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Beginner Vegetables: Squash plants are dying. How to save them?

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Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 9, 2013
2:42 PM

Post #9477857

It all started when: I put my mini squash plants into larger containers and added fertilizer.

I tried hardening them off for transplant and laid them out in the sun the next day but then noticed that one plant started to get brown spots on the leaves and soon enough shriveled and died. This started a trend. Soon each of my summer squash plants started to yellow and brown one by one. Why did they start dying? Did the fertilizer stress them? Too much sun exposure stress them? Is it transplant shock? Drastic temperature changes from indoor and outdoor exposures?

Any advice or tip is appreciated.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 9, 2013
3:45 PM

Post #9477949

Are your edges getting dry and crinkle-y? If so, I would suspect too much fertilizer, too soon. Did you use water soluble or granular fertilizer?

I killed almost 60 out of 212 tomato plants last spring, over-fertilizing.

Nothing beats a wish but a try, so I would recommend you FLUSH the potting mix with some clear water to try to force out some of the fertilizer. Then, let them drain, and flush them again. They should recover if they're not too far gone, and it doesn't look like they are.

Next time, don't fertilize until you're ready to transplant them into the garden. And then, "feed them weakly, weekly!"

Linda

I'll look for your update.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2013
3:53 PM

Post #9477961

There is generally no advantage to planting squash out of ground in your zones. Seed directly sown for some veggies, squash included, usually are more robust when direct sown. You can't really harden off squash like tomatoes. The soil temps need to be warm and the days long for them to thrive. Consider starting again in ground with seed when soil temps are good for your zone. You may have problem plants later due to their unfavorable beginnings even if you are able to rescue the seedlings.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 9, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9477977

Laurel,
That is so true about direct sowing!

However, many of the growers I know are starting their squash seedlings inside because of the Pillbugs / sow bugs / rollie pollies that don't give them much of a chance in the raised beds, even.

Additionally, if you sow these seeds indoors ahead of time and get a nice sturdy plant, you can carefully cut off the bottom of the vessel (especially if it's a peat / paper / toilet paper pot) and plant the entire pot without disturbing any roots. That pot serves as a collar against cut worms, too!

Finally, those of us who are succession sowing like to be able to grab a seedling and place it exactly where we want it planted, without sowing seeds and having to dig out the excess.

It's just another way to get the same results.

Hugs!
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 9, 2013
4:23 PM

Post #9477989

Gymgirl wrote:Are your edges getting dry and crinkle-y? If so, I would suspect too much fertilizer, too soon. Did you use water soluble or granular fertilizer?

I killed almost 60 out of 212 tomato plants last spring, over-fertilizing.

Nothing beats a wish but a try, so I would recommend you FLUSH the potting mix with some clear water to try to force out some of the fertilizer. Then, let them drain, and flush them again. They should recover if they're not too far gone, and it doesn't look like they are.

Next time, don't fertilize until you're ready to transplant them into the garden. And then, "feed them weakly, weekly!"

Linda

I'll look for your update.


I used Miracle Gro Potting Mix soil. The edges did end up like you stated.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2013
4:35 PM

Post #9478000

If starting out of ground avoids a problem then the same answer applies. A plant's later growth and production is tied to it's beginnings. Squash germinates quickly under warm temps. I'd start again. Meanwhile, I am puzzled about the pillbug and cutworm dilemma. I believe the reports here but that said, we have tons of both. The cutworms get some plants but pillbugs do not do the damage I see described. Perhaps there are predators in my garden that keep populations in control. Still, I can't lift a pot or move mulch without seeing them but plants, including seedlings, are not troubled.
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

April 9, 2013
5:00 PM

Post #9478036

I have always thought that rollie pollies(what a cute name) just ate decaying plant matter. Please don't anybody tell them they can also eat live plants, mine don't seem to know that yet.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2013
5:05 PM

Post #9478039

Apparently our rollie pollies are better trained than some. Mine like to do rolling into a ball tricks and eat decaying plant matter. Others swear they are the bane of their gardens.
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 9, 2013
6:08 PM

Post #9478123

MaypopLaurel wrote:There is generally no advantage to planting squash out of ground in your zones. Seed directly sown for some veggies, squash included, usually are more robust when direct sown. You can't really harden off squash like tomatoes. The soil temps need to be warm and the days long for them to thrive. Consider starting again in ground with seed when soil temps are good for your zone. You may have problem plants later due to their unfavorable beginnings even if you are able to rescue the seedlings.


