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Beginner Flowers: What type of foxgloves are these?

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Mountaindweller
Dolan Springs, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2013
8:33 AM

Post #9556224

Do these guys look healthy? They were mail ordered and I thought they would be much denser, thicker. There are three plants in the pot

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altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 12, 2013
9:04 AM

Post #9556262

They look like they are starved for light but otherwise healthy and should recover.
Mountaindweller
Dolan Springs, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2013
10:35 AM

Post #9556369

It's in the 90's and 100's here, I'm scared to put them out in full sun, hopefully they will hang in there in the light from the windows.
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 12, 2013
12:24 PM

Post #9556470

Why don't you just set them outside in shade for a while?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2013
12:41 PM

Post #9556484

Put them out in the shade and out of the wind...keep them watered good. In that size of pot atleast 2x a day...Get some growth on them before moving to the sun...I hate to ask but what did you pay for theseand where... Just wondering as my babies I grew this winter were bigger than that... Truely, it looks as tho they were just strted recently.. If I was home I'd show pix of my babies... Kathy
Mountaindweller
Dolan Springs, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2013
12:41 PM

Post #9556485

If the high temps won't hurt them... I'll water them well first and give it a try

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2013
12:43 PM

Post #9556488

No!!! Truely they are too small, especially with the heat you have there... How long have you had them?
Mountaindweller
Dolan Springs, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2013
2:23 PM

Post #9556583

About 2 weeks now. They are still inside because of high winds and overcast. But it's 95 right now. All those baby leaves are new, the originals that were there when it came all died.
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 12, 2013
4:02 PM

Post #9556695

What is the growing media they are planted in as it does not look like soil, it looks more like Vermiculite or something alike and I asume this stuff was purely for transportation, after you receive the plants ast the earliest time possible you are meant to transplant the little plants into a small pot FILLED with good seed / transplant compost and grown on till it's time to transplant either outside in the garden or indoors depending inside our outdoor plants.

Do remember Foxgloves are shade growing plants and are found on the edge of woodlands in there natural habitat, though we as gardeners can get away with planting in lighter positions that is because in the wild there is no one around to nurture them through their new open light situation and they would probably not survive, in our gardens however they wont survive for long in an open bright sunny place but can gain shade from other tree's, shrubs or plants growing close by.
I would remove your seedlings from the pot and transplant into good compost as above, keep in well light place but away from strong sunlight especially through glass, the plants will grow tall and lanky, falling over because they are too delicate to stand upright due to lack of nutrients from soil. By the way, Fox gloves are either Perennial or Biennial Perennial is after they first year of growing the plant flowers the second year and each year there after, Biennial is the first year the plant germinates, grows leaf and roots, next year grows some more, flowers and dies, Foxgloves are one plant that send seeds all over the place and you get a new batch of plants.

I should have said that depending on month you plant the seeds, you can get a flower-head the first year but not always.

Maybe I have the whole thing wrong BUT don't think the growing stuff they are in is right for greedy plants like Foxgloves.

Hope this helps you understand a little about the plants you have and wish you good luck.
Best Regards. WeeNel

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2013
9:11 PM

Post #9557028

On the right are some I grew from seed this winter...they were potted on into 2 1/2" pots back in March...and much larger now.

WeeNel has good advice but also need to add info for you...You are hot and dry where you live, please add peatmoss to your soil before planting (not on top but mixed in)and mulch. It will truely help. Also shade, like WeeNel suggests. Here where I am at (68-6900 feet in Colorado), I can get away with planting in full sun, but at your lower altitude, and hot dry climate, shade would be a definate! Remember, they are not an arid plant, your a zone 9 and I'm presuming your temps range up to 110*+ insummer with avg precipt of less than 10" per year, so give what they want (moisture and rich soil, not sand and clay) and they will reward you with blooms next season... Hope our monsoon season is good to us this year...here will start in early July< I get my July and August moisture from Arizona in the summer. By the way, what is your altitude? Kathy

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Mountaindweller
Dolan Springs, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2013
8:18 AM

Post #9557473

Weenel, you are right and wrong :>) they are in regular soil with wood shavings on top to help keep in some moisture. Average outside humidity is less than 15%, but then, I haven't been here through a summer yet, and the monsoons might change that. I definitely need to get them in a richer soil then, and I will also add peat moss as you suggest Kathy. Our altitude is just at or under 4000, with a large valley to the north and a mountain to the south, so the frosts roll off, and it is also a tad cooler then down there. Highs so far top out at 105.
I don't think I will even try to grow these guys outdoors, it would be cruel. The winds here are seemingly constant, and until we get some trees growing shade isn't available. The native flora and fauna aren't of the large leaved varieties!

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WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 14, 2013
12:19 PM

Post #9558989

Mountaindweller, starting of a new garden is never easy as you have or are finding out, there are so many hurdles when we start, like the right soil for the particular plants, shade or sun and then how much sun does that mean, and now as you say, the nead to grow shade tree's and what tpye is best, on and on it goes but, I for one want you to know that every one on this site has been in your shoes and I am also after around 50 years of gardening still learning.

