What veggies/fruit loves sweltering Tennessee Summers and..

Spring City, TN

... Could replace salad green boxes until time to replant salad greens for fall?

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Summer squash... yellow or zucchini's

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

If you want to continue with edible greens in those boxes, look at Swiss Chard, Malabar spinach, New Zealand spinach.

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

One word...Okra.

Spring City, TN

Another word -- blech!

(Sorry, thanks for the suggestion, but I'll save all the okra for good folks like you!)

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

LOL, Eggplants! Double-blech???

This message was edited May 6, 2013 10:20 AM

High Point, NC

Glorious peppers! California Wonder, Sweet and Spicy Bananas, and the one I fell in love with last year, Atris. There are so many varieties you simply can't go wrong.

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Oh, it's ok. Okra is definitely a love it or hate it kinda thing. I gotta agree with KarensWorld, peppers are where it's at for hot weather. Here in east Tn, I did great with California Wonder and Ancho/poblano last year. My Husband is a hot pepper freak and I grew 1 habanero plant and it just produced like crazy. The Poblanos are very prolific,and are a happy medium for us, good flavor, but not so hot.

Thumbnail by scarletbean
High Point, NC

That's one nice pepper picture, scarletbean!

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Thanks! I realized when I posted it that the pepper I liked the most, the poblanos, are not pictured. The cayennes were strung into a kind of ristra and I just used the last one yesterday. Anxious for hot weather and some peppers, tomatoes, well, I just want it to be warm, it has been downright chilly here lately.

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

Yes, peppers do well here (my Hot Banana peppers, Sweet Banana peppers, poblanos, etc. do wonderfully all summer long as do other peppers), certain tomatoes, as mentioned Swiss Chard does well but tends to take a little hiatus during the high heat of summer and can benefit from a partly shady location to take off again in the fall), radishes, some carrots, some beans, rhubarb, sweet potatoes, purple hull peas.

(edited to add the peas)


This message was edited May 7, 2013 9:52 AM

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

I wanna try growing swiss chard, the Bright Lights look so pretty. I have not eaten it. Is it like the green part of bok choi?
About beans in the heat, I was so surprised to see my Henderson bush limas, Cherokee wax beans and Contender green beans do well for so long in the heat. I grew limas for the 1st time last year. I couldn't get the ripeness timing right for fresh eating, but let them dry on the plant. Good Grief! They kept at it, constantly sending up flowers all season which gave me so many lima beans.(about a 32 oz yogurt container full from 4 plants)They were finally done in not by the summer scorch, but that stupid bean beetle( the yellow poky things before they turn into beetles)The Cherokee held out a little longer than Contender in the heat, but both were good steady producers after the first heavier harvest. Contender is designed to give a big one time harvest, but the later beans were just as good.

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

Somewhat like Bok Choi - I steam the chard like other greens. :)

Those are all good bean varieties for around here. I've never grown limas but I really like them so maybe will give them a try. Any recommendations as to varieties?

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Be forewarned. The Bright Lights Swiss Chard has a more pungent taste than the regular green Swiss Chard. And, I DO like my greens....

I didn't like the Bright Lights and had given up on chard until my neighbor served me some regular green, sauteed in butter & minced garlic, with a bit of salt & pepper.

Now, I can't grow enough Chard!!! ^^_^^

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

That's true - it is a bit different. I like them both. ^_^

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Well, I got Henderson Bush. It has a uniform and compact growth habit and is early at 65 days to begin harvest. the pkt says it is good for fresh, dry or canning and is noted for its flavor. I really like to add a handful of my dried limas to homemade vegetable soup.
Cville, I think I will try the Swiss chard. I rarely buy veg plants, but it is late for seeds on that one, and I think I saw some at Lowe's, the bright lights.

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Gymgirl, Do you mean bitter or tang? I like turnip and mustard greens and collards. and beet greens are nice. not big on dandelion or poke weed, I dont like bitter-not even radicchio or endive.
On the flip side of our topic, My collards are getting happy in this cooler weather here lately, but will be long gone before the TN summer heat hits. Peas, too. Gosh, I love fresh garden peas!

