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Vegetable Gardening: Late Summer Veggie Garden Pt 3 & Fall Veggie Gardens (Pt 2)

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 15, 2013
10:11 AM

Post #9631494

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1324686/

The other thread was getting way too long, so here's a new one! Let's continue talking about summer harvests and what others are doing to prepare or start their fall gardens.

Almost every single one of the cucumber seeds I planted on Monday has germinated! Yikes! Will definitely need to thin seedlings in about a week. We're growing National Pickling, Muncher, and Ashley this fall. The husband LOVES cukes! Need to get some mulch on them now that they've sprouted. We're growing two varieties along a cattle panel and one on an old wooden ladder that my husband has.

Since we have cooler temps for the next couple of days, I plan on being outside a lot more. We're working to expand our garden plot as well. We're adding about 10' on the east side and 12' on the south side. (I use the word "we" very liberally, by the way.) Pic #3 shows the east side where we'll plant some pole beans along a cattle panel. Pic #4 shows the area yet to be dug up on the south side of the garden plot. The area with grass to the right of that runner will be dug up so that it's parallel to the fence support. Putting the runner down kills the grass under it and also provides a clean spot to kneel down. All these pics look so good because we received an inch of rain and have had cloud cover and cooler temps for the past two days!! Woot!

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 15, 2013
10:23 AM

Post #9631507

I like the garden additions. It seems like we all need more space for veggies.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 15, 2013
11:53 AM

Post #9631595

Ok, I've been promising to post this recipe so, here it is, LOL!

Last night I made up my last batch of Spicy Eggplant, portioned for the freezer. It'll taste so good in the middle of winter, with some juicy shrimp thrown in!

SPICY EGGPLANT (Original Recipe)

"Eggplant cubes are stir-fried until browned, then simmered in a spicy Asian-inspired sauce with onion and garlic until meltingly tender."

My adjustments are in ( ).

INGREDIENTS:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I use Olive Oil)
4 Japanese eggplants, cut into 1-inch cubes
(or, slice them on the diagonal, like plantains)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I use Olive Oil)
2 onions, thinly sliced (thin is better, too)
1 tablespoon minced garlic (I put LOTS of garlic)
2 tablespoons soy sauce (I adjust to my taste)
2 Tbs. water (I use about 2 cups of water. You can also use shrimp broth or rice wine vinegar;
I use about 1/4 cup rice vinegar -- no wine -- and 2 cups of water, because I like more sauce
over my rice. Plus, it takes awhile to stew the okra down, and you need enough liquid...)
1 &1/2 tablespoons Oyster Sauce
(or use 1/2 fish sauce & 1/2 Worcestershire -- I use a good bit of the Oyster sauce; The fish
sauce is SALTY, and I've never used the Worcestershire sauce...)
1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce (adjust to your taste -- I use about 2 Tsps. in mine for a kick)
1 teaspoon white sugar (I've only used brown sugar, and I like it. I also tend to go on the
sweeter side, because it cuts some of the eggplant bitterness, if you're a little past the
prime. More like 2-3 teaspoons for me -- It balances with the salty, so it's not totally sweet.
But once you add the shrimp, you can appreciate the sweet...)
Ground black pepper (or red pepper flakes, to taste)
1/2 teaspoon Asian (toasted) sesame oil (drizzled on the finished plate...)
Toasted Sesame Seeds for texture (optional - I've never used them, although you might
consider toasting up some Ramen Noodles and garnishing for crunch)
Fresh Ginger (optional -- I LOVE the subtle ginger flavor; mince finely & saute with the onions
and garlic)
Fresh Broccoli flowerettes (haven't added these, but I think I'll add some in the future)
Shrimp, chicken, beef, or firm Tofu for protein (I've used shrimp and chicken -- I prefer adding
the shrimp, because it adds its sweetness to the eggplant; I'd consider some cubed pork or
honey ham in the future, again, because these would add sweetness to the eggplant.

DIRECTIONS:
1. Make your sauce FIRST. Mix the soy sauce, water, oyster sauce, chili garlic sauce, sugar,
and black pepper, and stir to form a smooth sauce. Adjust to your taste, and set aside.

2. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large skillet or wok (I use my cast iron skillet) over medium
high heat until almost smoking. Cook and stir the eggplant cubes until they begin to brown, 3
to 5 minutes. Remove the eggplant with a slotted spoon, and set aside.

3. Heat 2 more tablespoons of oil in the skillet over medium-high heat, and cook and stir the
onions just until they begin to soften, about 30 seconds. Stir in the garlic, and cook and stir an
additional 30 seconds.

4. Return the eggplant to the skillet, pour on the sauce, lower the heat, and allow the
vegetables and sauce to simmer until the eggplant is tender and almost all the liquid has
been absorbed, about 10-15 minutes (If you do NOT add the extra water to your sauce, you
won't have a lot of sauce over your rice -- mostly a drier eggplant mixture). Drizzle sesame
oil over the dish, and give one final brief stir to combine. Careful with that Sesame Oil!

Here are some helpful Allrecipes.com reviews I printed out before I made this the first time, for add'l tips and warnings

►Used everything but oyster sauce to keep it vegetarian. Served over ramen noodles (without seasoning packet). I used ROSA BIANCA eggplant from Farmers' Market. It has a wonderfully firm texture and not watery as regular eggplant can be. Can't wait to have again.

►I followed the instructions making only a few slight modifications - I added in a splash of rice wine vinegar, brown sugar instead of white, a teaspoon of teriyaki sauce and a sprinkle of ginger. Also, I left out the sesame oil and sprinkled toasted sesame seeds on the top. I served alongside sticky rice, broccoli, and prawns made simply with butter and lemon. I will certainly make this dish again and found the inclusion of Japanese eggplant versus the standard variety larger headed eggplant to be the key

►Excellent! I add shrimp for my husband for protein, and I also double the sauce, definitely a keeper.

►The only problem was that I didn't cook the eggplant long enough so it was a bit bitter.

►Add more chili paste to make it spicier. Cashews for crunch. Green onions for color. Serve on rice noodles.

►This was great! I omitted the oyster sauce, but everything else was the same. I spread it over pizza dough and sprinkled it with cheese (although it really didn't need it) and baked it. Absolutely LOVED it!

►This was an excellent dish. I added firm tofu which soaked up a lot of the flavor and made it more of a main dish for my family.

►I finally bought Japanese eggplant and wanted to make Basil Eggplant that I get at our favorite Thai restaurant. I decided to use this recipe and add basil. Recipe is outstanding! Don't be tempted to overcook the eggplant in the beginning. I mixed all of the sauce ingredients in a little bowl and added all at one time to the pan, increasing the sugar to 2 tsp. instead of 1. Added chopped basil (3-4 TBS of chopped) at the end. It is the very first time I cooked a sauce in a recipe that actually tasted like a sauce in a restaurant. Definitely a keeper for us. Next time I'm going to add chicken or shrimp...or both. Served with white and brown rice (choices) and sugar snap peas.

