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Vegetable Gardening: MOVING INTO OUR SUMMER VEGGIE GARDENS, PART 1

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2013
1:05 PM

Post #9556502

Our veggie gardens are really cranking out the produce! Most of us are harvesting our spring veggies, some are actually still planting, some are waiting, and some are still trying to figure it out!

Whatever stage you're in, our Veggie Gardens are underway. Jump on in!

We came from here:

STARTING OUR SPRING VEGGIE GARDENS PART 6
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1314022/

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 12, 2013
1:19 PM

Post #9556516

Fresh slate! :)

...but I posted on the other one about my spider mite infestation and how I'm treating them. I reiterate: I hate spider mites.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

June 12, 2013
1:22 PM

Post #9556520

Put me in the group of all of the above ,just had a very late start to spring then once it got started it turned to summer in one day..Evertime I planted my Okra it would come a cold rain wound up having to buy some seed to replaced what I had saved from some okra that branched on it's own ..Did want to get the branching type started it could be that the seeds of this mutant were not as strong as the old Cowhorn okra that I planted as a replacement..

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2013
2:17 PM

Post #9556578

So I watch along ,, about 90 degrees and swampy feeling here . #4 Is the Borage plant out of place in the back tomato bed , I hear they do that , the others are recognizable

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 12, 2013
2:44 PM

Post #9556597

My harvest today.
Cucumbers are producing like crazy now. The light cucumber is and Armenian.
One Zucchini ... weee and 3 Long Beans.
Delish

Thumbnail by drthor
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2013
2:59 PM

Post #9556609

I didn't prepare a summer garden this year.

This morning, I was pulling weeds and found some volunteer basil. I also have volunteer tomatoes and what looks like volunteer peppers.

Sage and oregano are growing all over the place where they were not sown!

I did have a few melons sprout earlier, but I pulled them because I want to starve out the squash vine borers.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 12, 2013
4:18 PM

Post #9556708

Linda, no link on the last thread to this one...

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9556718

I really enjoy the Armenian cucumbers , only found it difficult to grow much more than a few cucumbers a plant Also the plants are not as strong here , I hear they do better in "hotter or warmer" climates .
Pretty harvest there .and before a couple times ..
All I have here so far is lots of bloom and green .. lol

I need to learn to proof read spelling a little better also ..

This message was edited Jun 12, 2013 7:25 PM

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 12, 2013
7:41 PM

Post #9556938

Link supplied now. Sigh. Real food feast for the eyes everyone

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2013
8:57 PM

Post #9557010

Thx for the link!

Today's harvest. More tomatoes, and the first picking of Black Beauty and Gretel eggplants.



This message was edited Jun 12, 2013 10:58 PM

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
12:20 AM

Post #9557084

The Armenian cukes are really melons so they have a different growth habit.

Honey-have you had problems in the past with SVBs in your melon plants? That's one issue I've never had. I haven't grown squash in this area ever before but the SVBs found it and so did the squash bugs. Where do they come from anyway?

Congradulations on your tomato Stephanie and to think you almost lost those plants to that late freeze. Lited buckets and all.

GG your pic is great. I love the colors.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 13, 2013
3:30 AM

Post #9557133

Svbs are a pretty moth. Spot bright yellow blooms.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
5:08 AM

Post #9557197

Gymgirl
congrats on your harvest.
Do you make fry green tomatoes? I often see pictures of your harvest with unripe green tomatoes. Just curios.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2013
5:46 AM

Post #9557230

Time for the garlic harvest! It was a good year. I planted two heads of each variety, but the Lorz Italian makes a few large cloves so you get fewer heads the following year. Both of these varieties have done very well for me; I'm going to have to plant more next year just to keep up with the requests for starter heads.

Thumbnail by NicoleC   Thumbnail by NicoleC   Thumbnail by NicoleC   Thumbnail by NicoleC   
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2013
6:31 AM

Post #9557304

1lisac - [quote]Honey-have you had problems in the past with SVBs in your melon plants? That's one issue I've never had. I haven't grown squash in this area ever before but the SVBs found it and so did the squash bugs. Where do they come from anyway?[/quote]

My approach to bad bugs is to leave them alone and let the good bugs eat them. BUT - the squash vine borer had become a problem that seemed not to have an easy solution. Last year they destroyed a good part of my melon crop. So I did some research and realized I had seen the pretty moth flitting around the garden the past few years without realizing what it was.

Last summer was the first year I grew zucchini and yellow squash. This link says the moth is very partial to these:

http://www.toxicfreenc.org/organicgardening/vine_borers.html

I decided to think on it for a spell... and came up with a plan. As you know, I grew up in England a long time ago! Farmers back in the "old" days rotated their land, putting farm animals on pasture during some years.

I figured if the emerging squash vine borer moths had nothing to eat when they emerged from the ground this summer, they would either die, or go elsewhere. I don't have any farm animals to wander around out there, so I've left the beds to grow weeds to hold-in the soil.

As to where the moths come from - my answer is: Heaven. All creatures are here for a reason, even if I can't figure out why. ^_^

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 13, 2013
6:38 AM

Post #9557316

Honeybee, I tried not growing squash for a couple of years and when I planted it again the squash bugs and SVBs had a party to welcome it back. Oh well...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2013
6:46 AM

Post #9557329

greenhouse_gal - DRAT!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2013
7:08 AM

Post #9557364

Thanks, Guys!

Drthor,
Haven't eaten a green tomato yet! It's a cat and mouse game with the birds and the worms. I pull any tomatoes that have the slightest blush on their butt, and ripen them inside on the counter, as you saw in my previous picture.

If I don't catch them, the birds or the worms will!

The last batch of ripened tomatoes were cored, cubed and put into the freezer. When I get ready to use my homemade tomato sauce, I'll add more fresh veggies and herbs, and the other tomatoes. Everything will get rough chopped and sauteed, then added for a chunkier sauce.

Linda

I might do some fried greens toward the end of the harvest. My concern is all the oil the fried greens soak up. I bake them instead for a healthier version;

Linda
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
9:20 AM

Post #9557544

I really meant jokingly where do the squash bugs come from?

Like I posted above, I haven't grown squash in 1 area, ever and I haven't grown it in the other area for at least 2 years but the bugs found it anyway. I thought I could starve them out too.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9557551

Squash bugs are good fliers so they can come from someone else's garden, and you live in an area with wild cucurbits. There's no starving them out.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
10:48 AM

Post #9557675

Today in the garden, Mark and I worked on tearing out some grass that had grown in the bed where we'd had some onions planted. We then planted some tomatoes that we rescued from the "half-dead" bin in our backyard from the ones we had grown from seed and not planted yet. LOL We planted them sideways since they were about 4' long, leaving about 6" -12" above ground. We also planted 3 purple tomatillos, also from said bin. I also moved my lone jalapeno pepper outside and will plant that in a few days. We raked up the leaves that fell in our front flower bed from the big oak tree and put them on the tomato bed for mulch. We didn't mulch them with the mower first, but they'll still work well. Tonight, we have to spray everything with the aphid and bug deterrent insecticidal soap concoction. I've noticed more bugs since it's started to warm up. I also discovered another ripening tomato! This time, on the Beefsteak plant, but it doesn't really look like a beefsteak, so I think it's a NOID tomato. (How did that happen?!?)

#1 New bed with plants and leaves.
#2 Both tomato plants are Lg. Red Cherry plants. This one even has some baby maters on it! I hope they make it.
#3 Beefsteak tomato
#4 These really need to hurry up and get ripe!!

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 13, 2013
10:49 AM

Post #9557677

I have lots of milk thistle that grows as weeds and stinging nettle I grow as an herb .So far using that as mulch has slowed the insects, kept them off the lettuce.
Away from some of the cucumbers .
I don't know about the melons as of yet , I am also growing some rue to try . If your skin does not like it , neither do a lot of "Bugs" !
I read and tried spraying nettle water on plants some time ago , it was suppose to boost the other plants resistance , some of the plants did not like it sprayed on them though , , but around them it seems to work ,, whatever does right?
I hate that when the "Bugs" get to eat more of my garden than I do!!!

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
10:51 AM

Post #9557680

We use a combination of soap, compost tea, fish emulsion, and something else that I don't remember at the moment. Feeds the plants and kills the bugs.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
10:52 AM

Post #9557681

what is a NOID?

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 13, 2013
10:55 AM

Post #9557689

I like hot pepper juice and milk to spray Tomato plants with , sometimes I will add kelp to that .
All looks good above there #4 is a nice looking bunch of green tomatoes !!!!


NOID is no identification or non identified


This message was edited Jun 13, 2013 1:59 PM

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
11:11 AM

Post #9557710

No identification; plant of unknown name.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2013
11:20 AM

Post #9557727

"No idea"

"NOIDea.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
12:45 PM

Post #9557806

ohhhh
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
1:02 PM

Post #9557822

Nichole-squash bugs can fly? I didn't realize that. They reproduce so quickly it's amazing. I even have new dirt.

Kit- the adult SVB isn't white. It's dark gray with red and doesn't look like a moth to me at all. Honeybee posted pics of them awhile ago I'd never known what they look like.

