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Vegetable Gardening: Growing Vegetables in Containers

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
9:15 AM

Post #9576946

I open this thread to share, and welcome others' idea how to best grow our vegetables in containers when space is limited. Here in my garden this year, I'm trying to grow some basic veggies that I enjoy such as peppers, okras, eggplants and a few herbs, then I added some Asian veggies to the mix. My main focus is aiming at growing vines such as various squash and calabash (my first try) I will relate the outcome on these veggies as the season progresses.
1. I begun with some store bought eggplants
2. Soaked some seeds; Asian calabash and cantaloupes (1st week of June).
3. The sunny area suitable for growing veggies
4. One of the calabashes or edible gourds today
5. calabash and cantaloupe

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happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 28, 2013
9:28 AM

Post #9576964

How big is that deck? (FABULOUS by the way). The cantaloupe will take over. I usually use what I call "hairpins", (because I don't know their real name), to get the vines to go where I want. My current cantaloupes are growing on ladders to try to minimize the square footage they take up. What will you use in this instance to minimize the cantaloupe encroaching on everything else?

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
9:41 AM

Post #9576977

Thanks happygirl345 for the compliment, and welcome to the thread. I'm delighted that you shared some tips on the cantaloupes. The deck is roughly 15' x 15'. The area is a floating pier. Then I've a stationary one that I'm holding the big pots for the cantaloupes and others with arbors and trellises to allow the vines to climb on.

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2013
10:55 AM

Post #9577102

now that is my idea of heaven on earth, lol.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
11:34 AM

Post #9577144

Thank you jmc1987, are you growing any vegetable this year? Here is another view from the stationary deck looking back to the floating pier.

BTW (by the way) now is the time to buy land with water front down our way. Before the interest rate jumps sky high.

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2013
2:42 PM

Post #9577448

Definitely growing some this year, in fact its my very first Non container garden ever, LOL!

I have chosen Cucumber, zucchini, summer squash, eggplant, yellow bell pepper, mixed varieties of carrots, and 9 different varieties of tomatoes. I already have my harvest from my spring time planting for my carrots, and have just seeded my autumn harvest. Today i got my first summer squash off of the plant as well, with the zucchini not far behind. And finally starting to see female flowers on the cucumber after a big mega burst of all male flowers.

I admit the spring time batch of carrots were sown in a giant pot, but this second batch has been sown down in the new garden (where the white plastic sheet is--to keep them from drying out so quickly)

Had a few days near or above 90, and that seems to have stopped the developing tomatoes from getting any bigger at the moment, hoping they dont decide to abort

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2013
2:43 PM

Post #9577449

.

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2013
2:45 PM

Post #9577453

oops i just realized i posted the tomato photo twice, lol, this is what i meant to put in its place in the second post:

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
2:58 PM

Post #9577484

Those look great! How was your experience with container growing of veggies?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
3:07 PM

Post #9577503

Lily, if my garden looked like yours, I'd never leave the house!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
3:25 PM

Post #9577524

HoneybeeNC, that's very sweet of you to say. My husband and I worked on the garden over many years. We're getting close to be able to sit back and enjoy it. It will definitely enhance our enjoyment if we can grow some veggies successfully.

Here is some balsamic spinach I am growing in another container. The center-piece is a Peruvian daffodil (for ornamental purpose).

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2013
3:27 PM

Post #9577527

Oh here is the Peruvian Daf. in bloom;

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Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

June 28, 2013
5:35 PM

Post #9577696

Lily, I agree with the others, that is heavenly! Bet you never have low humidity problems, either, lol. It must be lovely to sit out on that bench on the water.

Jmc, your plants are doing wonderfully.

Happygirl, I like your ladders. Thought about doing that in my greenhouse, for tomatoes, and suspending boards between them for supports and smaller plants.

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2013
8:51 PM

Post #9578025

Lily, most of my veggies fared well back while i was still container gardening except that the tomatoes werent to happy about it, lol. It would get hot really easy on the back deck, and practically superheat the containers, which meant more watering than usual, and just unhappy plants for the most part. Which is one reason i am so glad to finally have a plot in the yard of my own.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
4:49 AM

Post #9578305

Solace, thanks for your comment. I do like the idea of having suspending boards between the ladders, plus supports for smaller plants. I've fancied having ropes tied between posts for the vines to cling on?
jmc1987, congrats on having your own plot to cultivate your garden. In years past our family joined 2 other families in the community in growing a shared veggies garden. This spring due to the weather changes. We didn't get a chance to participate with them. So I'm venturing out on growing my own. I wished for more land to grow a larger garden some days. So in regard to container- grown veggies, you've found watering and heat would be issues for tomatoes? I haven't got any tomatoes this season, so I'm taking notes as I learn. Thank you. Oh, I bet we'll need to fertilize the plants more often when they're not growing in the good earth habitat?
HoneybeeNC, what veggies are you growing this year?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
5:59 AM

Post #9578355

Quoting:HoneybeeNC, what veggies are you growing this year?


I didn't grow a summer garden this year. I grew English peas this spring, and plan to grow a fall/winter garden of broccoli and cauliflower.

I have perennial herbs that are doing well: Rosemary, thyme, Greek oregano, French tarragon, and sage. The parsley I grew last year is about to bloom. I'm hoping it will set seed for next year. I did add some dill.