►Really good recipe. I used rice wine instead of water, brown sugar instead of white, and I added about a teaspoon of grated fresh ginger. Instead of adding the garlic and sesame oil at later stages in the recipe, I mixed both with the sauce. I diced the onion instead of slicing so everything would be the same shape. I used Lee Kum Kee Garlic Chili Sauce. It's really chunky and more of a paste than a sauce. I don't find it that spicy so I added red pepper flakes to the sauce to boost up the heat. I stir fried the eggplant in two batches using a 14" carbon steel wok, and added about 6 fresh basil leaves to the last batch. I returned the eggplant and onion back to the wok and then stirred in the sauce and let it cook for a minute or so. I kept stirring as it cooked to keep it from burning. I will make this again as it is a tasty and quick recipe for eggplant.

►I loved this recipe!! I actually didn't have SESAME OIL but I could see how it would just add more to the flavors. I also substituted Worcestershire sauce for the oyster sauce.

►Tasty! to make it easier, you can just cook the onion and the eggplant in the same pan, then add the sauce ingredients and stir it all together.

►This is a phenomenal way to use eggplant. I used Sriracha because I did not have any Garlic Chili sauce and it add a good amount of spice - also I added ginger and the garlic and sesame oil to the sauce as other reviews did and it's a great flavor blend. I suggest cooking everything together for much longer, almost 15 minutes, so the eggplant gets really creamy and absorbs all the sauce. Great, easy, fast recipe! Oh- I also added oyster mushrooms - great addition!

Enjoy!

Linda

From: http://www.Allrecipes.com

Read more: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1327767/#ixzz2c47JD4zK

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 15, 2013
4:57 PM

Post #9631810

yeah now i am REALLLY hungry thanks to GG, LOL :)

seeing as i have a very small garden, (i would say 6FT X 6FT max--thats all the space my parents would allow me to dig up, lol!), what i usually pick, i end up eating the same day.

Although everything else in my garden is starting to look tired, the tomato plants are really starting to pump out plenty of toms. I do promise to get some shots of those tomorrow. By the way, anyone else been having stink bug problems lately? They seem to have a taste for the still developing tomatoes. I squish every one i see. (i dont care about stinky fingers if it saves my toms, lol!)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 15, 2013
9:10 PM

Post #9632005

Jmc1987,
Are you a teenager? So KEWL if you are. Nice to have the next generation sharing here!

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 15, 2013
9:49 PM

Post #9632021

i am 26 actually, but i do still live with them, dad has a self owned auto shop that is his work, and we all pitch in for our part around here and get our own pay. Plus they appreciate the extra pair of hands around here. :) And they have both admitted that they could kill a plastic fern, lol, so thats another thing for me be happy to add to my part around here.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 16, 2013
7:22 AM

Post #9632260

VERY KEWL!

So, ya'll are the "Waltons," yes?

LOL!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 16, 2013
7:28 AM

Post #9632271

Didn't know where to post this, but, my cousin Wanda in College Park, Ga. inherited all my 5-gallon, self-watering eBuckets, and she is now ready to pass them on.

If anyone is interested in having them, or knows any Georgia growers you think might be interested in the offer, please send me a dmail, and I'll let Wanda know. There are between 20-30 buckets available.

Linda

(P.S. I'm posting this in several forums...)

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2013
8:18 AM

Post #9632329

LOL i guess we could indeed be like the Waltons ;)

Ok here are the photos that i was promising yesterday of my tomatoes

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2013
8:29 AM

Post #9632342

Also i have some carrots that are coming along nicely, the one in the wash tub is Scarlet Nantes, and the other is Black knight (there would have been a lot more of those, but i had myself a bit of a slug war, hence the eggshells, i did put some more seed down in there to see if i could make up for the ones that i lost).

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 16, 2013
8:30 AM

Post #9632344

VERY nice tomatoes! You're doing a great job!

I see you make use of pine bark fines (in the washtub). That's what my original container garden was built on, because of the structure it offers and the great drainage. I've since moved on to raised beds, and dumped all my pine bark fines into the raised beds, so now, there's a mixture of the PBFs, garden soil, peat, sharp sand, and various amendments along the way.

The tub carrots are very promising. I believe the other container may be a bit confining, especially if you add more seeds there. If you can, try to find some old Rubbermaid tubs, 18-gallons. You wouldn't need to fill them all the way. Pine bark fines for good drainage (sift out the chunks larger than a quarter) and some peat for moisture retention (I'd go probably 3 parts PBFs, 1 part peat, and 1 part sharp sand). The square tubs would give you more surface room for the carrots.

You can do beets and turnips in those tubs, too.

My very first gardening experience was in containers because my DH's love affair with his St. Augustine grass in our HUGE yard, relegated me to being creative on the fringes of the yard. So, I gardened in homemade eBuckets!

This message was edited Aug 16, 2013 10:38 AM

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2013
8:32 AM

Post #9632350

and i did manage to find a few shots of what i have already picked this year :)

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2013
8:43 AM

Post #9632369

i know the carrots are rather scrawny, but i wanted myself a Rainbox mix "baby carrot" batch, lol ;) the scarlet nantes and black knight carrot that i am growing now, i will allow to get to full size

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2013
9:15 AM

Post #9632402

oh i just now noticed your post edit GG.

The round container is actually a nice and deep 10 gal. sized pot, plenty of root space, but i do agree with what you say about the square containers having more "real estate" than the round ones. :)

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 16, 2013
9:46 AM

Post #9632417

Here's what I'm getting daily now. To give you an idea of scale, the tomato on top weighed in at 22 oz. and is about 4 1/2" across. Most of these are from my ongoing tomato breeding experiment. With a couple of Cherokee Purples in there. The peppers are all "Jackpot," and yes, they are really that big.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2013
10:05 AM

Post #9632433

Great looking tomatoes jmc!! What varieties are you growing.

Way to go, Nicole!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2013
10:31 AM

Post #9632448

[quote="jmc1987"]
Ok here are the photos that i was promising yesterday of my tomatoes
[/quote]

Very nice looking batch of tomatoes going there!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2013
10:33 AM

Post #9632454

Nicole, VERY impressive!

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2013
12:04 PM

Post #9632556

my tomatoes this year are Red Brandywine, better boy, aunt rubys german green, cherokee purple and black krim

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 16, 2013
12:43 PM

Post #9632599

Thanks, Rita. I find it ironic that I am currently trying to breed my potatoes a little smaller but want huge bell peppers. :)

Strangely, selecting for size and crack resistance has significantly reduced the amount of red on the tomatoes. They are originally a German Striped / Brandywine cross, but they strongly resemble Gold Medal now. German Striped and Gold Medal may have a common parentage -- certainly the strong striping was the first thing to go.

They are still surprisingly sweet tasting given the massive amounts of water this year.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2013
12:56 PM

Post #9632605

Well, I don't know anything about growing potatoes but have grown tomatoes my entire life. My parents grew tomatoes in the garden when I was a kid and I grew up thinking everyone should have a veggie garden. And I am 66 now.