Edited to say sorry Kit I missed read your post about the SVB moth. But I still don't think they look like a moth.

This message was edited Jun 13, 2013 2:05 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2013
1:05 PM

Post #9557826

I'm confused. I thought the Squash Moth was the parent of the Squash Vine Borer.

The Squash Moth flies, and deposits the eggs on the stems of the plants. Then, they hatch into the Squash Vine Borers that burrow into the stems of the plants and eat and poop the frass. Their bodies keep the plant from drawing up moisture and nutrients.

Please correct me if I'm wrong. The whole point of the tulle was to cover the squash so the Squash MOTH wouldn't be able to light on the stems and lay eggs. No eggs, no Squash Vine Borers...

Help...
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2013
1:11 PM

Post #9557833

I just miss read her description of the moth. I call them SVB moth, that's all I meant. Everything else is the same. Now I'm confused. Lol

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2013
1:16 PM

Post #9557840

Ok. "The blind leading the blind," here, LOL!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2013
5:11 PM

Post #9558106

Saw my first squash bug today, out by the shed, although I am sure it will find the squash by tomorrow. They always seems to show up right when the squash start blooming.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2013
4:57 AM

Post #9558503

The first time I saw a squash vine borer moth, I thought it was a hummingbird! Which was rather confusing because the only hummingbird that frequents this area is the Ruby-throated Hummingbird

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-throated_Hummingbird/id

Here are photos of the squash vine borer moth:

http://www.google.com/search?q=squash+vine+borer+moth&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=RwO7Ub2lD4G29gS_zIGACg&ved=0CCoQsAQ&biw=1536&bih=658

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 14, 2013
5:30 AM

Post #9558545

I say coat the stems with vicks. That'll teach em.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2013
5:33 AM

Post #9558547

The cukes, zukes and butternut are mkaing female blossoms, the peppers are blooming, one of the tomatoes (Cherokee Purple) and finally set some fruit and the corn is swelling.

Yep, summer is here!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2013
6:27 AM

Post #9558592

The best time to take garden pics, is of course when everything is growing but before it's overgrown. Here's my garden as seen from the bathroom window upstairs.

Thumbnail by NicoleC
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greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 14, 2013
6:41 AM

Post #9558605

Nice garden, Nicole! Yes, this is the best time for pictures except that my flowers aren't as showy at this point.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2013
9:25 AM

Post #9558779

NicoleC
I always enjoy so much to see pictures of you garden. Well done!

My harvest today.
This is the first week with daily temperature over 90F, and this is what I did notice:
tomatoes slowed down
cucumbers have lots of blooms and making lots of cukes
eggplants ... so far is an amazing year
long beans are taking over and starting to produce
also okra, more flowers and pods every day
peppers ... still changing color very very slow

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happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 14, 2013
10:43 AM

Post #9558882

Jumpin' in on the discussion... Here are a few picks of my garden these days... Once again, I will overgrow my tomato cage. There are worse problems to have!

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Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 14, 2013
11:13 AM

Post #9558921

happygirl345'
I love a garden with defined paths, your garden is beautiful. Speaking of over growing tomato cages I have certainly done that this year. I am going to have to get taller, stronger stakes. My vines are turning over my cages! My sunflower is so pretty I think!

Thumbnail by Seedfork   Thumbnail by Seedfork   Thumbnail by Seedfork      
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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2013
11:25 AM

Post #9558934

Happygirl,
Your garden is so neat! I'm trying to make the decision to take out my grass and put in dirt paths like yours. MAJOR move...

Seedfork,
Your flower is beautiful! Almost doesn't look real, it's so pretty!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2013
2:58 PM

Post #9559139

I love your back yard, happygirl!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 14, 2013
8:37 PM

Post #9559488

new router tomoro, pix wont load. scootched the bugs over and grabbed green stuff for supper... it was sooo good. glad to be home!

Thumbnail by kittriana
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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9560208

Harvested my first tomato today!! Yeehaw! Supposed to be a beefsteak, but it doesn't look like any beefsteak we've grown previously.

The Homesteads are getting ready. The largest one that I've been (impatiently) waiting on to ripen has finally started turning that greenish-yellowish-kinda orangey color so it should be ripe soon!

The Burgundy bush beans are flowering like crazy. No pods yet, bu I expect them soon.

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2013
4:58 PM

Post #9560234

Congratulation.
Is this tomato from the seeds you started early January?

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 15, 2013
11:13 PM

Post #9560548

For those who have purslane in their gardens, good news: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portulaca_oleracea

I snacked on some today out in my garden. I didn't know it was considered a good companion plant - I'll have to stop selectively removing it.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 15, 2013
11:29 PM

Post #9560551

I have some of these growing in the grass. I will save them for all the good they do: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achillea_millefolium and plant some yellow to go with the white.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2013
11:43 PM

Post #9560559

Congratulations Stephanie, I remember when you almost lost those plants to the cold. Then you'd wished you hadn't planted out so early. Can't see what difference it makes when you get tomatoes, as long as you get some. : ). The 3 I planted early just sat there due to the cold. The fruit that has set is larger but not by much.

What are the other possibilities for that beefsteak?

Picking beans like crazy pulled the last of the beets and a few potatoes. Can't believe the potatoes are still growing. I need to remind myself to water them tho.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2013
11:55 PM

Post #9560561

Is all purslane edible? I have some seeds that I know are an edible form lol. But I also have something that looks like purslane growing as a weed. I won't eat it bc I'm not sure but I have been wondering if they are all edible.

I bought some plants (bc of the pretty flowers) and they are also purslane. Is there a difference and if so what is it? Thanks for posting that Solace, ive been wondering...but when I get in from the garden I start doing something else.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2013
4:15 AM

Post #9560635

Purslane, wild or otherwise, is edible and *very* nutritious. The caveat is of course to be sure what you have is purslane and not some other succulent. Sedum spp. is edible. Ice plant is toxic as is sea purslane (except the blooms, which you can eat, and apparently some people eat the leaves although they are not truly safe) and spurge is outright poisonous. Spurge is not a succulent but looks similar.

http://www.eattheweeds.com/purslane-omega-3-fatty-weed/

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2013
5:15 AM

Post #9560674

I recently found out why I did not get the volunteer tomatoes I had hoped for this year.

I mentioned to hubby that there were very few volunteer tomatoes, and he calmly explained that he had picked up all the fallen tomatoes last year, eaten the best, and put the rest in the compost. I blinked a few times, and told him that's probably why we don't have many volunteers.

Last year I had some volunteer tomatoes that had a really good flavor. So, to encourage more to grow this year, I scattered fruit along the bed. This morning I was delighted to find two plants growing amongst the weeds. I guess hubby missed the mother of these two.

Another bed has some volunteer tomatoes. The mother of these had volunteer fruit last year, but they didn't taste good to me. I'm hoping this year's fruit will be better tasting.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2013
11:21 AM

Post #9561023

My harvest today.
On the scale is Chocolate Stripes, the heaviest tomato so far this year.

This message was edited Jun 18, 2013 6:14 AM

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2013
12:53 PM

Post #9561112

Lisa, when we cut into it, it looked like a Beefsteak, just smaller.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 16, 2013
12:53 PM

Post #9561113

HoneybeeNC You reminded me of the Broad Ripple Currant Tomato plant volunteers that returned here this year , first time in some years I have had any volunteers .
Only it makes since ,that was how the plant came to exist in the beginning .(a few miles to he south of me)
You have me wondering if the volunteers will taste any different than the two plants I grew. Kind of gardener's Gotcha , ain't it ?lol

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 16, 2013
1:52 PM

Post #9561181

I had some volunteers from a currant-type tomato but they were more cherry sized, which surprised me, and they tasted a little different. I wonder whether they naturally crossed with something else. All of my tomato plants are OP so usually the volunteers come true to something.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2013
2:39 PM

Post #9561228

Thanks Nichole, I won't eat anything unless planted it, I just don't know enough about it and too many veggies look a like. I'll eat the purslane from the seeds I bought.

Honey- you have me laughing so hard. When you describe just standing there blinking at least you solved that mystery.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2013
8:59 PM

Post #9561674

Stephanie plants may be a little behind yours bc she almost lost them in a late freeze. I'm sure you remember that she posted a lot of pictures.

Oh well, I see a long productive season a head without having any extra work.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2013
5:07 AM

Post #9561914

Comparing results doesn't make gardening a "race." One of the benefits of DG is to see what practices others use and whether they apply to our own gardens. Early planting, late planting, fertilizing, pruning - all these are variables that can produce interesting differences.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 17, 2013
5:59 AM

Post #9561955

juhur7 - [quote]You have me wondering if the volunteers will taste any different than the two plants I grew[/quote]

From what I have read, the problem with supermarket tomatoes is that they have had the "taste" bred out of them in favor of long shelf-life and ship ability.

With home-grown tomato volunteers, the variables are endless, but I tend to save seeds from those fruits that taste good to me.

