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Water Gardens: Small pond

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newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

June 21, 2013
8:29 AM

Post #9567529

Not much but I enjoy it. What does your small or big pond look like now?

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newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

June 21, 2013
12:16 PM

Post #9567707

Darn Ipad.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 21, 2013
12:18 PM

Post #9567710

Very pretty and serene. Is it in a wooded setting?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

June 21, 2013
12:21 PM

Post #9567715

No in my small overgrown backyard.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

June 21, 2013
12:22 PM

Post #9567716

rightside up this time

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 21, 2013
12:27 PM

Post #9567720

It took forever and a new IPAD for me to figure out how to do it! Here is our pond - not a great photo but it is in the IPAD at least

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 21, 2013
12:37 PM

Post #9567727

What are the yellow blooms
mittsy
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

June 21, 2013
12:42 PM

Post #9567732

Your water features are lovely, here's my Frog pond.

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Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

June 21, 2013
4:37 PM

Post #9567952

Gorgeous! Gorgeous! Gorgeous!

I love pictures of everyone's ponds!
mittsy
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

June 21, 2013
5:21 PM

Post #9568002

Look what bloomed today. Japanese irises First Act and Coho.

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 21, 2013
7:45 PM

Post #9568129

The frogs must love sunning in it. This year the frogs have been deafening.
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

June 22, 2013
5:01 AM

Post #9568328

Mittsy, I just love the water irises. I wish they'd bloom all summer long!
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 22, 2013
5:17 AM

Post #9568337

Everyone's ponds are looking beautiful. I have been a little slow getting mine going this year. I really need to get the plants arranged better decide which plants will go into which pond. The Trop Water lilies and hardy water lotus seem to be very slow in getting started. I found a FREE kidney shaped preformed pond liner just a small one about 5ft long X 2ft wide and I am going to add it to the new small water feature we put in last summer.

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 22, 2013
5:58 AM

Post #9568367

Good score Holly!
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

June 22, 2013
8:04 AM

Post #9568493

Wow! Great find, Holly.
They
My hardy waterlilies are very late this year. I compared them to last year and although everything was early last year - my wl's are about a month later than they were last year. When we went to my local pond guy to pick up some water hyacinths, I did ask them about the lateness of the wl's. They felt very strongly it was our cold overcast spring. I am hoping things catch up soon.
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 22, 2013
4:44 PM

Post #9569023

Newton,
Your pond is beautiful and yours too Mittsy. BTW the water lillies you gave me are all still living. Putting out a few more leaves too.

My eye surgery has put me behind time. Both of my ponds need cleaning out and many plants seperated. The water celery has gone really bonkers so I moved into a tubby until I can split it up.

Happy ponding all,
Bonnie
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

June 22, 2013
9:42 PM

Post #9569386

Holly, great find. I WANT the piece of driftwood. Absolutely fantastic.

My pond is small and I would think with all the time it takes me, I cannot imagine having a bigger one. But with all the useful information I get from here, I am doing better, therefore, so are the fish. I will take a photo tomorrow.

Bonnie, sorry about your eye surgery problems. I strained my hamstring and had to sit still for 5 days. I thought I would go mad but it really hurt to move, so it was not difficult.

Japanese iris is beautiful. I grown Bearded, Louisiana and Spuria (sp). I actually have something that looks like the preformed pond above but it has small holes drilled in it and that is where the LA irises grow. Sharon
mittsy
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

June 23, 2013
4:02 AM

Post #9569499

Sharon, do you have enough Spuria that you could swap? This is mine.

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HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2013
4:25 AM

Post #9569514

We were on vacation in the Outer Banks in N.C. during a small hurricane. Ric and the boys took the boat out in the back waters the day after thinking they could do some fishing. Instead of fish they came home with a boat load of drift wood. This piece was so big and heavy (water soaked) that they towed it in couldn't get it in the boat.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 23, 2013
5:06 AM

Post #9569550

There's something about ponds that 'makes' them a great addition to a landscape. The one in Missingrosie's photo is something different though. It's just such a natural setting with those stones. I'm all into "natural".

This is my small pond, being dwarfed by all the plants in and around it. Wild ducks (Burdekin Ducks) have brought some duck weed which has multiplied rapidly. It's not going to be easy to get rid of.

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 23, 2013
5:45 AM

Post #9569582

Beautiful. You are so lucky to be able to grow such a lush environment. We've a wooded setting I am adding a few river flats to the pond edge because those rocks get up and disappear into the night! Seriously... I see pond liner poking thru and I flat out can't figure how those spaces pop up. Are the frogs eating those rocks??? ( some are big enough - grin). I hope I have not goofed because the majority rocks are grey / green and the new river flats have mixed - pale blue, plum, etc. hope they don't stick out.

