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Beginner Flowers: Astilbe, are they invasive?

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RESORT2ME
BATTLEBORO, NC

June 9, 2013
7:00 AM

Post #9551901

Thinking of putting them as border plant in front of Indian Hawthorn (see insert). Wondering if I get these started, will I be sorry? Do they seed or spread all over the place?

Thumbnail by RESORT2ME
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 9, 2013
7:03 AM

Post #9551906

They are not invasive. They do spread as most perennials do. Lift any excess and plant elsewhere. I have hundreds, if not thousands of individual astilbes.

Keep them moist!
taylordaylily
Hamilton, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2013
8:35 AM

Post #9553436

I agree with Pirl! I have several and love them. I wish I had more room to grow more.
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 10, 2013
8:46 AM

Post #9553456

Hi RESORT2ME, Love the different shades of green you have there and the shapes look great too, not too sure IF the Astilbe would be the best choice for the area beside already established shrubs or tree's due to these being the dominant type of planting, they will take all the water and nutrients from the soil, Astilbe's require damp to moist conditions as they are plants that prefer waters-edge situations, but not allowed to sit with roots in the pond /water they are often grown at ornamental garden ponds edge, more so now because they have grown into beautiful different colours ranging from Cream, pink, red, lavender and yellow so there is a lovely range of colours. As pirl also indicated, these are not in the least invasive but do form a nice clump gaining in size over the years but like all perennial plants, they get lifted and split up into smaller clumps to either make more plants or reduce the space, I have never had a problem with them, if anything, I wish the soil was more moisture retentive as even with added manure and leaf-mould they don't grow to their full capacity but they do flower a bit.
Hope this helps you out with regards the choice of plant and the area you wish to plant up.

Hope it all works out well for you.
Best regards, WeeNel.
taylordaylily
Hamilton, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9553531

WeeNel, I had wondered about them growing with shrubs like that. Mine do grow around my pond.
You are so good with plant and garden knowledge. I have read several of your post's and have always found you so informative and kind. You are a true gardener. I wish there were more people in the world with your manners and heart. Thank You!
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 10, 2013
10:30 AM

Post #9553593

Oh my goodness you make me blush, thank you very much for your kind words, it makes me feel good IF I'm able to offer encouragement and a little knowledge that, like all other gardeners, gain there know-how over the years.
Kindness costs nothing and I have been on the site long enough to realise that there are a few people who really do put some new members off asking questions just because they were rude in the replies or, dismissive of the fact that we all had to start out our gardening skills from asking questions.
I don't believe there is a silly question or a stupid gardener, were all the same really in as much as at the time, we didn't understand what to do or how to do it.
I hope you enjoy your new found hobby and never let anyone put you off, gardeners learn patience, serenity, and the love of the outdoor spaces we call our own garden regardless of what we grow.

Best Regards and happy gardening. WeeNel.
RESORT2ME
BATTLEBORO, NC

June 10, 2013
11:23 AM

Post #9553681

It's good that you are willing to give of yourself for others. Not enough folk doing that.

Be kind and love one another and the world would be a wondrous place for us all.

More gardens, less warring.
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 10, 2013
12:13 PM

Post #9553731

I second that sentiment whole heartedly RESTORE2ME.
Kindest Regards, WeeNel.
taylordaylily
Hamilton, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 11, 2013
11:14 AM

Post #9555055

Weenel, Your Welcome! Thank you for good advice and your kindness.
RESORT2ME
BATTLEBORO, NC

June 11, 2013
8:47 PM

Post #9555738

WeeNel wrote:Oh my goodness you make me blush, thank you very much for your kind words, it makes me feel good IF I'm able to offer encouragement and a little knowledge that, like all other gardeners, gain there know-how over the years.
Kindness costs nothing and I have been on the site long enough to realise that there are a few people who really do put some new members off asking questions just because they were rude in the replies or, dismissive of the fact that we all had to start out our gardening skills from asking questions.
I don't believe there is a silly question or a stupid gardener, were all the same really in as much as at the time, we didn't understand what to do or how to do it.
I hope you enjoy your new found hobby and never let anyone put you off, gardeners learn patience, serenity, and the love of the outdoor spaces we call our own garden regardless of what we grow.

