Photo by Melody
Are you ready? It's time for our 14th annual photo contest! Enter your best pictures of the year, for a chance to win a calendar and annual subscription here. Hurry! Deadline for entries is October 21.

Winter Sowing: WINTERSOWING 2014 Ambitions...

Communities > Forums > Winter Sowing
bookmark
Forum: Winter SowingReplies: 95, Views: 650
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2013
12:55 PM

Post #9735859

OK, everyone, who has their WINTERSOWING started? And who has started their lists?
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

December 30, 2013
1:36 PM

Post #9737022

I have not started and do not have lists either.
But I have gathered a bunch of seeds----need to go through the packages and see what is suitable for a WS.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2013
1:41 PM

Post #9737027

Mine is finished, perhaps too quick on the trigger (first year an' all). No list, I've got plant labels in all.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

December 30, 2013
8:14 PM

Post #9737208

JL Hudson catalog is online now, my list got bigger.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2013
8:18 PM

Post #9737211

OK, Robin show us your list. What have you already wintersown? Wow, you beat us all!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 3, 2014
10:28 AM

Post #9739400

Only do Iris and daylilies now. Daylilies were started in the fridge November 2013. Likewise irises. The irises are in plastic box stored in unheated shed for stratification. They will sprout around April when weather warms.

Below are daylilies growing under light. Started with the Deno method. Yea, I know they are not WS but they where sown during winter.

Photo taken January 3, 2014

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2014
5:40 PM

Post #9740271

Here's my list...3 containers full (Blomma style), thought I better get a picture snapped before the snow hits tonight.

Thumbnail by Mipii
Click the image for an enlarged view.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 4, 2014
8:14 PM

Post #9740352

Mipii,
Holy cow, that is a lot of containers in those bins, LOL! Sure is my style, though you outdid me. What did you sow in them?

Hint: I hope you aren't leaving the bins where sun will shine on them. Even in the winter it can get too warm in there and with the added moisture inside it is asking for disease to start. Otherwise it looks great. Place the bins on the north side of a building or in a unheated shed or garage until sprouting is noticed.

Below are mine from 2009. Now I place them in my unheated shed.

Thumbnail by blomma
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2014
9:16 PM

Post #9740380

Lets see, I've got planted:

*Flame Amur Maple, Acer ginnala 'Flame'
*Fragrant Ash, Fraxinus cuspidata
*Fragrant Snowbell, Styrax obassia
*Glory Bower, Clerodendrum trichotomum cs
*Japanese Tree Lilac, Syringa reticulata
*Magnolia, Magnolia kobus
*Redbud, Cercis canadensis 'Eastern Redbud'
*Redbud, Cercis canadensis f. alba 'Royal White'
Anise Hyssop, Agastache foeniculum 'Golden Jubilee'
Asiatic Lily, Lilium Lirio asiatico 'Tiny Puppet'
Asiatic Lily, Lilium Lirio asiatico 'Tiny Dino'
Aster, Symphyotrichum novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'?
Blackcap Raspberry, Rubus leucodermis
Blue Mist Spiraea, Caryopteris x clandonensis
Clematis, Clematis pitcheri
Clematis, Clematis 'Violet Charm'
Clematis, Clematis 'Dr Ruppel'
Clustered Poppy Mallow, Callirhroe triangulata
Columbine, Aquilegia vulgaris 'Clementine White'
Cotoneaster, Cotoneaster microphyllus
Cotoneaster, Cotoneaster apiculatus
Cumberland Azalea/Rhododendron bakeri, Rhododendron cumberlandense
Daylily, Hemerocallidaceae Hemeracallis 'Ruby Stella'
Daylily, Hemerocallidaceae Hemeracallis 'Stella D Oro'
Euonymous (Wintercreeper), Euonymus fortunei 'Blondy'
False Indigo, Baptisia australis
Fragrant False Indigo, Amorpha nana
Garlic chives, Allium tuberosum
Hardy Bitter Orange, Poncirus trifoliata
Hardy Hibiscus, Hibiscus moscheutos 'Kopper King'
Hardy Hibiscus, Hibiscus moscheutos 'Mighty Big Pink'
Hazelnut, Corylus americana
Heal All, Prunella vulgaris
Hibiscus, Hibiscus trionum L.
Hibiscus, Hibiscus cannabinus 'Amethyst'
Hibiscus, Hibiscus Acetosella 'Mahogany Splendor'
Ice Plant, Delosperma Cooperi 'Table Mountain'
Joe Pye Weed, Eupatorium variabile 'Variegatum'
Lemon Balm, Melissa officinalis
Manchu Rose, Rosa xanthina f. spontanea 'Canary Bird'
Meadowsweet, Filipendula rubra
Milky Way Dogwood, Cornus kousa var. chinensis
Salad Burnet, Sanguisorba minor
Scotch Broom, Cytisus scoparius 'Pomona'
Sedge, Carex morrowii 'Ice Dance'
Sessile-Leaf Tick Trefoil, Desmodium sessilifolium
Snowdrop Anemone, Anemone sylvestris 'Madonna'
Snowy Mespilus, Amelanchier ovalis
Sorrel, Rumex acetosa 'Large Leaf'
Spotted Hawkweed, Hieracium spilophaeum 'Leopard'
St. Johns Wort, Hypericum calycinum 'Blue Velvet'
Viola (Johnny Jump Up), Viola tricolor
Viola , Viola sororia 'Freckles'
Wild Geranium, Geranium maculatum 'Elizabeth Ann'?
Wild Leek (Ramps), Allium tricoccum

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 5, 2014
7:34 AM

Post #9740658

HOLY GUACAMOLE, that's a heck of a list!!!!!!!