I have both Better Boys and Big Boys in my garden now. Really like both those varieties.

That is very interesting that breeding for crack resistance has made the tomatoes less red. As long as they taste great then I think it doesn't matter!

tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

August 16, 2013
2:28 PM

Post #9632696

Pulled my carrots today and blanched them and stuck in the freezer. Going to plant snap peas where they were tomorrow. Planted some collards where the Kale grew all season.

Picking Patio tomatoes.

Drying my spanish and red onions. Not a lot of them but about a dozen or so.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2013
2:39 PM

Post #9632712

My snap peas are already planted and up and growing. Love sugar snap type peas.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2013
1:51 PM

Post #9633498

Tomatoes anyone?

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2013
1:54 PM

Post #9633502

cucumbers, pole beans, squash, peppers.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2013
1:56 PM

Post #9633504

Mixed harvests.

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jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 17, 2013
1:59 PM

Post #9633511

Holey mackerel, what a load of maters!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2013
2:11 PM

Post #9633525

I must be getting a record number of tomatoes this year. Tomatoes have been excellent.

jmc1987

jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 17, 2013
2:53 PM

Post #9633566

what variety are those really huge ones in photo #2?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2013
3:05 PM

Post #9633573

Beefmaster. I love that variety. And they taste really yummy. I had that kind for the first time last year and I loved them. So they are back this year again.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2013
5:53 PM

Post #9633695

Do you deliver to Texas?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2013
6:08 PM

Post #9633705

[quote="stephanietx"]Do you deliver to Texas?[/quote]

I guess you like the tomatoes!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 18, 2013
11:20 AM

Post #9634339

Yes and our production has slowed down considerably due to the heat. We actually had to BUY tomatoes last week. First time we've had to do that in 2 months. :( Next year, hubby wants to plant twice as many tomatoes as we planted this year.

Time to thin cucumber seedlings!!
My 3 year old watermelon seeds sprouted. (Well, at least 2 of them. LOL)
Pure evilness in the garden. I absolutely HATE jumping flying things!

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 18, 2013
11:43 AM

Post #9634350

Stehanie, I have 60 tomato plants. So planted an awefully lot. Last year had about 50, I think that was plenty. So next year will cut back some to about 50 instead of the 60 this year.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 18, 2013
11:50 AM

Post #9634355

Holy tomato! We only planted a dozen plants!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 18, 2013
1:22 PM

Post #9634412

A dozen plants wouldn't do anything much around here. ALL my friends and neighbors wait for summer home grown tomatoes. I give so many tomatoes away that I could supply a farmers market. And I don't give them away afew tomatoes at a time, they get large bags or boxes of tomatoes.

I few years ago I thought to myself, I am getting older, I don't need to plant enough for the entire neighborhood, I will just plant enough for me. Had about 16 plants. Well, let me tell you that did not work out very well. Everyone was asking for tomatoes and I didn't have enough to go around.

I was not happy, my friends were not happy so I went back to planting lots of tomatoes. But this is the most yet and it is too much even for me. Last year at 50 plants was the most I ever planted until this year. Before that maybe 40 plants or so.

Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

August 19, 2013
12:22 PM

Post #9635276

Rita, it's so kind of you to take care of the whole neighborhood that way!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 19, 2013
1:00 PM

Post #9635309

No one around here veggie gardens. And I am happy when I have plenty for myself and plenty to give away. Everyone knows me around here for my pretty flower gardens and the veggies that I grow.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 19, 2013
2:29 PM

Post #9635407

A Straight Eight Cucumber I picked along with two nice melons. Also some okra pods including one much too big one. The for fall planted Sugar Lace II snap peas growing nicely.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 19, 2013
4:20 PM

Post #9635509

We were able to share tomatoes with our across the street neighbor this year. She was very grateful and it makes me happy. I also shared with a friend's mom who's been unemployed. It doesn't help a bunch on her grocery bill, but they were fresh and she loved them.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 19, 2013
4:34 PM

Post #9635519

Home grown garden tomatoes are usually well received.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 19, 2013
6:08 PM

Post #9635613

I just told them, "They don't look good, but they taste great!" They were very well received and now people are asking for more. LOL

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 19, 2013
6:34 PM

Post #9635641

Yes, see I told you. That is why I have to grow so many. People want more once they get some.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 22, 2013
10:19 AM

Post #9638138

Straight Eight Cucumbers, Burpless Cucumbers. Tomatoes.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 22, 2013
3:28 PM

Post #9638418

Yummy!!

drobarr

drobarr
Hummelstown, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 22, 2013
9:27 PM

Post #9638702

[quote="newyorkrita"]A dozen plants wouldn't do anything much around here. ALL my friends and neighbors wait for summer home grown tomatoes. I give so many tomatoes away that I could supply a farmers market. And I don't give them away afew tomatoes at a time, they get large bags or boxes of tomatoes.

I few years ago I thought to myself, I am getting older, I don't need to plant enough for the entire neighborhood, I will just plant enough for me. Had about 16 plants. Well, let me tell you that did not work out very well. Everyone was asking for tomatoes and I didn't have enough to go around.

I was not happy, my friends were not happy so I went back to planting lots of tomatoes. But this is the most yet and it is too much even for me. Last year at 50 plants was the most I ever planted until this year. Before that maybe 40 plants or so. [/quote]

50 plants? You have a small farm! Thats alot of work just picking alone. I have 7 plants and I pick 10-15 tomatoes a day of which most I give away. Some i cant pick fast enough and they rot or fall off.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 23, 2013
8:56 AM

Post #9639099

Yes, when the tomatoes start to come on ripe the first few weeks of the season I am picking tubs and tubs full. It does take a while to get them all. They have finially slowed down some but I have lost track of how much I have picked.

My friends were getting tomatoes by the boxes.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 23, 2013
9:23 AM

Post #9639121

Eggplants and squash. Second picture my yellow and purple pole beans.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 24, 2013
12:47 PM

Post #9640162

I was complaining some time back that I didn't think I was getting enough cucumber production. Ha! not now. I picked tomatoes and cucumbers but I am over run with cucumbers.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 24, 2013
1:55 PM

Post #9640214

I was gifted with some turmeric rhizomes from Korea today (very much alive and growing). For a tropical plant, several folks locally are reporting that it will survive through the winter here in the ground. The farm worker at our local A&M who gave me the plant said that a late frost would severely damage them though.

The plants look like bananas, or cannas. I put it in a big pot to recuperate from banging around in my car half the day and than means it will no doubt be living indoors this fall, but come spring, I need to find a sunny spot with midday shade, sheltered from the worst of the winter cold and somewhere that stays fairly moist.

Arg. That's just about what we need for everything here!

Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

August 25, 2013
9:10 AM

Post #9640884

Nicole, how lucky! Turmeric is delicious, and good for you - both inside and out. (Indian women use turmeric as a face mask, too.)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 26, 2013
8:08 AM

Post #9641719

Fall is happening in a few weeks. How's everyone's progress coming along?

