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Article: Pumpkin Pie for Your Thanksgiving: Looks delicious!

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Forum: Article: Pumpkin Pie for Your ThanksgivingReplies: 25, Views: 70
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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 26, 2013
10:09 AM

Post #9716957

Wow, that looks like a great recipe! I never would have thought of putting a top crust on pumpkin pie, but this is something I'd like to make. Thanks, Adina!

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

November 26, 2013
1:12 PM

Post #9717033

You're welcome. I hope you'll try it and then tell us whether you liked it or not.
Happy Thanksgiving!

Adina

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2013
6:54 PM

Post #9717221

I guess they don't have canned pumpkin in your country? I think canned pumpkin tastes just as good as home made. And it's very nutritious...I used to feed it to my babies.

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

November 26, 2013
10:53 PM

Post #9717301

Carrie, I haven't seen yet canned pumpkin at the store, just apples. But it's easy to make it at home.

Adina

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2013
5:55 AM

Post #9718069

We typically make our pumpkin pies with a milk/egg/sugar mixture so its
more of a custard. Your version looks much healthier!

Thanks for sharing the recipe and all the personal perspectives!
Tam
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2013
8:48 AM

Post #9718139

I recently read that canned pumpkin is mixed with other kinds of squash, and now there's a Yahoo article that says there's no pumpkin in it at all! That's false labeling! If we want the good nutrition of pumpkin, I guess we do have to use fresh pumpkin. I've been thinking all these years that I was getting all the goodness of the real deal!

http://tv.yahoo.com/daytime/dint-pumpkin-pie-not-made-221449367.html

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2013
9:25 AM

Post #9718161

Hubbard & butternut squash are probably just as nutritious as pumpkin squash. I've made many "pumpkin" pies from hubbard squash myself. They are all just squash.

And it is a lot more time consuming to make your own puree. :-_

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2013
9:49 AM

Post #9718168

I think it's all equally nutritious whether we're eating winter squash, pumpkin or sweet potato. Just my opinion.

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

November 28, 2013
12:03 PM

Post #9718219

Thanks for the comments and opinions. I agree all are nutritious, but I prefer pumpkin puree for the pies. It tastes so good!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2013
1:45 PM

Post #9718245

I had a taste testing one thanksgiving a few years ago. Pumpkin won over Hubbard in my pies by all tasters (my family). So I agree with Adina. I don't agree with that guy on the clip in the link - its not stringier than other squash. The best kinds are the pumpkins bred for pie rather than for halloween decorations. But Hubbards makes a lot more pies than pie pumpkin. They are HUGE!

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

November 28, 2013
2:34 PM

Post #9718265

I had to google hubbard, never saw one. My family prefer apple pies, but I'm glad the kids like pumpkin pie too.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2013
3:42 PM

Post #9718285

Adina - have you tried the traditional (US) pumpkin pie?

My recipe: 2c pumpkin puree, 1c sugar, 3 eggs & 2 cups milk (or if you want something really rich, half & half), cinnamon mixed & poured into a 9" pie shell. No top.

Here's one of the best rated I found on-line. It looks really rich:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/pumpkin-pie-recipe/index.html

Tam

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

November 28, 2013
11:31 PM

Post #9718367

Tam, I'll try both recipes. Must be even more delicious with milk and eggs. Thanks for the link too. Now I know what half and half is!LOL

Adina

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 29, 2013
12:29 PM

Post #9718597

Half cream and half milk, Adina, for those of us who are too ashamed to drink cream straight and not ashamed of loving creamy things. Half and half is (here) often ultra-pasteurized, which means it doesn't go bad so even if you only use one-two tablespoons a day (in coffee for instance). We buy a quart at a time...32 ounces, or two months of coffee.

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

November 30, 2013
1:18 AM

Post #9718813

Carrie, thank you for clearing this up for me. So those small casseroles with milk for coffee are half and half? And the powder milk for coffee is the same?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 1, 2013
9:12 AM

Post #9719522

The little vacuum containers with peel-off lids are either half-and-half or "creamer," which should be fake half-and-half. The powdered stuff I don't know too much about, like "Creamora?" That never sees a refrigerator and may have no natural ingredients, period. The coffee that accompanies the fake stuff is usually pretty bad too.

At home I grind my own beans and use a French press, and half-and-half. All I'm missing is the pumpkin pie!!!

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

December 1, 2013
11:08 PM

Post #9719856

I don't use milk in coffee, but sometimes DH wants some. If we have cream, he prefers it rather than milk.
We also used to grind our own coffee beans years ago when we couldn't find any other coffee than beans. It smelled so good!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2013
5:24 AM

Post #9719930

Adina - many of those little containers of "cream" are not really dairy. Same with the powder. (In the US anyway). Half and Half is simply half milk & half cream. It can be used for coffee or cooking.