I had to pull-up the wonderful patch of thyme I had outside the kitchen door to make way for a wheelchair ramp for my hubby. He'll be 81 in August and is not getting around as well as he used to.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
6:19 AM

Post #9578377

I just returned from my morning walk around my neighborhood. Our 'community veggies garden' is looking a bit tattered this year. Neighbor Steve said the squash isn't doing well this year, nor did the tomatoes. Maybe because too much rain fall this year?

It's nice to see you're making adjustment for the wheelchair ramp for your hubby. Thyme can be replaced elsewhere in the garden. I too enjoy herbs, and am thinking about reseed more dills and parleys for the butterflies garden. And yes, Fall/winter crops, is something I need to see about creating one. Living in the South, with our extended growing seasons. Our choices of veggies are limitless.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
4:50 PM

Post #9579182

Lily, my squash is just not setting fruit like it ought. My toms are finally setting fruit, but it's also going to be slim pickings. The rain seemed about perfect to me up here, but it just didn't get warm at the right time. That's my theory, anyway, for all the good it does. The cukes are finally starting to come on strong, at least, and they are my favorite.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
5:01 PM

Post #9579198

Yes NicoleC, I noticed my neighbor Steve's cukes look mouth-watering. I love them cukes when they're young and crunch as you bite into them. Store bought cukes will never have that freshness.

Nicole, when you said that your squash is just not setting fruit... are there any bees. Have you seen both male/female blooms on the plant? You may have to venture out to hand pollinate them if there aren't enough bees visiting your vegetable garden?

Question please: One of my cantaloupes is showing flower buds, and it's not even 4-5 inches tall. Is that usual?

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
5:03 PM

Post #9579202

Hah, I've got to share. I discovered these ornamental peppers are edible, and they're quite hot!

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
5:51 PM

Post #9579257

Lily, I have indeed had a dearth of bees this year, although ants and flies are generally pretty good at pollinating squash types. They are certainly doing fine on the cuke plants. I'm just not seeing many female blossoms. My "Upper Ground" finally set a single fruit and I have maybe a couple of dozen butternuts set on half a dozen plants, which is really poor especially since I love donating rich winter squash to the local charity serving the elderly.

I have THREE zucchini plants and only two 8-9"-ers sitting on the counter waiting to be eaten. (*gasp*)

Regarding your melon/pumpkin there, I would generally be concerned about plants blooming so young, but it IS time to set fruit if the plant has any hope of reproducing itself and it looks healthy, so while I don't think it's cause for concern in terms of plant health I'm not sure you should let it expend the energy on fruit at that size. Of course if you aren't going to be able to protect it from frost if it's a long maturity type... well, maybe just let it go?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
6:23 PM

Post #9579296

Thanks Nicole for your response. I just returned outdoor to look at the vine again. It's a type of edible gourd that I labeled lite pumpkin because the seed look just like a pumpkin's seed. I double checked on the plant, I noticed the 1st pair of leaves were damaged. I don't know if that triggered the vine to respond in order to compensate for expected damage? Anyhow, that's my hypothesis. lol
While I'm at it. Here are two photos of the sunset and tranquility of the garden this evening. Have a good evening everyone. 'Til we meet again.

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 29, 2013
6:57 PM

Post #9579326

The cotyledons die when they have real leaves.

Is that Smith Lake?

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 29, 2013
8:49 PM

Post #9579476

oh yes, quite familiar with that pepper, they tend to sell them around here during christmas time, i rarely see them at other times, which they do resemble little colored light bulbs :)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2013
5:04 AM

Post #9579754

Nicole, it isn't Smith, it's Logan Martin. cotyledons do nourish the plant at the early onset right? Plants! I love to watch them grow and change, there are so much to learn about nature.

jmc1987, yes those colorful peppers do look like Christmas light bulbs. :-)
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2013
5:13 AM

Post #9579765

Hi Kim ~ gorgeous as usual. I am glad to see you are pursuing the container vegetable gardens. Did I miss it or do you have some containers of herbs mixed in also?

In the most recent issue of Organic Gardening there is a nice article on growing fruit in containers. They highlighted strawberries, blueberries and figs, all three of which I am doing. That might be fun to add to your container collection for next year...

Looking forward to more of your lovely photos. Kristi

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2013
5:38 AM

Post #9579784

Good morning Kristi. Long time 'no type'. I'm glad you're here. As far as herbs I've a few such as Thai basil, dills, parleys, lemon grass and a few others. Fruits? Ah, I've a stunned 'Top Hat' blue berries that I moved from too much shade in the garden into a container. In May we sustained two floods, everything seemed to get set-back, as a result my 'Top Hat' only yielded one single fruit for me. No other major damage, thanks goodness.

As far as veggies go, I am hoping to add more as the season progresses.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2013
7:19 AM

Post #9579913

I've heard nice things about Logan Martin but haven't been down that way. When we retire I may need to move to ensure the boy has a place to fish out his back door... so I may end up down that way!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2013
7:29 AM

Post #9579922

Nicole, the time is now to invest in water-front property. Purchase the land now when it's still affordable. Then build to suite when you do retire. Our kids enjoy the water now, water sports keep them in good physical fitness. Getting together as family is a much blessed gift we can share. When you come down this way, perhaps I can show you around.

