, 2013
1:16 PM

Post #9469880

Nothing from the Mirabilis- 4 o'clocks yet, so I carefully dug up the seeds one by one-- I only have 6-- and one was making roots, the others looked like they would never, hard as rocks. So I snipped them a little with a small clipper and stuck them back in.

Finally started tomatoes in peat pellets in small cups under the dome. When they get going a little, I'll put them at the bottom of large Solo cups, fill with soil up to the leaves, and keep doing that as they grow. That way they'll have a good root system by the time they go out.

Kathy, do you happen to remember how long the Verbascum Chaixii took to germinate? I looked up the thread but couldn't find a post...It seems to me it was just a few days, or am I mixing it up with something else? My latest has been a week, and no sign of anything yet :-(

I know, a week isn't long, but I feel like I've been waiting for months...

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 2, 2013
3:02 PM

Post #9469988

RICK,
Does that plant you have a photo of produce yellow flowers? I have something that looks like it with the same leaves and it sends runners out. Do you know the name of it?

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 2, 2013
3:11 PM

Post #9469996

KATHY,
I have sprouted many DL seeds 40 this season. The way I do it is soak in hand hot water over night. to plump the seeds. Then use the Deno method and place the seeds in teh fridge for 2 weeks minimum. After 2 weeks bring in the package to room temp. They usually sprout for me between 1 to 2 weeks.

1] This year's crop of Daylily seedlings in 3" foam pots. I have 40 of them. Photo taken March 2013
2] Sprouting in a paper towel just prior to poting in a 6-pack.

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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 2, 2013
3:23 PM

Post #9470003

blomma,

>> Does that plant you have a photo of produce yellow flowers? I have something that looks like it with the same leaves and it sends runners out.

YES! (grumble gripe moan curse)

Yes, lots of yellow flowers if your neighbor lets them run amok! (She got sick and couldn't weed, so it's more my fault than hers.) But she also seemed to think they were her strawberries, which used to grow near there.

The roots go very deep, and also runner around. It looks like the plant drops back to the ground and sends more runners, but I can't swear to that. They spread FAST.

This is what the Plant ID forum seemed very sure of:

Weed #1:
- - - Ranunculus / Buttercup
- - - Ranunculus repens 'Pleniflorus'
- - - Double Creeping Buttercup

looks ~ like a Strawberry - invasive, runners
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/57000/


This message was edited Apr 2, 2013 3:24 PM

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blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 2, 2013
9:21 PM

Post #9470352

Thanks Rick
that is what I thought. I got rid of it last summer but one pops up once in awhile. Not really hard to get rid of. I dug the mother plant out and tore out her babies. As long as you can get at them, no problem. there is always weed killer if digging don't do he trick.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 3, 2013
7:20 AM

Post #9470558

I grow this in a pot, planted around the edges. Variegated lysimachia and tall horsetail are in the center. It keeps all of my thugs in one place where I can enjoy them, and keep them from trampling neighbors. It is a great combo for kids to water, all of these can deal with super sogginess with impunity :)
sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 3, 2013
9:02 AM

Post #9470652

Happy lil' fat girl here - I've got Canterbury Bells seedlings!~ Did a happy dance, 'cause I've never grown anything much before. I've now a small apple orchard, Super Italian Pastes, Balsam, and one lonely little Eggplant so far. Yay me!!!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 3, 2013
9:58 AM

Post #9470703

Good for you!!!

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 3, 2013
12:50 PM

Post #9470852

RE: Ranunculus / Buttercup

>> As long as you can get at them, no problem

I guess you're right. But you have to get all of the roots! And you can't give them a few months of inattention to establish themselves.

Pulling them out of cracks between pavers, or out from under neighbor's bushes is the hardest part.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 3, 2013
3:42 PM

Post #9471015

Rick,
mine were confined to my border on the north side of my garage. Very easy to get to. As soon as I noticed its "wandering" habit, I began to get rid of it. My son gave it to me from his border where he allows it to spread. Better in his border, than mine. LOL!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 3, 2013
3:46 PM

Post #9471019

Orlaya aka Queen Anne's Lace grew wild in upstate Massachusetts where I used to live years ago.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 3, 2013
4:07 PM

Post #9471053

I think I need to increase the priority of "weeding" on my long list of overdue tasks. And move invasive weeds to the top of the list!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 3, 2013
7:30 PM

Post #9471258

Rick
I do my weeding early spring,like now. Mine are already done. Growth is young and roots are not as deep. It is easier to weed now, than later in the season. I still do later as I see weeds, but my main weedy chore is early spring. I like to stay ahead ;of them.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 3, 2013
8:11 PM

Post #9471284

Pam, V. chaxii took 6 days to germinate, I have plenty if you need a few...

YEAH for Barb!!!!!

I'm ready to start getting outside, I'm thinking spring is finally here and it's beginning to feel like it..Here's a pix of an Orchid I picked up at the grocery store for 1/2 price after Easter ($20), it's 42" tall!!!!!! Now I just have to find it a home in the house... for now it will stay with my babies so I can enjoy it all day, sure wish it was fragrant...

Got fresh batteries so will update progression of the babies in the next few days. Got 2 more days of sitting the Gkids and then back to potting things on and maybe some outside things as there are many... I know we'll still be getting snow, but it melts in a day or two.

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 4, 2013
8:03 AM

Post #9471647

Your orchid is beautiful! And I may take you up on the V Chaixii...

Platys going nuts! Pic 1, Astra Blue with on bud on a Perlmutter on the far right. Pic 2, Astra Pink about to start.

Gave DD a flat of deer resistant babies, Alchemilla, Aquilegia, Dianthus, and a couple of maybes, Campanula and Platy, probably better kept on the raised deck for safety.

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 5, 2013
5:03 AM

Post #9472455

New sprouts du jour: Dracaena draco, Aristolochia elegans, Schizanthus, ground cherry, and two that made me especially happy: Adansonia digitata and Pandanus utilis! They're the ones that make you run around and say "I am the germinator!" in an Arnold Schwarzenegger voice.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 5, 2013
5:31 AM

Post #9472472

ROFL... Congratulations! You are the germinator!

How did you do it?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 5, 2013
1:17 PM

Post #9472871

Oooooh, I've had the schizanthus before...love those liitle things. Is the Aristalochia elegans thee perennial vine? (Dutchman's Pipe isn't it?) Gosh all the others are complete blanks..lol.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2013
2:21 PM

Post #9472922

This thread is such an education! I love it!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 5, 2013
6:10 PM

Post #9473141

Dracaena draco, a large growing relative of the spikes sold as a throwaway annual everywhere. Soaked and sowed in 1/2 vermiculite, 1/2 Promix with bottom heat.

Aristolochia elegans-yes, the perennial vine, but annual here unless you bring it indoors. Sowed on the surface of the soil with Promix.

Schizanthus-Promix, bottom heat, sow on surface, needs dark to germinate.

Ground cherry, just like a tomato

Adansonia digitata-Baobab. Pandanus utilis, Screw Pine. Both germinated with bottom heat + extra heat from a lamp, in 1/2 vermiculite and 1/2 Promix.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2013
8:30 AM

Post #9473585

Ok, you got me. I googled Schizanthus and found seeds for a rare white strain on Amazon - is there anything they don't carry?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 6, 2013
11:39 AM

Post #9473756

Nope! That's how I get in trouble. I don't know what a plant looks like, so I google it. I find the seed on Ebay or Amazon, then I think...might as well see if the seller has other stuff I want, let's economize on postage. So, before I know it, I have six colors of zinnia, for instance. lol

Oh, and if you run out of seed you can't live without, hit Pinterest for five or ten minutes. That'll fix it.

This message was edited Apr 6, 2013 1:41 PM
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2013
12:09 PM

Post #9473774

At least this was only $1.09 for shipping and handling... Only a tiny addiction fix... Lol!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 6, 2013
3:22 PM

Post #9473935

Saw the mention of 4 o'clocks. I'm starting them from seed for the first time this year in an experiment with Japanese beetles (and because of the cheerful flowers!). I wasn't going to start them until 5/1 and I had read they prefer to be sown in place. Am I misinformed? Should I be starting them now for late May plant out? I had already planned on starting them in paper pots and was going to soak/nick them and give them some warmth for germination. Any advice is appreciated!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 6, 2013
3:24 PM

Post #9473938

Hurrah, my iris seeds are just beginning to sprout. I bought them in 2 weeks ago from spending the winter outside since November.

Here are a few of my crosses that are sprouting:
1] Ziggy x Batik
2] Tiger Honey x Nigerian Raspberry
3] Mister Flounce x Mesmerizer
4] Season Ticket x Cat's Eye
5] Drama Queen x Broad Shoulders

Now the long wait for blooms.

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blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 6, 2013
3:30 PM

Post #9473947

Cindy
You can start them now. Nick, then soak in hand hot water overnight. I used to grow them. Last year I started them for my daughter. Unfortunately, the deer found them to their liking.

4 0'clock are perennials in warm climates. I used to carry the roots over in damp peatmoss in my basement to plant the following year. Cut the stem back to 2".

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 6, 2013
4:01 PM

Post #9473974

Mine overwinter against the south wall of my house. I start mine in newspaper pots, so I can just plant the whole thing with minimal root disturbance.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2013
7:46 PM

Post #9474187

Sooooo... Does the Schizanthus need any special,treatment? Somewhere I read it needs darkness? Cover the pots? Heat? Cold?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2013
9:35 PM

Post #9474259

Pam ~ You found white schizanthus? Do you have enough to share a small amount?