Lisa - [quote]Honey- you have me laughing so hard. When you describe just standing there blinking at least you solved that mystery.[/quote]

What truly was going through my mind at the time (while I was blinking) was that it was too late to sow the saved seeds I have in the garden room. I had decided to rely on volunteer tomatoes this year so as to let other areas of the garden lay fallow.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
6:12 AM

Post #9561974

greenhouse_gal
I am so glad that there are gardeners out there that want to learn the most and enjoy growing vegetables.
I wish there was some DG member really active and curios as I am, in my area to share seeding dates and technique and most of all the varieties that work the best in my climate.
Looking forward to hear all about your season.
Right now we are having some very heavy rain = so happy = larger tomatoes are going to go PUFF ... crack crack ... ooohhhh

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2013
6:24 AM

Post #9561988

We've been having a LOT of rain; it's pretty much ruined my strawberries - they've mostly turned into mush. But at least we don't have to water the rest of the garden.

Honeybee, what a shame about losing your tomatoes! And how funny that your DH didn't tell you what he was doing. At least you have a few volunteers to play with!

I planted two rows of peas this year: one was from seed saved in 2011 and the other was from seed saved in 2008. The older seed actually looked much better than the newer seed, but alas, none of those sprouted. So I have very little in the way of peas this year and have only frozen two packages so far. I asked a friend to send me some more so at least I have a fresh supply for next year.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2013
6:49 AM

Post #9562018

One other variable to consider when comparing our gardens and microclimates is the different varieties of tomatoes we are growing. Won't 54 dtm cherry tomatoes come in far ahead of say, beefsteak tomatoes with a 90-120 dtm?

The very first tomato I ripened on the vine was picked at exactly 150 days from the day I dropped the seed into the soil. Being such a newbie at the time, I was seeing all the other tomato growers touting the wonderful fruits they were getting, and I was wondering what was wrong with my garden. Not a thing was wrong. I just had not considered that there are different timeframes for just about everything, including when tomatoes mature, LOL!

So, wouldn't it be a more accurate comparison if both Stephanie and drthor were growing the exact same variety of tomatoes, 30 minutes apart?

So which common variety of tomato are you both growing?

^^_^^

This message was edited Jun 17, 2013 9:39 AM
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
1:42 PM

Post #9562476

I was messing around, don't know when DG got so hostile. I'm not stopping Stephanie from posting, I believe she can post whenever she wants to. I thought drthor's first tomato was a cherry type so yes that would be ripe before a Beefsteak, I would think. First Stephanie needs to reply, but I'm not stopping her, I was joking around. We used to be able to do that on DG...

Even a 30 minute drive can put you in a totally different micro climate. There are so many different variables it's hard to compare but I do think your suggestions GG are a great place to start. I've been gardening in this same place for 20 yrs and have found that the weather always has a mind of it's own, and that's what ultimately decides when I plant out.

Personally, Im more concerned with my over all harvest then how soon they start producing. I also prefer to have the shortest DTM possible, so I have less work and get the same production. The plants I put in the ground at the beginning of April have large tomatoes on them that are just starting to turn, so the DTM is about 70 days. They wouldn't get going until the soil temps warmed up. That works for me, and I prefer larger tomatoes. I think gardening should be fun and productive but that term means different things to all of us.

Mine aren't the first to ripen but that's fine by me. I like to harvest tomatoes all summer long, that is more important to me.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
2:07 PM

Post #9562504

Drthor-what kind of tomato is the one on the scale? I don't think it can be Choc cherry bc it's not a cherry tomato but it does look good.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2013
2:15 PM

Post #9562521

I hear yah, Lisa, on that "overall harvest" thing you said!

I don't care when I get my tomatoes, so long as I eventually do get them! I was so glad to see any blooms at all on my tomato plants this season, it wouldn't have mattered if they were chartreuse purple with little green men growing on the insides!

I took a very calculated risk planting out so early here for the first time, and, I kinda was holding my breath on the weather. But, so glad I went for it, cause it has been totally worth the effort and the little bit of struggle (not much at all, really, with everything in place).

I have learned that I have the patience to wait for the long-season beefsteaks I love to grow. I'm never in a hurry for any tomato. I think I appreciate it more when it's taken so long to make it to my plate. It's like waiting to go on vacation and the day finally arrives!

On the other hand, I have lots of friends who want tomatoes 3 weeks after they set the plant out, and that's fine, too. I've had to stop sharing my seedlings with those growers, because they kept asking when they would get their tomatoes, LOL! It never occurred to me in the beginning that other people want their food sooner than later, LOL! "Are we there, yet???"

And next season will probably be a whole different ball of wax!

Add in the 3 lbs. of greenies I harvested when I trimmed all the vines back on Saturday, and I'm at 35.5 lbs. The remaining tomatoes I left to ripen should give me about another 3-4 lbs., so I'm happier than a hornworm in an abandoned field of volunteer tomatoes!

Hugs!

Can ya'll believe it is truly almost time to start the fall/winter seedlings???!!! I figure about 3 more weeks! WOW!

This message was edited Jun 17, 2013 4:17 PM

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
4:50 PM

Post #9562662

Whoa, people! I went to take a nap, enjoy the day with my husband, and then work today and come back to people arguing!

Drthor, I saw your questions, both times, but chose not to answer you. I don't keep records, but this year, I've had the most tomatoes set fruit than any year previous. I can't wait for it all to ripen! I am a bit south and west of you, so my climate is a bit different from yours. Also, I use planting calendar and don't plant according to the lunar cycles like you do, so I planted later than you did. If I remember correctly, I also started my seeds later than you did as well, though still in January. I lost the first bunch of seeds to mold, so I had to re-plant a few weeks later.



1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
8:36 PM

Post #9562921

I don't start my cool weather crops until the first week of August. That's for market sales, the ones that need 8 weeks till plant out. The others I start at the beginning of Oct. I have a chart, around here somewhere, lol that gives the sow date according to your region. It's from A&M

GG-I think it freezes later in your area, why do you start them so early?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2013
9:05 PM

Post #9562942

Lisa,
I think you're right. I think I determined that I started a bit too early last fall. It didn't cool off around here until almost mid-November!

I start the seeds inside to have good size seedlings for transplanting out when the weather starts cooling off.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2013
9:40 PM

Post #9562971

Last Fall was strange. It didn't cool down until Christmas, I remember it being a topic on DG it just would not cool down. You put your plants out when they are bigger, most of mine are around 4 weeks old. But fall isn't my favorite season like it is yours. : ). I hope you try the tulle, I really think it's the reason I have squash at all. This is the first time in 20 yrs I've actually grown squash and had beautiful plants. I promise to post the pics tomorrow. The leaves on the zuke plants are like lilypads. Wasn't the tulle your idea?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 18, 2013
7:31 AM

Post #9563293

drthor,
I Googled Chocolate Cherry tomatoes, and none of them look like the large striped tomato you posted as Chocolate Cherry...and, the Chocolate Cherry tomatoes posted on the web are much smaller than in your pic...more like cherry tomatoes...

"Whas' up with dat?"

Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

June 18, 2013
8:00 AM

Post #9563330

The only race I'm in is against the bugs. I've never seen some of the critters devouring my garden: tiny yellow fuzzy caterpillars, junebugs, hornworms...add to that some weird fungus and I wonder if I'll harvest anything else out of here this year!

I've learned soooooo much from y'all. Keep it up!

This message was edited Jun 18, 2013 1:01 PM
happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 18, 2013
8:12 AM

Post #9563348

Boy... forget to log on to Dave's for a few days and I'm behind!

Gymgirl -- TEAR OUT THE LAWN!!! there are so many benefits! First of all, less chemicals. Secondly, more food! Third, it's way more interesting. I've attached a few photos of the front of my house. A few years ago we took out the lawn (the water company gave us a kick-back). We put in mostly drought tolerant natives. Since then, I've outgrown the back yard for my food production, and we decided to take out a huge Sycamore tree (it argued with the power lines and made DH and me sneezy). Once we took out that tree, I went garden-nuts. I now have 9 (yes NINE) fruit trees in front, blueberries, corn, strawberries and (had) garbanzo beans.. I am proud to say my yard has become a great conversation starter with my neighbors, and many people who walk by are now asking me gardening questions... it is SO rewarding. I have five of the fruit trees on an espalier, and will get a picture of that today... Meantime... this is my front yard, and the string of garbanzo beans I just harvested. If I can do it, you can do it!

Food, not lawns!

-Patty

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 18, 2013
8:23 AM

Post #9563361

happygirl - how do you keep the deer from eating everything in your front garden?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 18, 2013
8:31 AM

Post #9563373

LOL!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 18, 2013
9:10 AM

Post #9563431

I went back and read every post on this and the Tomato thread where the pic was posted, and drthor never said her tomato on the scale was a Chocolate Cherry.

It is labeled correctly as a Chocolate Stripes. Nice colors, too!

Just keepin' it real, ya'll, LOL!