Best Regards and happy gardening. WeeNel.



A little something for everyone, in this regard: GLASS OF MILK

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You don't owe me anything," she replied. "Mother has taught us never to accept pay for a kindness."

He said ... "Then I thank you from my heart."

As Howard Kelly left that house, he not only felt stronger physically, but his faith in God and man was strong also. He had been ready to give up and quit.

Many years later that same young woman became critically ill. The local doctors were baffled. They finally sent her to the big city, where they called in specialists to study her rare disease.

Dr. Howard Kelly was called in for the consultation. When he heard the name of the town she came from, a strange light filled his eyes.

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Dressed in his doctor's gown he went in to see her. He recognized her at once.

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Tears of joy flooded her eyes as her happy heart prayed: "Thank You,
God, that Your love has spread broad through human hearts and hands."

There's a saying which goes something like this: Bread cast on the water comes back to you. The good deed you do today may benefit you or someone you love at the least expected time. If you never see the deed again at least you will have made the world a better place - And, after all, isn't that what life is all about?
taylordaylily
Hamilton, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2013
12:15 PM

Post #9556455

Resort2me, Love your story! I believe kindness comes back to you. Thank You!
sm4657
Marshalltown, IA
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2013
7:44 AM

Post #9558682

Beautiful story!
RESORT2ME
BATTLEBORO, NC

April 4, 2014
10:37 PM

Post #9805236

Close to Rocky Mount, NC. . . These have lost all leaves. Hope it is due to COLD winter.
Also, Can they be trimmed now, April?
Diana_K
Contra Costa County, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 5, 2014
7:43 AM

Post #9805421

Astilbe do go dormant, and lose all their top growth in the winter.
Nothing to trim, then. You can dig and divide them, though.

When they are growing I suppose you could cut off a few leaves, for example if they are growing into a walkway. You could even divide them then, but they are more sensitive to drying out when they are growing, and when the weather is warmer. Safer to divide in fall or spring, in the mild weather. So now is probably a good time.
RESORT2ME
BATTLEBORO, NC

April 5, 2014
9:24 PM

Post #9805873

I'm daffy, it would seem.
I went back to this originating post to investigate the dead appearance of the bushes. The post originated with regards to planting Astilbe in front of the bushes (in the inserted photo).

I have confused myself by saying the Astilbe have lost their leaves. Actually the Indian Hawthorn bushes in the inserted picture are the ones that look dead.

So, let me ask correctly... Does Indian Hawthorn lose its leaves in severe winter? Can they be trimmed back now?

This message was edited Apr 6, 2014 6:56 PM

Thumbnail by RESORT2ME
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WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

April 7, 2014
2:06 PM

Post #9807132

O.M.G. So funny ReSORT2ME, join the club, we've all made similar mistakes be you wont forget the difference's between those 2 plants again LOL.

Sit down, have a stiff drink and remove your head from between your hands, tomorroe's another day.

take care and be good.
WeeNel.

RESORT2ME
BATTLEBORO, NC

April 10, 2014
9:05 PM

Post #9809580

Does Indian Hawthorn lose its leaves in severe winter? Indian Hawthorn are supposed to be evergreen The winter was unusually cold. They have lost all leaves.

Those pictured now have branches that are brittle in the outer 8". I haven't tried checking further for fear of damaging the plants. I''m thinking of trimming them to be smaller bushes, in hopes they come to life, but again, I don't wish to do harm.

1) How may I determine if the bushes have died?
2) Is it good to trim the bushes while dead looking or should I wait until after they leaf out?
3) Is there something I could feed that might revive them?



This message was edited Apr 14, 2014 6:20 AM

This message was edited Apr 14, 2014 6:22 AM

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