Thanks, Evelyn

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 7, 2013
12:39 AM

Post #9474320

I use heat mats for the schizanthus, and they do need dark to germinate. Sow them on top of the soil, I just cover that part of the flat with foil till they sprout.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2013
1:39 AM

Post #9474326

I just ordered them from this sketchy place on Amazon, don't even know how many seeds I'm getting. They should arrive by the end of the week. I hope they are what hey say they are!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 7, 2013
7:13 AM

Post #9474507

Thanks for the info on starting the 4 o'clocks. I'll be making up some paper pots tonight. Have already gone through about 60 for other babies. And didn't know they were a perennial. Interesting. I'll be ultimately planting them in pots so it's easier to position for possible effect on JBs.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2013
12:23 PM

Post #9474827

Pfg wrote:I just ordered them from this sketchy place on Amazon, don't even know how many seeds I'm getting. They should arrive by the end of the week. I hope they are what hey say they are!


True...you never know until they are planted out and then they already have your money...unless you know their rep. Do they have a good rating? Also, since I have never heard of white schizanthus, doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I have only seen them offered in mixed colors, especially in bright colors...if they do not come out as promised, you can get a refund from Amazon. That is one good thing in your favor...the same with ebay.

OK, in "The Book of Annuals", Alfred C. Hottes says it does come in white. So maybe it is from saved seed. I just have never seen them offered in any other way besides mixed colors.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2013
1:34 PM

Post #9474906

I ordered the seeds in spite of 3 out of 3 bad reviews. Is that asking for it, or what?! One review was about the seller from an eBay purchase that was advertised as giant pumpkin seeds but were regular size. The other two were ranting on about the description being misleading, not exactly literate or accurate.

RARE*SCHIZANTHUS PINNATUS*' White Angels' ORCHID*15 SEEDS*E~Z GROW*SHOWY. A beautiful exotic looking Orchid flowers on attractively fern foliage!
Beautiful Decorative, so quite Versatile. The Quick Growing and Blooming plants
This Exotic plant always gets the Most Attention in your Garden! This Beautiful Chilean Native!
* We offer combine shipping ALL OVER THE WORLD!!!****
* EASY TO GERMINATE *Plants are Simply Stunning! Profuse orchidlike flowers!

But the reviews weren't exactly literate, either. And I know they are not orchids, so what the heck... I bit. But with a large grain of salt added... Lol...
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2013
7:56 PM

Post #9475314

Well, the review about the pumpkin, I believe, was just the growers experience. In order to grow any "giant" type of summer annual fruit, one has to start it inside or in a greenhouse. It is possible the person who grew that seed, just sowed it in the ground and expected a miracle. There is a whole book dedicated to growing giant veggies...somewhere, I came across it...don't remember... I know they just don't HAPPEN...from seed, no matter what kind of seed that you buy. Just like if you want really large fruits or tomatoes, you actually do have to prune them and start them early as well...

Usually people that do not have a good experience write reviews, but how many of us write reviews of wonderful experiences?? I forget sometimes, to put down all the reviews as the orders come in, but it does help others in their purchases, and sometimes, it will improve the seller as well.

Good luck!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 7, 2013
9:42 PM

Post #9475404

I have a copy of Western Garden Book, by Sunset. It is 2" thick and my plant bible. I looked up SCHIZANTHUS pinnatus and here is what it said:

"Annual, Height 18", 12" wide. Profuse orchid-like blooms in pink, rose, lilac, purple, or white, all with markings in various colors. Ferny foliage. Buy plants or sow seeds 4 weeks before planting time. Germination is slow. Sensitive to frost and heat. Give well drained rich soil in wind-sheltered site. Filtered sunlight. Often grown in greenhouses."

Growing giant veggies involves allowing just one veggie to grow to maturity per plant, then give heavy feedings with plant food low in nitrogen.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 8, 2013
3:41 AM

Post #9475526

I love schizanthus but can never manage to save seed. It's teeny tiny.

Yesterday I potted up some seedlings...Datura Ballerina White and Yellow, Currant tomatoes, Mirabelle Blanche cherry tomatoes, a mystery cherry tomato (cat stole the tag), Tithonia, dwarf pomegranate, lemongrass, variegated cat grass, and Mexican sour gherkins. Many hot peppers: Mayan Love, Goatweed, Aleppo, Nosegay, Seven Pot, Trinidad Scorpion, Filius Blue, Tepin, Ghost, Peter-yellow and green, Bolivian Rainbow, Naga Morich, and some Indian and Korean peppers that don't have any English on the package. Weirdly, none of my anchos or purple jalapenos germinated. All of the hard to germinate varieties pop up and grow like it's their job, but the reliable varieties failed, what the heck?! Almost forgot variegated Nicandra, and ornamental black rice.

New sprouts: So many poppies poppin'--Drama Queen, Breadseed, Persian White, Giant black, Danebrog, Dubiums, ruffly pink, The Giant, Lavender feathers, and I'm sure there are more. Giant agastache, Clitoria, Beaucarnea guatamalensis, campanulas, and pink and magenta evening primrose.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2013
7:55 AM

Post #9475873

I have a warning for you (Celene) on the Lemon Grass, WATCH OUT, it spreads. I planted a 2 1/2" pot and will be taking it out of the garden this year. It spreads!!!!!!! (No pix button but will post a pix of the plant 3 years later if I can find it, clup now is atleast 4-5ft each direction...).

Love your poppies, some I've grown years, ago some I've never heard of...make sure you post pix when blooms begin would love to see them!!!

What is Giant Agastachie? and which Campanulas (another of my favorite plant groups).. Oooh and a magenta primrose, sounds interesting.. I'm growing two new (to me) Oenothara this year (primrose), and one of them is acting wierd...leaves are just not happy...was going to transplant but decided to wait til they stabalized.. Am thinking my problem child is the O. hookeri ( the other I'm trying this year is O. pallida 'Innocence') do you have any experience with either?

Pam, the flowers on Schizanthus are Orchid like in form but very small and profuse. I usually buy them from one little nursery in Denver but tried them from seed one year...yes darkness for germ. I placed several sheets of newspaper over the top of the domed flat, till they grminated. Got mine from T&MSeed.com...they should have pix and germinating instructions.

Ok, am off to get caught up on a few other threads will be back in a couple of days... I promise new pix are coming Pam..lol.

Got a doosy of a snow storm expected overnight, look out those that live east!!!!! I'm hoping to get out and put some fertilizer on the flower garden this morning... 'Spose to get 9-12" of the white stuff with rain coming in today.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 8, 2013
8:10 AM

Post #9475893

Lemongrass is hardy for you? It shouldn't be hardy, I'm zone 6a. I bring mine in every year, and it promptly dies, but I do try to overwinter.

I have regular old O. pallida, nothing can kill it, it's a tough customer.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 8, 2013
9:15 AM

Post #9475966

Celene,
I am in zone 4a and O. pallida 'Innocence' didn't survive the winter. I started them from seeds. They were inter- planted with O. macrocarpa (missouriensis) along my driveway south side. I had 6 growing and loved them.

I also grew O. speciosa (pink blooms) from seeds. It survived the winter but is also weedy as it spread by rhizomes underground. I got rid of it before it became too much of a problem . Too bad since I loved it. I have no photo of it.

My favorite is O. macrocarpa missouriensis aka Ozark Sundrops for it long season of bloom and easy culture.

1] O. pallida
2] O. macrocarpa (missouriensis)
3] O. macrocarpa (missouriensis) along my driveway where O. pallida also grew, and perished over the winter.

This message was edited Apr 8, 2013 10:57 AM

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 8, 2013
7:22 PM

Post #9476748

My O. pallida is sited in a warm place, that might make the difference. I love the O. speciosa, I'm just careful not to plant it where it will overrun other things. The magenta that I have planted now is a darker pink O. speciosa. It's going in a pot!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 9, 2013
10:11 AM

Post #9477527

In CT there was still some snow, but it's warming up this week so that should be it. I put the digitalis seedlings outside in 46 degrees for a couple of days, then left them in the mini greenhouse with the zippers open for ventilation, and covered with Reemay to diffuse the sun and keep some warmth in. The plastic cover is now in its 4th season, and has holes and splits everywhere. I actually think that's a good thing, I'm more worried about the plants frying than freezing.

New sprouts in NY: Lobelia Siphilitica, Petunia Axillaris (wild petunia), lots of each, in vermiculite in small cups. Also, all the tomatoes are up except for Sweet Million, I used old seeds, only about half germinated. I thought tomato seeds lasted forever, but I guess not.

Snaps and Nicotianas coming along,,,

...and I have a garden blooming its head off in the apartment!

Pic 4, Platycodon Perlmutter

Pic 5, Platys Astra Blue and Astra Pink, and Petunia Easy Wave, and a Dianthus Loveliness about to do it :-)))))

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deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 9, 2013
11:19 AM

Post #9477623

Pam will you still get Blooms once you put them outside this summer & How tall do these get

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2013
10:38 AM

Post #9478875

Pam...OH MY...you have that many blooming already, wow!!! LOL...I have one Petunia so far. If yiou get some warmth to that Dianthus it should smell good!!!! And if you want to extend the life of that outdoor stand can use plastic from Home Depot, (package or roll, package fairly cheap and get the thickest mill). I still need to get mine up outside, hoping this weekend as it's only about 10* at the moment...

I'm growing the O. pallida this season and this is the one that is just not happy yet, leaves have been curling and just are not happy...hope they make it.. I'm also trying O. hookerii, it lists as a z7-9, anyone have any experience with this variety? Like anyone in a cooler zone growing it? Gosh, I'm hoping it will grow for me but if it's not going to be hardy then I just may have to ship to someone in a warmer zone...LOL, shucks cuz it's doing great and time for potting on.