(But, I still maintain that if we're gonna compare harvest times, we should consider that the tomatoes need to be the same variety, for a more accurate assessment.)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 18, 2013
10:11 AM

Post #9563531

Drthor edited it to read Choc Stripes, which I'm sure is correct. I've grown both and didn't think it looked like a Choc Cherry. It is a beautiful tomato.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 18, 2013
10:36 AM

Post #9563575

Oops! Sorry, guys, I missed the "edited" tag!



happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 18, 2013
2:13 PM

Post #9563924

HoneyBeeNC -

If there was a deer in my front yard, it would make the evening news. I live in a concrete jungle. (Suburbs 30 miles east of San Francisco).

That said, I have racoons, opposums, squirrels, the occasional turkey, cats-from-he!! who use my garden as a latrine, and bees. I don't have to fight any of them too hard... though the racoons will start to fight me for strawberries if I'm not careful! -Patty
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 18, 2013
2:56 PM

Post #9563977

Nola-can you post a pic of the fungus? That stuff always interests me. It rained (a lot) here last night. If I'd known rain was coming I would have sowed seeds instead of spreading out soaker hoses and watering everything. Lol

I'm seeing bugs that I've never seen before, we went for so long with no bugs then bam, they are every where. Weird little worms I'm seeing horn worm poop and by the size of it the worms should be big but I can't see them. Found a couple smaller ones tho.

Happy-thanks for reminding me where Pleasant Hill is I was just about to google it. When my ex and I separated that was the first ting I did was tear out the grass. It was such a waste, at least too me. I still have some but my live stock keeps it mowed.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 18, 2013
5:35 PM

Post #9564232

happygirl - I counted seven deer on my neighbor's lawn a few nights ago.

Vegetables out front would be a smorgasbord for deer. I'm thankful they don't leap the fence in the backyard.

We live in an enclave called Heritage Woods. All kinds of wildlife abound here - which I must admit, is one of the reasons I live here.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 18, 2013
11:55 PM

Post #9564534

I live way out in the boonies. 5 miles to the highway. So it's 5 miles just to get on a road that goes somewhere else. Lol. I have to get fuel before I get home bc I hate making a trip just to get fuel. I have to fence everything too bc of the deer but I luv it out here. There are 5 houses on my road and 800 open acres across the road.

Deer won't jump if they can't see where they are going to land, thus the moats at zoos. Your back yard is safe, if your husband doesn't eat the tomatoes you left out to be volunteers. Lol

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 19, 2013
3:59 AM

Post #9564611

I have seen deer-excluding fences made of split rails which slant outwards. They don't have to be very high; the deer apparently know that if they try to leap them they'll get caught in the horizontal rails on the other side.

We have a four-foot fence around the two sides of our garden that offer access by deer. On one of those sides is an old orchard, and on the other is a pasture. Both of those areas back up onto the woods where deer like to wander and we see them in the pasture and orchard sometimes. DH put up an electric strand at a height of 22” and two feet out from both of those fences, where the deer would have to set up to jump. When he first turned the current on, that night we heard a deer hit the electric wire and fall back with a thump. There was a lot of huffing and snorting, but they never tried it again. That was many years ago.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 19, 2013
4:42 AM

Post #9564637

Lisa - thanks for the giggle - it's a perfect way to start the day ^^_^^

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
7:50 AM

Post #9564838

This is my latest harvest. After two days of rain some of my largest tomato cracked.
I am having the best year for eggplants.
From left: Ping Tung (this eggplant is green inside), Bonica, Japanes, Casper, Prosperosa

I did a lot of grilling yesterday.
I discover that CASPER, the white eggplant, doesn't store well in the fridge. After 2 days it starts to develop brown spots. So I have to harvest and cooked really fast.

Thumbnail by drthor
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Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

June 19, 2013
7:55 AM

Post #9564848

1lisac - it's hard to get a photo of, but it looks a lot like this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nidulariaceae

I have these all over the garden space that gets a lot of roof runoff from my neighbors, and I don't know that this space has ever been a garden before. Our neighborhood took on 11+ feet of water during Katrina, so gosh knows what's under there.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
8:46 AM

Post #9564902

My tomatoes ate growing really well, even if I think they slowed down recently.
This year I'd like to try something new and I am interested to find out if somebody has done this before.

As you can see in the first picture, the tomato vines are growing horizontally and they are still producing fruits on the top.
June 24th (=fruit day) I'd like to direct seed some LONG BEANS under the tomato plants. The beans will grow and attach to the tomato trunks. The tomato canopy will shade the younger bean seedlings and by the time the beans are to the top, the tomato plants will be done and I could trim them away.

Those long beans really love our climate. In the picture #4 you can see the beans growing on the wood fence.

Have you ever done this?

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
9:09 AM

Post #9564921

With the storms the past couple of days, the tomatoes didn't fare too well. Almost all of them were knocked over due to the high winds. I swear I live in a wind tunnel! LOL Then the neighborhood possum found some of my ripening tomatoes. :( I'd like to trap that thing and dispatch it somewhere. All the plants are still healthy and hubby is working to upright them all this morning. We might have to stake them and tie the plants up to the stake. Next year, we'll have to do something different. I think hubby is looking into using a string trellis or something like that.

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Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 19, 2013
9:16 AM

Post #9564931


My tomato vines pulled my cages over so I went up to Lowe's and bought those steel T-posts used for fencing. I purchased the 6 1/2 foot ones, drove them down into the ground and used the packet of fence ties I purchased to attach the cages to the T-posts just like you would a fence. Just used a three lb. small sledge hammer to drive them in, that should hold them up even in a heavy wind. I finally was successful in trapping my demon Armadillo last night, I permanently relocated him.

This message was edited Jun 19, 2013 11:22 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 19, 2013
9:33 AM

Post #9564962

Mittleider T-Frame instructions...

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://sustainable-gardening.subto.us/TFrames.pdf&chrome=true

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
10:34 AM

Post #9565022

That's very interesting, Linda. I'll have to save that and show it to hubby.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 19, 2013
10:47 AM

Post #9565037

Steph,
Check it out in action! Go to YouTube/ldsprepper or ldsprepper channel and watch his videos. Search for the Mittleider T-Frames video, then his garden update from this month.

This guy is growing all this in Houston, in sawdust and sand!


I think this is the link. OUr company has blocked all YouTube...wonder why, LOL?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CLWdctgzOA&feature=youtube_gdata_player

This message was edited Jun 19, 2013 12:50 PM

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 19, 2013
11:17 AM

Post #9565072

Stephanie/Seedfork

I don't have a picture right now, but I use concrete wire cages for my tomatoes. I secure them with a 7' t-post at the end of each row, and a stretch of electric fence wire across the top of the cages from each post, over the row of cages. I use plastic zip-ties on the top edges of the cages where the wire crosses. Each cage is secured to the wire on both edges. Between the bottom six-inches of the cage and the wires between the posts the cages resist a pretty good wind. It is much less work than a post at every cage and seems to be enough, even for the occasional storm wind.

David

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 19, 2013
11:27 AM

Post #9565085

Steph,
The real beauty of the T-Frames is that the crossbars extend over the pathways between the raised beds, and are framed on all four sides.

He then trains climbing plants on leaders (attached to the square frame). Because the leaders angle out and over the pathways, you're actually growing beyond the width of the beds on the sides. He alternates each plant in a row. Every other plant leader angles "outward" on the frame, and "inward" on the parallel lines above. So, the leader lines make a "vee" on the T-Frames.

There's light, space, air, rainwater, ease of harvesting, monitoring bugs, in the "vee" space.

Look at the video and his latest garden update. A picture explains it better than all my words, LOL!

Linda
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 19, 2013
12:16 PM

Post #9565131

David,
That's a great idea, only my tomato rows are only three cages long and three cages wide, nine plants in one location and nine in another.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
2:15 PM

Post #9565254

My husband refuses to use zip ties in the garden because the heat tends to break them down. We will definitely have to do something for next season though.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 19, 2013
2:24 PM

Post #9565273

I have used strips of felt, loosely tied to the plant and stakes. Old t-shirt material would be less rigid, though. I need to get some of those clips for hanging tomatoes, as my vines in the house are getting to be really tall. I tied them up with twine, and now will need to put a cross member from wall to wall to support them. I'm hoping to keep growing them as long as they will continue to grow. Some say years. We'll see. I just weaved the ones outside into sheep's wire that splits the bed in the middle.

I must have thousands of baby elm trees coming up all over the place. Sigh. Maybe I'll transplant some and make circus trees, lol. http://www.arborsmith.com/treecircus.html

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 19, 2013
2:33 PM

Post #9565284

I use those pale green velcro strips that come on a spool. They work really well for us. In fact, I often can save and reuse them the next year. They match the color of the tomato stalks and you can readjust them easily.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 19, 2013
2:43 PM

Post #9565295

Stephanie, the zip ties only have to last one season. They are removed when you take the cages out to turn the soil (and plant fall or winter vegetables). They could be tied or wired with other material, though. The key is the overhead wire.

Seed, it would work really well for rows of three, but it would only save driving one post. My cages are in rows of 8, about 30 feet from end to end. That saves me from driving 6 posts for the cages in the row.