This message was edited Jun 23, 2013 8:47 AM
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 23, 2013
6:12 AM

Post #9569633

One of these photo depicts the river rock colors that I am hoping will fade/ dirties. I was mainly after the rounded shapes - similar to the smaller river rock that lines the bottom. When visiting the rock lot...the colors weren't so ' in your face,'

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HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2013
6:38 AM

Post #9569680

I agree I love natural looking ponds and have always planned to put in a large natural looking pond but it seems that what I have isn't that. Instead I have a group of small ponds that aren't at all natural which doesn't mean that I don't like them but I still yearn for that big natural pond that I envisioned so many years ago.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 23, 2013
7:09 AM

Post #9569715

Holly - you may not have exactly what you want yet but your gardens and hard scape features are outstanding! You/Rick have a natural eye and your family pitches in to give you the garden of your dreams.

I am prejudiced because I did not want a pond - period. Ponds are for fish and plants. I wanted a pondLESS water feature...those waterfalls disappearing into gravel and recirculating. Providing noise and a visual for the front porch. But alas - got it all built and learned the waterfalls required lots of water that the pondLESS reservoir could not provide. Hence the pond...and algae...and leaves...and maintenance...and snakes... Ponds and upkeep are for the young in my humble opinion! But agree are beautiful when kept up.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2013
7:22 AM

Post #9569730

You sure are right they are a lot of upkeep my little ones aren't too bad to take care of we just drain all of them but the birdbath pond. We sit some of the plants down in it and move all the fish into it for the winter then put the rest of the pond plants either in the GH or sink the pots into the Veggie garden till spring. The older we get the less likely it is that we will ever move the big rocks we have for the pond but they do make for a lovely accent to the garden where they are and a nice back drop for the plants I am growing there.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 24, 2013
6:48 PM

Post #9571924

Missingrosie, that stream in the later photo isn't connected to the pond in the earlier photo? That's the sort of thing I'd like to set up. My landscape is a bit flat though, only a slight slope to the back and one side. But with a bit of effort I could make it work. A meandering creek with stoney cascades is something I could sit beside and watch for hours.

I think that's one of the problems with plastic liners, rocks slipping down. Small creatures getting between them can budge them enough to make them slide. How thick is your liner? I've always worried about them getting punctured when you have rocks on them. I have animals coming in too, especially kangaroos.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 24, 2013
8:46 PM

Post #9572088

Yes it is one long run (3- 5 feet wide perhaps narrowing and widening) ending in the large pond. Starts at the fountainhead where there is a small deep pool then the first waterfall immediately afterward. We just drilled a hole in a large flat flagstone and stood it up on end because I did not want to invest in statuary to serve as fountainhead ( no goddess pouring water from pitcher etc). Next a 6 foot run ( estimate) that curves 'round to run in front of the house with a bolder waterfall...then a looooooong run ( running the width of the front of the house ...( coming off the porch is where the walkway/bridge is over the stream) ...the water is rather calm there under that bridge -the channel narrows too .. ) then another pool and after that another bold waterfall then the large "supposed to be pondless" pond finishes it off.