Earlier this week (8/20/13) I topped off a 3'x10' RB with a mixture of pine bark fines, Perlite, and various old container potting mixes. I watered it well, then covered it with some dark plastic to keep the roaming kittens out.

Saturday (8/24/13), I dug out the empty half of the 4'x8' RB that my spring bell peppers are planted in. The peppers never took off in this bed, and produced very little fruits (small, small). I was concerned about the drainage, so I dug out about 10-12" of a mixture of sand and garden soil. It was heavy with sand. I dumped the medium on a tarp and mixed in an 18-gallon Rubbermaid tub full of pine bark fines, and enough Perlite to fluff it up. It was certainly lighter when it went back into the bed! I used a 6' fence picked to "screed" the surface of both beds, and this worked like a charm to level them off. I could never level them before I learned this trick! I covered the half of the 2nd bed with plastic as well, and we got some rain yesterday.

Last weekend I had started cutting down the bells growing in the other half of the bed, but I had never pulled them out. They stand about 12" tall, and I noticed that they've started growing again, faster and sturdier than they were at 18-24"! Go figure. Also, they're putting on blooms, and fruit is coming on quickly. Maybe they just needed a fresh start. I hope we have enough heat left in the next couple weeks, cause I've got to dig out and refresh the other half of that bed!

Still haven't dropped a seed yet, but, I'll get some going this long holiday weekend.

Linda



stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 26, 2013
2:05 PM

Post #9642057

Fall is a dream. It's going to be 100 + this week. Summer's back in full force! "We" are working on expanding the garden and it's slow going. Need to prod "we" back into getting it finished so I can plant more stuff.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 26, 2013
3:16 PM

Post #9642129

Here's what my eggplants are still doing...

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 26, 2013
7:39 PM

Post #9642379

Looks great!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 29, 2013
11:46 AM

Post #9644946

Picked small tomatoes again, you know the Juliet Grape tomatoes and the Sweet Million Cherry tomatoes. Also had a nice batch of various eggplants. And the usual glut of cucumbers. Nothing wasted though. I was able to give away the excess cucumbers and eggplants.

I did see two female blossoms on my squashes today. Along with the usual tons of male blossoms.
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

August 29, 2013
3:51 PM

Post #9645150

My carrot haul! Not a ton of them but enough for me for a few months! Already blanched and in the freezer. "Nantes".

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 29, 2013
6:02 PM

Post #9645238

Those are beauties! Congratulations on a great haul!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 29, 2013
6:32 PM

Post #9645321

Fabulous carrotts!

drobarr

drobarr
Hummelstown, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 29, 2013
8:43 PM

Post #9645459

some butternut squash, tomatoes, apples and pears...plus some peas, lettuce and cilantro recently planted...

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

August 29, 2013
8:45 PM

Post #9645462

Looking good!
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

August 30, 2013
7:01 PM

Post #9646310

Thanks ladies!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2013
7:40 AM

Post #9646627

Time for the first squash harvest; this is about 75%

The death toll from pickleworm was truly awful this year with the butternuts. Something hopping the fence and gnawing on some didn't help, and neither did the ones rotting due to too much rain and the usual squash bug devastation. But this is enough for the winter with a few to share.

The ones that look like pumpkins are "Upper Ground Sweet Potato" -- the garden gloves are for scale. That monster in the middle is 43 lbs. *Zero* pest or disease issues with this variety, but what the heck will I do with a 43 lb. squash?!

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 31, 2013
7:47 AM

Post #9646630

Squash casseroles, mock sweet potato pies, cube and add to winter soups, etc., etc.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2013
8:09 AM

Post #9646655

I'm guessing the big one probably isn't good eating. The big ones usually aren't except for the seeds. Maybe I'm doing a jack-o-lantern this year, although I've always considered them a waste of good vegetable.

If I did try to process it, that would be about 7 quarts, I think, unless the meat is a whole lot thicker than the typical "pumpkin."

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 31, 2013
3:03 PM

Post #9646986

Everything looks great!!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 2, 2013
3:33 PM

Post #9648887

Okay, I broke down the big one and ended up with 16 pounds (8.5 quarts) of drained mashed squash. It isn't stringy at all like most big ones, but is all edible. The flesh is pretty thick.

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2013
4:28 PM

Post #9648957

Lots of pears and tomatoes , all right for a backyard .
You all still make me hungry
Black Krim and Asian pears

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 2, 2013
4:32 PM

Post #9648960

Here's my little harvest for today. Surprised I'm getting anything considering the hot, hot temps we've been having lately, several cherry tomatoes and a couple of very small jalapenos. Also, a shot of my fall cucumbers. We put the panel up in front of the cukes because they will grow towards the sun. We've grown them with the panel on the opposite side a couple of years and it just didn't work out well. National Pickling in the front and Munchers in the far back of the pic.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2013
9:30 PM

Post #9649209

Oh my on everyones harvest!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 3, 2013
7:12 PM

Post #9650128

This might be the last of the eggplant harvest. This is the fourth batch, and they're slowing down. And, I'm tired of processing them, LOL!

Pic #1 Pot Black Eggplants, picked at their prime. Notice how shiny they are. They range from ping pong ball to cutie oranges in size, and do well in containers.

Pic #2 Pot Black Eggplants that have started going dull from being on the vine past their prime. These may be a tad bitter

Pic #3 Listada de Gandia Eggplants way past prime. Notice how dull they are. Some are even turning yellow. The ones with the darkest stripes are probably the freshest of the lot.


This message was edited Sep 3, 2013 9:13 PM

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

September 4, 2013
2:26 PM

Post #9650734

A lot of eggplant you have there.

I thought I could keep summer squash going till the end of September but that is looking less and less likely every day. Yesterday I pulled and tossed three, today pulled and tossed two. They look so ratty from the powdery mildew that I am sure more will follow. But I pulled due to the fact these showed the typical wilt that comes from SVB. Just don't feel like fussing with the squash plants like I do earlier in the season. Plus the stems on the gone ones were so anemic, not then nice green they should be at all.

Picked my last Sugar Cube melon today and the melon vines look done on and done. Doesn't look like I am going to be getting any fruit from those Sweet Sakura melons I planted.

The Camilla cuke vines are totally done. I picked the last of the Camillas today and probably the last of the Straight Eights as well. That entire larger trellis section is done for and needs to come out.

The Burpless on the short trellis thought are still going strong. Those are amazing.

I took pics but they are in the camera and will not be downloading today.
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

September 5, 2013
7:26 AM

Post #9651245

Today, I'm going to pull all of the summer veggie stuff, with 3 exceptions. The field peas are still going strong. The Chinese Red Noodle and the Thai Purple Podded Yard Long Beans are still producing, as well as the habanero peppers. All the other beds are being prepped for fall/winter veggies.

Oh, I forgot about the bed of sweet potatoes. I need to dig around in there & see how big they've gotten to try to determine when to dig them up.

