Photo by Melody
Congratulations to all our photo contest participants! Check out the winning photos here. We will have the 2015 calendars available to order from Zazzle soon.

Seed Germination: All about seeds

Communities > Forums > Seed Germination
bookmark
Forum: Seed GerminationReplies: 23, Views: 213
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

August 29, 2013
12:15 PM

Post #9644976

Can you tell me if there is a book that teaches you how to recognize seeds, how to collect seeds, how to clean seeds, how to store seeds, pictures of seeds and seedpods, longevity of seeds, sowing seeds, etc.
If there is a book that is helpfull, please tell me the title and author.
If you canít find a book about seeds, please tell me what you want to learn about seeds.
Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

August 29, 2013
8:07 PM

Post #9645438

Not sure it covers everything you want but look at Seed to Seed by Suzanne Ashworth.
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

August 30, 2013
12:49 PM

Post #9645996

Thank you Doug9345 for your link. It's very helpful.
Well, it will be a project that will take at least 2 years. First Iíll have to find out if there is really no book that teaches beginners everything about seeds: recognizing , collecting, cleaning, storing, longevity, sowing, exchanging, etc. So this autum I will check all the links I got from all over the world, will order some books to see what the real content is. After that I will decide if the book I would like to write is really Ďnewí and will be helpful for newbies. I posted my questions on several websites that use the English language. I want to add a lot of pictures of seeds, seedpods and the plants. If there is interest in it, I have to make more pictures of seeds and seedpods next year. After that I have to write it in English. Thatís not my motherlanguage, so I have to find someone who will help me correcting my English. And last, but not least, Iím not a botanist, I do not have experience with tropical plants and canít make a book about all plants, so my book will be a bit limited. And I will only write about Ďnaturalí plants and heirlooms, no breeded hybrids (they will seldom come true from seed). If Iím going to write it, it will be just for beginners. No scientific talk, just my own experience. The idea came up to me because I get a lot of questions about the subjects and I realized I had the same questions when I was a beginner. I tried to find books to help me, but I couldnít find a book that could answer all my questions.
If I decide to write the book, I will offer it as an E-book first because that will be cheaper ( so many photoís) , but I will also offer the possibillity to order it as a real book.
Any suggestion is welcome.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 30, 2013
6:10 PM

Post #9646262

Another possibility for publishing an inexpensive PAPER book is to print only a few photos, or mostly black and white photos and sketches.

Then give them an Internet link to hundreds or thousands of color photos.

And gee, if that means that people keep clicking on one site that also has links to flower photos on YOUR site, that would not be a terribly bad thing, would it?

JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

August 31, 2013
12:27 PM

Post #9646845

[quote="RickCorey_WA"]Another possibility for publishing an inexpensive PAPER book is to print only a few photos, or mostly black and white photos and sketches.

Then give them an Internet link to hundreds or thousands of color photos.

And gee, if that means that people keep clicking on one site that also has links to flower photos on YOUR site, that would not be a terribly bad thing, would it?

[/quote]

Thank you for your suggestion, but I don't think it will work to print only a few photo's. People either want an Ebook, or a printed book, not a mix. And I only want to use my own photo's or photo's people sent to me with the free right to use it in my book.
And to be honest, my main interest is not selling my seeds, but trading my seeds.
Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2013
12:42 PM

Post #9646862

[quote="JonnaSudenius"]Thank you Doug9345 for your link. It's very helpful.
Well, it will be a project that will take at least 2 years. First Iíll have to find out if there is really no book that teaches beginners everything about seeds: recognizing , collecting, cleaning, storing, longevity, sowing, exchanging, etc. So this autum I will check all the links I got from all over the world, will order some books to see what the real content is.[/quote]
Here is a link to a amazon search for seed saving
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_11?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=seed%20saving&sprefix=seed+saving%2Caps%2C356&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Aseed%20saving

[quote]
After that I have to write it in English. Thatís not my mother language, so I have to find someone who will help me correcting my English. [/quote]Your English isn't horrible so it definitely is correctable.
[quote]And last, but not least, Iím not a botanist, I do not have experience with tropical plants and canít make a book about all plants, so my book will be a bit limited. And I will only write about Ďnaturalí plants and heirlooms, no breeded hybrids (they will seldom come true from seed).[/quote]

You are going to have to think what segment of plants you are going to write about. The number of plant species in the world is something like 400,000. Are you going to write about garden plants, house plants or exotic plants. As far as hybrids go their seed save the same as the non hybrids in the same species. Some species, blueberries for an example, are not self fertile and therefore are hybrids automatically. That's why they are propagated by cuttings, but I think there is a number of people that would want to know how to grow blueberry seeds if for no other reason than to see what they get.
[quote] If Iím going to write it, it will be just for beginners. No scientific talk, just my own experience. The idea came up to me because I get a lot of questions about the subjects and I realized I had the same questions when I was a beginner. I tried to find books to help me, but I couldnít find a book that could answer all my questions. [/quote]

One challenge I think you are going to run into is that things have different names in different parts of the world. For example what is called aubergine in Britain is called eggplant in the USA.