Makes a lot of sense. I will try again and sow directly in ground to observe the difference.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2013
6:34 PM

Post #9478150

Our big headache is squash vine borer. They need to come up with a good solution to keep the moths from laying.
mom2goldens
Carmel, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 9, 2013
7:01 PM

Post #9478180

You also might want to be careful when you first start putting them outdoors---those are still small plants. They should be in a protected area for just a few hours, and gradually working up to more time and direct sunlight. For most seedlings, using 1/4 strength fertilizer is plenty.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

April 9, 2013
10:55 PM

Post #9478384

You have gotten some good advice. I started mine in doors this year because of the cold spring we have been having. My comment would be to put them in indirect sun when hardening them off to start with. I never fertilize anything until it is out in the garden and has time to let the roots get a hold. If I do fertilize in the cup, I just mist lightly with a mild Miracle Grow water. Another question is did you pucnch some drain holes in the bottom of the cups?

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 9, 2013
11:39 PM

Post #9478404

Linda, as usual, has some great advice. The big 3 veggies that are direct-sown are cucumbers, squash, and zucchini. They are easy to start, and they need the warm soil to do well. I made the mistake of starting cukes in January inside in trays, and had tendrils running up into the lights. If it had been warm enough to get them out into the garden, they would be 5' tall by now. I just started some more in the fabric pots I'm using, and they just popped a couple days ago.

Almost everyone agrees that fertilizing while inside or before hardening, is dangerous at best. The MOST liquid fertilizer you would consider using would be at about 25% concentration. When you are hardening off, transplanting, and adding fertilizer at the same time, you have too many variables to pinpoint exactly which is the culprit if you have a problem, plus you have multiple stress factors..


1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 10, 2013
3:53 PM

Post #9479235

Pill bugs will destroy small seedlings. For the longest time I couldn't figure out what was mowing down my small seedlings I put a circle of Garden Dust around each seedling and the next morning I found jillions of dead pill bugs, but the seedlings were a live.

I always direct sow squash seed tho. They can be difficult to transplant, they don't like their roots disturbed. I started some minature acorn squash a couple of years ago and everytime I transplanted them they died..even when just took the bottom off the paper cup. I think you only save about 10 days by starting them inside, bc their acclimation time is so much longer then other plants. GG starts them due to other issues but if your trying to get a head start you won't get a big one.
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 11, 2013
1:44 AM

Post #9479604

Jim41 wrote:You have gotten some good advice. I started mine in doors this year because of the cold spring we have been having. My comment would be to put them in indirect sun when hardening them off to start with. I never fertilize anything until it is out in the garden and has time to let the roots get a hold. If I do fertilize in the cup, I just mist lightly with a mild Miracle Grow water. Another question is did you pucnch some drain holes in the bottom of the cups?