DTR

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
8:18 PM

Post #9565642

We use strips of pantyhose to tie our things up in the garden.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2013
8:29 PM

Post #9565648

Wow Stephanie the winds must have been bad. We got some rain yesterday morning but nothing like that. I use different types of wire to make cages, this year it looks like I may be using the sprawling method lol. I pound in a wood post or a metal stake thru the wire and into the ground, I've never had the wind blow one over yet.

Nola-I'll look at the link you posted tomorrow I need to get some sleep.

Ohhh ALERT ALERT I picked my first ripe tomato today. It was a currant with a DTM of 0, as it is still in a nursery pot and had not even made it to the garden yet. Lol. I should have saved seeds from it bc im sure it was pure but my youngest son gets dibs on the first tomato. We really had a good laugh over it tho.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 20, 2013
7:23 PM

Post #9566932

One day behind , I posted this to the other tomato thread but , once again .My first tomato of the season were two Broad Ripple Currants today .. oh good ...

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2013
8:00 AM

Post #9568483

Things are heating up in the garden! My tomatoes are loaded and the beans have started producing. I think I'm going to plant some pepper seeds indoors for the fall. I should be able to do that today since I'm off. I was supposed to go to a wedding, but not sure that's going to happen.

Pantano Romanesco loaded!
Burgundy bush beans
Today's harvest: Homestead 24, the "kissing cousins" Pantano Romanescos, and some beans. The kissing cousins were so close together on the plant that I had to harvest both because they were on the same stem. The green one is now ripening on the windowsill above my kitchen sink.
A nice hefty tomato. Can't buy this at the grocery store!!

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greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 22, 2013
11:10 AM

Post #9568701

Just picked a nice bunch of fava beans. Now to figure out what to do with them!
JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 22, 2013
2:43 PM

Post #9568874

Looks like everyone is doing great in the garden! Lots of nice pics.

Well, my cucumbers are going gangbusters, plus I have lots of jalapeños as well. I had a decent onion harvest a couple of weeks ago too and a garlic harvest a few weeks before that as well. Now the things that went wrong...didn't properly stake my indeterminate toms, plus they were 7" transplants but for some reason I thought I could grow okra from seed right next to them at the same time. Not smart. Anyway, the bigger problem is that the birds can't stay away from the toms, even when they are green so it was a slaughter. At least the animals ate. Also, my bell peppers are not doing well either.

Well, I have a nice 5'x5' space clear for new plants- any ideas? It is not raised.
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2013
4:49 PM

Post #9569032

Not too bad of a harvest today. I'm dispointed in my large tomatoes cracking on top. I guess I should give up on trying to grow them here except 'Big Beef' haven't done too bad.

Thumbnail by hrp50
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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2013
5:42 PM

Post #9569083

Great harvest, hrp! Everything looks great. I don't mind the cracks too much as long as the taste is good. I'm not picky; I just love home-grown tomatoes!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2013
6:49 AM

Post #9569683

My first cuke came in yesterday -- H-19 Little Leaf wins the speed round -- although I picked them "Muncher" size and I think these will be better if I let them get bigger. Muncher and Boston Pickling are blooming and setting female blossoms now, but not cukes yet.

Costata Romanesco zucchini should be ready in a couple of days. The corn is coming along nicely and I suspect I may have some for 4th of July.

And I picked my first blueberry yesterday, but all the rest are still fully green.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 23, 2013
9:37 AM

Post #9569880

I don't think I'll have corn (the Bantam anyway) by July 4th. And as the smoke from the forest fires get closer, I'm sure it's as hard for the plants to breathe as it is for me. Not sure what that will do to the garden, but I'm more concerned with those in the immediate path, the firefighters, and the wildlife - bears and cubs, birds, deer, elk - that have already died and those that are trying to flee. A whole ecosystem is going up in smoke. 70,000 acres as of this morning.

Taken last night, the smoke turned the moon a rusty red.

The Bantam corn in wheat bales.

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hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2013
11:49 AM

Post #9570006

Solace,

I've heard that corn should be at least "knee high by the 4th of July". I guess that would differ depending on where you're growing it. My corn is about 5' tall and has tassels. I'm not expecting to harvest any corn again this year as I never got around to building a cage over the raised bed to keep out the squirrels. Last year they took every last cob just as it was ready to harvest. Has anyone had success relocating squirrels by trapping them in those little traps like you can buy at Home Depot or Lowes? That just might be the answer.

Someone once suggested getting a dog but we had one until about a month ago when we had to put down our sweet Becky. She realized that she could never catch a squirrel but she never tired of chasing them back and forth along the top of the fence. We had Becky for thirteen years and I don't think I'll ever have another dog because making the decision and then having her put to sleep was just too difficult and painful.


Becky, the (part) Whippet
2000 - 2013
R.I.P.

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Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 23, 2013
1:12 PM

Post #9570101

What an adorable dog. So sorry for your loss of Becky. I lost my "baby" (9 years old) black lab/german shepherd cross last year. I still miss him so much. He was my guardian angel, I always told him. He followed me everywhere, and when he couldn't go out, he was at the windows. I don't think you ever get over that love, because they give an unconditional love you can get nowhere else. It's special. Someday, I hope you can get another dog, as one is out there needing your love, too. I'll bet it's still hard to write about her. I know it is for me.

Regarding the corn. If it were me, I'd cut some strips of either hardware cloth or chicken wire (you get cut less if you use hardware cloth/welded wire) that will just go around each cob and stem below it. You can reuse them every year. They're not going to bite through metal. OR make a box out of 2x4s and surround your corn crop with chicken wire. I have squirrels in the back yard, mostly in the trees, but they never come into the front yard (knock on wood).
JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 23, 2013
4:43 PM

Post #9570332

Sorry to hear about your dog, hrp. I went through something similar with our yellow lab Zeno about four years ago and I was sad for days afterwards...

Well, here is my onion harvest from about three weeks ago. I had my 6 year old girl and my 4 year old boy do the digging...it was great. The onions are on the small side, and some of them are like "pearl" onions (lol) but they taste great. The reds had a nice, strong aroma.

This is the short-day sampler from Dixondale Farm. I followed their spacing and planting guide, plus I fertilized during planting. But, I did not fertilize during the growing season so that is most likely why my harvest was small. I used my drip irrigation system to water and I think there is some tweaking to be done there as well so that the onions get the water they need. Once my kids dug them up, we placed them on newspapers in the backyard. I left them out in the sun for two days, then brought them inside. They are in this box now in the kitchen. All in all, I was pleased.

Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75   Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75         
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JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 23, 2013
5:50 PM

Post #9570418

Cucumbers are pretty fool proof, as I can attest. Here are some pickling cucumbers from Johnny's Seeds, Jackson Classic F1. I have 10 plants right now, and they are producing well. I have lots of cucumbers, and I need to get pickling ASAP. My wife and I have also started eating cucumber sandwiches. Yum. Any other ideas?

I bought a packet of pickling seasoning by Mrs Wages, and the pickles turned out great if I do say so myself.

Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75   Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75   Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75      
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kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 23, 2013
6:33 PM

Post #9570465

Corn-yellow dent- for us on normal years was a 4th of July treat just north of Carrollton along the red river... we'd grab gunny sacks and dad would whack the top and we'd shuck and silk. Yum. The milk had to have a 5 min set in boiling water, or you'd make yourself sick, not as watery as the sweet corns of today...but better wrapped in foil and grilled, or made into peppercorn...

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2013
6:39 PM

Post #9570470

They look great, John!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 23, 2013
6:54 PM

Post #9570490

I can remember foil wrapping "feed corn" more fun than it usually tasted , if I recall correctly .
great pics , gardeners gallery of greats here, Two tomatoes and a couple of beans is all for me so far .
My melons are growing faster than my cucumbers ,, that's not good for me , as long as it turns out all right though , is really all that matters ..
JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 23, 2013
7:01 PM

Post #9570496

Here's something my neighbor is growing- any ideas as to what kind of bean it is? I am assuming these are beans, as there are lots of slender bean-looking pods, but wow, they must be a foot long! You can see one of them really well in this pic. That trellis is a good 7' tall, easy.

Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75
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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 23, 2013
7:08 PM

Post #9570503

Are they that , ? yard long beans .. asparagus beans ,, my guess is one or the other ..

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2013
3:37 AM

Post #9570751

John, you can freeze excess cucumbers:

Freezing Cucumbers

Slice them thinly, mix them with salt (about a tablespoon per large cucumber), and put them in the refrigerator for a day.

Then rinse them really well and press them as dry as you can.

Mix them with sugar and vinegar, 50/50, enough to cover them.

Refrigerate for another day, then put them in freezer containers or bags and freeze.

When you thaw and drain them later, they're still crisp and good in salads, gazpacho, etc. They’re also good by themselves as a cucumber salad.
JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 24, 2013
5:58 AM

Post #9570876

Thanks GG, I'll give that a try!
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 24, 2013
11:41 AM

Post #9571322

Thanks GG,
I had no idea Cucumbers could be frozen.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2013
12:09 PM

Post #9571361

I know, I didn't either until an email friend in Oregon mentioned it. I've done it for several years now and it's a great use for your excess cukes. I use a mandoline to slice them and that makes it quick and easy.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 24, 2013
12:49 PM

Post #9571405

Do you freeze them straight from the sugar-vinegar mix, or do you rinse them again before drying and freezing them?