Send me a D-mail and I'll send you my email address if you want to bounce ideas off me or take a look at a book in the library.
Doug

JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2013
12:28 PM

Post #9647743

[quote="Doug9345"]


You are going to have to think what segment of plants you are going to write about. The number of plant species in the world is something like 400,000. Are you going to write about garden plants, house plants or exotic plants. As far as hybrids go their seed save the same as the non hybrids in the same species. Some species, blueberries for an example, are not self fertile and therefore are hybrids automatically. That's why they are propagated by cuttings, but I think there is a number of people that would want to know how to grow blueberry seeds if for no other reason than to see what they get.


One challenge I think you are going to run into is that things have different names in different parts of the world. For example what is called aubergine in Britain is called eggplant in the USA.

Send me a D-mail and I'll send you my email address if you want to bounce ideas off me or take a look at a book in the library.
Doug

[/quote]

I will only write about garden plants. Will try to convince people to grow only natural plants (so no hybrids or GMO plants). And ofcourse I can't discuss all plants, but hope to make a guide for beginners. When I started my garden I had to look up everything and often didn't get the answer. Didn't know how to differatiate a weed from a plant. Didn't know how to gather viable seeds, etc.

And the challenge you name about the different names in Britain and the USA: One of the things I want to learn starters is to use the botanical (latin) names of the plants. So I want to use the botanical names in my book, but will also give the 'common' names. I will try to explain people that using the botanical name will be much better, because than you will really get what you want if you are exchanging seeds.

Thank your for your help and I will send you a D-mail.

Jonna

blomma

blomma
Casper, WY
(Zone 4a)

September 11, 2013
9:38 PM

Post #9657614

[quote="JonnaSudenius"]

I will only write about garden plants. Will try to convince people to grow only natural plants (so no hybrids or GMO plants). [/quote]

If that is all you will write about, you may not get much interest. Hybrids are the most beautiful plants to grow. Also, most plants today are hybrids. They are an improvement over what you call "natural"

If there were no hybrid daylilies or irises, I wouldn't grow them at all. The veggies are another example in improvement against cracking, disease, etc.
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

September 13, 2013
1:27 PM

Post #9659038

[quote="blomma"]

If that is all you will write about, you may not get much interest. Hybrids are the most beautiful plants to grow. Also, most plants today are hybrids. They are an improvement over what you call "natural"

If there were no hybrid daylilies or irises, I wouldn't grow them at all. The veggies are another example in improvement against cracking, disease, etc. [/quote]

Thank you for your input, but I do not agree with you.
A lot of people are really interested in growing wild plants.
Please have a look at my article about wild plants here http://allthingsplants.com/ideas/view/JonnaSudenius/1363/Wildflowers-in-Europe/

I would like your comments after reading this article.

Kind regards,
Jonna
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

September 14, 2013
1:36 PM

Post #9659818

Jonna is right... most garden plants are not hybrids, that is, interspecific hybrids (the real definition of the term). The term "hybrid" has come to be used very loosely, to mean crosses between cultivars of the same species.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 16, 2013
6:14 PM

Post #9661868

>> interspecific hybrids

Ohhh, now I understand. Yes, those are very often or usually sterile.

I usually use "hybrid" to mean "F1 hybrid seeds", and they aren't sterile, nor are their F2 offspring usually sterile ... just wishy-washy variable who-knows-what-plants.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 20, 2013
9:24 PM

Post #9731621

Jonna

I love your idea of writing a book for those who want to learn more about how to get started. I know there will be a market for you book.

I'm still torn between paperback and kindle books. I love that the paperback is easier for my aging eyes to read, but the ease of kindle books means you will always have it handy...LOL

Please keep us posted on your progress.

Jan
( who is now living in FL)
mlmlakestevens
Lake Stevens, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 24, 2013
10:53 AM

Post #9733686

Hi Jonna-
i am currently reading a library book you might find interesting:
The Organic Seed Grower by John Navazio. published 2012 by Chelsea Green Publishing.

Another book I have had for years, a sort of chat between two knowledgeable plantsmen. :
Garden Flowers from Seed by Christopher Lloyd and Graham Rice. Published 1994 by Timber Press.
Good Luck!

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 24, 2013
5:13 PM

Post #9733852

>> a sort of chat between two knowledgeable plantsmen

Was that a somewhat traditionalist, old fashioned Brit and an up-to-date or faddish American? I read such a book once, or maybe just an extract, and thought it was a great way for the authors to advance two different points of view without sounding confused or indecisive.

There's always (at least) two different ways to do something. Even if one way clearly works better (in some situations), other ways will work as well or better for other people and other situations or goals.

That's why I appreciate advice that includes a "why" or at least a context.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 24, 2013
7:49 PM

Post #9733905

[quote="RickCorey_WA"]>> a sort of chat between two knowledgeable plantsmen

Was that a somewhat traditionalist, old fashioned Brit and an up-to-date or faddish American? I read such a book once, or maybe just an extract, and thought it was a great way for the authors to advance two different points of view without sounding confused or indecisive.