When I moved them into bigger cups, no there were no drain holes. Didn't take me long to think it may be one of the reasons behind it. However even after creating drain holes I continued to have healthy plants that eventually started yellowing.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

April 11, 2013
12:32 PM

Post #9480280

Mix a little Miracle Grow in water. Just enogh to barely give it a blue cast and mist the plants and see if that helps. It shouldn't hurt them if the mixture is mild. If it helps you'll know it is a nutrient problem. If it helps it will only take a couple of days to see a difference.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 12, 2013
11:45 AM

Post #9481461

A "good" insect to have in the garden are lady bugs. I know they go after aphids plus others, that I don't recall off of the top of my head. Contact an organic nursery & they should be able to help you find some. We got them last year, and they stayed around the garden for several months. From what I've heard, this year they might be a little harder to find. They are totally organic, easy to use, and when you have a grand daughter, she loved letting them loose. I think we paid 7 or 8.95 for 2,000 of them last year. Keep them cool in the fridge until almost sunset, then just take them to your garden and let them go. Some will fly away, but most will home in on the garden and return. We found some almost into the end of the summer.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2013
2:44 PM

Post #9481694

Kev,
I found Ladybug INSTARS!!! Thank God, someone posted a thread on identifying the juvenile ladybugs, cause the instars don't look anything like a mature Ladybug. I am taking care of those babies!

Linda
behillman
Plantersville, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2013
3:30 PM

Post #9481750

I'm sure it was the fertilizer that killed your plants.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2013
8:16 PM

Post #9482044

I agree it was probably the fertilizer but the combination of things probably weren't good either. Squash plants don't tolerate change very well. How are your plants doing did you direct sow some seeds?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 13, 2013
10:38 AM

Post #9482498

Quoting:Thank God, someone posted a thread on identifying the juvenile ladybugs


You're welcome, Gymgirl :)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 14, 2013
8:30 PM

Post #9484249

:-)
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 15, 2013
1:56 PM

Post #9485170

1lisac wrote:I agree it was probably the fertilizer but the combination of things probably weren't good either. Squash plants don't tolerate change very well. How are your plants doing did you direct sow some seeds?


I did. Got 2 plants in ground that are growing, however now they have insects biting on the leaves.

*this is harder than I thought
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 15, 2013
5:57 PM

Post #9485306

Update on squash plants. Has holes in leaves. In-ground planting.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 15, 2013
6:06 PM

Post #9485314

Those holes do not look threatening. I must have caught this thread on the fly now seeing it is a beginner forum. Kudos to you, Silvermist, for jumping into veggie gardening. It's a great challenge with great rewards. You will maybe appreciate farmers in a whole new light. They are truly unsung heroes. I would suggest you become a subscriber so you can access the expert information offered by vegetable gardeners on the specialty forums.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 16, 2013
9:17 AM

Post #9485957

Silvermist,
I suggest you might go to your local fabric store and purchase a length of "tulle" (the bridal veil fabric), to tack down over your new squash plants. It will keep the Squach Moth from lighting and laying eggs on your vine. At least until it is established, and has enough growth to have a fighting chance. You won't stop it completely, but you'll give your plant a chance to get some size.

We have a whole thread going on how to thwart the dreaded Squash Moth, and the Squash Vine Borer.

When you become a subscriber, you will be able to access the "expert information offered by vegetable gardeners on the specialty forums." Particularly, the thread on defeating the Squash Vine Borer, lol!

Linda
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2013
2:38 PM

Post #9486333

Aren't the Squash moths the adults of the squash vine borer? I'm really liking this tulle idea it will keep most any bug out, it's cheap, and you can make it any size you want. Hand pollunating is so easy too.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 16, 2013
5:01 PM

Post #9486489

Oh, yeah, Lisa,
you're gonna teach me hand pointing for sure!!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 16, 2013
5:04 PM

Post #9486493



This message was edited Apr 17, 2013 7:36 AM
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2013
9:36 PM

Post #9486726

I'll be glad to but you might want to google it. It's very simple but hard to explain.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2013
5:35 AM

Post #9486925

you will need to have a "body guard" when you lift the tulle and hand-pollinate !
The SVB is so smart ... he will wait on your shoulders while you lift the tulle ... and pu pu pu he will deposit millions of eggs ... seriously ... SVB is SMART !!!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 17, 2013
6:35 AM

Post #9487018

drthor - I doubt very much that any male moth will deposit any eggs on anything, ever! LOL

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 17, 2013
6:37 AM

Post #9487021

Ruh Roh!!!
Jim41
Delhi, LA

April 17, 2013
10:35 PM

Post #9488083

I'm going to put aluminan foil aroung the bottom of my squash and cucumbers to guard against the moths.
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 3, 2013
12:44 PM

Post #9506894

Jim41 wrote:I'm going to put aluminan foil aroung the bottom of my squash and cucumbers to guard against the moths.