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

Thanks. Uniform and compact is good. :) Yes, I put limas in homemade soup also - which I make a lot. Our Lowe's here has several varieties of chard right now, among them the 'Bright Lights'. I think they even had it in our Walmart garden center. Pick the leaves often while they are young and tender.

Fresh peas are da bomb!!

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Scarletbean,
I think our taste buds are alike. The green chard tastes more like beet greens, without the "earthiness". Almost like a cross between the beet greens and a nice spinach.

I think you'd like the green better.

The taste of the Bright Lights (for me) would be in the same category with the radicchio and the endive. I don't like them either!

Hugs!

Linda

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Oh, good advice! IThat seals it, Regular green it is for me. I wonder why the difference in taste due to color?
I worked in quite a few swanky fine dining establishments in the 80's & 90's and radicchio and Belgian endive were all the rage. It seemed like I couldnt get a salad without it. Plech-o! call me plebian, but I'll take butter lettuce or romaine anytime. Even a nice wedge of iceberg with bleu cheese vinaigrette....(or, ..gasp...ranch!) YUM!

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

Well, I love all greens, whether tart, somewhat bitter, or otherwise - especially doused with some good vinegar. So I'm probably not the best adviser on this. The 'Bright Lights' do need some shade in the heat of the summer. :) Sorry to lead you astray. lol.

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Ha Ha Cville, have I been led down the garden path?

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

LOL. Very good. ^_^

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

I am just now learning how to cook greens with apple cider vinegar. Beet greens especially.

I'd never eaten them until my DexH's Aunt Beatrix cooked them for me, fresh from my own garden! I was growing the bottoms, but once I tasted the tops, I can't get enough of 'em. And, she taught me how to pickle the bottoms, too.

Now. If I can just grow enough beets to put up, I can break out the All American Pressure Canner, that's never been on the fire, LOL!

I'm still learning...THANK GOD!!!

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Oh boy! don't get me started on the greatness of a pressure canner! I want to like pickled beets, but well, i just can't . they are so pretty in the canning jars. yet they taste like dirt. Maybe I will like them some day. I felt the same way about cilantro, it tasted like soap. Now, I cant get enough of the stuff. Weird.

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

LOL, "taste like dirt!" "tasted like soap!"

There are not any foods I will not try, at least once. In fact, every food I've ever eaten I'm willing to try again, just to be sure I don't cross it off my list because of a bad chef.

Almost did that with tripe. A very dear friend served me some once and I had been dying to try it. I almost gagged!!! That might have been the worst thing I ever ate.

But, I'm a trooper and good for a challenge. So, when my Asian-American co-worker took me on a gastronomic (insider) tour of our local 5-star Chinese restaurant, and asked if I ate tripe, I had to go for it. I thought NOTHING could be worse than that first time!

Well, that beef tripe is the first thing I order at that restaurant, every time I go! Can't get enough of it!

Oddly enough, the one food I'm not all that fond of is....gasp....asparagus. I think I had something from a jar, so, I'm willing to try it again at some point. Fresh. From someone's farmer's market or garden, lol!

You will have to teach me all about CANNING!

Hugs!

Linda

Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Oh, Tripe: the unsung hero of menudo. (the soup, not the boy band of the 70's)
Yep, it can be very uuhh, icky, or yummy. Another love/hate food. Ever had Cincinnati style chili? another weird food.
Anyhoo, I agree, try and try again with foods. Of course preparation is the key.
Asparagus from a can is like canned peas. Edible, but why bother? Fresh, a whole different thing.
Hey, this is off subject , but Nasturtium seeds are good pickled.
Canning is one of those things that makes you feel like a domestic goddess and when you open the seal with that little "Ssswok!" sound it takes you back to the middle of your summer garden smelling your tomatoes, or peaches, whatever is in the jar. Your own salsa, you get the idea. Plus if you give home canned gifts, people think you are so amazing. And you are, you canned it yourself!