I would just tell you to try relax and enjoy what gardening you are doing as there is not a garden around that was made in one season, even the ones we see being created on TV over a day or so is not true. The program makers WITH ALL their experienced workforce have weeks / months to plan the design, select and search for plants and send in experienced ground staff with large machinery to do the job AND they never show you the following year how the garden has faired. I think all in all, you are doing great, your asking questions and wanting to learn, well that in my mind is not bad for a beginner and fighting the soaring heat for the first time with tender little plants, so well done you !!!!.

I would only add that I would be putting these little baby plants outside for a couple of hours each day, water well and try make a home ,add shade for them till you grow them on further till large enough. Sometimes if I start seeds of Foxgloves in spring, I don't plant them in the soil till late summer when the soil is beginning to cool a bit and they are ready for flowering the following summer, this might give you more time to grow them on safely.

Good luck and enjoy your new found hobby, by next year it will be your new found obsession ha, ha, ha.
Best regards, WeeNel.
Bloomfly22
Palmdale, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2013
3:22 PM

Post #9559156

[quote="Mountaindweller"]Weenel, you are right and wrong :>) they are in regular soil with wood shavings on top to help keep in some moisture. Average outside humidity is less than 15%, but then, I haven't been here through a summer yet, and the monsoons might change that. I definitely need to get them in a richer soil then, and I will also add peat moss as you suggest Kathy. Our altitude is just at or under 4000, with a large valley to the north and a mountain to the south, so the frosts roll off, and it is also a tad cooler then down there. Highs so far top out at 105.
I don't think I will even try to grow these guys outdoors, it would be cruel. The winds here are seemingly constant, and until we get some trees growing shade isn't available. The native flora and fauna aren't of the large leaved varieties!
[/quote]

I feel you Mountain, lol. We have Joshua trees here in South California. Its rare that I get a seedling to grow properly due to light issues, water issues, temp issues, and wind issues. Those Santa Ana winds South CA gets can really damage them.
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 14, 2013
4:18 PM

Post #9559214

I know you guy's might not want to hear this BUT, sometimes we are just trying to grow the wrong type of plants for the environment we live in, it takes a while for that to get into our heads when we first start to make garden.
I used to look at all those lovely garden magazines and see the beautiful pictures of gardens laid out with every type of flowering plant I recognised as I was growing up and helping my Dad in his garden, well " in his way " more like.
Anyway the long and short of it was at that time we lived on the East coast, them I was making my very own garden but had moved to the West coast, the soil, rainfall, temp, light salty winds were all so alien to me and all my efforts were failures long before I realised I could not grow all those lovely sweat peas Delphiniums and Phlox ect, all the stuff I loved, it was my Dad when visiting me reminded me that I had to either adapt the soil, (here in west it is quite acidic) East is more humus naturally, anyway I soon learned to look at what grows in my WEST local and have adapted some areas so I can now grow the Delphiniums and Foxgloves ect but I now grow other stuff like Rhododendrons, Azalea's, Camellia's ect that I love. so maybe you guy's need to learn what you can and cant grow in your area, by visiting the local library will give you more ideas for your local too as will a walk around the neighbourhood, the parks department too will all give you inspiration to get you going. hope this gives you some ideas and encouragement as to how to get back on track again and begin to enjoy your gardening.
Best regards. WeeNel.
Mountaindweller
Dolan Springs, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2013
7:51 PM

Post #9559437

Weenel, thanks for the heartfelt encouragement! I have been gardening for only about three years now, and posting in the beginner gardeners forum might be a stretch, but I certainly don't feel like an experienced gardener yet!
You are totally right about learning what will thrive in your area. The trees we've planted here are palo verdes, desert willow, and chaste berry- all desert types. Well, except for the poor mulberry, and he's definitely not happy!
I'm learning that geraniums are tough as nails, and rabbits won't eat them, roses are almost as good, and I even have three gardenia blossoms on my potted plant, although I take no credit for that, it had to be a miracle!! :>D
But it was March, and those darn catalogs caught me at a weak moment, and I just couldn't resist those foxgloves!
Our soil is way past alkaline, I poured straight vinegar on the ground once and the bubbly reaction would have impressed a science student. It sure depressed me! But every cloud has a silver lining... And I live in open range country, and we had to fence the cows out, so I am making the most of the available 'resources' and eventually the soil will be much nicer!
Bloomfly...my dad has propery out of Victorville, I think that's a lot like Palmdale? Where it takes faith and determination to see the gardening possibilities among the creosote bushes! But we won't give up!
Bloomfly22
Palmdale, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2013
11:46 AM

Post #9560035

It is very much like Palmdale,yet the desert land has not been optimal for either of us it seems. I can barely get veggies to grow because of how dry and hot it is. The best vegetable plants I have thrive in my backyard, shaded by oleander.

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