On to newly sprouted (mostly annuals):
Nemisia moederskoent Dwrf
Felicia True Blue Daisy
Osteospurmum Pastel mix (purples)
Salvia turkestanika Pink
Salvia farinacea Blue Bedder
Ammi visagna
Heliotrope arborescens Deep Marine
Zaluzianskya capensis
Resedia odorata
Asperula orientalis
Cynoglossum zeylanicum Chinese-Forget-Me-Not Mystery 'Chill Out'
Cynoglossum amabile Chinese-Forget-Me-Not 'Mystery Rose'
Salvia claryssa mix
Campanula ramosissima 'Meteora'
Centaurea scabiosa
Scabiosa 'Beaujolais Bonnets'
Centaurea imperiallis 'Sweet Sultan'
Lavatera trimestris 'Ruby Regis'
Lavatera trimestris 'Pink Blush'
Papaver orientalis 'Brilliant Red'
Osteospurmum ecklonis 'Sky and Ice'
Lavatera trimestris '
Loveliness Mix'
Dietes iridioides 'Fortnightlily'

Potting things today, if I remember will get some new pix. Here's one of the New babies (listed above) and froggie swap from Susie. Later...Kathy

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2013
12:06 PM

Post #9478968

Welcome back, Kathy, hope you had a great birthday! And as always, your list is impressive. Loooooove those froggies...

Susie I posted the answer twice to your question, and the computer genie ate it. The Astras are 8-12," P Perlmutter is 24." And I don't know if they'll keep blooming or not... They may just make roots for a while, but time will tell.

One Astrantia White Giant germinated. It's about 1/2" long. I took it away from the open window, and teased the seed cover off its head- and managed to do it without breaking the seedling, too. Then I agonized, finally decided to mix up seed starting mix with lots and lots of vermiculite (it was in pure vermiculite since 3/24), then put it in a small cup under the warm dome. After all that chilling, freezing, thawing, blah, blah, blah... A reward?! Now to see if it survives infancy!

It was 80 degrees in the city yesterday, and today's another warm one. Then it cools off some but should stay nice over the weekend. I wonder if I fried my digitalis, leaving it outside. It's usually 5-10 degrees cooler in CT, but that's still a big adjustment for the babies. Oh well, it's all part of the joy of not being there all the time to babysit :-(

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2013
9:54 AM

Post #9480075

Yup, had a great birthday, spent the day with my daughter and we both came home winners...love that when it happens, and should happen ALL the time, thanks for asking Pam...

Here's some new pix. Check out those Centranthus, they are growing like crazy and I've clipped them back and now they are branching nicely.
1. Centranthus rubr, Jupiter's Beard
2. Digitalis grandiflorum (yellow) leaves are very different than the D. purpereas., back tray: Polygonum Pink and Red, Baptisia alba, Aqulegias, Snaps
3. Digitalis p. Alba
4. Digitalis p. Primrose Carousel
5. Verbascum chaixii


This message was edited Apr 11, 2013 10:05 AM

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2013
1:41 PM

Post #9480348

I'm trying an experiment... There's another thread about getting faster germination by soaking even tiny seeds, so I decided to try it.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1302492/

I put a bunch of seeds in hand hot water in separate cells in an ice cube tray this morning. Tomorrow morning I'll plant them using Kathy's method of vermiculite on top of seed starting mix (I found one that's peat and perlite). Supposedly even the lobelia should sprout in just a few days, usually they take longer.

I soaked Lobelia Regatta White, Lobelia Fountain Blue, Lobelia Compacta Paper Moon, Dracocephalum, Dianthis Annual White, Sweet Peas Captain of the Blues, Basil Lettuce Leaf, Basil Sweet, Parsley flat leaf. And one more try for Veronica Fairytale, although I'm beginning to think that's a hybrid that doesn't set viable seed.

Latest to bloom: Dianthus Loveliness, just one flower so far, sooooo pretty, more Petunias and Platys.

The old tomato seeds sprouted, just took a little longer.

Tomorrow in CT I'll find out if I cooked the Digitalis by leaving it outside in the mini GH during the warm spell we just had...

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RiverNymph
the Mountains, CO
(Zone 4a)

April 11, 2013
2:00 PM

Post #9480363

I just read about putting a thin layer of vermiculite on the top of seedlings as well - in a mother earth article.
Seems like a good idea. Normally I Just do a little compost.

This message was edited Apr 11, 2013 2:01 PM

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 11, 2013
2:04 PM

Post #9480366

Pam won't it be harder to get them out of the ice cube tray ? Next time your by a $1 store they have very small 2oz Med cups or Jigger shot glass. they would work better i would think . if you can't get them there let me know i can get them for you . pretty flowers :)
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2013
2:44 PM

Post #9480406

Good idea... I figured I'd use an eye dropper for the smallest seeds, like the lobelia. Or I could put a layer of paper towel, then screening and flip the whole thing over... As long as I remember to do a chart of what's what first. I'm glad to know about those little cups though. I bought 3oz cups at the supermarket, but would love the smaller ones.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2013
3:05 PM

Post #9480439

If you need large quantities of them to use later, check kitchen supply stores (or Amazon) for the plastic cups they use for condiments, 2 ounces I think.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2013
7:14 PM

Post #9480730

Thanks! I ended up getting most of the seeds out with a small spoon without too much trouble. Most of them were floating. The Lobelia seeds, super tiny, I scooped out with a small marker made from a Venetian blind. I scooped a few at a time, they stuck to it, and I used a spritzer to rinse them off into the cells. But individual cups would certainly be easier, then the seeds could just be dumped out with the water.

The strange thing was that some of the seeds, especially the basil and parsley, were coated in a kind of viscous gel. Very odd. They were soaking for about 12 hours, maybe that gel is the first step in germination? Basil doesn't take that long, I just did it because it was on my list to do next.

The sweet peas I did Deno, that worked well a couple of years ago, everything else is in cells or cups under the dome. It's a full house again. Tomorrow I take another batch of plants out to the house to make room.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 11, 2013
9:35 PM

Post #9480865

Would small test tubes work for this?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2013
12:33 AM

Post #9480927

Maybe, but if seeds get stuck in the bottom it might be hard to get them out.

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 12, 2013
5:04 AM

Post #9481011

I planted my Pumpkin,Squash,& Gourds this last Monday & weds &they have sprouted already I used some little plastic 3oz cups put hole in bottom & threaded some yarn up through it keeps them moist but not soggy & I just put water in the pan seems to be working . I just hope that I can keep them from over growth before i can get them outside seed pks said germination 7-14 days Ha ha ha I had germination in 3days.even the tomato seeds are popping up i planted them on weds.

well off to read more forums before my coffee is gone ya all have a great day

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 12, 2013
5:34 AM

Post #9481039

I would probably flush them out with a syringe. Normally fluids pour out pretty cleanly, but I'll do a test in the next couple of days and report back.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2013
7:08 AM

Post #9481147

Soooo cute, DJ :-). I got a few beets and some lettuce started in CT, but that's it so far for veggies. I guess I better get going!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 12, 2013
8:05 AM

Post #9481212

I am doing veggies today. Beans, winter squash, zucchini, peas, cucumbers, melons. Plus I am soaking seeds for a few of the annuals that I sow later...Ipomoeas, Mirabilis, nasturtiums, and Castor.
RiverNymph
the Mountains, CO
(Zone 4a)

April 12, 2013
9:47 AM

Post #9481346

I love nasturtiums... This year I'm trying out Alaska Mix and Peach Melba cultivars. Which one are you growing Celene?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2013
12:36 PM

Post #9481547

Pam...Uuuuuuh, I'm wondering in that pix above you are showing your Platy and a white flower in bloom (the white looks like a Petunia, I hope that's not the Dianthus you showed getting ready before or is that a white Platy?) I'm soo confused...lol.

River...those Peach Melba sound wonderful... I forgot, where are you located again, was it by Golden?

Hey dj...looks like your going to be pretty busy here soon, hope your brother will help!!! LOL. And the kids too...

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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2013
12:47 PM

Post #9481557

When soaked, Salvia seeds absorb water and exude a gel layer, kind of like frog / tadpole eggs.

Pre-soaking seems to make them germinate faster, perhaps because they don't have to scrounge that water out of the mosit soil.

I did my soakin g in 0.1% hydrogen peroxide 1.5 teaspoon per cup. Others make it stronger.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2013
3:46 PM

Post #9481765

It was the basil that had the gel...

Kathy, yes, that's a petunia, lol... This year I tried Easy Wave for the first time, much more promising than P Storm. Couldn't believe how fast it branched without pinching, and blooming already. I wonder if it poops out later?

I didn't post the Dianthus pix because I was waiting for more than one bloom...and here it is today. The other beauty is P Perlmutter, the first double bloom.

Happily, the digitalis I left outside during the mini-heat wave look perfectly fine. Today is wet and raw, so I just peeked, then left them covered up.

I love nasturtiums, too, have grown most colors and types through the years.. This year I'm doing Buttercream, not sure yet what else. Maybe the traditional sprawlers to fill in while perennials grow in the new area, have to wait and see how much room there is- and how much weed suppression I need- once it's all cleaned up and planted. Squash is good for that, too.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 12, 2013
3:47 PM

Post #9481768

Hi all! :) I have been gone for a couple of weeks. Man, a lot happens on this forum in a short time. I had to "catch up" from the last week in March.
Everyone has had such good success with germinating. I just arrived home yesterday so haven't had time to calculate my survivors and losses yet.