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

Love that sound. ♥

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Nasturtium seeds might be good pickled but they certainly do NOT taste like capers.

When I was growing up, my step-mother cooked tripe about once a week, just fried southern-style. I hope to never have to eat it again. Tough shoe leather. Taste-wise, it wasn't so bad.

I will however eat lots of offal (although I exclude brains). I'm pretty adventurous about trying new things once. I particularly like creamed sweetbreads in puff pastry.

Thumbnail by darius
Newport, TN(Zone 7a)

Darius, when I worked in those swanky french restaurants sweetbreads were a regular on tjhe menu "ris de veau" If I remember right. The first time I heard sweetbreads, I expected Banana nut bread. Hhmm not exactly, they are the thymus gland, is that correct? The French word sounds nicer. I gotta say that ANYthing creamed in puff pastry sounds good!

I like that shirt!

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Yup, generally from the thymus, but sometimes the pancreas. "Sweet" is perhaps used since the thymus is sweet and rich-tasting, as opposed to savory-tasting muscle flesh.

LOL, almost anything sounds better in French, as well as anything in creamed in puff pastry.

I get lamb sweetbreads for free when my friend at the farmer's market sends sheep to the abattoir. Folks around here have no clue, nor any use for them.

Spring City, TN

OK, what is Cincinnati style chili?

Middle, TN(Zone 6b)

Quote from darius :
Yup, generally from the thymus, but sometimes the pancreas. "Sweet" is perhaps used since the thymus is sweet and rich-tasting, as opposed to savory-tasting muscle flesh.

LOL, almost anything sounds better in French, as well as anything in creamed in puff pastry.

I get lamb sweetbreads for free when my friend at the farmer's market sends sheep to the abattoir. Folks around here have no clue, nor any use for them.


How do you prepare them, Darius?

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Yuck, in my opinion. I guess you have to be raised with it. Spaghetti on top of chile, IIRC...

High Point, NC

Oh my goodness, what memories you guys are stirring. When I was a little girl, my grandma would cook us up a big breakfast of "brains and eggs." We, of course, loved them, though we had no idea what they really were. When I asked her about it and found out she'd actually been serving us oinker brains, well, let's just say it curdled my stomach. Much later in life I shared the story with my children, who decided they wanted to try eating a big plate of brains and eggs for themselves. Well, I cooked it, and they stared at it. Every bit of it went into the garbage. Still gives me chills to think about it.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Blanch them in milk then remove the membrane. From there you can bread and sauté them, grill them, and a gazillion different ways (even include them in pĺté). Do a search for sweetbreads recipes.

I like to sauté them and make a cream sauce to cover them...

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Karen, my dad's favorite breakfast was scrambled eggs and brains. I'm sure he must have made all of us taste them and I really don't remember the taste. It's hard for me now to wrap my mind around eating brains even though I KNOW the organs have superior nutritional value compared to the muscle meats.

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Wow.

I want that shirt!!!

I love chicken & calf liver. Would like to experience Rocky Mountain Oysters one day...

Ya'll, don't ask...Google it. LOL!!!

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

Fry em up, good eating like fried gator tail and frog legs. Does depend on the chef a lot tho. Fried chicken livers and good chewy gizzards, my grandad had dibs on brains scrambled eggs and scallions, and the pickled pigs feet. I like pickled okra-pickled beets(depends on the beet tho ) i like the website nolacuisine.com sigh, there is a taco meat I havent found how to prepare that is prob sweetbreads- soft meat with awesome flavor, just like my beloved braunschweiger. But I am not fond of head cheese. Recipe has to be just right for that stuff. And boudain, rats. East/north coast cant cook. I am ready to be HOME

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

I was born and intermittently lived near the Everglades... so of course I like 'gator and frog legs. I'm working on a recipe for duck gizzards.

I don't pickle much anymore, choosing instead to do old-fashioned ferments like our grandmother's did with 'kraut and dilled cukes. You can lacto-ferment almost any vegetable except green beans... and the nutritional value of the foods increase over eating them them raw, cooked, or pickled, thanks to the lactobacillus.

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