That's why I appreciate advice that includes a "why" or at least a context.
[/quote]

I, also, have a copy of that book, Garden Flowers from Seed. Both Christopher Lloyd (who is now deceased) and Graham Rice are Brits. I do agree with Corey, that this book, though highly entertaining, was definitely not the most scientific on the subject, except for the very beginning of the book.

In the first 52 pages alone would give the new seed sower a clear picture of what has to take place in order to grow plants from seed. The different types of plants are covered and how to coax the best germination from each type of seed, as well as different methods and why they are used.

In this first 52 pages is some information that is very precise and informative. What is covered is:

Sowing in Protection
Timing
Containers
Composts
Seed Compost Recipes
John Innes seed compost
Peat-Based seed compost
John Innes potting compost
Peat-based potting compost
Seed-sowing techniques
Pricking Out Seedlings
Hardening Off
Problems
Chlorotic seedlings
Damping off
Drying out
Etiolated growth
Lack of germination
Moss
Scorch and shriveling of seedlings
Weeds
Worms

Sowing Outside
Drawbacks to direct sowings
Annuals for picking
Half-hardy annuals outside
Biennials

Sowing in Cold Frames
The frames
Composts and drainage
Sowing
After-care
Pricking out
Problems

Then we have the A to Z List of Garden Flowers, interspersed with just a few color photographs of some of the plants listed, many taken from the authors' own gardens.

So we have a general and specific overview of seed-sowing. In the "A to Z" part, we have the more casual attitude here with in some instance little information about the plants except for personal preferences, and in other descriptions, there are many details of the plants. The main idea of this book is to glean the knowledge of these two esteemed plantsmen, as many details are given based on their personal experience, and sometimes the two gentlemen do not agree on the best way to proceed.

I, for one, go back to this book every year, before I start my seed-sowing, among others. No, this is not the only book. I have others that give more precise germination info for each seed as well. They all have value to me. And of course, one would be remiss to not peruse Dr. Norman Deno's instructions, Tom Clothier's website, or many other online sources which give precise information on a wider range of plants, with a lot more entries.
mlmlakestevens
Lake Stevens, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 25, 2013
12:53 PM

Post #9734264

When I read the book I felt like I was a silent guest at lunch with two longtime professional gardeners who were chatting about seeds. It was certainly not complete, but gave all kinds of personal preferences and hints. Like Evelyn, I pull it out now and again and look at it.
For Corey- Lloyd was a trained Horticulturist in England, I think he was a professor for a while, then ran a famous nursery and garden. He bred flowers. He died of old age a few years ago
Rice is also English, also a trained Horticulturist, but now gardens in both England and Pennsylvania (I think his wife might be American). He has written a lot of really good books. The book does feel like the old guy and the new guy, so I bet it was the one you read.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 7, 2014
5:26 PM

Post #9742845

Thanks! The bit I remembered had a good vibe going between them.

Like an old married couple where one says one thing, and the other says "Yeah, Honey, I know YOU would do it THAT way, but on the other hand *I* would ..."

mlmlakestevens
Lake Stevens, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 7, 2014
6:45 PM

Post #9742910

'Zactly. Kind of like these forums on DG!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2014
6:13 PM

Post #9743522

^_^
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 9, 2014
7:55 AM

Post #9743818

I just ordered the book, used, through Amazon. I loved Christopher Lloyd! I went to his first appearance in the US, at the NY Botanical Garden, where he was introduced by his great friend Penelope Hobhouse. He was a delight, both in person and in his books. In the 80's I had and read many of them. Later, long before coming to where I garden now, I donated my collection of gardening books to the local library for their ongoing sales. Now, of course, I'm collecting again, and many of the books I had and loved are out of print. I'm so happy to find this one! Thanks! :-).
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 9, 2014
10:52 AM

Post #9743949

One of my favorite ones from Christopher Lloyd is, "The Well-Tempered Garden"...but I always wonder if he originally intended to name the book, "The Well-Tempered Gardener"

My 2 other books for seed-sowing are, "Park's Success with Seeds" by Ann Reilly, and "The Complete Book of Growing Plants From Seed", by Elda Haring.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 9, 2014
12:10 PM

Post #9743993

Could be ;-)

Another one I used to have!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 10, 2014
11:19 AM

Post #9744631

Yeah, I understand. I gave away a lot of my garden books, and need to cull them out again. I just have to be sure that I do not give away any that I want to keep. I will not give my Hortus Third away, even though it is large. I did, however, give away the Botanica and some others that I wish that I kept.
impynic
Drexel Heights, AZ
(Zone 8a)

January 20, 2014
3:58 PM

Post #9752153

I just started reading "The Complete Guide to Saving Seeds" by Robert Gough and Cheryl Moore-Gough, and it's pretty good so far. A lot of good info!

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Seed Germination Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Propagation: Why are some seedlings "leggy"? gardendragon 18 May 8, 2013 6:47 PM
Welcome to the Seed Germination Discussion Forum! dave 20 Dec 23, 2009 2:56 PM
Jiffy Mini-Greenhouse for starting seeds PeggieK 188 Mar 21, 2013 11:19 AM
Stratification kimmers 27 Mar 26, 2014 4:37 PM
Sowing in Spaghnum moss Laurie1 3 Mar 8, 2007 11:55 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America