Kathy, you mentioned snapdragon: Plum Blossom. Yes, I have seed and yes, you can have some. I don't know if you still want it or not? If it's too late for Sp., it would make a nice plant for fall as well. I may try Pam's method for fast germination on snaps. I don't think mine made it. This would be my third attempt for snaps, but I have been absent so much. If I don't get any, I sure hope the garden centers will have them. Most of the time, they don't have the tall snaps anymore. Black Prince returns for me every year. It gets about 15 to 18 inches tall.

I love the Digitalis grandiflora. I rec'd one from a DG'r {ahem, Pam :)}. It survived in a harsh summer with me carrying water to it occasionally. I was so impressed; I started some from seed last season and planted some here and there in my gardens. I hope they made it through the winter. I wouldn't mind if it would re-seed! And, a big additional plus, is it's perennial vs. biennial. I also notice the Digitalis thapsi is perennial. I will be growing this one in the future. Diane's Seeds have 11 different cultivars of Digitalis. I started from seed her Digitalis purpurea 'Glittering Prizes' and was really impressed how robust the plants were. They will bloom this year.

Blomma, your Iris are beautiful.



birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 12, 2013
3:50 PM

Post #9481773

Pretty flowers Pam. Good for you!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
11:18 AM

Post #9482545

Would love the seed of Plum Blossom, when ever you can send the seed. Thankyou!!!! And in return what can I send your direction? Lol, thankyou! :) And just curious, what color is your grandiflorum.. I'm excited about mine, it's suppose to be a yellowish, 30", z4-10 and June-Sept. My pink grandiflorum is only 18", and blooms Junish only. Never reseeds either and the leaves on my new one are quite different from any foxglove that I've seen. Gosh, I sure hope they didn't mix up the seed with something else. Take a look at pix 2 above 4/11/13 and see if anyone might be able to ID the leaves of the plants in the first tray. Any ideas? (Seed was obtained in a trade from Netherlands...do they look like a potentilla or maybe something else?). I have 38 of whatever they are...lol.

Pam, did you smell that Dianthus yet? Remember to pinch off old blooms and it will continue the whole season, getting thicker thru the season (pix 1 is of one 2-3 years old, pix 2, is 2 or 3 plants together, approx same age but both in 2 different locations, 25 miles apart)).. Collect seed toward the end of the season from a few buds as they are short lived,(3-4 years maybe as they bloom so profusely).

Was going to put up the plastic on my metal tube frame greenhouse today but the breezes are just a bit much...phooey! Now we will be having breezes (20+ mph) and a new storm blowing in. They said today was suppose to be the nice day before weather came in. Rain and snow on the way for 3 or 4 days and then I'll be sending east again..lol. So I'll just keep on potting, lol. I'm running out of room... My tomatoes are against the lights again, just waiting to see how long before I start getting flowers on them, should be any time now. My other batch is ready for potting on, next year I won't be starting any that soon as I did the first batch, lesson learned. Lol!

I'm curious, what's everyones last frost date? Here where I am it should be around May 10 or Mother's Day. Z5-6 here. But I'm also at altitude and was wondering if that made any difference? So what's everyone elses?

Ok, I mailed out a package today for the froggie trade and included a few of my new babies, I'm going to see how well they make the trip. Fingers are crossed. First time mailing newbie plants. Ok, I've got potting to do...will chat later all..Kathy

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy         
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sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
12:16 PM

Post #9482602

Here in my neck of the woods, April 3rd is the date the last is anticipated; however, the informational site says the last possible date for a frost, worst-case scenario, I suppose, would be April 20th.
I'm in, as well, for a break, and to find out if/how azaleas might be grown from cuttings. I've two absolutely humongous azaleas in front of my living room window, which, while beautiful, are overtaking the front bed there. I'd rather they be moved, but if they might be started elsewhere, that would make me as happy. I've several flowers planted around my little goldfish pond/dog-water-bowl (1/2 a whiskey barrel), in hopes of starting a garden of sorts in that area of the entry to home.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 13, 2013
2:13 PM

Post #9482701

I have a kind of embarrassing selection of nasturtiums. Indian Cress-a generic term for the plant, but this was a yellow variety with red markings from Select Seeds, Hermine Grashoff, Cobra, Park's Fragrant Giants, JL Hudson's trailing variety, Empress of India, Blue Pepe, Aloha Red-White, Cherry Rose, Variegated Queen, and Milkmaid. I really like Nasturtiums. lol

I have an Orlaya sprout! It was planted 22 days ago, and kept moist and room temp with no bottom heat.

I also have a couple of African basils for tea sprouting, and a lonely spiky little Hesperaloe peeking out today.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
4:21 PM

Post #9482829

The leaves on my yellow D Grandiflora are nothing like other Digitalis... Smooth, smaller, brighter green... I don't know if you can tell from my pic 1, pic 2 is new leaves emerging after the winter at my DD's house. She thought the plant I gave her died. She's new, but learning, lol.

Dreary grey drizzly day... Everything got potted up, full house again, and I bought another light. Next week no matter what, snaps and Alchemilla go out in the mini GH, and the Digitalis that are in there now go out.

What about Campanula? Do they like it cool? I'm ready to kick them out, too. I know the Platys and Salvias like it warm, and they're worth it, but what about Dianthus?

In the city there's lots of room now, but I just picked up a bunch more seeds from Susie's robin... I could have sworn there would't be that much to tempt me, but I ended up with... Ahem, cough, cough... 19 bits and pieces. Yikes!!! I haven't sent the box out yet, maybe I'll put some back? Lol!

Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   
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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 13, 2013
4:49 PM

Post #9482858

Quick question on snaps. I've pinched them back once and moved them outdoors during the day. I bring them in at night into a 60-degree garage because it's been right at the freezing point here for a few nights and because I have a raccoon meandering around on my patio at night and afraid it will cause some mischief with the plant trays. Anyway, the snaps are doing well in the cooler temp (and toughening up a bit with a light wind) as are Digitalis, Canterbury bells and some thyme. How many times do you pinch the snaps back?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
5:07 PM

Post #9482872

I think I started mine later than yours. I only did it once so far, and they are just leafing out now. Maybe someone else knows?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
5:46 PM

Post #9482903

You can keep pinching the snaps all season, remember the more you cut them back the more stems you'll be getting... Tho about the time you plant them if already pinched back let them grow to develop flowers and remember to deadhead. And pam, don't worry about putting out the snaps, they like it on the cool side, also Dianthus like it cool too...Since they are (both snaps and Dianthus are not hardened off yet don't let the frost get to them... just sayin... A rule of thumb might be...those that bloom early (spring-e. summer) can take the cooler temps. I'm quite sure there are probably a few exceptions. And Pam if daytime teps are above 50*, then you can open your greenhouse up for an hour and begin extending the time so they can be ready to get planted early if need be.

Ok, I've still got a question on the table so to speak...and only one answer, come on...lol.

LOL, Celene, you don't like Nasturiums do you..? Are there any others you don't have? Looks like maybe you've turned into a plant collector... My downfall are the Centaureas and Campanulas (Adenphora and now including Platys see below)...

Now I have another couple of questions for the group...anyone in Zones 5-8, ever grown: Dierama argyreum, ambiguum or erectum? How about Dietes? And Oenothara hookerii? Need pro, cons and general info as these are actually out of my zone but I have babies and might try to push the zone requirements, or do I need to bring them in for the winter cuz heavy mulch just won't do it...

Hey Pam, was thinking about it, aren't platys and Campanulas related? Cuz my first impressiom of your question on putting the platy's out later cuz they like it warm is the opposite of what I would have guessed. Ok, just looked at one of my ref. books: HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL PLANTS, by Alan Armitage, (professor at one of those Southern colleges, and the go to guy in the U.s. says that Platys, Campanulas, Adenophora and Codonopsis are all related. and the platys are Z3-8 ( so theoretically they can handle the cool temp (harden off first tho), and that they are late to emerge in the spring also did you know they bloom from the top first? Platys are also one of the last to emerge in spring so care must be taken not to plant over or dig out accidently in spring cleanup. Seed germinates readily with warm temps and moisture. Divide and move in spring (shoots 2-4") if necessary. Lol... ok class is over, now answer my questions...lol!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 13, 2013
6:10 PM

Post #9482924

Dianthus stays evergreen for me so can take some really cold temps.
Did some weeding today. Ach! so much chickweed and henbit. It comes up right in the middle of my plants!

Edited to add:
Kathy, I will send you some of the Snapdragon 'Plum Blossom".
I am sure you have something I would like!

This message was edited Apr 13, 2013 7:13 PM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 13, 2013
6:53 PM

Post #9482993

I like campanulas, too. Not as much as euphorbias, sedums, sempervivums or nasturtiums, but hey...you have to draw the line somewhere. I really like that Campanula "Blue Eyed Blonde".

I also like variegated things, especially tricolor variegates. I have the tackiest garden, ever.
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2013
7:52 PM

Post #9483089

We're in good company, Celene. My garden is planted willy nilly and adore variegated plants. Used to have a tri-color Sedum that was really cool looking. It should have survived with the Semps but didn't return last year even after our mild Winter. Go figure.

birder, we're in the same boat. Weeding never seems to end this time of year. Henbit is the bane of my existence!

Susie's Robin is a tempting place to let your fingers do the walking, Pam. You and Kathy have some mighty fine looking seedlings. Have learned and continue to learn from both of you and so many others.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2013
10:02 PM

Post #9483180

Yikes! The computer just ate a really, really long post! Grrrrrr...