Sounds like a nice idea
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 3, 2013
12:57 PM

Post #9506915

Update on my squash plants: the very last photo seems to be my most unhealthy plant inground
and the very first photo is an image of my most healthy one

I intend to get cages for them so they can grow their vines upwards since I've heard they take up a lot of ground space & whatnot.

Thumbnail by Silvermist   Thumbnail by Silvermist   Thumbnail by Silvermist      
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Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 3, 2013
1:01 PM

Post #9506926

For those who are wondering about the ones that were sow in cups (that were yellowing & etc)...I went ahead and gave them a fighting chance and now they are in my raised garden bed. I wanted a first-hand experiment to see how they will turn out after being transplanted. Why are they in a raised garden bed? Because it was a spur of the moment project and I decided why not experiment with some plants this year.

*and of course they're not doing as well as the ones in ground

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scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2013
5:36 AM

Post #9510156

Hiya, I have been following this thread in hopes of avoiding the problems I had last year. More with cukes than squash, but I still had the same issue with brown leaves using a seed mix with fertilizer mixed in. You'd think it would be mild enough. I am going to try sowing direct to see if the plants are better.
Silvermist, do you mean that you planted in the raised bed rather than a hill? I had this question last year, and was told that a raised bed is already a big hill. I'm not sure this is really right, The squash plants I gave my neighbor was rampant, planted on a hill, mixed in with other plants, like pumpkins and cukes. These outstripped mine in my fancy raised bed, even though the neighbor's dirt was probably imported from the depression era OK dustbowl,(ha) rocky,weedy and full of earwigsand slugs under every rock. She never weeded or watered until they were practically dead. Yet, they just grew like triffids and produced lots and lots. I have to admit, i was irked, since I gave her the plants.

Anyone know what bug would cut the tops of my squash plants off? It just left the stem, and didn't even eat the top it cut off!! UGH!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 6, 2013
6:01 AM

Post #9510196

Quoting:Anyone know what bug would cut the tops of my squash plants off? It just left the stem, and didn't even eat the top it cut off!!


That would mostly likely be a cutworm!
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2013
6:30 AM

Post #9511605

Cutworms or sow bugs. Both have cut my plants off.
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 7, 2013
6:42 AM

Post #9511617

Sort of off topic here, but what would cut the large stem of a Amaryllis. About two inches above the ground, the stem was probably two inches at least in diameter. Not smooth like with a sharp knife, but almost that smooth, just a little ragged. I have had this happen on two plants in separate areas of the garden. Are there such things as chainsaw cutworms?
Right now my cucumbers and squash are under attack by an armadillo.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2013
6:44 AM

Post #9511622

Rabbit?
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2013
7:48 AM

Post #9511684

LOL! seedfork, I just had a great image of a thuggish bug with a chainsaw at the base of your poor amaryllis yelling "TIIIIMBERRR!" and then running away with the cord dragging behind it.