No, the rocks don't move at all. The rocks that form the sides of the feature are very large boulders and they rest on NC red clay under the liner. My problem with rock displacement comes in the fall - I net the entire feature because of leaves...we live in the woods. We secure the net ( plastic bird netting) UNDER the top most rocks and then when we remove the netting come springtime we don't do a good job of placing back correctly and leave the liner exposed in areas. (I just blame it on the frogs eating the rocks!) Anyway, I think that is what happens. The neighbors huge dog also goes flying through there into the water when chasing deer and also the deer will try to break through the ice with a hoof in winter if we have had a bad (unusual) winter and they can displace rocks.
Sorry, I don't remember how thick the liner is. But there are lots of resources for do it yourself ponders with recommendations for thickness /specs. Important to excavate leaving no debris, roots, sharp stones. The river rocks that line the bottom of the long runs are 3-5 inch average and are very smooth. I put waders on and walk in there to clean - no punctures yet. I am ~ 133-135 pounds and I am stepping all in there. The pond itself (not the long runs) is jam filled with 5 inch black flexible plastic DRAINAGE tubing to take up space but yet allow for a reservoir of water to fill the tubing. Important to get the drainage tubing with holes ( not solid) because you want it to FILL/TAKE UP SPACE the huge pond excavation but still allow water to flow thru and around it. When it was "pondLESS" it was solidly filled with trash / concrete rock etc to fill the hole inexpensively and then top dressed with pretty river rock... That all had to be emptied to give a large water reservoir to run the falls. A big mess. A MAJOR miscalculation that did not consider evaporation caused by the falls - MAJOR issue. You can't go pondLESS with long runs and falls.
So --- it is the liner (first) ...the plastic drainage tubing space filler (second)...plain old landscape fabric on top of the tubing to disguise it and to provide a solid base (third) for last component -- the river rock for esthetics. Those are the components of the large pond. The actual "run" containing the falls is a maybe 2-3 foot wide '50 foot long trench' containing a small deeper pool located right before each waterfall...all covered with the rubber liner and a layer of river rock at the channel bottom and bigger boulders forming the channel sides. The large pond is where the pump lives that sends water from the pond to the fountainhead. I think that answers your questions. We do not have naturally sloped land either and it is not needed. I don"t have many photos in IPAD but I will attach one where you can see that bridge better and I think it allows a view of how the channel goes into the larger pond. If you look at the photo of the large pond -- you can see an example of the drainage tubing because I took a spare piece and attached it to the gutter outflow to capture rain water for the pond. I think that plastic pipe goes a long way to protect the liner from punctures in the pond...it is not sharp..just all coiled up in there like intestines!! I do not walk much in the long runs -- but I think I could without a puncture risk since the river rocks are smooth. Sorry so long. Wanted to give Tropic an idea about construction and alleviate puncture and slope concerns. Apologies to all here for length since you likely know all this.

This message was edited Jun 25, 2013 12:41 AM

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 24, 2013
9:20 PM

Post #9572122

Tropic - In first photo you can see size of the river rock at bottom of the run and it is not a deep layer either. The liner is black and so any spaces between the rocks not visible.

Subsequent photos you can see the size of the rocks comprising the walls... so no fear of slipping or movement-- those rocks are very large. But bets involving kangaroos are off!

You can perhaps get a sense of the "speed" of the water and I think it is not a slope that drives it as much as the "pool" that precedes each waterfall supplying a decent "spill"over - along with the actual pump's action.

You can see the fountainhead in one photo - not a really good view - ton of rain has made everything grow obscuring the view. But you can see it is for looks only... Smoke and mirrors. That 1st pool that the fountainhead pours into is the deepest pool - NO slope -- just spill over, and yet I don't think it is deeper than 24 inches. Just after it and under the water is the true water outport from the pump...just a fraction is diverted to the fountainhead to make it appear that the 'stream' has a source. You express concern about flat land so understand that the runs are not so very much sloped from start to finish of the entire feature ... It is more a function of utilizing the motion of each pools spill from waterfall to waterfall assisted by the pump action sending the water in the right direction.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 25, 2013
4:34 PM

Post #9573117

Thanks for that detail Missingrosie. It's got my mind thinking already (and that can be a dangerous thing, LOL). You're leading me into temptation.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 25, 2013
4:49 PM

Post #9573139

Good!! No slope...just overflowing pools cascading over a ledge ( the waterfall) into another pool and another ledge. After I went to bed last nite I thought. ...why didn't I just say the way a faucet left running overflows a sink...that is the motion that keeps it flowing.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2013
5:00 PM

Post #9573153

LOL I have been playing with the idea of making a small run (very small run) only a few feet into that new pond we picked up. Have to talk to Ric and see if he likes the idea. We have started digging it in so you can see where it is going. We could easily do a little run down the small hill

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 25, 2013
6:42 PM

Post #9573291

Site it where you can hear it!

If run goes down a slope - water will need to be pumped back up. Suggest Rick gets / rents a ditch witch. That would be real hard work.

I could see that pond you just got with a very small submerged pump in it ..not expensive. stretch a screen across the top or a metal perforated grill and then cover completely with screen on top withn that river rock you used on your last bowling ball with...or tumbled glass ,...or both. It would be a pretty kidney shaped self contained disappearing fountain. The water would shine and darken those rocks just like the sealer you used on the bowling ball. All the colors would pop. The only physical work is digging the pond in and you have it mostly done. Is there electric nearby? The "upright" piece that acts like the fountainhead could be made exactly like the clay pipe you recently covered. Or you could get a piece of statuary and plumb it. Water spilling over the top and back into your little pond again. Every now and again you would have to hit it with the hose to replace evaporated water.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2013
6:45 PM

Post #9573299

Oh yea we know how to do it just have to find out if Ric wants to bother. There is also a rock ridge that runs along there so digging can be difficult if you hit it.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 25, 2013
6:52 PM

Post #9573310

Well, if he doesn't want to mess with a run, consider the disappearing fountain --requires no further physical work.