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 24, 2013
5:25 PM

Post #9571822

Mark harvested the first of our Royal Burgundy beans today! (They look black in the pic, but they're really purple.) We've got several tomatoes that will be ready to harvest tomorrow.

Thumbnail by stephanietx
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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 26, 2013
7:40 AM

Post #9573814

Cukes and zukes are starting to come in in earnest now, and banana pepper are strating to come on, but the bells aren't setting fruit at all. The corn is still teasing me. The toms are setting fruit now that I have been out there shaking the cages daily in lieu of the bumble bees shaking things up.

The two butternuts are setting fruit now, but the Upper Ground Sweet potato isn't blooming yet. It's huge... just no blooms. The sunflowers are getting ready to bloom.

Blackberries and blueberries are starting to ripen, too.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 26, 2013
8:02 AM

Post #9573856

Harvested almost 3 more pounds of tomatoes yesterday. All of my tomato plants are loaded with maters, too. Now I'm thinking of fall planting since temps are now in the triple digits. :/

Thumbnail by stephanietx
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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 26, 2013
8:33 AM

Post #9573910

Steph, LOL, I've cut my seven tomato plants down to 3 already, and yours are just coming in! Amazing! I love it!

I believe you had asked me how my Virginia Sweets tasted, and I couldn't answer because the jumble of fruits I was picking made it difficult for me to identify all but the Mule Teams. Since I trimmed the vines back and isolated the remaining plants, I can SEE what I'm picking and where it's from, LOL!

I'm fairly certain the two HUGE fruits I've been waiting on are Virginia Sweets, but I'm including a pic so you can tell me. Each weighed in at just over 1 lb., my largest ones of the season.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 26, 2013
10:26 AM

Post #9574059

My problem is that Mark picks the maters and he doesn't remember which came from which plant! I do have to say that the Pantano Romanesco is a pretty tomato and it tastes soooooo good!
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 26, 2013
10:48 AM

Post #9574085

Well, all my cucumbers were beginning to get Pickle Worms, so I pulled them all off. Went to Lowe's looking for some Spinosad, but could not find any. I brought back a bottle of BT, not what I wanted but it will have to do. I am going to be gone for a week shortly and I want to spray all the plants so when I get back all the worms will be gone.
I figure that by pulling all the cukes, then spraying I should be able to get rid of the Pickle Worms before they bore into the Cucumbers again. I did manage to get quite a few before the worm infestation, I could not believe how fast those things grow. If I missed one, it would be huge when I found it after just a few days. Now the little pickling type cucumbers on coming on, they only get a few inches long compared to the others which grow over a foot long, and when they hung from the fencing would be almost perfectly straight.
My neighbor gave me a Purple Cherokee tomato, the first one I had ever eaten. It was delicious and meaty, not the prettiest tomato. The top was green and had cracks, the coloration other than that was almost identical to my Black Cherry little tomatoes.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 27, 2013
6:38 PM

Post #9576303

Harvested more tomatoes today and the plants are still loaded! If we can keep them watered evenly and bug-free, we might have tomatoes into mid July! The mostly dead cherry tomato plants and purple tomatillos I planted about 10 days ago are doing GREAT! I'm so happy for them. I also discovered 2 small okra volunteers in the same bed where we pulled onions and now have the cherry tomatoes and tomatillos. I need to try moving them, but will have to do that in the evening so they have all night to get acclimated.

Today, I also planted 24 peppers (inside). Since none of my seeds germinated this spring, I decided I would try them for the fall. We'll see if I have better luck!

One of today's loving, happy tomatoes harvested
Cherry tomato plant
Purple Tomatillos
A loaded tomato plant. I stopped counting at 18 green tomatoes.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 27, 2013
8:24 PM

Post #9576431

Ok, Steph!
Here are the two one pounders I think might be the Virginia Sweets. Can you verify they are?

Also, my last harvest of Black Beauty Eggplant.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl         
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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2013
12:11 AM

Post #9576511

Those look like VSs. I was the one who ask, the VS have a distinct shape and color and a long DTM. So even in the tomato jungle you should be able to tell them apart.

I'm out of town but I'll be back late Mon. nite and in the gardens early Tues. Morning. Im going to try and keep my tomatoes going over the summer. I checked, just before I left town, and they were still setting. Little tiny baby tomato buttons, I think I finally figured out why my plants never stop setting bc we cool down more at night then most of Tx. By the time some of these tomatoes buttons are big enough to pick there won't be much time before the temps start to go down. I have some huge tomatoes that I thought would ripen while I was gone, but it looks like they are going to wait. I don't mind sharing, but I want the first ones. Lol

I had no idea that cucumbers could be frozen and maintain their consistency I'm amazed.

GG- why is that your last EP? I've read that EP and peppers shouldn't be yanked bc they love the heat. Tomato plants are more of an individual choice.

So far I have harvested 4 types of beans, cukes, 3types of squash, Rosella leaves. Tomatoes and a few different peppers are close (some of these plants are older bc I overwintered them), various eggplant, tomatillos, ground cherries and golden berries. I still need to plant or sow 4 types of long beans, okra, more
pepper plants, and dwarf tomato plants. I was afraid to sow or plant anything right before I left. Now I'm really glad I waited, as I had a water pipe leak in the house (the night before I left) and they couldn't get the water in the house turned off without turning off the water to the garden. Turned out my ex's rememory of how he did the plumbing was wrong. But between 3 fantastic friends, including the plumber, who fixed it so the house water could be turned off and leave the water to the garden on and turned on the soaker hoses too. My gardens are getting watered. Just getting around to working on the house.

I'm so glad to see everyone's garden doing well. I hope I have pictures to post next week...and not of the 4 ' long hole in my hallway. Lol
on the house...

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2013
6:51 AM

Post #9576729

I'm looking forward to the 3 days of "cool" weather we have coming up!! Supposed to only be in the low 90s late next week with lows in the upper 60s. Woot for us!
happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 28, 2013
9:10 AM

Post #9576936

Funny... we are coming up on three-four days of miserable hot (100+). I am shocked that I still have PEAS in my garden, but I am confident this will be the last of 'em.

I harvested my first cucumber this morning, and think my very first tomatoes will come off this weekend... It has just occurred to me that I also have peppers, onions, basil, and an outdoor grill. Throw some bread and olive oil on that and we've got bruschetta! My favorite...

My storage beans (cannellini, black, hidatsa, borlotti and jacob's cattle), are starting to dry on the vine... I love harvesting them and thinking about all the yummy chili and bean dishes we will have this winter.

I am very proud to say -- we will be 90% "food independent" by the end of this season. The only food we will have to buy at the farmer's market is animal products (cheese, cheese, and eggs). How about that?!?!?!!!

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2013
9:56 AM

Post #9577008

I'm glad to hear that it's going to be cooler in TX. I'm in SoCal right now and a record setting heat wave has hit ( my friends blame me, for bringing Tx weather) it is so hot here it is unbelievable.

Happy-congradulations on your gardening success, it a great feeling.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2013
12:17 PM

Post #9577210

Lisa,
You are a TROOPER!!!

LOL, that should've read, my LATEST harvest of Black Beauty eggplants!

There are many more to come, especially when I water them consistently!
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 29, 2013
4:56 PM

Post #9579192

My egg plant is still producing a little, the banana peppers are over producing, and the bells are very slow, The tomatoes are outdoing themselves. The squash is just really starting since I sprayed it with BT, and now the cucumbers aren't full of pickle worms.

Thumbnail by Seedfork   Thumbnail by Seedfork   Thumbnail by Seedfork      
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kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 29, 2013
5:56 PM

Post #9579264

yay guys!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 29, 2013
6:39 PM

Post #9579310

Looks great, seed!! It's been a great year for tomatoes here as well.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 1, 2013
5:17 PM

Post #9582476

Woohoo!! Got my first pounder tomato today! The rest of the tomato harvest from today, over 3 pounds of tomatoes. We also harvested some more burgundy beans.

Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx         
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Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

July 1, 2013
6:26 PM

Post #9582572

Beauties! Congrats, all.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 2, 2013
12:36 AM

Post #9582856

Wow, what kind is that? Not that it really matters...lol congradulations they look fantastic.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 2, 2013
8:22 AM

Post #9583249

Hi!

These bells have been in the ground almost 3 months, and haven't produced a single pepper. When the were inside under lights, they had megablooms and even started making fruits. I pulled off at least 50 blooms cause it was still too cold out...

They get fed regularly and watered, but the leaves stay droopy and look like in this picture toward the bottom leaves. the top leaves are nice and green. There are a few blooms lately, and the plants look like they're trying, by do I need to give it up?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 2, 2013
8:29 AM

Post #9583263

Bell pepper leaf...