SparklinBarb,, we have some very old azaleas next to the house, and every couple of years just after they bloom I whack them waaaay back. It doesn't take them long to fill in enough green to cover the stems.

Congratulations on the Orlaya, Celene!

Thanks for all the info on hardiness. Campanula and Dianthus get kicked out next week, along with the snaps and Alchemilla.

But since the Platys are so late to emerge in the spring, and so quick to dump their top growth in the fall, I figure they don't like their foliage to get chilly. I'll keep them inside until time to put the Basil out, here it's usually around June 1.

This thread has been so much fun, and such an on-going education. I just love that so many have been sharing so much experience, I've learned a ton!

Having said that, sorry, Kathy, I don't know the plants you're asking about. Maybe someone else does? And THANKS for all the goodies in the robin, especially the ones I had trouble germinating this winter. I'm about to try again this week.

My garden is beginning to wake up. Daffs are up 3" and weeds are spreading as I watch. :-(((. Time to get to work out there...

A pair of cardinals hung out for a while this morning, sooooo beautiful. :-)))


deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2013
6:10 AM

Post #9483333

daff;s are getting frozen here ,& also my hyachins are or were almost open & Now with all this snow & rain i don;t think i will see any blooms on them . this is to stay with us for another week yet no sunshine in sight for a few days .

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 14, 2013
9:30 AM

Post #9483495

LOL, you missed the question again, and so did many others. "It is: What is everyone last frost date?"

I'm just wondering say for instance mine is approx May 10ish for z5 (actually a new z6 here), is that the same across the country for anyone in z5, or does it vary for those at a lower altitude? Trees in Denver are already budding and some early leaves, here at my place they are just beginning to show swelling buds, but yet I'm in the new zone listed as a z6.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 14, 2013
11:31 AM

Post #9483613

On a CT website, our zipcode comes up as May 11-20. My town doesn't have its own zipcode and is not listed separately anywhere that I can find. Of the two nearest towns, one in each direction about 10 miles away, one says 5/18, the other 5/29. I'll stick with experience and local lore, tender annuals and veggies at the end of May, and whatever feels right before that for the rest. I actually test the soil temp for a few things with an instant read-out meat thermometer. Nothing is simple...
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 14, 2013
11:47 AM

Post #9483623

Kathy, my last freeze date is April 15th. My zone is 6b. Our cherry trees, pear trees, forsythia, hyacinth, daffodills, aubrieta, iberis, scilla, anemone blanda, tulips, phlox sublata, blueblells, red bud trees, serviceberry trees are all in bloom. The viburnum have swollen buds. Spring is in full swing here. Garden Centers are full of plants. We mowed our yard this week. We were out of town for awhile and now, the landscape looks so different! We are behind on our spring activities!

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2013
1:44 PM

Post #9483752

Z5 here also 1st sunny afternoon in a week we have had snow & Rain for over a week & more to come later tonight our last frost is usually the 15 th of may this year not so sure this time last year i was finding Mushroom not this year for sure .
happy gardening all .
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2013
3:33 PM

Post #9483852

There's a tool here at DG to calculate first and last freeze and frost dates.
I plugged in 12345 as a Zip Code sample. Erase those numbers and plug in yours or another Zip Code you'd like to check.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/freeze-frost-dates/index.php?q=12345&submit=Go



Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 14, 2013
5:39 PM

Post #9484020

April 28, here.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 14, 2013
11:12 PM

Post #9484302

frostfree from Sept. 19 to May 22=120 frostfree days
FruitOfTheVine
Blue Ridge Mtns, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 15, 2013
5:41 AM

Post #9484456

May 6 through October 5 / frost-free growing season is around 183 days.
Safe planting date keeps inching up here. We still 'traditionally' say May 15th.
Haven't been to one of my fav nurseries yet, but the owner always puts big signs on her greenhouse doors warning buyers not to plant tenders until... then she fills in the date.


Lily, how close are you to the latest blizzard? Or are you in it?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2013
6:43 AM

Post #9484551

We have nurseries here selling tender plants like basil, tomatoes and peppers. They're only going to die if they're planted now. Second worst garden center pet peeve.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 15, 2013
7:45 AM

Post #9484662

Hi Susan,
No blizzard here. We have had snow off and on since last Monday when we got 18". Then snow off and on all week. Friday another 3 " and yesterday 3" more. Slight dusting of snow this morning. It is19 degrees.

We really need the moisture so no complaints here. I would have preferred moisture in liquid form. I don't have to shovel that. Oh well...!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
9:00 AM

Post #9484817

Thanks on the zone info. What I find interesting is birders is April 15 and a z6b, I'm a new zone at 6a and May10.
Celene are you a 6a or b? and blomma I would have guessed would have been later, only about a week after most of us. And blooma aren't you getting that snow storm today? (We're on the southern end of it. I may only get 2". Can send here if you might like to share, lol.)

Lol Fruity, I thought it would be easier to ask than try and figure what's happening in others areas than looking at a map. I was more interested in personal expeince. It looks like everyone is pretty much the middle of May. But it's interesting that birder is 6a and you are 7a but later than birder. Fruity, I would have guessed you at e. April..(being in the south). Just curiosity...lol. And have you grown any of those above that I was asking about? Sure would like to push the zone on those.

My H.Depot had already put tomatoe plants out last week and we've had snow since several times...go figure..lol.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 15, 2013
11:24 AM

Post #9485008

I cannot go by the zone numbers. Even though I am in zone 8, many time we will get snow late April or early May. We live in the Sierra foothills at 3500' in elevation. This year has been unusual that we have not had snow since February. When I first moved up here in 1987, the snow stayed on the ground for months and the temps averaged out to 40. Now the snow melts within a week and the weather warms up. This time it stayed warm for at least a month in between storms.

So I (usually) don't put out any tenders until May 16th. Now I have tomatoes planted. If they freeze, I'll just replant. I have to wait until almost fall to get tomatoes otherwise. Our nights in the summer will usually fall to 50, until August anyway...I know they like 60 nights and 75 - 80 days. How many of us get that consistently?? It has been consistently 60 for about a month now, on average during the day and not lower than 50. Of course, we had rain last night and this morning I noticed it was 45. Gosh, how are we supposed to figure out the weather???



This message was edited Apr 15, 2013 12:47 PM
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 15, 2013
12:25 PM

Post #9485086

warrior - thanks for the pinching info on the snaps. I sowed my seeds 2/20 and they were all up in 5 to 6 days. I wasn't sure if pinching them a second time too soon would result in top-heavy plants before the main stems were sturdy enough. They are exposed to some light breezes so hoping that will toughen them up some. They've already gotten a small dose of organic starter fertilizer (Dr. Earth) when I potted them up but I haven't fed them anymore other than some seaweed juice when I potted them.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 15, 2013
5:50 PM

Post #9485300

Yes, Kathy, I agree the zoning is confusing. A friend of mine is in the north east, her zone is 7 and yet has snow longer than I do. But, we usually get about one snow per season, and then, it's usually about 3-6 inches. From what I have learned, snow protects the perennials from freezing. Not to be picky, but my zone is 6 "b" and I am probably 45 miles at the most from zone 7. Also, it might be that I am close to the Mississippi River (15 min.) and perhaps the water puts out warmth. I don't know!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 15, 2013
6:06 PM

Post #9485315

Sure enough, it snowed today...go figure!!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 15, 2013
6:12 PM

Post #9485324

Well, guess what...WE HAVE SNOW!!! Right now! Oh well...as I said, I cannot go by the numbers...any numbers...

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
6:26 PM

Post #9485356

See everyone does have their little micro climates. And the maps just don't explain that. Not only that I would spend days trying to figure out where everyone lives and the maps are sooo small..
And I would have never guessed that evelyn gets snow, lol... Speaking of which it's coming down here now and more over the next three days. Yeah!!!

Been potting all day and figured out I'm gonna run out of pots, ohoh!!!! Best I go dumpster diving at the nursery recycle bin personally... Sure wish I could remember when I scored a gazillion a few years ago, was April or May...? Did see a bunch in the bottom of one bin but couldn't reach them, and figured if I tried I might end up in the thing..lol. Got a bunch of trays, but at the rate I'm going thru them they be all used by the weekend...

Pam.. I'm trying to remember if you had pinched your Platys a while back? Mine are getting leggy and don't think they will bud up for a while yet, so maybe I should.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 15, 2013
6:41 PM

Post #9485376

Kathy"
We have had flurries off and on but nothing major today. As far as frostfree date, it depends on the year. The date stated is only meant as a safe date. Usually we can plant earlies.

The cheapest and best pots are the 3" foam coffee mugs sold at Walmart. They insulate, are lightweight and you can use a black marker to write with. Easy to punch drainage holes with a screwdriver. Easily reusable after giving them a quick wash.

This message was edited Apr 15, 2013 6:45 PM
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
7:18 PM

Post #9485433

My zone went up, too, but I don't bother much about it, haven't changed it on my listing here. According to my mini-maxi thermometer we didn't get below 20 degrees this winter, but other factors, like the late freezes, make me mistrust believing in a warmer zone. It's too soon to tell if my'iffy' plants made it, probably by next week I'll get more clues.

Yes I did snip the Platys, a couple of times, and most of them got nice and bushy. But once they started to bud I stopped.

Meanwhile, something very interesting has happened. I've been in contact with Diane of Diane's seeds, who says that my double Platycodon Perlmutter is a sport, and unique. I am going to keep that plant separate from the others, and hope that the seeds come true to type.

New sprouts today: Dracocephalum and Orlaya.

Lots of new goodies from DJ's robin to get working on, and lots of potting to do...