Jo-Ann

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 6, 2013
5:30 PM

Post #9652789

Dang pickleworm! We are definitely having a second generation of them this year. I went out to check on my remaining butternuts, and the suckers had hit nearly all of them in the last week. Also some trouble with some damage at the vine end that I haven't seen before. Looks like nibbling, but it's very swallow and no obvious teeth signs. There's a raccoon that raids my garden but he's pretty about just taking the whole thing or eating a lot; I don't think he did this. This weekend I will have to pull out the vines.

My Upper Ground Sweet Potato gifted me with another 10+ lb. squash and there's one the looks to be about 15 pounds turning orange.

Tomatoes are about played out; I have maybe another week or two of harvest in them. The late blight has hit them hard this year. I hung up most of the basil to dry today. Peppers are still coming in good, Jackpot, Orange Bell and two kinds of banana peppers. My orange bells are actually turning orange with almost no loss to rot; good taste, too. Problem is, they are not sizing up until they start to turn orange, and the boy won't eat the colored ones. I'd like a pepper that gets to a good size while green. California Wonder is finally trying to produce some fruit, but they are so small I doubt that they will get to a decent eating size before frost. My search for an open pollinated bell that does well in the South continues. It may not exist; bananas are more traditional here.

I have no idea when yo harvest peanuts, but the plants look wonderful.

Peas are starting to come in and the cabbage is looking well. Lettuce is up; spinach not yet. Kohrabi, carrots, turnips and beets should be up but aren't. I never have luck with beets and carrots here, but the kohlrabi and turnips usually do well.

Leaves are starting to change, the birds and hummers are absolutely stuffing their faces and we are without a doubt into fall here. That's several weeks early for us. It does not bode well for the winter. I haven't seen any squirrels making caches but the mast hasn't matured yet so they don't really have anything to store yet.
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2013
10:41 AM

Post #9653261

Nicole, I would let the peanuts go until the leaves turn yellow or frost is about to get them.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 7, 2013
10:58 AM

Post #9653276

Thanks, Indy. The local farmers are pulling peanuts now, so I wasn't sure.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 13, 2013
4:20 PM

Post #9659138

It's very quiet in here.

Not much has changed for me. Cabbage still growing well, although I had to spray with BT today because some were taking serious damage. Half my pea plants has also up and died.

It's going to be mid 50's tonight - gasp! - so some of the fall stuff will definitely get a boost!
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

September 14, 2013
2:49 PM

Post #9659864

Planted some baby spinach seeds and collard seeds. Yanked the last Patio tomato plant out.

Sniff...
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

September 15, 2013
5:49 AM

Post #9660286

My long beans, Chinese Red Noodle and Thai #3, are finally played out. So those got pulled up & removed from the trellises. I just left the vines on top of the beds. They'll sit for a week or so & then I'll put in some fall peas.

Going to dig some sweet potatoes today.

Jo-Ann

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 17, 2013
5:25 AM

Post #9662101

Finally!

Arcadia Broccoli, Snowball & Improved Cauliflower, EJW Cabbage. Sowed 9/16/13.

More to come.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

September 17, 2013
7:38 AM

Post #9662194

Is molding not a problem with those packages closed like that? Or do you open them up now and then?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 17, 2013
11:02 AM

Post #9662367

Hi, Jo!

Never have had a mold issue on any seedling I've started this way. There is venting on the ends of the drawstring bag, and a couple have a hole or two pinched in. Since most of these are new baggies, they don't have vent holes.

I purposely don't vent them, to keep the heat in the soil. They're planted in recycled Roots Organic potting mix (probably the second recycling to date). I figured all the amendments were sucked out of the mix, so, after running it through the microwave for 20 minutes, I added 8 scoops of fresh RO to each batch coming out and mixed it in. Just to give it an "oomph."

Once the steaming mix (I moisten before microwaving) cooled down enough for me to handle it, I work very quickly. I filled the 4" pots and 6 oz. yogurt cups (only cause they fit the excess space in the tray) with the warm potting mix, dropped the seeds on top, covered them with a thin layer of Vermiculite (first time doing it this way), then watered them in with the hose faucet sprayer and hot water, and shove them in those bags as fast as I can.

The heat gets trapped inside the bags, and creates enough humidity so there's a bit of run-off into the pots. If there's too much condensation building up, I prop the drawstring end open a bit more, or poke a couple more holes in the top of the baggies.

Not sure what's gonna come up this season, because the seeds are a year old, or more. I know that's not necessarily a bad thing, but they've also been in my lunch kit going in and out of the fridge. Sheesh... talk about winter upheaval...

Linda
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

September 17, 2013
5:40 PM

Post #9662700

Thanks for all that info, Linda
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

September 18, 2013
8:39 AM

Post #9663103

I finally got my English peas & sugar snaps in the ground. Today, it's going to be carrots going in. I've still got to get a bed full of mixed greens to feed to the chickens & to keep the bed growing something during the winter. Also, I really need to plant the green onion & the regular onion seeds. Just have to decide where to put them.
Jo-Ann

This message was edited Sep 20, 2013 5:34 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 18, 2013
10:00 AM

Post #9663168

Some spot you won't need for at least the next 6-8 months for the regular onions to grow to full size...

Planting onion seeds now may be iffy. Ideally, onion transplants (they look like little dried up green onions) go in in November. Your seedlings may not get big enough by then.

I started my onion seeds last August and grew them for 12 weeks, to have them the right size for transplanting into the garden last November...

I'm chomping at the bit to order my transplants from Dixondale. They won't start taking orders until the end of October...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 18, 2013
9:29 PM

Post #9663648

Jomoncon,
Go ahead with those onion seeds!

I did more research, and found out we can transplant seedlings in January, too. I'd forgotten that I set transplants in January year before last!

Now, I gotta go find some FRESH, short or intermediate day seeds.

JoParrot,
I just checked and the Arcadia Broccoli in the baggies have declared! TWO days after sowing!

They're sure not waiting on me, huh?

LOL!!!


This message was edited Sep 19, 2013 8:59 PM
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

September 19, 2013
5:28 AM

Post #9663816

Linda, I ordered from Dixondale last year & had great success, especially that it was my first time growing onions. I thought I'd try seeds this year. The LSU Ag Center says I can plant seeds until 10/15 and onions until 1/30.

If the seeds don't do well enough to transplant, I'll still have time to order from DD. Last year, I ordered Texas Legend & Southern Belle Red. Both grew great.

I wish I could find someone in the New Orleans area so I could share an order. The price really drops down when you order more. Maybe I'll put an ad on Craiglist to try to find someone.

Anyone in the New Orleans area want to share a purchase?

Jo-Ann

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 19, 2013
8:04 AM

Post #9663965

Jo,
I'll share an order with you. Stay away from Craigslist, LOL!