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2013
8:20 AM

Post #9579969

We're not sure what we want to do yet and have 20 years to decide, so any purchase would be premature. I have land I own I can't sell now as it is!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2013
8:40 AM

Post #9579991

Lily_love wrote:Good morning Kristi. Long time 'no type'. I'm glad you're here...

...As far as veggies go, I am hoping to add more as the season progresses.


No Kim ~ I haven't been around much. My husband passed away in May so have been occupied. We have a small business as well so he left me with a full plate. My plants and gardening have been neglected as well as my friends here at Daves Garden. Always enjoy your photos and posts so had to peek in.

I've been enjoying my container tomatoes and cucumbers. This year I am growing two different miniature okra that is just starting to produce. Think I am really going to like one of them. A friend gave me a bag of fresh purple hull peas (already shelled so a real friend) and I put some fresh onion & garlic with them and will enjoy them later.

Looking forward to seeing your container garden progress. Take care, Kristi

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2013
8:48 AM

Post #9580003

Oh Kristi, ((((((((hugs)))))))). Words couldn't express my feeling of sorrow for your loss. Please know, I am here should you want to write/dmail for any reason. Kim
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 1, 2013
5:17 AM

Post #9581270

Thank you Kim. You are so sweet! I am doing o.k., I find staying busy helps and busy has been the order of the day and will be for a while. You are appreciated.

Please keep your gorgeous photos coming. I will check in on occasion and enjoy them. Kristi

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
6:10 AM

Post #9581351

As per your request Kristi, here is one of our gardeners' friends. Hope these bee/wasp will help pollinate flowers when they arrive on these veggies. Next is the actual size of the plant grown from seed today. The bee/wasp really took an interest on the Penta next to the young calabash vine.

The next two pics. are for Kristi especially.
a. Hoya bloom
b. Lotus bud.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
6:18 AM

Post #9581358

On the ornamental blossoms; the 1st Lotus bloom for the season are followed with two additional buds as of yesterday. The 1st one actually opened yesterday, its petals are closed in the evening, then reopened the following day. Early this morning the bud was slow to open as seen above--due to over cast sky. But it will reopen. Now it's raining outside, I'll take more pics. when the morning rain subsides.

The following pics. were taken yesterday as the Fist of the season (FOS) flower opened.

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
6:27 AM

Post #9581369

Lily - your wasp/bee is actually a hoverfly also called a syrphid fly

[HYPERLINK@en.wikipedia.org]

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
7:43 AM

Post #9581510

Ewk! HoneybeeNC, syrphid fly, is that the same one that parasitizes caterpillars? I butterflies gardening as well, and surely find any type of caterpillars' predators distasteful. Thanks for the i.d.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
11:15 AM

Post #9581886

Have you grown any peanuts lately? Neither have I, but my squirrels must have. lol These I found to be peanut. They make sporadic yellow, pea-like flowers every so often. So do the peanut grow above the soil? Or will they be like tubers forming underground do you know?

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
11:56 AM

Post #9581944

In peanuts, part of the top of the plant buries itself and then the "nuts" (they aren't) form under ground.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
12:15 PM

Post #9582031

Hah, Nicole, I feel so uninformed. Thanks for the lesson. Much appreciated.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2013
2:58 PM

Post #9582265

Peanuts are strange.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 2, 2013
5:03 AM

Post #9582965

Lily -
Quoting:HoneybeeNC, syrphid fly, is that the same one that parasitizes caterpillars?


As far as I know, syrphid flies do not parasitize caterpillars.

Here's a link about parasitic wasps with photos. Most of them are small and black.

http://www.drmcbug.com/parasitic.htm

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 2, 2013
5:33 AM

Post #9583012

Thank you HoneybeeNC for the link. Very interesting read. Here are a few pics. taken this morning. There is a slight cool breeze out, I'll take advantage of that for a brisk walk. Have a good day growing veggies everyone.
1. Calabash is growing at a faster rate compared to that of cantaloupe.
2. Orka 'Clemson spineless' is making flowers (most are hiden from the oversized leaves).
3. The misty morning view of the 'portable garden'.

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Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

July 2, 2013
4:10 PM

Post #9583783

Lily, nice arrangement of plants you have there. Flowers are stunning and the okra looks pretty happy. Nice touch with that tag in the third pic. Did you do that in memory of Minnie Pearl? (wink) :)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2013
5:54 AM

Post #9584430

Tehehehe, Minnie Pearl with her hat's tag uncut? Yah, love that. ~grin. Solace, I read on other thread you were dealing with spidermites problem. How did you solve that? I only found spidermites problem with plants being kept in basement make-shift greenhouse. Though, adding fans in the area helps. Spidermites flourish in cool, damp, air stagnant area I believe.

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Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 3, 2013
6:47 AM

Post #9584510

Dang, I'm late to the party. I enjoy container gardening and I've missed this entire thread. Wonderful container veggie "gardens", everyone. Everything looks great.

I planted some basil and marigolds in my back door (well, it's actually a side door) raised planter along with the pepper and tomato, and the marigolds have attracted the mites. I guess that's its job as a good companion. Now if they'll just stay there. :) It has been cool and lots of rain so far this year so I'm seeing more than usual. When it gets into the hotter weather of summer, the situation should change.