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

December 2, 2013
6:21 AM

Post #9719983

It's the same here, many of the cream products have vegetable fat.
pastapicker
Columbus, OH

December 2, 2013
8:20 AM

Post #9720073

Thank you Adina. I would love to hear more about the other traditional ways that you use pumpkin in Romania, like the pumpkin dessert that you mentioned. I love pumpkin and every fall roast and freeze liter bags of it for use as a vegetable, in soups and chili, and of course pie!
Once it is roasted in the oven it is so easy to mash or puree.
My pie recipe uses not just cinnamon, but also ginger, allspice, clove, and molasses for sweetening. Also eggs and milk, it is a version of custard pie.

I am pretty sure that canned pumpkin is really pumpkin. Have you ever tasted it plain? It is not sweet. Most of the farm production of pumpkin in Illinois and Indiana goes to canning. Remember the shortage a few years ago? That was because the pumpkin crop didn't do well. I think that chef in the clip was either mistaken or making it up. (ps if you roast the pumpkin, the peel just lifts off the flesh-- no peeling required -- which I am sure the canners know!)
cybercrone
Toronto,, ON
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2013
6:50 PM

Post #9720374

Hi Adina:

Just to add to the discussion . . .
Yes, I was going to say that 'pumpkin' pie here is more like pumpkin custard pie. We sue cream, sugar, eggs and several spices.

I do like cooked pumpkin in soups and stews though, or any kind of squash. My favourite way to cook squash is to just halve it, and put a lump of butter and a spoonful of brown sugar inside, with maybe a sprinkle of cinnamon, cover the top with foil, and bake it.

This pie recipe is very like my mother's. And as one other reader commented, we don't really ever see a top crust on a pumpkin pie, except occasionally a lattice crust.

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Bake-a-Pumpkin-Pie-from-Scratch/

Thanks for writing such lovely articles . . .
~m

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

December 2, 2013
11:58 PM

Post #9720462

Pastapicker, you could be right about the canned pumpkin. As far as I've heard from all my American friends, your food is well checked before going out on the market and the producers could pay a high price for false labeling. I'll add the spices you mentioned to my next pumpkin pie, thanks for sharing. The pumpkin dessert I mentioned in the article is the plain slice roasted pumpkin, with just a bit of granulated sugar on top.

Marilyn, thank you for appreciating my articles. The recipe looks great, thank you for sharing. I really need to make a custard pumpkin pie now!

Adina

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

December 3, 2013
2:35 AM

Post #9720478

Adina; First, I'm sorry I'm late!! < =/

But, most importantly... Gosh, how to put this into words..?? What a wonderful article, and such a BEAUTIFUL and LOVING heart that you have, to honor your American friends in this way!!! Your loving kindness knows no bounds!!!!! It brought tears to my eyes to read about how you wanted to celebrate Thanksgiving with us by baking your pumpkin pie, you are such a Lovely Lady!!! I tell ya, God was SMILING when He created you!! < =D

As others have said, we Americans (for the most part) are not used to using a top crust on pumpkin pies, but... well, I've got pumpkin pie on the dessert menu to make this week (we had a different pumpkin treat for Thanksgiving), so in honor of YOU, I am going to make mine like you make yours!!! Thank you ever so much for sharing your rich and beautiful (cooking) heritage with us, you honor us greatly!!

Thumbnail by speediebean
Click the image for an enlarged view.

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

December 4, 2013
2:28 AM

Post #9721102

Suze, thank you for your appreciation. Is that your pumpkin dessert? Looks delicious! I hope you will enjoy making the pumpkin pie after my recipe.

Adina

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

December 4, 2013
3:32 AM

Post #9721130

Yes Ma'am, that is a "pumpkin pull-apart bread" that I made a couple months ago. It is quite easy... just use about 8-10 biscuits, spread each with a little melted butter, and then spread with pumpkin (pumpkin that has been prepared as you would for a pie... with all the spices and sugar that you'd like) on ONE side only, leaving each end clear of pumpkin. The biscuits will then be stacked SIDEWAYS into a bread loaf pan, with the two not-spreaded biscuits at each end. (don't want the pumpkin to be sticking to the sides of the pan!). Bake in a pre-heated 350 degree oven for 40-45 minutes.

There is a glaze that can be made for this (shown in the photo): 2 cups powdered sugar,
ΒΌ cup milk, 1 teaspoon vanilla, and a pinch or 2 of the combined pie spices if you like. Just mix that all up in a small bowl then drizzle it over the still-warm "loaf".

Hubby likes his pie cold, so it's already done baking and cooling. And the iPod is on the fritz!!!!!!! (which means I'll get pics if I can figure out what is wrong with the iPod) < =/

XOXOXOXOXOX

adinamiti

adinamiti
Balotesti
Romania

December 6, 2013
9:11 AM

Post #9722561

Thank you for the recipe. I'll have to try it!

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Other Article: Pumpkin Pie for Your Thanksgiving Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
I have never used a top crust Cville_Gardener 4 Nov 27, 2013 8:57 AM


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