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 2, 2013
4:39 PM

Post #9583852

Lisa, the one pounder is a Homestead 24. I didn't realize they could get so big!! The others are mainly Pantano Romanesco, but there are a couple of Rutgers and more Homesteads in the mix.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 2, 2013
6:49 PM

Post #9584022

Here is a Belle Starr paste tomato . lots of green tomatoes . no red ones only a few yellow cherry so far

A few green beans being eaten .. good "stuffins"

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 2, 2013
8:34 PM

Post #9584182

Wonderful stuff Juhur!

Feedback on my ailing bells would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 2, 2013
8:39 PM

Post #9584187

I have seen that on mine a few times in the past , lower leaves doing that like tomato leaves that turn yellow .
I have no idea though .. I wish I could help . Have seen other peppers do that from too much water and not enough sun .
Only that was not why with my Bells

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2013
6:36 AM

Post #9584496

Wish I could help with your bells, Gymgirl, but I haven't a clue.

I can, however, offer some guesses:

1) soil too wet and roots are not prospering.
2) transplant shock.
3) weather in your area is very hot/wet and plants have not established a strong enough root system to support top-growth.
4) they need more nitrogen - try fish emulsion.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 3, 2013
8:21 AM

Post #9584632

Wikipedia pulls up a long list of 'Bell Pepper Diseases' ck esp on fusarium wilt, anthracnose, an mosiac wilt i think it was

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 3, 2013
8:23 AM

Post #9584637

Ok. Thanks!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 3, 2013
8:33 AM

Post #9584654

I'm with bee in thinking it's some kind of chemical imbalance. I was also going to suggest fish emulsion.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
9:05 AM

Post #9586361

Whew! 2" of rain and still coming down. During a break in the rain, I just picked the mother of all cucumbers... and it's a pickling variety. I must have missed it yesterday but the rain probably helped it along.

I have a ton of cukes and zukes backed up. At the BBQ this weekend that means grilled zucchini with goat cheese and balsamic vinegar, sliced cucumbers and other veggies with cucumber-tarragon dip, and banana peppers stuffed with black beans, wild rice and pepper jack cheese. Plus the pick-your-own corn.

And probably to go baggies for extra cukes and zukes!

Hey look, it's pouring again.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
10:37 AM

Post #9586480

My mother used to say that rain was the angels crying. They must be very upset about something, because it has rained on and off everyday for days on end. ^^_^^

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 4, 2013
12:31 PM

Post #9586643

My father use to say it was the creator weeing on us all .. ^_^ Apologies for any offense ,, I could not resist .. yeah well .. the feeling ...

Bee; That is a nice sentiment , My grandparents and in bible school . I use to hear that .

This message was edited Jul 4, 2013 3:51 PM

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
1:15 PM

Post #9586681

Could be tears of joy... not everything is bad news, it only seems like it. :p. We've had a wet year, but it beats the heck out of drought.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
1:39 PM

Post #9586712

Nicole, [quote]Could be tears of joy[/quote] I never thought of it that way.

And agree with you, a wet year IS better than drought.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 4, 2013
3:37 PM

Post #9586874

Please share that rain with us who are dry, dry, dry!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 4, 2013
4:47 PM

Post #9586952

One day to go and it has rained here everyday for three weeks ,, really ,, Last year we had 7/10 tenths for June here , July was not much better , That drought was B...A...D... !!!

Lots of Beans and Herbs . They really like this cloudy wet weather ..

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2013
8:44 AM

Post #9587652

I think our tomato plants are finally slowing down, even though I picked 6lbs, 5oz of tomatoes today. The plants are still loaded and we're harvesting every other day, but I don't see many new fruits on the plants. Hopefully we'll be able to nurse them through the hot part of the summer and they'll rev up again when it cools down. The bush beans are definitely done. My first orange bell pepper sprouted yesterday. Here comes the fall garden season!

Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx         
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2013
9:28 AM

Post #9587701

Our volunteer tomatoes gave us their first fruits yesterday. They tasted real good in last night's hamburgers!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 5, 2013
10:20 AM

Post #9587769

We can grow bell peppers in the fall in Houston? I thought they liked the hot weather.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 5, 2013
10:25 AM

Post #9587776

Peppers will turn into trees in milder climates and not die every winter. Most garden veggies that have reblooms can survive til frosts, a few have a terminal ending/renewal cycle, like soybeans that are also sensitive to length of day light requirements. Depends on the type of Fall Houston has more than anything else..

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2013
11:36 AM

Post #9587858

I always get my best peppers in the fall. We grew a jalapeno plant for 3 growing seasons once. It was in a container and it produced all winter in our sun room.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2013
5:45 PM

Post #9588271

Linda-regarding your bell pepper. You might want to try posting that pic on the pepper forum. I didn't think much of it until I saw the pic. Something isn't right. Lol

Great haul Steaphanie. That's one reason I like pole beans better, they produce longer then bush beans. I still need to sow my yard long beans. I have 20 or so pepper plants that I overwintered from last year. Some were in the 4" nursery pots but they still produced pods. They are definately a perennial, that can be grown year round if they are protected from the cold.

I think I have figured out why my tomatoes set, even when it's hot. In this area we usually get below 70* at nite. Lately we've been getting below 55* which might be too cool. But I just checked and there are more tomato buttons on most, if not all of my plants. So even tho it gets hot during the day, it cools down during the night.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2013
6:07 PM

Post #9588297

Banana peppers stuffed with black beans cooked with sumac and garlic and wild rice with a smidgen of pepper jack cheese and hot sauce? To die for. Way better than I hoped, flat out cold with the peppers crunchy and the stuffing with a bit of toothiness.

I may not be giving away as many banana peppers as usual this year... although getting the seeds and such out of banana peppers with just a slit in the side was a challenge. I ate the mistakes. :)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2013
6:10 PM

Post #9588300

That sounds REALLY good. I can think of other peppers that would work with too.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2013
6:15 PM

Post #9588309

The folks at work have started asking for handouts from the garden. LOL
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2013
8:42 PM

Post #9588463

I sent the men that are working on the water leak in my house home with squash today. The squash were supposed to be picked, the week I was gone, but weren't. Needless to say the zukes were like baseball bats, but they seemed happy with them. I've picked 4 tomatoes so far but today I picked my first one that I actually know what it is, it's a Phoenix weighing in at 13oz. Also picked a Heatmaster that is much smaller.
The plants are just loaded, and my harvest is exactly a month later then normal but the yields look to be higher, much higher.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 6, 2013
6:41 AM

Post #9588707

Only thing I am seeing on the leaves may have to do with something sucking juices from the leaves-like aphids... What have you discovered GymGirl?

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 6, 2013
11:25 AM

Post #9589010

I saw my first stink bug of the season today , just before it started raining ..
That 's about as exciting as stepping on snails or sitting on a snake ,,isn't it ? lol
Good thing was I got four little yellow tomatoes , set them on the counter , came back to take a pic ,, and gone , they got ate , poof !

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 6, 2013
1:18 PM

Post #9589132

I went out and picked three tiny ripe currant tomatoes - our first of the season - this morning, to go with the cottage cheese and smoked whitefish and bagel we were having for breakfast. Yum!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2013
4:08 PM

Post #9589329

Yay Lisa!! Any harvest in July is good.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 6, 2013
4:50 PM

Post #9589367

I miss the crab and lobster from the seashore areas you all might live close to (closer than me anyway)
I still miss those , only after decades of learning about pollution ,, somehow it ain't the same anymore (sigh)
Thank heavens for a garden ...
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2013
5:20 PM

Post #9589396

Stephanie, I grow such a wide variety of veggies that I'm usually harvesting something. Lol
But given the strange weather this spring I really didn't know what to expect. I didn't expect a bumper crop of everything. Never expected all this squash, and last week the night time temps were so cool that it really helped to allow more tomatoes etc to set. This is what I used to remember gardening was like. Lol

I got 2.5 lbs of tomatoes this evening. I still need to get more planted/sown but it's just too hot during the day. A lot of these will go in containers to extend the season and keep them out of the blazing sun.My helpers moved some of my seedlings, while I was gone. They didn't realize I only had tags in one plant and everything to the right of that was the same thing. That system will no longer work. Lol. Everything with a tag will go in a container and the tag less ones will go in ground. When they set fruit then I will know what they are. I had it sooo organized this year. Oh well.

I think I have finally solved the mystery as to why I get tomatoes and such all summer long.. We usually drop to 70 or below at night, with very few exceptions. Last week we got below 55, very unusual.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 6, 2013
5:27 PM

Post #9589404

Here's the little yellow currant tomatoes we have been munching on . this was one of the first .. more since . more to follow '

Thumbnail by juhur7
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2013
11:26 AM

Post #9592982

Ok, Ya'll, I just (and I mean within the last 5 minutes) got my first FRUIT TREE!!

It's an "Improved Meyer" Lemon tree from Walmart, on sale for 50% or, $8.50.

Now. How big will it get, and what do I do next, LOL???

It already has about 5 small lemons on the branches. It has a good stem, and is about 6' tall.

