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Water Gardens: Keeping Topsoil from washing into pond

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Forum: Water GardensReplies: 15, Views: 88
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DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

June 9, 2013
1:55 PM

Post #9552464

We've just moved to a new home which has an in-ground pond. In the past, I've had container water gardens or above ground arrangements so though I have little experience with in-ground, I think I've spotted a problem.

The pond has been neglected and I spent today draining and clearing debris. There were 3" of dirt in the bottom. The pond is set low so that the ground slopes toward it. Obviously, the top soil's been washing into it.

Anyone have an ingenious solution to prevent or at least slow the flow of dirt into the pond without digging the whole thing out and raising it up? ( Hoping not to have to do that because I'm ball-parking it at about a 90 gal pond. The previous owner set stones around the edges, but that has had little effect.

Thanks!
Deb
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2013
1:59 PM

Post #9552466

Is your pond a flexible liner pond, or a hard preformed plastic liner?
DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

June 9, 2013
2:00 PM

Post #9552468

It's a preformed plastic.
DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

June 9, 2013
3:23 PM

Post #9552591

Here's a photo I took when I was starting to drain it.

Thumbnail by DebinSC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2013
4:58 PM

Post #9552669

Deb

Short of lifting it out and jacking it up some, I don't know what else to do. Perhaps somebody else may have an idea.

Ponds should always be put at the high point of a yard, so water can run out it and not into it.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 9, 2013
6:40 PM

Post #9552809

Bit difficult to see detailed topography in that photo. Although water runs into the the pond, can it also run away from it along one of the sides? Meaning, it's not actually in a complete hollow in your yard? Do you have an overflow/drain in the pond?

You should be able to get some garden edging. There's some that's plastic and comes in rolls. Not very high, and you can run it around the pond. Put some top soil around it and plant low shrubby plants. The plants will cover the edging and the edges of the pond giving it a more natural look. Direct rainfall into the pond should overflow out between the edge of the pool and the inside of the garden edging.

There's lots of other possibilities and variations on that approach.
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

June 9, 2013
10:01 PM

Post #9553006

I was thinking close to the same. I was also thinking dig away some of the soil and put the rocks a little further out on a slant. Then plant something that has a mat like root system. Baby tears does that. Baby tears may freeze in the winter, as it does here, but it always come back in the spring and the root system stays in place. I also have dichondra that does the same thing. Also Australian viola. Very invasive in Australia. Not in Las Vegas. Loves full sun. Baby tears loves shade but also may like your sun. Does not like our intense bright sun. I can post photos of all three if you wish.
DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

June 11, 2013
7:55 AM

Post #9554774

Carolyn, Tropic and WLS, thanks for your responses! It's not a total hollow; there is one edge where I might be able to landscape a channel for water to run out. Perhaps if I do that and build up with the methods you suggest on the opposite side it will alleviate the problem. Thanks for the plant suggestions, too! :)
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 16, 2013
4:03 AM

Post #9560628

Hi Deb,
Those curved cement landscape stones from Lowe's should solve your problem. You could stack them up 2 or 3 high and then plant around them but they look pretty good by themselves. If dirt flows into pond a lot you could put a little cement between them and that should stop it completely.

Bonnie
DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2013
8:49 AM

Post #9560861

Thanks, Bonny! I will get to work on it and (hopefully) post a photo of my successfully completed re-do! :D
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

June 16, 2013
9:13 PM

Post #9561704

Good luck with your new project. We are cheering for you. I have redone several areas several times. It just takes a few tries to get it right. At least you have nice weather to deal with. We are 100+ degrees but it is dry heat.

Just make it fun. And keep us posted.
DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
5:57 AM

Post #9561953

"but it is dry heat." LOL Thanks Sharon, we are having "seasonable" temps this week - so not too bad. Thanks for the encouragement. :)

DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

August 6, 2013
12:25 AM

Post #9622736

Update: In between various "moving in" activities, I've been slowly working on the pond. I laid plastic around the edges, carving out just enough holes for a couple of plants, then walled it all off with the wood. (The previous owners had left a pile of pressure-treated lumber in the back yard.)

Dug a channel for water to run around the outside which has worked better than I expected so far.

And - of course - I've managed to put in some plants. Still can't get the water to completely clear, but it has improved. I'll post one more photo when it's completely finished. Going to finish it all off by camouflaging the "walls" with stones.

(PS, the green trash can holds a Lotus I started from seed. Pretty excited about that!)

Thumbnail by DebinSC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

August 6, 2013
6:22 AM

Post #9622871

Hi Deb,
Your pond looks good and once you plant around it will really shine.
Do you plan to put any little fishies in it? or will it be a plant garden.
Either way a water feature is always nice in a yard.
Bonnie
DebinSC
Georgetown, SC
(Zone 8a)

August 6, 2013
9:01 AM

Post #9623011

Hi, Bonnie. No fish, just plants, though frogs are welcome and there are already a few resident Damselflies. :)
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 6, 2013
3:05 PM

Post #9623365

Looking great, Deb! Love the damsel and dragonflies myself.

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