My husband uses a hole digger like you have there. When he does, I always check the life insurance policy! He looks like he is gonna die!

This message was edited Jun 25, 2013 10:33 PM
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

June 25, 2013
7:16 PM

Post #9573337

I'm trying to put a water fall on the one end of my new pond. It's a little difficult with no slope to the yard, and the soil here is all sand, so no matter how fast you dig, it just falls in on itself. I'm determined though, lol...I'm going to get that sucker in there somehow~ :)
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 25, 2013
7:40 PM

Post #9573380

Maybe you can use plywood to hold it back as you make progress. Or...this may sound crazy...but could you wet it as you dig?
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2013
4:01 AM

Post #9573621

missingrosie wrote:My husband uses a hole digger like you have there. When he does, I always check the life insurance policy! He looks like he is gonna die! This message was edited Jun 25, 2013 10:33 PM


LOL,

missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 26, 2013
5:57 AM

Post #9573703

That is some invention. The force of each thrust hitting solid ground must sent shoch waves rippling up the arms ...shoulders...into the cervical spine...whooooooooooo...might knock loose something gravely important!

I don't want to give him excuse to develop clot induced amnesia because I ain't digging my own holes!
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2013
6:23 AM

Post #9573745

ROFLOL
Took Ric out and talked to him about the possible run. I tossed out several different ideas everything from a pond at the top to just a fountain head. He liked the idea other than the digging could be a serious issue with the rock ledge that runs though there. We are going to finish getting this liner in the ground and move on to the other main project going on a big arbor that we hope to start building next week. We have done a good bit of work in preparation for the arbor. Bricking part of the driveway/utility area and lifting the huge old wisteria that was sprawling across more than half the space. So we are ready to pick up the lumber next week.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 26, 2013
10:33 AM

Post #9574070

I hope you will post photos as you go along of the pond and the arbor
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2013
12:41 PM

Post #9574214

Sure will here is the latest pic of the driveway/utility area. The potting shed and flats bench are in this area as well as the trash & recycle cans. It is a working area where plants are staged and grown. Really can hardly believe how much space there is since Ric got the wisteria up off the ground. Here is a picture taken a couple of weeks ago pretty messy so much going on then but you can see the wisteria sprawling on the left side of the picture. There was a table full of plants and the filled flats bench. Then this other one taken just a few days ago with the wisteria propped up and a second one with the wisteria all the way up. After the arbor is up it should settle on top without any trouble. At least that is what we are hoping.

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 26, 2013
4:10 PM

Post #9574541

Wow. You must stay busy from dawn to dusk. And, you are in Pa and so your season to "do" isn't as long as many have available. That wisteria looks so healthy. I heard it can pull buildings down!
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2013
5:10 PM

Post #9574652

It's about 35 years old I had it growing for years over a fence off the patio, but it really needed something more substantial. An arbor has been in the planning stages for many years but we just kept putting it off. Last year we started digging up the stone driveway and laying brick. Close to half the bricks have been laid. Here is a really old picture of the wisteria a good 15 years or more ago. That is were the box pond use to sit and you can see it under the wisteria. And a new shot of it from the yard side you can see the ropes that are holding it up secured to the ground. Not sure what I will do about the yard side yet.

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Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2013
6:07 PM

Post #9574749

Holly - So gorgeous!

We put our wisteria in a large pot and it still wants to take over!
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 26, 2013
7:36 PM

Post #9574860

Missing Rosie your pond runs and falls are really beautiful. Used to live in NC and rocks abound. Fl. doesn't have them so they are very expensive here.
Holly your addition will be beautiful.
It's wonderful to read how we each encourage the other and share such good ideas.
Good luck with your projects.
Bonnie
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2013
3:33 AM

Post #9575150

Thanks Bonnie, My FIL lives and Fl. and I have done some gardening at his place. I love how easy it is to dig and weed in his yard. I took out a tree stump a few years ago that I would never been able to remove from my own yard. But I guess there is a drawback to that sandy soil as well.
I agree these conversations on DG really get the imagination going.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 27, 2013
7:00 AM

Post #9575337

I went to Ft. Lauderdale High.
My sis lives in Plantation and two brothers Dania and Ft. Lauderdale. Cousin in Titusville and sis in law in St. Pete. I have zone 8 envy big time. But I do like the seasons shifting.