Tell me how you grew those gorgeous onions. What soil, fertilizer did you use?
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

September 19, 2013
4:35 PM

Post #9664377

Linda, the soil in my raised beds is some cheap garden soil I bought last year, amended with lots & lots of compost & chicken manure. Some com post I bought, some I made. The chicken manure comes from my 8 little ladies. For fertilizer, I started with a combo of fish meal, blood meal & an organic fertilizer. Following DD recommendations, I applied the equivalent amount of blood meal every 2 weeks. I have a drip irrigation system, so it's pretty easy to water if we have no rain.
Jo-Ann

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 20, 2013
9:09 AM

Post #9665084

We're getting a gully washer today!

Started last night, and progressing steadily. Picking up this evening, too, and through tomorrow!

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay!

Linda, jumping for joy, and doing the rain dance! ^^_^^

UPDATE:
►The BROCCOLI and CAULIFLOWER seedlings I sowed this Monday are poppin' up like popcorn! Cabbages aren't up yet...

►I picked up a fistful of seed packets from Southwest Fertilizer yesterday. Self-serve from the bins, with labeled packets, and a coffee scoop. Avg: $.99/packet.

For $12, I've got about a bazillion seeds -- enough seeds to feed a small nation, LOL!

The "HUNGRY GAMES" are officially underway!
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

September 20, 2013
4:35 PM

Post #9665467

Linda, The rain Texas got today, New Orleans is going to get Saturday & Sunday. I think I'll skip my farmers market tomorrow.
Jo-Ann

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 20, 2013
6:06 PM

Post #9665555

We're supposed to see rain tonight and tomorrow. Hope we get a bunch! After a soggy year its gotten just dry enough to keep at lot of fall goodies from sprouting.
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

September 21, 2013
9:56 AM

Post #9666073

It rained 2.15 inches the last 2 days...was rather dry.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 21, 2013
12:20 PM

Post #9666227

We got a solid 4" of lovely rain last night and today, most of it gentle with only some spots of hard downpours. We sure needed it!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 29, 2013
8:25 AM

Post #9673169

I started a new job and it's kicking my butt! I work 4 ten-hour days and need the other 3 to recuperate! LOL We had a bit of rain yesterday and a cold front came through. I should have good weather the next couple of mornings to get out in the garden. My cucumbers are doing great, though! They are starting to flower, too.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 30, 2013
8:09 AM

Post #9674049

CONGRATULATIONS ON THE NEW JOB!!!!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 30, 2013
9:39 AM

Post #9674135

Thank you!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2013
10:08 AM

Post #9676928

What's going on in the Zone 8a-9a veggie gardens????

The temps have just started to dip here. Free...er, cold front expected Monday morning. The high FIFTIES, LOL!

My broccolis are putting on true leaves inside under lights, and I'm trying to decide if I'm gonna pot them up for a few weeks of individual growth (there are multiples growing where they came up in the 4" pots).

Seems like a waste of time, but, they need more true leaves before I set them out. Won't take long to do, but, I'm gonna end up with 3x as many seedlings as I sowed!!!

And, ya'll, I HAD to start feeding them. I put about 1/8 tsp. MG water soluble plant food in a gallon of water and bottom watered. The whole tray of seedlings threw on a new leaf overnight! These really do grow like baby hippos, and those babies are hungry!

Trying to get the drip irrigation set up. In the meanwhile, I may as well pot the seedlings up for the next 3-4 weeks...there's still plenty of time before the cutoff, December 20th.

Linda

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 3, 2013
10:20 AM

Post #9676941

Cabbage looks great, peanuts and peppers are going crazy and I'm harvesting turnips and a few radishes (bad year for them for some reason.) My snap peas up and died for no reason I can tell; I'm letting the few left mature to seed, I hope, since they are clearly tougher than the rest!
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 4, 2013
8:57 AM

Post #9677762

Niccole, Apparently a rabbit mowed my young sugar snap seedlings last spring, but they came on a month late and did very well. This fall's crop was apparently mowed off again and they did not recover much so I sowed a cover crop there [Daikon type radishes].
Timgreene
Houston, TX
(Zone 9b)

October 13, 2013
6:43 AM

Post #9684807

Looks like the place to jump in. New member here. I have been working this little spot for about eleven years. Mainly grow spring tomato crops. Just a city dweller, so knowledge has been slow coming. This year I gave more of an effort on the fall garden.

Have a few things that will never make it, but overall I am really happy with how its turning out. Most plants were direct sown, starting September 1st. Crops are, Kentucky Wonder, Fillet, Contender, Romano beans. English peas, Amish Sugar snaps, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Mustard, Kale, Collards, mixed lettuces, carrots, parsnips, beets, turnips, onions, garlic, shallots. I also have some Corn, pumpkin, and winter squash. The corn is a maybe, and the squashes are no way, but still produce blossoms.

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 13, 2013
7:26 AM

Post #9684825

I seeded wheat today -- more for fun than anything else -- and the pigeons are feasting. It'll be a miracle if any comes up.

Garlic went in today as well. 3 heads each of Lorz Italian and Broadleaf Czech, so next year I have plenty to share.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2013
8:40 AM

Post #9684861

Nice little plot, Tim! Gymgirl is in your neck of the woods as are a few others. They'll be able to steer you in the right direction.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 14, 2013
8:20 AM

Post #9685558

Welcome, Tim!

Yes, I AM in your neck of the woods! Always excited to meet another Houston grower!

You're waaaaaaaaaaaaaay ahead of me at this point. I delayed planting out because the heat was hanging on. Last year my seedlings were in by mid-September, but the heat held on until well into the 3rd-4th week of October, and I was a bit miffed about having to use up all my water to keep those plants happy until the chill came.

I had started everything from seeds, inside under lights the week of August 6-7th, too...

This year, I started the seeds for broccoli, cauliflowers, and cabbages the weekend of September 16th. They're still under lights with about 3-4 true leaves. I'll start hardening them off in the next two weeks from transplanting outside the end of this month.

Still need to sow my root seeds, too.

Getting closer to some chill around here. This weekend will be perfect as we're supposed to get some rain and cloud cover. That'll help keep the seeds moist for a few days until germination, if I manage to get them sowed.

Heading to a Winter Vegetables class presented by Urban Harvest this week. You might wanna attend, Tim.

http://urbanharvest.org/classes?p_p_id=shoppingeducation&p_p_lifecycle=0&p_p_state=maximized&p_p_mode=view&p_p_col_id=column-1&_shoppingeducation_struts_action=%2Fshopping_education%2Fview_item&_shoppingeducation_redirect=http%3A%2F%2Furbanharvest.org%2Fclasses%3Fp_p_id%3Dshoppingeducation%26p_p_lifecycle%3D0%26p_p_state%3Dnormal%26p_p_mode%3Dview%26p_p_col_id%3Dcolumn-1%26p_p_col_pos%3D1%26p_p_col_count%3D3%26_shoppingeducation_categoryId%3D140841%26_shoppingeducation_struts_action%3D%252Fshopping_education%252Fview&_shoppingeducation_itemId=314862

Linda

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 14, 2013
4:09 PM

Post #9685910

"Ashley" Cucumbers growing up the ladder trellis
"Muncher" cucumber
Cucumbers are at the top of the wire trellis. These are Munchers and National Pickling.
Jalapenos galore!
Tomatillo Morado (purple tomatillos)

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jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 15, 2013
7:40 AM

Post #9686367

Unfortunately, I had to go out of town for 6 days. I told & told my DH to PLEASE water my carrot, beet & onion seedlings every day. They were just beginning to sprout & needed the extra moisture. He "forgot" so everything died. I'll be replanting everything this week.