Thumbnail by Pfg
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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2013
7:22 PM

Post #9485440

How did you get your Orlaya to sprout?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2013
7:56 PM

Post #9485486

On 3/26 I soaked it in the usual hand hot water/peroxide 10:1 for 3 hours, then put it in vermiculite in a 3oz cup, then stuck it in a small covered container by an open window. After 2 weeks (last week some time), I brought it in and put it under the dome. Et Voila!

Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg         
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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2013
9:19 PM

Post #9485567

Then mine should continue to germinate, I hope I get more than one seedling :)

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 16, 2013
5:17 AM

Post #9485727

Kathy bring a UHALL I can fill it for you Not a problem trays pots 3" - tree size Pots you pick any size you want about 3-4 Hundred + no joke . well you would have to load since I Have to stay in bed a few more days Yet :) findly 56* today then rain for the next 3 days . have a great day

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2013
7:27 AM

Post #9485860

LOL susie... got a bunch of pots here of all sizes too. What I'm low on are the 2 1/2" that fit perfectly in my trays (32 to a tray). Potted up 62 yesterday, am thinking I need to get at it. And Charlene said her plants made it just fine, so will be able to ship you babies in a month or so... Don't ya just love it...your Christmas presents just keep comming...lol.

Blomma..just curious, how much for how many? Am thinking I need a few thousand...

Ok pam, I'll start cutting them back as they are getting too floppy.
sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2013
7:57 AM

Post #9485889

Our house is apparently in a weird position. We're down the east side of a small valley, with the wind blowing straight down the property from the west. I guess that's why here our little various things are barely budding at times, and the same things up at the road are already in full budding stage. It makes trips to the store fun, seeing the difference in such a very short distance from home to here. For example, my redbud out front Friday had no blossoms, but a mile down the road I was so pleasantly excited to see blossoms on the redbuds there!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2013
10:41 AM

Post #9486099

Susie ~ We hope you feel better soon. Do you have to go back into the hospital, or can you stay home and rest? Prayers are going your way. You must be feeling frustrated. I did not start anything this year, for the first time in years. Now I am too busy with outside to start seeds...well except for yesterday when it snowed! After being warm for months with only rain. Now some of my tenders may succumb to the vagaries of the weather...grrr...

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 16, 2013
11:16 AM

Post #9486124

Sorry to hear that EVELYN We have had snow & Rain Mix for over a week it seems yesterday & today some sunShine the back to rain & Storms for the next 3 days . My Molly Duck Is enjoying the sun shine :) Looking for worms . My Doc's office is taken their own sweet time about calling me to let me know if i can stop the heperine & Go back to coumadine or not so for now I'm still home & Staying in bed with my legs elevated sure happy to have a lap top to rely on when i have to :) well zoey is here now so ya all have a great day
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2013
2:58 PM

Post #9486359

This is where I get my 2.5" pots, they sell them by the hobby pack, 32 for 2.80. And they are extra deep, 3.5" so the plants can live in them quite a while. This year I got the 3.5" as well, they are deeper than standard 4" pots so more pots fit in less space, but there is still good root room.

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/black-form-pots-hobby-pack/containers

Potted all day, nothing fun. We're heading out tomorrow owning for a little road trip, so no gardening for a couple of days. I decided to wait before starting anything new until next weekend in CT. BTW, except for the basil, I don't see that soaking made much of a difference in germination. No Lobelia, no Parsley so far. I just checked the list- Dracocephalum popped right up, maybe the soaking did make a difference, but certainly not Lobelia in 3 days. It's been 5.

My one Astrantia White Giant seedling bit the dust. One day it was green, the next brown. I got the big seed head off it, but there was a smaller one underneath I couldn't budge without damaging the seedling. I guess finally it gave up. Me too. Now I'm on the hunt for a plant to buy. All those months, all that cold, colder, warm, cool...yikes! At least I know it worked, something germinated, but now I want someone else to go through all that so I don't have to, lol.

Is spring really getting here? Sigh...

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2013
5:51 PM

Post #9486538

Thanks for the info pam.. have a nursery supplier I will be checking with in the morning, tried online but their catalog didn't show up...Like I say, I'm needing a couple of thousand...so I may buy a box or two. Been a long time but am thinking they are 1800ish to a box.
Don't give up on that Astrantia, I've had plants that I thought that had died off, kept watering for a few weeks and low and behold, new green. One example that comes to mind is my Asclepias. They looked so good a few weeks ago..now leaves are yellowing and stems die from the top. I had this happen in previous years. First time it happened I decided to keep watering and finally got new sprouts to the side. Now afer experiencing this several times, I just figure the tops will die off and new shoots will appear and I'm guessing it's one of the plants idiosyncracies *gosh, hope I spelled that right...lol. (if not forgive).

Ok, gkids are keeping me busy so will be back to,orrow and let ya know about the pots..TY all. Kathy
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2013
7:19 PM

Post #9486624

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/black-form-pots/containers

Case of 800 is 51.90
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 17, 2013
4:40 AM

Post #9486848

My last post was on the fly, just wanted to give the info while I had it.

My father the English Teacher would have been impressed!

Sadly, the Astrantia is toast. Brown from top to bottom. It was only a thead, never even got its first leaves open. RIP. :-(

I have some yellowing leaves on a few plants, more near the bottom, especially on the cool weather plants. I figure they're getting sick of confinement, but it won't be long now.

Does anyone have experience with Impatiens Balfourii? I did it a couple of years ago but can't find any reference to it in my records. Is it quick? slow? Need any special attention?

Thanks!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 17, 2013
5:08 AM

Post #9486872

I wintersow Impatiens balfourii, but they mostly just volunteer now. They definitely need cold stratification to germinate.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 17, 2013
9:34 AM

Post #9487254

Thanks. I guess it wil have to be the fridge, it seems to be warming up out there. I want to try them in containers, since the regular impatiens went kaput last year. I got the seeds from a couple of volunteers, so I guess it's not affected by the blight.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 17, 2013
12:01 PM

Post #9487404

Thanks Pam ,just ordered a case. Was $7 cheaper than I can get from my supplier in Denver and less gas (about 100 miles). Still will dumpster dive and see if I can get more..lol.. (Plastic pots are goning to cost: .07 vs. .02 on styrafoam but will fit my trays). I guess if I still need some next month, I'll reconsider..lol). Thanks gals..I believe I need to start winning more at the Casinos to support my habit!!! LOL, would be wonderful, how do you do that again Susie?

Snowing like crazy today, yeah!!! 'Spose to be a blizzard by late afternoon with 6" possible...just loving it.

Ok, a few threads to catch up on and off to the plant room..clipped my Platys and some Dianthus this morning and my little rose grown from seed is still blooming, yum..smells so good. Speaking of which, Pam did you smell that Dianthus yet, never did hear...lol.

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blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2013
3:02 PM

Post #9487639

Pfg,
Impatiens are a tropical annual so I don't think the seeds requires stratification. I have started other varieties from seed years ago by just sowing in seed mix without covering and keeping at room temp. They grew nicely in Massachusetts when I lived there. Too hot and dry for them in WY. I used to grow tuberous Begonias there also using the same roots each year. Lost them when I started them in Nebraska from the heat and dry climate. I gave up on both.

Kathy, it is 51, 8 oz foam cups for $1.00. There is also 21, 12 oz cups. I like the 8 oz.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 17, 2013
6:13 PM

Post #9487890

I. balfourii isn't tropical, that's why it needs cold stratification. It is a Himalayan plant, from higher elevations where it's cold. Same for I. glandulifera. I.omeiana, I. arguta, which are hardy in Zone 5 with protection, are from China and Nepal(I think). /impatiens geek :)

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2013
7:25 PM

Post #9487961

According to the Wikipedia Encyclopedia, it is an annual herb and yes native to the Himalayas at 330 ft-2,000 ft above sea level, which really isn't that high.

Here is a link to it. Nothing about seed sowing. For some reason, I always thought of them as tropical.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impatiens_balfourii

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 17, 2013
8:30 PM

Post #9488019

Had to just stop by and tell ya I got to order some new books for my birthday, (Amazon.com gift card from my daughter). Was thinking of plants (gosh I must need another hole in my head...lol) but then decided on books instead...
1. The Flower Farmer, An Organic Growers Guide to Raising and Selling Cut Flowers by Lynn Byczynski
2. Specialty Cut Flowers: The Production of Annuals, Perennials, Bulbs and Woody Plants For Fresh Cut and Dried Cut Flowers by Alan Armitage
3. Color In My Garden, An American Gardener's Palette by Louise Beebe Wilder
4. What Happens in My Garden (American Garden Classics) by Luise Beebe Wilder
5. The Fragrant Path: A Book About Sweet Scented Flowers and Leaves by Louise Beebe Wilder
6. The Unknown Gertrude Jekyll by Gertrude Jekyll
7. Gertrude Jekyll on Gardening by Gertrude Jekyll

Who knows...maybe I can use the info in books 1 and 2.
Books 3,4,and 5 are by a gardening Legend! Or should I say an American Gardening Legend. One of the first women in American landscaping.
Books 6 and 7 are a British author and another Legend in her own right.

Now that I've grown a wide variety of plants I can actually follow along with what they are talking about...both authors are from the previous turn of the century, ok, maybe not quite that far back but close. I tried reading #3 more than 20 years ago and got lost..lol, or I wasn't ready then. When she started talking gilly flower, egads, atleast now I have the computer to help me with some of the names and terms.. lol.