The plants have grown a lot since planted about six weeks ago. I'm going to use this planter like a salad table come winter.

A few other container photos as well.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2013
8:33 AM

Post #9584655

Cville__Gardener, welcome to the thread, I love that planting table you've got. It's just about the perfect size to grow our herbs for the kitchen. Small enough to be relocated. Great idea!

The curcumbits are taking off, some are growing as much as 4 inches over night! About Marigold, I heard/read that they repel certain insects, have you found that's the case. Repel insects; but attract spidermites? Ummmm. We've got to do some more research don't we?

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

July 3, 2013
8:47 AM

Post #9584677

Lily, My eggplants, squash, beans, and other seedlings were in a hot dry room, but I'm not sure what the normal environment would be for spidermites. They loved it in there. I didn't get them until after I bought a couple of six-packs of marigolds and put them in there with the other plants. They may have already had them when I bought them. Don't know. I used Neem oil mixed with dish soap and a few drops of eucalyptus oil. I may have to spray again. I sprayed them every two or three days, but I think you have to reapply at the 10th day. They had a web super-highway going until I sprayed them. Nasty varmints. I loathe spider mites. Ughh.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2013
2:26 PM

Post #9585254

Solace, I can't say for certain for I don't have any scientific data to back up my guess. But from what I've observed is that my ornamental tender perennials were troubled by spider mites indoor over the winter in years past. Comes spring, I get them outdoor, and that seem the end of their life cycle? They sure are nasty varmints!

My melons are growing at a high rate. We're getting more rain, 50% above annual average thus far in the growing season. Well drainage soil is a must for these containers.



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Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

July 3, 2013
9:57 PM

Post #9585820

I've planted two types of corn in containers and almost all of them are coming up. Planted some cantaloupes with them. I transplanted the eggplant and they're out in the driveway on the concrete, as well. Today I transplanted some brandywine tomatoes and I think, an amish paste tomato into containers for the driveway. I used 3/4 of the container aged barley straw, topped with mixture of Happy Frog soil conditioner, wood shavings, builder's sand, and some powdered fertilizer to transplant into, in the containers. For the seeded containers (corn and melons) I topped it off with a half inch of vermiculite to keep the seeds moist. Also transplanted a couple of Charleston Gray watermelons into containers and they're out on the concrete pad, as well. More to go. I'll have to put the sheer curtains (my version of shade cloth) over the watermelons and tomatoes tomorrow, if it isn't cloudy. The first Charleston Gray I transplanted is escaping the pot and already blooming. It got a head start on the others, being outside longer. Those will probably have to go inside, eventually, since my growing season is SOOOO short.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

July 3, 2013
10:10 PM

Post #9585829

I forgot: my mix has some chick starter in it, too.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 4, 2013
2:22 AM

Post #9585871

Thanks for the welcome, Lily. Much appreciated.

Solace, you are growing some interesting things in your containers. I have never tried corn in a container ... or watermelons/cantaloupes. What size containers are you all using for those?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
6:23 AM

Post #9586081

Solace, this is my first year growing vining veggies in container. Do our growing in container changes the taste of the fruits? Last year my son grew some cantaloupe in the ground, the flavor was quite good.
In June, I purchased one of those "sun kissed" cantaloupe from publix. The flavor was super sweet. So I germinated two of the seeds, they are growing happily right now, in container, and I'm anticipating the fruits. I hope the taste won't be affected?
Cville_Gardener, like you I am interested to learn from others. Solace does have many interesting plants growing for the season.

At present, the calabash vines are growing much faster than cantaloupe vines.

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Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 4, 2013
6:45 AM

Post #9586125

Very nice, Lily. What is the pink flower you have in there? I should know it.

Swiss Chard in an old enamel dish pan
Leeks
Lots of potted herbs

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
8:35 AM

Post #9586328

Cville_gardener, those look good. I just returned from picking some peppers and herbs for lucnh. The nice thing about growing our own herbs garden, they can inspire us to eat healthy. :-)

The red flower is Penta, I interplant those ornamental flowers for two reasons. 1. Beautify the pot. 2. The flowers attract night-pollinator moths, the Tersa sphinx to help pollinate nightblooming calabash and other nightblooming ornamentals. One of the ornamental nighblooming flowers is Angel trumpets for instance.

Here are more Pentas among others in my butterflies garden. Oh, the grassy looking plant in the background is Lemon grass. One of the edible herbs.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
9:33 AM

Post #9586403

Happy July 4th everyone! I meant to say that earlier. Pardon.

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Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 4, 2013
9:48 AM

Post #9586427

Thanks, Lily. And a nice looking Crinum you have there, too. One of my faves as far as plants go. I probably have several dozen faves, maybe more. lol.

I picked hot banana peppers to put in the omelettes I made for lunch. Also picked my first big ol' 'Giant Marconi' pepper just to eat on the side. Luv peppers. And, of course, some yellow pear tomatoes from the side door planter. It's raining, raining, raining so I didn't get down there to pick any fresh parsley for the omelettes. Next time.