At least he remembered to take in the eggs. Although the chickens can make so much noise that they are hard to ignore.
Jo-Ann

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 15, 2013
8:49 AM

Post #9686412

You are a better woman than I am...he is still alive...

Uh, I'd look into installing a drip irrigation system as soon as possible, LOL!

So sorry for your loss...I know it takes coordination to keep those seedlings moist until they pop. I'll be sowing carrots, beets, turnip seed this weekend. Expecting rain, so the ground will be nice and moist. I might try laying sheets down to help keep them moist. Also, I'll soak the beet and turnip seeds for a couple hours before I sow them. That'll get them outta the shells a bit sooner, since they'll have some oxygenation to help wake em up!

I have about 200 seedlings inside under lights that need to be potted up. I sowed Broccoli, Cauliflower and Cabbages on September 16th. There are multiples growing in 4" pots and since I started feeding them, they're getting huge! Don't relish this chore at all! I'm torn between potting them up to individual pots now, or just setting them out to harden off, and transplanting them directly into the ground in another week...

I prefer to put a larger cole crop seedling into the ground because of my pillbug population. Also, it is a VERY humid 85 outside today after a short sprinkle. We're due for a cool snap starting tonight (nights in the mid-50s and days in the low-70s), for the rest of this week. But, who knows after that. We could be back in swim suits next week!

Jo, are you growing any green beans or snap peas? How about garlic?

Also, you decided to sow your onion seeds rather than go with Dixondale? LMK.

Linda

jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 15, 2013
5:08 PM

Post #9686761

Linda, I had such a large garlic crop last year that I still have plenty. So I'm only planing about 2 dozen or so garlic cloves and about a dozen shallots that I got from a local feed store. The onions were planted about 2 weeks ago & have just started sprouting. I grew long beans for the first time this past summer, both Thai #3 extra long beans and Thai Purple Podded Yard Long Beans. They quit producing about 3 weeks ago and I have about 15 2-pound bags in the freezer. I just didn't need any more green beans. These long beans taste so good, I may just grow these & skip the regular green beans.

Luckily the English & snap peas were big enough that they didn't need the constant watering. I grew a few snap peas last year, but they were so good I ate them all in the garden! This year, I planted a lot more. We love peas & if the fall ones do good, I'll also plant some more in late December/early January.

With the onions, I think I'll still have to order from Dixondale. Those were some of the ones that succumbed to DH's not watering.
Jo-Ann

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 15, 2013
8:42 PM

Post #9686910

Jo-Ann,
I called Dixondale today. November 1st is the day to order. She said ordering online would greatly expedite the order.

I have a package of Red Burgundy seeds from Ferry-Morse, and I think I'll go ahead and start those. I keep forgetting the first time I ever did onions from Dixondale, I didn't get the transplants in until January and I had really nice onions, so I could have these ready by then too!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 19, 2013
9:24 PM

Post #9690034

My eggplants just won't stop in our Texas heat, even with the cool fronts that are coming through.

I harvested 4.97 lbs. today.

Unfortunately, I have about 200 leggy broccolis, cauliflowers, and cabbages under lights. Gonna try to salvage as many as I can for plant out next weekend. Start hardening them off this week...

About to build a new light kit, and start some more seedlings. Should have them out in 8 weeks.

Good thing I'm not in a big hurry this season, LOL!

Helping a friend build a raised bed, 4'w x 20'L x 15"H out of cedar fence pickets. Once I used the measuring tape to show her how much growing space she'd have, she was very excited and relieved.

Ya'll pray for this construction project, please, LOL!

Linda

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 20, 2013
6:28 AM

Post #9690211

I pulled the peanuts yesterday and got quite a haul considering I only planted a handful of seeds. My boyfriend kept asking where the jars were. I'm not sure how to get from green peanut to roasted peanut, but I am sure the internet will know at least 8 ways, and one of them might even be right.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 20, 2013
8:06 AM

Post #9690271

Nicole, do you have any photos of your peanuts growing? I bought 2 plants from a garden center this year and planted them. I know now that they should have had a lot more room to peg into the soil, but it looks like I may actually get a couple dozen peanuts. How do you know when to pull them up? Mine are still green on top in spite of several light frosts.
drdawg43
Starkville, MS
(Zone 8a)

October 20, 2013
8:46 AM

Post #9690321

I just finished getting all my gourmet garlic planted. I planted Turban, Artichoke, and Creole and a total of eight varieties. I planted approximately 350 cloves in my raised garden, each variety enclosed in a 48"x48"x6" box. The boxes created a raised garden on top of a raised garden and will not only have more depth but also better drainage. Hopefully I will have a better growing season than last year (extended cold and wet in the spring). I planted a Turban variety about 7 days ago and it is already up and is 8-10" tall. Other varieties are just beginning to break ground. I don't know why that particular variety grew so quickly.

Ken

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 20, 2013
11:10 AM

Post #9690403

[quote="JoParrott"]Nicole, do you have any photos of your peanuts growing? I bought 2 plants from a garden center this year and planted them. I know now that they should have had a lot more room to peg into the soil, but it looks like I may actually get a couple dozen peanuts. How do you know when to pull them up? Mine are still green on top in spite of several light frosts.[/quote]

I think peanuts just keep going and going, and whenever you pull them there are going to be some that aren't ripe.

I agree, raised beds isn't a good idea for peanuts since the plant hangs over and has nowhere to set fruit. Still, I got a fair amount.

Shot taken a few weeks ago to show the fruiting stems:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43080081@N02/9984057644/

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 20, 2013
1:27 PM

Post #9690455

Today's harvest, after over an inch of rain and significantly cooler temps this week.

2 "Muncher" cucumbers, Hill Country Red okra, Lg. Cherry tomatoes and a jalapeno. My jalapeno plant is LOADED with peppers!

Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click the image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 20, 2013
2:21 PM

Post #9690484

Still looks delightful , next few days here garden is done (sigh) (i know , no such thing) a few winter greens ...
No new Vegie pic's until next year .. from here ..

