Phoenix, AZ

Have had this particular type of euphorbia (see photo) for years and propagated it with great succuess but I cannot find out anywhere it's specific name or even a common name. It does have the white milky substance inside so I am assuming it is a euphorbia. These are smooth slender long trailing and can have small flowers all the way down in spring. Thought they were Rhipsalis Clavata based on a pic I saw, but really don't think so. Hope someone knows. Thanx

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Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

Looks more like a Rhipsalis.

San Francisco, CA

Sure looks like a Rhipsalis to me. Are you *positive* it has milky latex when wounded?

Clarksville, TN(Zone 6b)

Yes, Rhipsalis. maybe R. capilliformis, but not certain about that.

Adelaide, Australia(Zone 10a)

I suspect you may have a Sarcostemma, or some other vining member of the Asclepiadaceae. They also have milky sap. Here are some pictures to compare the flowers -

Sarcostemma: http://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/22498
Rhipsalis capilliformis: http://www.growsonyou.com/photo/slideshow/124926-rhipsalis-capilliformis-flowering-on-my-windowsill/all
Euphorbia - White flowered Euphorbias are fairly unusual. I know this is not your plant but the flowering structures are all very similar - note the bracts, and the three sided green seed capsules forming in the centre of the flowerheads: http://www.backyardnature.net/yucatan/euphorb.htm

Hope this helps, KK.

Beautiful, BC(Zone 9b)

I think, at this point, we need to see close-up pictures of the blooms, fruit, joints, stems, tip, etc.

Phoenix, AZ

Sorry it took so long to get back with another photo, but here are two more, one with the flowers. These plants are not upright at all. They hang down and grow and grow to great lengths in which I have to cut them back or they drag the floor. So what do you think this variety is now? Thanx for your suggestions. Digr

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Clarksville, TN(Zone 6b)

The photo of the flowers looks more like Sarcostemma than R. capilliformis to me. But I could be wrong.

Adelaide, Australia(Zone 10a)

This is the same green flowered Sarcostemma that I had without a proper ID for about 20 years! I need a better reference book for this genus!

Having said that, I have tentatively IDed mine as Sarcostemma stolonifera. Yours could also be S. viminale but the flower petals on that species are usually white to a kind of pale mint green in colour.

Here are some links to
Sarcostemma stolonifera: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/162720/ and https://www.google.com.au/search?q=sarcostemma+stolonifera&newwindow=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=UUeJUrD3HqOFiQewmYH4Ag&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1280&bih=827

and Sarcostemma viminale: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcostemma_viminale

as well as Sarcostemma as a genus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcostemma

My problem with saying "Yes, this is Sarcostemma X or Y" is that there are more than thirty species in this genus and I have only ever seen 3 of these species in person - for all I know there could be more long twining species with greenish flowers to confuse these with!

Ciao, KK.

Phoenix, AZ

Based on a pic I found of a smaller plant at http://www.cactuskiev.com.ua/mediawiki/index.php/%D0%A4%D0%B0%D0%B9%D0%BB:Sarcostemma_stolonifera_Iv.JPG. I think it is the Sarcostemma Stolonifera. Thank you greatly for your input. I am going with Stolonifera. Don't think there are many in my part of the country though.

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