Here's my 'Giant Marconi' - picture taken on June 25th - it is larger now. I know people recommend picking the first pepper or so to set in order to put the energy into growing a larger plant, but I couldn't bring myself to do it. It is already larger and setting more peppers. :)

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
10:28 AM

Post #9586463

Lily, the seeds you saved from the melon you purchased at Publix are probably from a hybrid. If you find a melon that you like from those, save seeds from it. If you keep saving seeds from year-to-year from your favorites, you should eventually have lots of melons that agree with YOUR taste buds.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
11:37 AM

Post #9586572

HoneybeeNC, I learned that hybrid flowers don't turn out identical to their parentage--if planted from seed. Does that hold truth for fruits producing plants? Another word, will the taste differ from that of the last generation?

The 'Giant Marconi' pepper does look good. Like you, Cville_Gardener, I do like peppers. For me, the hotter the better. I was disappointed with my helopino Jalapeno peppers for it's very mild this year. Where as the ornamental 'loco' the ones that looks like Christmas light bulbs--are hotter, go figure! Oh thanks on the compliment on the crinum. It was a gift to me, and I'm delighted to find out it's a dark red variety. I nick named it "Freedom" for blooming on July 4th. :-)

This message was edited Jul 4, 2013 12:42 PM

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
12:42 PM

Post #9586656

Lily - as far as know, all seeds from hybrids produce plants different from their parent, including fruits and vegetables.

That doesn't mean you will not have a melon, or melons that are not delicious. I've had volunteer melons from hybrid parents that have had a wonderful flavor. I've also had some that taste akin to motor oil!

Quoting:will the taste differ from that of the last generation?


The answer is: maybe.

It's always fun to grow a few seeds with unknown parentage, just to see what you get!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 4, 2013
5:38 PM

Post #9586973

Anticipation; is half of the fun when awaiting to harvest our crops. I planted more veggies today. No cooking, no fanfair, just kick back and enjoyed the garden and appreciate the mild weather ... in the 70'ish F. That quite unusual for this time of year.

Ah, I found a few more Peanut's flowers today. Also, my 1st baby okra. Yeah!

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 4, 2013
7:38 PM

Post #9587104

Just for the record Spider Mites like hot dry conditions. That's why they can be such a problem in Tx. I water one of my gardens with a sprinkler and have not had a problem with SMs. The garden with the soaker hoses is a different story. SM are common on houseplants bc the air is usually warm and dry. I have found that neem oil works really well.

I have been growing pepper plants in containers for a couple yrs now and they seem to do the same or better in containers. I put the pots in kiddie pools to help keep them watered so far so good.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 5, 2013
1:26 AM

Post #9587280

You are right about the anticipation, Lily. I'm always watching my plants. I'm like an old mother hen sometimes. lol. I ate the big 'Giant Marconi' for lunch today. Was it ever good! Now I'll be anxiously awaiting more. The weather was unusually cool for so long this year that things got off to a slow start.

I have had more peppers than we can eat since growing them in containers. It turned cool and rainy for awhile (unusual for us this time of year) but will be warming up into the 90s again this coming week. The peppers and tomatoes will love that. However, we usually have lots of humidity. The spider mites are transient here. Occasionally we have a problem but it doesn't seem to persist. Even the Japanese beetles are transient. However, they can do some real damage while they are out. :(

The old boots aren't mine although I have a pair to plant this year.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2013
3:14 PM

Post #9588124

Hello 1lisac and welcome. Basically, you've summed up the problem of Spider Mites that I've experienced. Cville_ yes due to the prolonged cool spring (not that I am complaining), lots of things in the garden were out for a late start. The humidity is bad here, no doubt. But the extended cool period is welcomed. It could be unbearable hot around our neck of the woods!

Hah, the vinery veggies are sending out tendrils. I'm guiding them up various poles to hopefully they will eventually climb up the arbor and trellises above.

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Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 5, 2013
3:18 PM

Post #9588127

Really like that frog. ;)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2013
3:24 PM

Post #9588134

Thanks Cville, I've all kind of ornamental planting out there. Most boaters fishing along the shore really complimented that frog. Its name is "Bufford" He looks good with that 'firecracker fern' riding on his back doesn't he?

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 5, 2013
3:33 PM

Post #9588145

Yes, he looks just like a Bufford. I have a growing collection of frogs and lots of yard art. I'm always collecting something, it seems. ;)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 6, 2013
2:41 PM

Post #9589193

Quoting: I have a growing collection of frogs ...
I can really relate. My calabash vine is really happy it seems. I'm on the look out for insects that may damage the plants. But so far this year, it seem there are more predatory bugs out there than usual?

This message was edited Jul 6, 2013 6:30 PM

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happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 8, 2013
6:52 AM

Post #9591253

Lily_love wrote: We're getting close to be able to sit back and enjoy it.
... My mother has a saying, which turned into t-shirts that she sold at garden shows for awhile.

Gardener: A person who cannot sit in a yard and leave well enough alone.

Bad news, Lily_love... not sure you will EVER be able to just sit back and enjoy!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 8, 2013
8:00 AM

Post #9591345

happygirl345 wrote:... My mother has a saying, which turned into t-shirts that she sold at garden shows for awhile.

Gardener: A person who cannot sit in a yard and leave well enough alone.

Bad news, Lily_love... not sure you will EVER be able to just sit back and enjoy!