Gosh and I could have gotten some more Iris..lol. (Might have been easier).

piz: Passiflora incarnata: Pasion Flower Z(5 roots)- 9 or 10, take a close up look at this one...flowers are truely miracles and the fruit is even edible.

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy
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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 18, 2013
2:55 AM

Post #9488133

When I started gardening in the early 80's I had a friend who lent me the whole stack of Jekyll books, all beautiful editions bought in England. I would fall asleep reading, then wake up in the morning, pick the book up off the floor and keep reading. I've been trying to find them again, but those editions are rare and $$$$. I still have a 'thing' for her sense of color and design, and for for the Brits in general. Happy reading!



Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 18, 2013
3:15 AM

Post #9488136

Blomma, the balfouriis are indeed annual, I tried germinating them (pre-internet and advice of other gardeners) for like five or six years. I broke down and purchased plants from Baker's Acres in Alexandria, Ohio--they clued me in to the cold stratification. I have zero clue about the approximated USDA zone of the Himalayas where this is from, but it does see frost. DH says you can see it. lol In any case, they reseed nicely here, maybe more than you want, but not in a way I regret planting.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 18, 2013
3:39 AM

Post #9488149

I just looked on Google Earth. Our town's altitude is 1200 feet, but our house is 1700. Balfourii should be very happy!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 18, 2013
4:45 AM

Post #9488199

We are a whopping 685 feet here, and it grows pretty well. I don't think it has complex requirements. My husband grew up in India, and when I grew the plant out he said he remembered seeing it in the mountains there, apparently it grows in a lot of places. I grow a couple of plants because he has pleasant childhood memories of them, but that was a total accident. Blomma's right, there are a whole lot of tropical impatiens that can't take any kind of chill, they just die without bothering to pout around for a couple of weeks first. One of my first house plants was a double flowered impatiens like that, an old-fashioned pass-along plant from one of my mother's friends. Easy to grow, easy to flower, a good confidence builder for a kid :)

I lucked out a few years ago, I found a box of gardening books at a tag sale, it had some Penelope Hobhouse, Tracy DiSabato-Aust and some other good books. $5. It had a Buddhist cookbook thrown in there, Tassajara Cooking, which was random but I loved it.

New sprouts du jour: MG Gypsy Bride, Rebecca, Carnivale di Venezia, Ishidatami, Sunrise Serenade. Still waiting on Ipomoea indica. More Orlayas popping up, and a boatload of edamame. "Not all the seeds germinate, plant extra" I was told...I wondered why it'd be different than any other soybean, which have a high germination rate and are very easy. Should have listened to my intuition, now I have way too many edamame! Scarlet Runner beans, and Hyacinth bean are popping up as well. I must have mismarked my Mina lobata seeds, because I know I soaked them, I know I planted them, but I don't see them. I may have a surprise later on.

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2013
5:54 AM

Post #9488269

Celene if you might have a couple extra plants of the Orlayas would you like to maybe make a trade ??
well I will be back later today gotta get off here .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 18, 2013
7:54 AM

Post #9488435

I'll see how many actually germinate and grow, but if I have extras, I'd be happy to trade.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2013
11:41 AM

Post #9488656

warriorswisdomkathy wrote:Had to just stop by and tell ya I got to order some new books for my birthday, (Amazon.com gift card from my daughter). Was thinking of plants (gosh I must need another hole in my head...lol) but then decided on books instead...
1. The Flower Farmer, An Organic Growers Guide to Raising and Selling Cut Flowers by Lynn Byczynski
2. Specialty Cut Flowers: The Production of Annuals, Perennials, Bulbs and Woody Plants For Fresh Cut and Dried Cut Flowers by Alan Armitage
3. Color In My Garden, An American Gardener's Palette by Louise Beebe Wilder
4. What Happens in My Garden (American Garden Classics) by Luise Beebe Wilder
5. The Fragrant Path: A Book About Sweet Scented Flowers and Leaves by Louise Beebe Wilder
6. The Unknown Gertrude Jekyll by Gertrude Jekyll
7. Gertrude Jekyll on Gardening by Gertrude Jekyll


Wow, Kathy, what a nice selection! I read #'s 3, 4, and 5 every year! I do not have the last 2 and would like to get them. I will look to see if they are still available, after you have made your purchase. I only have 2 G. Jeckyll books, the best one for me is "Colour Schemes for the Flower Garden", which I probably read every year as well. Gosh, I hope some of her wisdom sinks in for me. I really do love the L.B. Wilder books as well. Good choices, Kathy!

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2013
12:31 PM

Post #9488718

Oh, I forgot to mention...there are 3 books that I also read every year. I do not know where I got them, I think a couple from ebay and one at a local used book store...all written by E.A. Bowles.
"My Garden in Spring", "My Garden in Summer", and "My Garden in Autumn and Winter". These are reprints by Timber Press, of course, since they were originally published in 1914, and first editions of these are difficult to obtain. True, they are English, but again so much information just on every single page...these are not actually design book, like G.Jeckyll, but observations of plants and the growing environments that each plant likes and how to grow them well...not actually if you live in California, but still...

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 19, 2013
10:15 PM

Post #9490340

LOL... Yup these are reprints, I only paid .01 to .05 each (Amazon.com, garden books) and then tack on $3.99 postage, so about $4 each book except the first two, they were full price. Evelyn and Pam their were many at this price if interested, just aren't first editions at this price..

Celene..I have several books by Hobhouse also, love her stuff too, in fact just got book #7 today and it is written by Hobhouse and her comments and suggestions of the compilations of Jeyll's works. Will be interesting as she gives updated plant references.

Evelyn..I just love the Garden books..that's how I ended up with such a large garden!!! (And I have several bookcases filled with gardening books, from technical to eye-candy and everything inbetween...I probably didn't need these either butttttt..lol). Will have to look for E. A. Bowles. English author?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 20, 2013
10:45 AM

Post #9490827

Kathy ~ What is the name of the new P. Hobhouse book?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 20, 2013
4:18 PM

Post #9491095

OK, Sweet Peas are sprouting. I soaked them 4/11, then Deno. About 6 show sprouts. I'm hoping more show over the weekend, I'd Ike to get them all planted. The plan is, several toilet paper rolls fitted into a larger pot, filled with potting mix, top 1" seed starting mix, seeds 3 per roll.

The Detroit Red beets I soaked 4/7, then planted in cells under a dome have not sprouted. Grrrr... 2 years ago that was the magic formula in just a few days, but for Red Ace. I may try again, but still wait and see if these do it.

First day outside, exhilarating, and of course tiring. I MUST get the annuals going! Yikes!

This message was edited Apr 20, 2013 8:37 PM

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 20, 2013
7:40 PM

Post #9491366

Evelyn...not a new book per say. It's #7 above, it is edited with a commentary by P. Hobhouse. Giving updated plant info for those not available any longer or hybrids, newer planting techniques and less expensive ways of acomplishing Jekylls ideas.

The book I have from 20 years ago: Colour Schemes for the Flower Garden by Gertrude Jekyll (Introduced and revised by Grahan Stuart Thomas).

Still burry here. Might get to 60 tomorrow but more rain/snow mix on Monday. Would love to get outside and get some cleanup done. Goffed around all day, got another bale of peat, dumpster dove for pots...lol. Hope you all enjoy my escapades...a couple of employees offered to help me pick pots out of the bin...lol...was funny. Later all...Kathy.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2013
4:41 AM

Post #9491547

I thought I was going to harden off some of the early perennials this weekend, but we suddenly have a cold spell. Last night 29, then around 30 the next two nights. I had the Alchemilla, Aquilegia and some hardy geraniums from a co-op outside yesterday but brought them in for the night. The digitalis that have been in the mini GH were out too. I put them back at night but left 2 of each outside to see what would happen. I haven't looked yet...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 21, 2013
5:06 AM

Post #9491561

Super cold the last two nights here. We went from 85 to 35 in 30 hours. What the heck?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2013
5:12 AM

Post #9491565

Yeah, really!! We were in the high 60's, low 70's. Ouch!!!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 21, 2013
1:12 PM

Post #9492034

Sprout report! Poncirus "Flying Dragon", some are obviously curlier than others even from 2 leaves. Mina lobata, Datura 'Purple People Eater', Tall Telephone Pole peas, moon flowers, Radio calendula, and a lone Sanguisorba.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2013
2:13 PM

Post #9492080

Celene...let me know how you like the Sanguisorba, I've eyballed that for a couple of years now and never gotten any, so reports would be welcomed!! LOL. You start the moonflowers inside? Probably a god idea, I've tried them in the garden without any results, so I guess i should remedy that this year, lol. Will be starting the last batch of annuals later this week so I'll put those on the list, anything special to get them to grow?

Went out earlier to begin putting plastic up but turned around and came in...to breezy!!!! Am thinking I have just enough plastic sheeting to do the back (horse stall). Small area, and it's enclosed on three side and the area protected best from the winds, but the least amount of sun. But I figure I will only need it for 3-4 weeks.

More snow tomorrow, 3" is what they are calling for, gosh willl it ever warm up so I can get my garden cleaned up and ready for planting? Only 22 days til planting can begin...lol. Later all!!! Kathy

Pix: Delphinium grandiflora, at 18" and an alllll summer bloomer, Started a batch of these this winter of mixed colors,(blues, white and pinks). Nice little filler plants, sure hope I get some pinks!!! And they reseed themselves too.

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Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 21, 2013
6:16 PM

Post #9492436

I use the Deno method to start moonflowers and MG's, it works great. They are indeed indoors.