Yes...we have rocks. The builder was afraid he would have to dynamite! Hahahahahaha. Not as bad as western NC however. Funny - we have to pay for rocks too. We always want the kind we don't have! My son in law has a 22 acre QUARRY in PA. Do you think I get rock?? Nope! Too expensive and heavy to truck. To be fair he has some equipment to quarry but mostly others do and pay him for the quarry time. But still...surely he can bring me a slab for a bench...or some steps... I make him eggplant parm and mussels whenever he comes to town...that ain't easy!
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 27, 2013
7:02 AM

Post #9575342

And it ain't cheap!


Last week I went out to get cauliflower for pasta soup... GRAPEFRUIT sized cauliflower ...4 BUCKS!

He'll with that - we had broccoli and pasta instead.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2013
7:42 AM

Post #9575392

LOL we have tons of rocks close at hand but still gather some from different areas and have been known to buy a few for some projects. Like the river rocks for around the pond and pool.
I think a stone slab is a "very" reasonable request.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 27, 2013
8:43 AM

Post #9575505

Thanks Holly - I need a friend to support me. Nobody likes me here at home!

This message was edited Jun 27, 2013 2:58 PM
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

June 27, 2013
10:22 AM

Post #9575653

We don't have anything but sand...I'm jealous... I may try making some decorative rocks out of hypertufa, the cement/perlite/paper mix. Lighter to move around too.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2013
10:34 AM

Post #9575672

I have made a few hypertufa pots that is always fun.
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

June 27, 2013
11:49 AM

Post #9575758

Do you think it will hold up to water, like on the edge of a water fall? I guess it would depend on how much cement is used?
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 27, 2013
12:13 PM

Post #9575792

Mary - I just read yesterday that there are 'falls" that you can purchase. I haven't seen or explored but I think if you have a pond you can buy ready made fall to sit on it and direct the cascade (???)

I asked my brother who had a tile business if mastic would hold up in water and he said it would. My idea was to purchase thin gauge wire screening.. Mold it over a boulder (rough mold it with hands and then pound with rubber mallet to get the proper contours and to actually fit tight to the boulder ...the wire screen would allow me to stretch it back up and off the boulder plus provide a scaffold of sorts for the mastic. Then cover the shaped screen "boulder' with a thin layer of mastic and paint grey and fleck with other color to make rock coloration after it is dry. The idea was to get a hollow mold the size of a boulder - yet have it be light enough for moving and eventually sitting in the pond. I wanted a boulder to sit a turtle ( made from metal helmet) and to function as a water level gauge but the pond liner couldn't take a massive weight - and it had to be able to sit in water indefinitely. I ended up just using the pump cover - it was talk enough and depending how exposed the helmet is - I know if I should add water or do a rain dance.
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 29, 2013
9:57 AM

Post #9578663

All the ideas sound great. My son Jeff made me a fiberglass faux rock to sit on top of one of my skimmers and it is is very light weight. It's held up well but of course its not down in water. They make figerglass boat bottoms so I think it would also work underwater. He had a scrap of fiberglass cloth around the house and he just shaped it size of skimmer top and then covered it with whatever your supposed to use. Then put some gray paint on it as other rocks around pond are gray.
I have a painter friend that used to work for Universal Studios and he makes lots of faux stuff and its just beautiful. Even trim for around his living room and also on the furniture. Does beautiful work. He said shaping a waterfall would be very simple. Maybe for h im but I have to stick to the heavy plastic ones all made and then hide the form.
M Mary,
I'll bet you could make some really beautiful pieces of hypertufa to go around your waterfall and stream bed.
Take care all,
Bonnie
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

June 29, 2013
3:49 PM

Post #9579076

Mittsy, I am sorry it has taken me so long to answer your question regarding swapping Spuria. I really only have a few. They were sent to me by a iris grower to see if they would live in this climate. My landscapers moved my tags so they are all noids. I need no more pants but I will cut them back in September. If you will remind me, I will send you some. I also hsve two in the garden that have seed pods. Do you grow from seeds?

My friend came over and he could not tell if the yellow fish is a Koi but he did say he is pushed around by the bigger fish. I took a lot of photos. My eyes are not good enough to see the whiskers and my Koi fish friend does not have good eyesight. He was going t bring a net but forgot. He did bring me a Blue Koi. He is white and black but a shimmer of blue shows up when he rises to the top. I have two other black & white and one is turning more yellow as he ages. My friend was going to tell me the fish's gender but we got busy on other things.

I will download my photos and see what I can see. It is hot here, 16, so I am in my bedroom watching Masterpiece Mystery from last Sunday and my DH is watching golf.

You all be safe. Hugs, Sharon.

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