Now, for real, armadillos can be very destructive. They are cute with those little round ears, but boy oh boy, I have heard some stories and seen a couple of TV show episodes about the mayhem they can cause. I had some(only 2 or 3) hungry bunnies 2 years ago,before i got the cats I have now, and am too lazy and cheap to engage in fencing, etc. I planted lettuce in a few spots on their route, but away from my garden. I didnt have any more rabbit trouble. Now the cats keep them away. (but the cats think I built them 3 very large litterboxes also known as raised beds! If its not 1 thing, its another.)
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2013
3:13 PM

Post #9512226

scarletbean wrote:Hiya, I have been following this thread in hopes of avoiding the problems I had last year. More with cukes than squash, but I still had the same issue with brown leaves using a seed mix with fertilizer mixed in. You'd think it would be mild enough. I am going to try sowing direct to see if the plants are better.
Silvermist, do you mean that you planted in the raised bed rather than a hill? I had this question last year, and was told that a raised bed is already a big hill. I'm not sure this is really right, The squash plants I gave my neighbor was rampant, planted on a hill, mixed in with other plants, like pumpkins and cukes. These outstripped mine in my fancy raised bed, even though the neighbor's dirt was probably imported from the depression era OK dustbowl,(ha) rocky,weedy and full of earwigsand slugs under every rock. She never weeded or watered until they were practically dead. Yet, they just grew like triffids and produced lots and lots. I have to admit, i was irked, since I gave her the plants.

Anyone know what bug would cut the tops of my squash plants off? It just left the stem, and didn't even eat the top it cut off!! UGH!


I built the raised bed after my clay soil hardships...by then it was too late to sow the seeds I wanted to grow so I transplanted my seedlings and "transplant-shocked" squash plants just to see how well they will survive. I guess I'm practicing out of the box techniques this season since I didn't really bother with hills either for my in-ground plants.
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2013
3:21 PM

Post #9512233

Well, I guess we will see what happens. Without hills and with transplants last year, I had plenty of squash,cukes and melons. I want more and better this year. I guess i am an impatient and greedy gardener Ha.
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2013
3:35 PM

Post #9512250

Does anyone know if it's a bad sign to have squash flowers this early in the plant stage?

My mother tells me that my plants will not produce any crop because they're still small and already have flowers. Her remark gave me a scare. However I did my own research and found that flowers this early in the stage are usually the male flowers that will wilt and fall off since I am ultimately waiting for a female flower.



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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2013
8:06 PM

Post #9512594

Scarlet- I doubt if the browning leaves were caused by the fertilizer in the potting mix. I would expect a problem with the fertilizer burning the leaves if it was put directly on the leaves, not in the soil mix.

My squash have male flowers when they are that size.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 8, 2013
6:01 PM

Post #9513802

I named my first raised bed "The Catbox" becuase it was the first soil in the neighborhood that was soft enough to dig, that wasn 't fenced or dense-packed with plants.

So many "presents!

I tried crushed chili peppers, cayenne powder and bought a Super Soaker. Forget about it!

Chicken wire over the section of the bed that you just planted.
Draped it over cut soda bottles pushed into the soil as support columns.
Hold it down around the edges with bricks, or pegs
Remove when the plan ts are tall enoguh to get tnaqgled

Or save every blackberry viner and rose branch that you cut. Drape thorny branches around the edges.
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2013
7:59 AM

Post #9514351

i think the net option will work for me. Its only a "gift" once in a while, not a huge problem. But, it may escalate, especially since I am spay/neutering the neighborhood cats as I can afford it, and 1 female just had a litter of 5.
The thorn bush canes will just end up tearing ME to shreds. (i am not too graceful)

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 9, 2013
11:06 AM

Post #9514563

>> The thorn bush canes will just end up tearing ME to shreds. (i am not too graceful)

I know exactly what you mean!

Whn I was trying the "hot pepper deterrent", I bought a big bag of dried "pizza peppers" - probably Thai or Japanese chilis. Then I ground them up in small batches in my little coffee-bean grinder.

Blinking, tearing up, sneezing and coughing from the dust! But I knew to wear gloves and wipe up aftewards.

Well, NOW I know that when I( wipe up hot chili p;owder with a paper napkin, I should throw the napkin away right away afterwards. Silly me, I dropped it som ewhere and forgot about it.

Later, I unthuin kingly wiped my hands and counter and silverware wuith it like I usually do ... until I brushed something out of the corner of my eye and went WAAAUGH!!