Hope you get your pink delphs :)
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2013
8:59 PM

Post #9492630

I've also had good results with Deno for MGs and Moonflowers, both vine (Ipomea) and bush (Datura). Celene, you are doing some really cool things... I just read about Poncirus on Danger Garden- yikes! I wouldn't want to get stabbed by one of those spikes! My roses are mean enough, lol!

Coooold here... At least, cold enough for me. So glad snow seems to be over for us! Last night went down to high 20's. 3 out of 4 of my poor little foxgloves wilted. I put them back in the mini GH and they revived minus a couple of leaves. The one that didn't wilt I left outside. Inside the GH it only went to 32.2, and everything looked great, including 1 Alchemilla and 1 Aquilegia I left in there overnight for a test. They had been outside all day, temps in the 50's. So tonight, after spending the day outside again, I put the rest of them in there, left yhe zippers open, and wrapped the whole thing up in Reemay again. It's a joke, really, how many tears there are in the plastic, but it's really doing the job of staying above freezing and not boiling in the sun. Better than when it was new, lol.

So tonight and tomorrow 30 degree night temps predicted, days 50's and 60's, then gradually warming up a little at night, but not really during the day.

Detroit Red Beets I soaked & planted 2 weeks ago inside doing zero, might have been old seeds. Today I soaked new Red Ace, will plant tomorrow in cells, leave inside. The house goes down to 52 when we're not here, I have them in a cold room with a mat. That worked a couple of years ago.

Got to get the annuals going!!!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 21, 2013
9:21 PM

Post #9492645

Strangely, Deno didn't work for my Daturas. I have 3 different varieties, harvested from 2002 to 2010 and tried them all. When I sowed them in seed mix they all sprouted within 2 weeks. Go figure...

Edited to add that the test was to see if the seed were any good. They are now over my daughter house in 3" pot.

This message was edited Apr 21, 2013 9:22 PM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 21, 2013
9:52 PM

Post #9492672

I have better luck direct seeding Datura with gibberellc acid. The Deno method failed with them, at least for me.

I'll see how much I hate the Poncirus thorns. They won't be any worse than the Acanthus or the Yankee Lady rose. That thing has thorns piled on thorns. I call it a grandithorna rose.

I have several kinds of cucumbers and tindora sprouting today.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2013
10:02 PM

Post #9492683

Too funny... I hope you have a pair of good heavy gloves!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2013
2:09 PM

Post #9493456

Whoopee!!! Schizanthus sprouted. over the weekend while I was gone! There are only 2, it's only been 7 days, so I pricked them out, and put them under lights. Then I covered the container with the rest of the seeds since darkness helps gmination, they say. But I'm very excited, the pictures look amazing so I'm eager to see for myself.

Also lots of Lobelia sprouted, but unevenly. There are still a few empty cells.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 22, 2013
10:47 PM

Post #9494005

I spent the last hour reading all the above post with all its dizzying numbers of perennials and annuals seed sowing. I am really surprised that everyone sows both types in the spring. No one thinks of sowing hardy perennials in late summer.

Guess what? I sowed many perennials starting in August. I concentrated mainly on annuals and veggies in the spring because I was selling those for the summer trade. This is when I was living in Nebraska and operated a commercial greenhouse.

I started all perennials in August and transplanted them to a coldframe where they spent the winter. The coldframe was built out of free railroad ties. No cover. These seedlings were husky plants the following spring. I potted them up to 3" square commercial pots to sell. I specialized in drought resistant plants for the climate I was living in. For some reason in the Midwest plants were only sold in the spring. Customers liked the idea of planting perennials late summer and early fall.

When I moved to Wyoming and bought a house I followed almost the same ritual. There were not one flower in sight. First action was to built a simple coldframe situated against my link fence. This one had a frame with shade cover. I started 54 different varieties of perennial split between spring and late summer (Aug). I sowed 12 of each for my self and my daughter. It took 4 ft of lightning on 4ft shelving, plus my plant stand. My office smelled like a greenhouse. Those that I started in the spring, were mature enough to be transplanted to the coldframe. By August and September they were old enough to survive the winter on their own. The August sown seedling then went into the coldframe where they spent the winter.

All became husky plants the following spring. Many of those that were spring sown were mature enough to bloom the following season. This is an ideal way to start perennials for those of you that don't have room to grow a bunch of different plants during spring.

This idea came when I was living and garden in Massachusetts. There, nurseries sold plants both spring and fall. Mainly perennials in the fall. I did likewise in Nebraska.

1] The coldframe from railroad ties.
2] My plant stand with greenhouse behind.
3] My current coldframe before I planted. It will be filled with DL seedlings come May 31st.

Edited to add that I operated the greenhouse in Nebraska during the 80's.

This message was edited Apr 22, 2013 10:52 PM

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2013
11:10 PM

Post #9494011

Which Lobelia is that Pam cuz I have plenty to share. Mine are L. cardinalis and L. siphilitica 'Great Blue Lobelia', L. s. mix which has blue and white. The only one potted on so far is the L. cardinalis (more than 30). I will get the others potted on right away if you're wanting any of them for our May trade in susie's forum. And yes, they will be extras..

All 3 Daturas I've tried starting were with my method: D. stramonium (sprouted in 5 days); D. purple and white (8 days), and D. 'Black Currant Swirl' (5 days). My D. metaloides reseeds in the garden for me.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2013
11:39 PM

Post #9494015

blomma, are you doing the nursery thing where you are now? I'd love to start my plants late summer but I'm always soo busy in the summer with planting. This last season I was planting til mid December. And I don't have airconditioning thru the house, think I'd get a bit warm in there with lights late in the summer. It's always seemed like the perfect winter hobby.
Many of the seeds I'm doing this season are Biennial and those that are perenn and not going to bloom til next season will be interplanted with the annuals. Not only that, the other excuse I get to use is I didn't get the seed til last fall in a seed trade and then another this January. And to top it off, lol, another round of the seed swap will be on it's way to me in the next few weeks. I thinking that I may have to wait to start any of those til next season. Once the weather starts to warm up all plants will go outside and then I'll be out there dawn to dusk (except for time out to take care of the gkids this summer. I'm trying to decide if I want to try selling some of my leftovers but not sure where to find the time..lol.

bluespiral

bluespiral

(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2013
5:36 PM

Post #9494957

How about a new thread for us slow dial-uppers? Thank you all for a very useful thread.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 23, 2013
6:12 PM

Post #9494990

Kathy,
No, I am not doing that now. I don't live in a commercial zone here. The way the world is now, I wouldn't take a chance on strangers coming to my home to buy since I live alone.

Sowing seeds don't take very long. You were planting until December last year. Wow, those plants could have been new perennial seedlings started late summer. You are one zone warmer than I. What could you possibly plant safely in December? Are you taking time to "smell the roses". and enjoying your garden?

Are all your seeds from seed trades? You realize hybrids don't come true from seeds

bluespiral,
You need to send a message to Pam (Pfg) to start a new page.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 23, 2013
6:26 PM

Post #9495012

Blomma, usually I wintersow perennials that need cold to germinate, but for those that don't, I'm definitely going to try sowing them in August. It makes so much sense.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2013
7:17 PM

Post #9495079

Okay, i did it, here's the new thread:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1308987/

See you there!

Pam

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

April 23, 2013
9:07 PM

Post #9495169

Celene wrote:Blomma, usually I wintersow perennials that need cold to germinate, but for those that don't, I'm definitely going to try sowing them in August. It makes so much sense.


It isn't the cold so much as moist cold (stratification) as Nature intended. Most perennials that I strated required stratification. Some I got lucky with and I cheated on the stratification but not all germinated. Anyway, the fridge works great as far as moist cold for 1 or 2 weeks. It is how I do my daylily seeds.

You are correct, there are some perennials, Datura (moonflower) comes to mind that don't require any stratification. They just want the warmth.

Will use the new post after this posting.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 26, 2013
10:35 AM

Post #9641907

Which ones, besides Datura are good to sow now?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2013
10:58 PM

Post #9726547

Pfg wrote:Last year I had one 4 o'clock plant and fell in love. This year I have seeds (not from that plant, silly me). I'm just starting to look into how to start them. Some sites say easy, some say not so. What say you?


Pam ~ They are SO easy! LMK if you want any seeds. Just sow them in situ (in place) in mid spring, once it starts to warm up a bit.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

December 12, 2013
7:15 AM

Post #9726723

Thanks, Evelyn-- do you have white? If so, I'll take you up on your offer. But since our season is so much shorter than hours, shouldn't they be started inside?

deejay9

deejay9
(susie) Hastings, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 12, 2013
11:08 AM

Post #9726829

pam i just put mine right inthe ground where i wanted then two yrs ago but forgot to get seeds from my plants so if there is any in the robin i hope to plant a few again they are easy to grow just as Balsam & Would like some of these also .
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 14, 2013
1:14 PM

Post #9728026

Susie ~ Did you want white and/or other colors of the four o'clocks?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 15, 2013
8:14 AM

Post #9728460

Pfg wrote:Thanks, Evelyn-- do you have white? If so, I'll take you up on your offer. But since our season is so much shorter than yours, shouldn't they be started inside?


OK, Pam...why don't you try it both ways and see how they do? And then you can tell us. Wait until late spring to start them. they grow quickly once the weather is warm.

I don't usually have that much time in late spring to be starting seeds indoors, at that time of year, I am usually doing other garden chores
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

December 15, 2013
5:06 PM

Post #9728685

Thanks, Evelyn!

This thread is getting really long, so I started a new one for 2014. I know it's a little early, but as soon as I'm sure I got rid of the whitefly problem there are a couple of things I'd like to start working on. Either way, it's nice to keep the chat going :-)

New thread:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1344533/

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