Tehehehehe, right you're and your mother's saying does tell all. LOL Happygirl345. Before I can harvest my first crop from the garden, I was out there working on the next container where I can sow some more vegetable seeds. :-)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 8, 2013
8:02 AM

Post #9591349

At the meantime the initial vine is climbing up the pole. Whooohoooo! happygirl345, how is your garden coming along? Have pics.?

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 8, 2013
9:13 AM

Post #9591467

When I walk through a plant nursery, I find myself picking-off dead leaves and flowers!

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2013
9:39 AM

Post #9591509

:-)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
5:57 AM

Post #9595002

Cville, I like your current Avatar! That seems to suite you best. :-) Is that 'Ellen Bosequet' crinum? I have one in the backyard and I just love its blooms. In previous years, I had but one inflorescence. This morning, I discovered 3. They multiply nicely.

Next, some of my calabash'es male flowers opened this morning. Whooohooo.

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Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2013
6:44 AM

Post #9595035

Thanks, Lily. Well now, I don't know but it does look like Ellen B. Someone sent me a crinum that was supposed to be C. angustifolium and I thought that is what it was going to be. But it certainly isn't. I planted another one around there that was supposed to be 'Red and White'. It's not that either. lol. So it's a conundrum. But I love this one. I have Ellen B and Super Ellen planted elsewhere but they bloomed earlier. So I guess I'll remain puzzled for awhile longer.

Squash is looking good! Yay on the blooms.

I just cut back the potted Nepeta cataria blooms. Didn't take 60 seconds for these two to arrive on the scene. Catnip indeed. :-D)))

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
8:45 AM

Post #9595176

Cute kitties. Bet they help keep some unwanted critters away from the garden? Crinums are easy carefree plants. All they need just some sun shine and enough water to thrive. I love them.

Cville, I am very excited about the squash/calabash. My goal is to train them up the arbor for an attractive ornament, then harvest and cook them when ready.

Here is another vine climbing up another arbor nearby.

This message was edited Jul 11, 2013 9:46 AM

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2013
9:33 AM

Post #9595228

The vine is growing like 'shrump' with all this rain. lol I feed the container roughly every other week. It seems as if it grows 4-6" over night.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 12, 2013
7:33 AM

Post #9596211

More male flowers. Ummm, when will the female flowers be produced? What if the female flowers arrive late, and there will be no remaining male flowers available to pollinate?
I'm pleased to see more of the flowers this morning, and no sign of bugs Yeah!

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2013
6:13 AM

Post #9602019

Hi all, since I last post, that very day I saw a few female-like type of flowers on my gourd vine. But thus far, no real growth on those females, some have been aborted at a very early stage. The male flowers continue to open up daily. I'm scratching my head, what am I doing wrong? Any idea?

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2013
10:13 AM

Post #9602320

How's your pollinator situation? You might try hand pollinating those female flowers to see if that prevents them from aborting.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2013
10:28 AM

Post #9602332

Hi Nicole, the pollinators are quite numerous. I see honey bees, bumble bees and few mason bees. Ton of wasps, not to mention those hover flies. Here is a bumble bee visiting one of the male flowers.

Second pix there are other flowers in the garden to attract those pollinators. Problem is the female flowers were self-aborted very early, when they were small, and not mature enough to be hand pollinated.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2013
3:54 PM

Post #9602727

1. Calabar Balsamic spinach ready for harvest.
2 & 3 Balsamic spinach dish served along with talapia on rice.

Ooops, editted for typing errors.



This message was edited Jul 23, 2013 4:59 PM

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 17, 2013
4:34 PM

Post #9602766

I have an entire pot garden getto on my sunny driveway where I grow heat lovers. I have cantalope. okra, eggplants and lots of zucchini and squash.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2013
5:00 PM

Post #9602790

Those look great Rita. I'd a few Clemson spineless okra in the mix with my veggies dish tonight. How big will Clemson spineless okra get to be before they become tough, if you've grown them?

Last year, our community garden in the neighborhood grew a type of okra that were tall, and large. The okras were quite large and still were tender. I wished I knew what they were.

The first pic. is my 'Clemson spineless' in container. The 2 last pics. are those of the small 'community garden' in our neighborhood. Their tomatoes look really battered by rain this year.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 17, 2013
5:46 PM

Post #9602830

Sorry, I don't really know anything about okra. I never grew it before. I have a mini okra especially for a pot I bought from Burpee. So far no flowers yet although I do see buds forming.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 18, 2013
1:02 AM

Post #9603207

Nice little community garden, Lily - even in the rain. It's broiling here and everything is wilting. I pulled the last of the onions in pots yesterday. Another 100 day today with the heat index. I did a little watering but it's too hot to be out much. Tough on the containers and difficult to keep some things watered. It's this time of year that I always vow to quit container gardening. ;-) I didn't get out to take any pictures.