For the next week, my kitchen was like a Biohazard zone or minefield, invisible patches of chili dust that would transfer to my hands, then lips or eyes.

I started treating it like a lab I had worked with radioisotopes in, or the chemical plant where we manufactured tons of a carcinogen: think before you touch anything. If you wear gloves to touch something "dirty", then you can't touch anything "clean" until you change gloves ... wash wash wash your hands without ghetting c hemic als on the faucet handles.

It deterred the cats and squirrels a little, until the next rain, but I know it deterred the heck out of me.

Probably the main effect it had was to entertain the squirrels as they watched through my kitchen window as I flinched and winced, or forgot and went wailing to the sink with burning lips or eyes.

If you try this at home, consider finding a grinder that doesn't leak!
And after you wipe up the chili powder, THROW the napkin AWAY!
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2013
12:08 PM

Post #9514614

OH ! ROTFL!!!!! My husband loves hot hot hot peppers. I am more wimpy, jalapenos are my hot limit. Every sunday I make chorizo and eggs for his breakfast. This includes chopping a variety of peppers on hand, from jalapenos or cayennes to habaneros or a few tiny tepin peppers. No matter what I do, everyprecaution, gloves,separate cutting board, wiping everything with soapy water, I ALWAYS some how get a bit on me some how somewhere. While he is enjoying breakfast, I am enduring yet another burning spot, sometimes a finger or under the nail, the corner of a eye, just any random spot. I got to hating Sunday breakfast. Finally a few weeks ago, the tortilla wrapped around the chorizo peppers and eggs split apart onto his plate. This forced him to shove the escaped bits back into the tortilla with his fingers. After eating, he visited the restroom, and 10 minutes later the squirming began. Then the long string of four letter words.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 9, 2013
12:10 PM

Post #9514617

LOLOL! ROTFL!!! TMI!!!! TMI!!!! TMI!!!

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 9, 2013
1:10 PM

Post #9514712

Scarlet- when my oldest son was 15 yrs old he did the same thing at his girlfriend's house. He sat with ice on his lap for an hour. Being my son he should have known better...he was so embarrassed.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 9, 2013
1:12 PM

Post #9514714

>> I ALWAYS some how get a bit on me some how somewhere. While he is enjoying breakfast, I am enduring yet another burning spot, sometimes a finger or under the nail, the corner of a eye, just any random spot.

Yeah! Exactly what you said. Watch where you put your hands afterward ...

And you do this knowing ahead of time how they'll bite you??
Greater love hath no wife than to chop habaneros into a breakfast tortilla!

This message was edited May 9, 2013 1:13 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 9, 2013
2:59 PM

Post #9514852

"SOMEbody wept!"
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2013
12:38 PM

Post #9515859

Aaaawwwww! I may just have to get that quote made into a plaque.

I tried doing the pepper chopping all at once, and putting it in the freezer for use when needed. Still, I guess I am just a martyr to the scoville scale, because It gets on me. **sigh**

Pic is last years final pepper harvest. This year I am trying "fooled you" jalapenos...for me!

Thumbnail by scarletbean
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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 10, 2013
4:14 PM

Post #9516053

I flinch just LOOKING at that!

I don't know why I do, but I collect hot pepper seeds out of curiousity.

Would you like just a few of any of these?
Some might be all gon e.