________________

Ok. So, I just read up in the Plant Files, and it looks like this tree will stay manageably small enough for me. I can also grow it in a large container (which would be my preference), and move it inside and out to protect it.

One comment said I should remove the fruit from the less-than-one-year-old tree, to force energy to the tree instead of the fruit. Should I cut them off, now?

I'm getting excited!!!



This message was edited Jul 9, 2013 1:43 PM

Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2013
12:00 PM

Post #9593018

[quote="Gymgirl"]Ok, Ya'll, I just (and I mean within the last 5 minutes) got my first FRUIT TREE!!

It's an "Improved Meyer" Lemon tree from Walmart, on sale for 50% or, $8.50.

Now. How big will it get, and what do I do next, LOL???

It already has about 5 small lemons on the branches. It has a good stem, and is about 6' tall.

________________

Ok. So, I just read up in the Plant Files, and it looks like this tree will stay manageably small enough for me. I can also grow it in a large container (which would be my preference), and move it inside and out to protect it.

One comment said I should remove the fruit from the less-than-one-year-old tree, to force energy to the tree instead of the fruit. Should I cut them off, now?

I'm getting excited!!!



This message was edited Jul 9, 2013 1:43 PM[/quote]


I love mine - it brings all kinds of bees to the yard. It does take about 3 months for the fruit to mature, but even green, the lemons are tasty.

Since mine is also in a container, all I worry about is feeding it, keeping bugs/fungus away, and keeping it in the sunshine.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2013
1:11 PM

Post #9593098

Thanks, Nola_Nigella!

Could you post a picture of your Meyer in a container? How old is your tree?

And, what kinda bugs/fungus do you have to battle against?

Linda
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 9, 2013
4:56 PM

Post #9593355

Don't know if this is the proper forum, but it certainly applies here. Can you imagine not being able to buy or trade seeds for your garden. Isn't that just a bit too much government.
http://www.offthegridnews.com/2013/05/06/banned-european-union-to-outlaw-heirloom-seeds/

This message was edited Jul 9, 2013 6:57 PM

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2013
5:56 PM

Post #9593416

We see a lot of leaf miner in citrus here in South Georgia.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2013
4:14 AM

Post #9593726

Seedfork, there's a thread discussing this topic here

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1311316/

but unfortunately it's been taken over by people discussing the changes in DG's formatting.
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2013
5:40 AM

Post #9593795

Thanks greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2013
10:57 AM

Post #9594129

Seedfork, thank YOU for bringing that topic back to its original purpose!
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2013
12:14 PM

Post #9594211

Bad post, sorry.

This message was edited Jul 10, 2013 4:44 PM
Seedfork
Enterprise, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2013
1:53 PM

Post #9594349

Bad post on my part.


This message was edited Jul 10, 2013 4:44 PM

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2013
5:43 PM

Post #9594602

Well, my summer garden is slowing down, thanks to the heat. It's that time of the summer to baby my tomato plants, spray the okra for aphids, and to plan for my fall/winter garden.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2013
6:01 PM

Post #9594616

Let them be Lynda, they dont turn til Oct or Nov and you wont want to repot til Jan anyway. Thorns. Citrus needs way different handling than veggies, but hungry hippo is a good beginning. Fertilizer spikes DO NOT work. Once you get it in a permanent location they are a lot less problem. It can bush out, always thought espalier would be a good thing to do with this citrus. it should be the new improved Meyer Lemon not the older version as well?

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2013
2:54 AM

Post #9594887

Hey greenhouse_gal We are only part time thread hijackers...lol
Storm here played some havoc with my plants . power was out all day yesterday .
Knocked over a bean trellis , broke two of my tomato plants , not the ones that are doing real well though .
Still waiting for my first red garden tomato ..


greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2013
4:27 AM

Post #9594931

I've been getting some currant tomatoes but so far nothing else. Cukes are coming but not there yet, and peas, favas, and lettuce is over. I see some pepper buds...

I keep thinking that some of the storms we've been having will damage plants or supports but so far we've been lucky!

Juhur, I was following the European rule thread with interest because I've heard several different takes on it. I wish our European subscribers would weigh in.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 11, 2013
8:31 AM

Post #9595159

Thanks, Kitt!

So, leave the little lemons alone, feed the plant regularly, and repot it in January, correct? It came in a 3.5 gallon tall little pot. Will it be comfortable there until January?

I have a 15? 25? gallon cattle molasses tub that I can use as a container. It's black plastic.

Or, if push comes to shove, there are two possible places I could plant it into the ground, either the inside or outside corner of my fence, on the south of the yard. Gets full sun on either side of the fence most of the day...

LMK...

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2013
8:40 AM

Post #9595169

greenhouse_gal , Europeans have a different view of those of us here, arguing or copying them and their arguments ..
I wish they would of kept that one there ..personally .. Only ; wish in one hand ... Well you know ... I might as well...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
8:44 AM

Post #9595175

I'm European - what do you want to know?

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2013
9:28 AM

Post #9595222

I tore out some diseased tomato plants today and whacked some diseased branches and limbs off of another. I also harvested some tips to root from some healthy plants in order to plant for the fall. We saved all the green tomatoes on those to see if they would ripen. Also harvested some tomatoes that have sun scald. I cut off a bunch of aphid infested limbs on my fennel and discovered a bunch of green lacewing eggs! Yay for me! Sprayed the okra for aphids/ants with some soap water. Shooting with plain water just never works for me. I still have a lot of baby Royal Burgundy beans on my plants, so I might decide to save them and not yank them just yet. Almost all of the pepper seeds I planted a couple of weeks ago have sprouted, so I'm moving from summer to fall gardening. LOL This dragonfly was enjoying my compost pile, too. Love to see all the various flying critters in my yard. (Except for the wasps!)

Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click an image for an enlarged view.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 11, 2013
10:49 AM

Post #9595320

It will be fine where it is til Jan Lynda, it can get to be a real tree and not a small one either. Just so you know...They are susceptible to freezes, but I dont remember the temps requirement. Sun hogs to prevent the leaves from getting a fungus that washes with a concoction of soapy water and something. Ok. I need my notes and dont have internet and the brain just came up with about 5 cures, so am backing out of this a moment...

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
11:21 AM

Post #9595346

I'm harvesting/eating: corn, zucchini, cucumbers, banana peppers and as of today, tomatoes.

The first run of corn is about played out and I was lazy so I didn't freeze or can any. I guess I am leaving it out there to dry and make corn meal with. I had more corn than I imagined possible. Still, I'm not sure corn is worth it.

It looks like a bumper year for butternut squash despise the fact we really haven't had the heat they like, but it's still early in the season.

I'm starting to prep for fall now; it's nearly time to plant cabbage, broccoli and carrots already.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 11, 2013
11:28 AM

Post #9595359

D mail Gymgirl

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2013
11:46 AM

Post #9595381

Hey Bee you and greenhouse_gal disappeared to another thread did you? and ; Yes I am hijacking in thread stray again ,,, oops ..
Bean trellis ,one them went down in yesterdays storm .. beans from the ground it is .. !

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2013
12:52 PM

Post #9595457

Juhur, I'm still here! I posted something early this morning! Just picked a nice handful of currant tomatoes for salad tonight.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2013
1:02 PM

Post #9595470

I only asked as HoneybeeNC asked what you might of been wondering as HoneybeeNC is European ..

Me too!!! picking little yellow currant Tomatoes and that is about all .yummy !!!
Everything else is looking good except it is laying on the ground ..

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2013
1:40 PM

Post #9595512

Oh, I didn't notice that post, Honeybee! I meant that people who are currently in Europe might have a better sense of what's going on there with the new regulations. I do know that you're European, but I figured that those on the ground there are probably hearing a lot more about it than we are here. Although my friend in France doesn't seem to have much sense of the ramifications.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
2:25 PM

Post #9595548

I'm missing something. Perhaps yáll are referring to a post on another thread?

My brother and sister-in-law live in France. The rest of my family (except my children) live in England.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2013
3:54 PM

Post #9595628

There is a thread on the tomato forum abt that topic already. It's kind of hard to have so many topics going on,on this one thread when the original topic is still going strong. It's hard to talk about that EU thing if you haven't read it all and I think there may be better places to discuss it, since people keep posting around it here. Pretty clear, at least to me, that most of us want to stick to the original topic.

I'm harvesting tomatoes, beans, cukes, 3 types of squash, eggplant, and some peppers. There is still a lot more out there.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2013
5:15 PM

Post #9595679

Honeybee, there's a thread, as 1lisac mentioned, about new rules in the EU which strictly regulate the sale of seeds unless they are registered and well-documented. It's not intended to apply to noncommercial seed trading, supposedly, but that could change at any time without the need for public comment. Here's the link:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1311316/

Maybe your brother and the rest of your family have some thoughts about this that you could share on that thread.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
5:20 PM

Post #9595681

Thanks, GG - I'll have to ask my brother about this. They are avid gardeners.

My mom is 95 and doesn't garden anymore. None of the rest of the family garden.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2013
5:36 PM

Post #9595690

This thread is getting long, so here's a new thread!

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1324686/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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