Like your driveway ghetto garden, Rita. :)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 18, 2013
9:25 AM

Post #9603602

As hot and humid here also but I am out there every day no matter what watering my pots of veggies. Not about to let them get stressed. That driveway veggie garden pot getto has my heat lovers. So as long as they have plenty of water they are plenty happy out there.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 18, 2013
10:14 AM

Post #9603669

I'm glad you can do that. Not everyone can. :)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 18, 2013
10:56 AM

Post #9603731

True. I am always home. The pot getto wouldn't work well for anyone that needs to be away during the day.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 23, 2013
11:37 AM

Post #9609567

Rita - how large are the pots in your garden ghetto? I have a level area in front of the garage that gets all-day sun.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2013
1:00 PM

Post #9609663

Vaious sizes. From 15 inch to 20 inch. I have four 20 inch pots and my eggplants are in 15 inch pots. Summer Squash mostly in 17 1/2 inch pots. Next year I am bumping up all my eggpplants into the 17 1/2 inch pots. I have melons in 20 inch pots now and working well so will be doing more pots of melons of more varieties next year. The compact varieties of squash are good in the 17 1/2 inch pots but the bigger squash plants such as Cavilli really should be in a bigger pot than that 17 1/2 inch pot.

Plus you need to be a person that stays home mostly so that you can water every day. You can not grow veggies by letting them get bone dry. I figgure the squash would die and the eggplants would be bitter and not edible.

But for me, it is all working out really well.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 23, 2013
4:11 PM

Post #9609844

I agreed with Rita about the need of keeping the container grown plants well watered. Especially those smaller containers. I've found that 5 gallons and larger containers can sustain the heat pretty well. My one-gallons specimens get dried out pretty quick if not being monitored closely.

We just had another soaking rain; this time of year. The garden is really benefiting from all these moisture. I'm very pleased to find out my vines are growing at such a fast pace. In 3 weeks time, and the vines are topping my arbor and trellis. And my 'Clemson spineless' okras, a few of them that I've planted are ready to be picked.

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 23, 2013
5:19 PM

Post #9609906

Rita - I'm home most of the time, so watering early morning and/or late evening is not a problem. I have a rain barrel sitting outside the garage door, so I wouldn't have to carry water very far.

Thanks for the info. Sounds as though the 20 inch pots would be a good size. I'll try to find some that are attractive seeing as they will be seen from the road out front of the house.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2013
5:26 PM

Post #9609916

Sounds like a veggie pot getto would work well for you. My heat lovers just thrive. Cauliflower cooked but Summer Squash and Egglants love it.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 23, 2013
5:36 PM

Post #9609929

Rita = I'm thinking vining plants would not only do well, they could shade the area and help keep that end of the house a little cooler.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2013
7:50 PM

Post #9610088

Yes, the cantalopes love it also. Setting more fruit than I have ever seen before.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 24, 2013
2:13 AM

Post #9610252

Sounds wonderful. We just had another rain overnight. That's 7 or 8 inches already in July. And cooler temps. Unusual for July and August. Things are growing well and I haven't had to water much. Yay!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 24, 2013
4:57 AM

Post #9610312

Rita = Yes, I was thinking melons would do well in the area I'm thinking of. They would be resting on concrete, instead of soil.

If I get really ambitious, I could erect some kind of trellis against
the south wall, and they could climb up the side of the house.

Cville_Gardener = it's been cool enough here that we have not needed to turn on our air conditioner. A far cry from the
triple-digits we experienced last summer.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
the Highland Rim of
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 24, 2013
5:41 AM

Post #9610354

Wow, no AC. That's great, Honeybee. We have had to use ours, sometimes just to dehumidify the house though. Yes, those triple-digits last year were killer. I hope August continues this way.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2013
9:19 AM

Post #9612381

The driveway pot getto this morning. Mostly summer squashes and eggplant with a pot of melons and some okra. Last picture my spagetti squash. At least in my limited experience these veggies do very well on pots.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 26, 2013
10:22 AM

Post #9612479

Look at your containers garden! Everything is looking great. The spaghetti squash looks to be about ready to pick? Awwww!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2013
10:25 AM

Post #9612484

That is what my neightbor told me this morning, that the spagetti squash is ready. I am not sure. I have noticed that it turned from green to yellow but not sure how yellow it should get before picking.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 26, 2013
1:02 PM

Post #9612618

Rita - I just had a thought...

We have deer that wander all through our neighborhood. Now I'm wondering if they would eat anything I grew in the driveway.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2013
1:21 PM

Post #9612643

Is your veggie garden fenced and they can't get in there? Deer do like to eat some veggies from what I understand. But there are no deer here so I only know what I read about deer in other peoples gardens.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 27, 2013
10:20 AM

Post #9613375

Rita - the back yard garden is fenced and the deer have never jumped in.

The front yard is very open, so I'm wondering if deer would eat any potted vegetables I might set out in front of the garage. They definitely like to eat my neighbors' grass across the street because I see them there frequently. A herd of seven a few weeks back.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2013
10:50 AM

Post #9613402

Oh oh. That doesn't sound good!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2013
10:51 AM

Post #9613404

So what's today? July 27th. I planted my fall crop of peas today just now. No where near as many peas as I did in the spring but it will be plenty. I only planted the Sugar Lace II snap peas although I did have plenty of pea seed varieties to choose from. Will just be planting more varieties in the spring, these are enough for now.