'7-Pot Jonah' - alleged 1 M SHU
'Trinidad Scorpion Red' Pepper
'Bhut Jolokia' - 'Naga Ghost' Chili Pepper - 850 K SHU
7 Pot Red Mix
7 Pot Yellow
7 Pot Chocolate
Aji Red
Aji Umba
'Thai Bird' Pepper > 30 K SHU
'Arbol de Chili' Pepper HOT 15K-30K
'Peter Pepper' - "Penis Pepper" - Late
"Red Peter" HOT 5K-30K - twisted oblong
'Guam Boonie' - light green to orange to red
'Piquin' "bird pepper" points up < 2cm long
'Fish' Pepper - HOT 5K-30K - late
'Cherry Bomb' Pepper 5K-30K - HYBRID
Japones




This message was edited May 14, 2013 5:55 PM
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2013
7:14 AM

Post #9516701

Well golly, Rick... I would LOVE some! I enjoy growing them, as they ripen they are jewels, pendulous and shining on their stems, every color and hue. They are just so #@*! dangerous! I guess they are the wasps of fruit. Not sure if that is a great analogy, but you get it. Anyhoo, i couldn't begin to choose, so I will leave the choice to you. If you will Dmail me with info, I can send you a SASE. I am soooo lazy and have not even begun to work on my DG member info, tradelists etc. I will check yours and maybe I can return the favor of some seeds you might enjoy.
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2013
2:11 PM

Post #9517083

hiya
- forgot to say that the jolokias/ghosts are actually too hot ...i finally found his breaking point!

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2013
6:00 PM

Post #9520808

You'll have mail in a few minutes!

P.S. Here is a link to the address exchange:

http://davesgarden.com/address_exchange/

You have to enter your own address before you can see other members, and you have to be a subscriber.


This message was edited May 14, 2013 6:03 PM
scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 15, 2013
7:11 AM

Post #9521304

I'm on the exchange. I am glad you reminded me, I have to renew my subscription. I swear, DG is the best $ i spent last year.
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 9, 2013
3:24 PM

Post #9552593

UPDATE!!!

I want to thank everyone who has helped me on my journey & inform all of you that I've been having great success in bringing those dying squash plants back to life. They are growing like crazy now & my first harvest was very rewarding.

DON'T GIVE UP ON THOSE SQUASH PLANTS! I sowed my seeds indoors, moved them into bigger pots (which shocked them, yes), and transplanted with success. I learned that if you don't give up, they won't either.

HAPPY GARDENING!!!

Thumbnail by Silvermist   Thumbnail by Silvermist   Thumbnail by Silvermist   Thumbnail by Silvermist   Thumbnail by Silvermist
Click an image for an enlarged view.

scarletbean
Newport, TN
(Zone 7a)

June 10, 2013
10:12 AM

Post #9553573

Yay Silvermist! Looks like ya done good! Congrats!!! It feels great to bring a harvest from seed. Very gratifying.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 10, 2013
11:51 AM

Post #9553711

I am envious ... great job !

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 10, 2013
12:07 PM

Post #9553724

Simply Beautiful harvest! Congrats!
Jim41
Delhi, LA

June 11, 2013
9:55 PM

Post #9555781

I'm glad your squash are doing good. Nothing like fresh veggies. Mine are producing but pulling a lot of unpollenated ones off. No bees.
Silvermist
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 12, 2013
8:36 AM

Post #9556227

Jim41 wrote:I'm glad your squash are doing good. Nothing like fresh veggies. Mine are producing but pulling a lot of unpollenated ones off. No bees.


I was pollinating by hand because I usually wake up too late to see the bees at work. Started checking the garden at 8am sharp and found out the bees come out to work early. I think having roses/flowers grow around the premises contributed to it also, definitely investing in more flowers next year.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

June 15, 2013
8:33 PM

Post #9560475

We had a disease hit the honey bees a couple of years ago and just about wiped them out. I noticed I had some male blooms open higher on the plant and I've been getting a good many squash lower down. I think the wind shaking the plants in the cages is getting the pollen down to the lower blooms.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2013
12:20 AM

Post #9560566

I've actual found bees stuck in the closed male flowers sometimes two. I've opened the flowers and let them out.

Jim I don't mean any disrespect but I don't think squash can pollinate like that but other insects can be pollinating them.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

June 18, 2013
7:02 PM

Post #9564348

Hey, I'm just guessing. I'm just glad to get the squash for any reason. Thanks for the comment.

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