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 25, 2013
7:18 AM

Post #9694511

peanuts- the tops are baled for hay in large fields, the peanuts are spread to dry. I always loved em green, but be careful, they will give you a tummy ache. Havent found a boiled peanut I like, taste like a poor cousin to a purple hull. When they are dry-er, tho, my little skillet gets a pat of butter and just enough peanuts to cover the bottom of the skillet, I dont like em toasted to dryness, so stop as soon as they are hot thru and thru, salt and enjoy. yummmm. Love you guys harvests, was impressed with my ping tung eggplants, but think I like the green Louisianas ep better than this Calliope, my basilos are doing the best this year, but we had carrots for many meals and just dug what we needed til they were gone. Just got my seeds in for carrots/beets/turnip/collards, and am trying a hugelkulture mini mound for a new bed. Also changing companies to one out of Fon du lac, doubt my veggies will get much more attention than before, but I may be happier- the serranos are delirious, took em all summer to come back from the deer topping them, but the plant is loaded down and my daughter is sharing at work with her co workers. As warm as it has been all summer we may try overwintering a few things without yanking them.

Thumbnail by kittriana   Thumbnail by kittriana   Thumbnail by kittriana   Thumbnail by kittriana   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 26, 2013
5:01 AM

Post #9695069

Goodbye summer plants.

We got our first frosts. Just a nip last night but there's frost everywhere this morning. That's a solid week or 10 days earlier than normal for us, although last winter I don't think we had first frost until late November.
drdawg43
Starkville, MS
(Zone 8a)

October 26, 2013
5:46 AM

Post #9695085

We had just a bit of frost this morning but I don't think it got down to 34 F as predicted. Though last winter was fairly mild, it was sure prolonged and wet. Normally I begin putting out my plumeria in early March but last year they did not go out (permanently) until April. The wetness reduced my garlic crop's weight by 40%, which is a substantial reduction.

Ken
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 30, 2013
2:28 PM

Post #9698560

Planted my strawberries yesterday, about 45 of them. They may be planted too close together, but we'll see.
Jo-Ann

Thumbnail by jomoncon   Thumbnail by jomoncon         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 30, 2013
4:29 PM

Post #9698630

My daughter showed me the faithful sprinklin of seeds before I left Texas has netted lettuce babies and fern leaf dill plants playin catch up growin. She did mention I could have been kind enuff to have told her where I planted what, chuckl. OOOOPS. Halloween is in full laughter and screams up here.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 30, 2013
4:37 PM

Post #9698633

Wavin Helllooooo!

Thumbnail by kittriana   Thumbnail by kittriana   Thumbnail by kittriana      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2013
7:38 AM

Post #9711625

Well, I finally made some garden progress this weekend.

►Reinstalled PVC hoops on two raised beds...one more to go...
►Sowed winter veggie seeds outdoors: carrots in & kale in patio containers & SmartPots
►Sowed seeds for broccoli, cabbages, beets, turnips & spinach in Root Riot sponges, indoors...
►Pruned the crepe myrtle trees...
►Dumped container mixes and refreshed them for repotting...
►Cleared everything in eyesight that DOESN'T lend itself to the veggie garden aesthetic!

Still need to:
►Plant a gazillion onion transplants from Dixondale Farms
►Plant mustards, collards, lettuce
►Build a 4th raised bed for my garlic, and a 5th raised bed for my greens...
►Mow one final time and then winterize the lawn...
►Put out a notice for all my neighbors to drop their bagged leaves at my place...!


Yep. That's a good start!

This message was edited Nov 18, 2013 10:40 AM
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2013
8:10 AM

Post #9711646

Linda, You're planting your onions a little earlier this year? If my old memory serves me right, I thought you said last year you plant on 01/15 - your birthday?? Why the change? My DD order is going to be shipped on 01/06, so I'll probably be planting around the 8-10. I know another gardener in New Orleans who's going in with me on the purchase. Together, we're ordering 9 bunches for $39.69 - that's only $4.41 each!!
Jo-Ann

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2013
8:37 AM

Post #9711669

Jo-Ann,
I've always wanted to plant the onions earlier than January, because I've read that the longer they grow, the larger they get.

The first time, I delayed planting because I just couldn't get to them. I was home on my b'day (January 8th) in 2011, so that's when I finally planted them.

The second year (2012), Dixondale wouldn't ship them earlier than December, so I decided to plant my own seeds. It would've been a great haul if my seeds had been fresh. They were older than a year. I followed "The Bayou Gardener" on a YouTube video. He planted seeds in a trough in August, for transplants by November. Wish I had known about the old seeds...

This is the earliest I've ever received my onion transplants, and, I have everything in place to go ahead and plant them out this week. If I procrastinate, they'll start to shrivel up, and I'll lose a good bit of my order.

I'm gonna put a band of Super Phosphate underneath each bulb when I set them, and side dress with some Ammonium Sulfate (high nitrogen) after they take, in about 3 weeks. The faster those leaves develop, the larger the bulbs will be.

I'll post my progress here, so you can see the development. Hope I get a good crop this year. Being from NOLA, you KNOW how many onions we use, LOL!

Hugs!

Linda
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2013
2:43 PM

Post #9711876

Maybe I'll see if I can change my DD order to an earlier delivery date. If that's the case, I'll need to get my beds prepared a little earlier. These are the beds that held field peas last summer & fall. I've been making & hoarding a lot of compost for use with the onions & the corn. I used bone meal & blood meal last year, but I'm going to go with the Super Phosphate & Ammonium Sulfate.

I tried the onion seeds this year, but I tried it in an unused bed. The seeds came up really great - but so did all the weeds & it just got away from me. It was a bed that sort of out of the way, & I just didn't see it enough to take really good care of it. I know: Excuses, excuses, excuses!!

BTW, let me know how your garlic comes out. I tried some for the first time last year, and they looked beautiful, but made one gigantic clove. I was told that it just didn't get cold enough here last year for better bulbing. This year, I stores the garlic & shallots in the fridge for a few weeks before planting. Maybe that will help. My single clove garlic still tasted great and they're supposed to be the latest gourmet item.
drdawg43
Starkville, MS
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2013
2:53 PM

Post #9711883

I am intrigued by your "one clove" garlic. I grow perhaps a dozen varieties, and have planted around 500 cloves this year and have never seen anything like that. All my garlic are "gourmet-type" garlic. Do you happen to know or can find out what variety of garlic that was?

By the way, there are specific garlic varieties that grow well in the south and specific garlic varieties that do better in the north. Some (supposedly) will grow well regardless of the region. I try to stay away from those varieties that grow best in the north, though I have to admit, I like to experiment and prove that northern varieties can do well in the deep south. I am in Mississippi.
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2013
3:42 PM

Post #9711912

kirkkr, the garlic I planted last year was the warm-winter selection from gourmet garlic that had Applegate, Rogue River Red, Inchelium, Ajo Rojo & Creole Red garlic. They ALL had one clove. We had an especially warm winter last year. I don't think it ever got below 40 degrees.

After talking to other gardeners/farmers in LA, it seems the "single toe" garlic is more weather related than variety related. I've also been told that wood ash/lime will help.
Jo-Ann

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2013
4:16 PM

Post #9711926

I've grown Inchelium and Ajo Rojo and while it didn't do well here, I did have actual cloves in the heads. So I'd agree it's probably a problem with the varieties.

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