This spring I had 10 pots of peas, some of them snaps and some snow. But I have reused some of those (especially the bigger) pots for summer veggies so had 5 pots at the ready. In my garage I do have more pots but I decided that 5 pots of fall peas will be plenty.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 27, 2013
11:40 AM

Post #9613443

I have deer, too. Why they don't hop a 3' fence and raid my garden, I don't know. Perhaps there are easier pickings elsewhere, and perhaps the dog doing her business in the yard and even the smell of the two indoor cats who get a supervised walk outside from time to time is also helpful.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 27, 2013
1:15 PM

Post #9613524

Oh my! Deers isn't a problem here (I'd love to see some however), though we've other critters that could potentially be a problem to the veggies garden. We've rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks, luckily we've quite a few fruits trees around such as crape apples, pears which they prefer at this time of year. Thanks goodness. Wow, Fall planting apparently is underway ladies? I don't like it to acknowledge summer is almost over. :((

One thing, I'm glad we've bees and other insects that help pollinate the garden. Last night after sunset, I went out in the garden and was taken by surprise how the night is full of activity out there, moths of various sizes (no SVB moth seen--thanks goodness) and spiders all were active.
1. My very 1st cantaloupe-to be. :-)
2. Various herbs and ornamentals combo and 'loco' pepper, those that look like Christmas lighting.



This message was edited Jul 27, 2013 6:34 PM

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2013
2:17 PM

Post #9613595

Beautiful, especially with the water in the backround.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2013
9:15 AM

Post #9617388

Thanks Rita for the compliment. Here is an update, the containers culture progression. Remember the trillis I started out with, back on 1st week of July? Here 3 weeks later. That trellis is supporting 3 vines and some pot fillers ornamental. 1 of the 3 vines is Luffa and it's producing fruits.

Thus far bugs isn't a big problem (yet), I've found a handful of spotted and stripped cucumber beetles in the garden which I try to hand pick them. I noticed those stripped cucumber beetles seem to NOT only enjoying the veggies' pollens, but they ALSO chew on the petals. I learned that they are vectors of bacterial wilt diseases? Bad, bad bugs!

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2013
9:20 AM

Post #9617391

Yes, Lily, I concur. Cucumber beetles are bad bugs!

They gave my cucumbers a wilt disease a couple of years ago. I decided I could live without growing cucumbers!

Other bad beetles are: Japanese beetles and Mexican bean beetles.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 31, 2013
9:29 AM

Post #9617399

Yes. kill all spotted and striped cucumber beetles and also all striped colorado potato beetles you find.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2013
10:06 AM

Post #9617442

Hah, I'll need to do some research on those various beetles such as the colorado patato beetles, and the Mexican bean beetles you have mentioned. HoneybeeNC, Japanese beetles are bad news. Luckily milkyspore treatment has been a big help. Plus, un-informed neighbors who put up JB traps in the their gardens, helped lured all the bugs all around to their yards. I've to admit, I've made that same mistake years ago. Experience is BEST teacher sometime. Japanese beetles usually emerge from the ground in 3rd week of May around here. They're so distasteful that fish won't even eat them when I drop 'em into the water. lol
For the past few years, their number has been declined here. But, let me tell you, we've a new type of nuisant bugs to be dealt with. The kudzu bugs. Yike!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 1, 2013
1:07 PM

Post #9618541

Cavilli (light green) and Elite zucchini from my container garden. I really like this growing of squash and zucchini on containers. What with the battle with SVB this really works best for me.

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 4, 2013
9:58 PM

Post #9621684

Hi you all, I am hoping to get some answers someplace, and thought I would try you.

I have Blue Lake Pole Beans in an earthbox. They are up to about 8 feet tall. No flowers, no beans. Nothing, but leaves. I gave them some bloom fertilizer with 52 in the P slot. For NPK. That was a couple weeks ago. Still nothing.

I checked the package and the were packed for 2013. Don't have a clue. Jen

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2013
6:01 AM

Post #9621854

Good morning Jen. Welcome to our thread. I've no clue as to what the problem maybe causing your BLPB to be non-productive. Maybe Rita may have some experience to share? What say you Rita?

This morning I discovered quite a few more pest-problems around my veggies garden, all in container culture. I think I'll be heading over to my County extension office for help.

I've found my very first SVB problem, discovered pickleworm for the 1st time yesterday. Also found out about cucumber beetles ravenous appetites. One of my okra has some kine of fruit borer that deforms the okra and made the fruit to curl and reveals a gaping wound exposing the seeds. Luckily, this only confined to one container, others (okras) so far are unaffected. Keeping my fingers crossed.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 5, 2013
8:10 AM

Post #9621999

Jnette, sorry about your Blue Lake with no flowers. Honestly, I don't know what the problem might be. I have grown Blue Lake Beans for years but never had any problems with them.

Usually with vegtables, lush folliage with no blossoms means too much nitrogen. But it also could be that they are just not reasy to flower yet. Though 8 feet tall sure seems like they should be flowering.

Just had a thought, maybe they are too crowded?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2013
5:19 PM

Post #9623473

Currently I've a wave of pickworms invasion. My hand pollinated calabash is looking healthy. I hope that the worms will leave this fruit alone. Quite a few cucumber beetles are also quite bothersome. I cooked some okra and eggplants today. The okra, well is good as usual. But my 'pot black' eggplants, they looks to be more suitable for ornaments rather than eaten. The taste is wee bit bitter, eventhough the skin is still tender on those eggplants.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2013
10:01 AM

Post #9625841

Fairy Tale Eggplants and Golden Egg Yellow squash. I just love both of these. So pretty and taste great too. All my squash and all my eggplants are in containers.

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