I'm kinda curious about y'all's Winter Sowing methods. Are the containers (with soil and seeds, I presume) left inside larger containers, stacked all together like that? If so, could you please explain to me why you do it that way? Are there holes in the tops and bottoms of each container for drainage and for nature's moisture to gain access?

I've done Winter Sowing before (this will be my first year not doing any), and I did it quite a bit differently. I used many different types of containers, but predominantly milk jugs (the universal favourite, I think). And mine were scattered all over the deck out back, getting plenty of sun, but that never posed a problem. Basically, I just "contained" the soil and seed to keep the critters out, but otherwise exposed them to the elements like they would be were they just ... naturally sown out in the wild (for want of a better way to put it).

Here's a couple pics of my first year of WS'ing; the results completely filled 2 brand new beds.

1: one view of many of the jugs; newly-bought plants on the railing. (those are in my "container shady garden" out back now)
2: A couple brand new babies in a couple milk jugs. I don't remember now what they are. ;)
3: These pots were also used for WS'ing; I covered them with heavy plastic (held in place with rubber bands), and then slit holes in the top for ... there's a word for it but I can't remember it at the moment -- hate when that happens! Respiration? No, that's not it! Ugh!

Anyway, I'd love to learn how you guys do yours, and why. =)

Thumbnail by speediebean   Thumbnail by speediebean   Thumbnail by speediebean      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
9:50 AM

Post #9740774

Speedie, guacamole sounds good, I'll have to sow some Avocados...lol.

Blomma's the expert on this 'container method'. Seeing how this is my first WS experience I can only tell you what I did and the thought process behind it. I used a lower quality grade sowing medium (mixed with garden soil) for the bulk of the fill, well moistened.

Added an inch seedling soil-less mix, well moistened, then seeds, (pre-soaked ones that needed scarifying). I covered the seeds with the required amount for the specific seeds (some seeds are just pressed into the soil-less mix).

Spritzed the tops of each completed container with fungicide and closed individual containers and stacked in a larger one.

The double wall construction moderates the wildly fluctuating temperatures but still allows natural freeze and thaw cycles. The moisture added is hopefully the exact amount the seed will need to germinate when temps are favorable. Because the containers are sealed, no more water has to be added or drained for the duration.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 5, 2014
9:55 AM

Post #9740777

Mipii,
That is quite a list of seeds. Hope you have lots of room for planting. Hibiscus, and Daylily are easy to sow indoors using Deno method. Delosperma is a succulent plant and the tiny seeds most likely will rot if left in a moist container all winter.

1] Hardy Hibiscus--with the Deno method sprouting in 2 days. Nicked, soaked overnight, placed in moist kitchen towel inserted in baggie kept at room temp.
2] Delosperma---mixed seeds in fine peatmoss 1 week in fridge. Sprouted in 1 week at room temp.
3 &4] Daylily---Deno method. Soaked overnight, placed in moist paper towel, inserted in baggie, stored in fridge for 3 weeks. Sprouted at room temp within 2 weeks.

All the other seeds you planted should do well as you have them.

Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
10:44 AM

Post #9740799

Thanks for the info, I delegated one whole inner container for Delosperma, luckily I have more. Love your photo's of sprouting seeds...I'll never tire of those.

Come to think of it, I didn't soak or nick the Hibiscus, they were a test planting.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 5, 2014
10:50 AM

Post #9740803

Mipii, good explanation for Speedie. I am far from an expert, just learned by trial and error for 50 years.

The only correction I would make on your explanation is NEVER use garden soil with potting soil in an enclosed container. Potting or seedling soil is sterile---no bugs or disease. Adding garden soil, you undo the sterilization not to mention what garden soil contains such as bugs.

I used potting soil for the bulk of the container, then 1" of seeding mix to sow the seeds in.

Speedie,
My reason for smaller containers in a large bin is against critters, plus I don't like to mix different seeds in the same box. The soil inside the shoe boxes is moist and when covered should remain so all winter without added watering. The shoe boxes have drainage holes from a hot nail. Those holes will be needed when seeds begin to sprout since covers need to come off then moved to a sunny area. Watering will be required then.

I find I have more control over the seeds doing it this way since nothing can get at them and moisture will remain even. I have clay garden soil which isn't great to sow seeds in eenthough it has been amended with horse manure and eat moss.

I will add that a bin full of smaller boxes is far more attractive than milk containers spread all over. In addition, the seedling are easier to get at (with a small pickle fork) for potting up.

P.S. I think the word you were looking for was "ventilation".

1] Iris sprouting April 2011
2] Then potted in 6-packs
3] April. Moved to morning sun, still in bin.
4] Planted in open coldframe May 30, 2012
5] First blooms June 2013 at 14 months of age. I was thrilled.

I have done hardy perennials in the same way. Now I just sow iris and daylilies from my own crosses.

Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma
Click an image for an enlarged view.

CLScott
Calgary
Canada

January 5, 2014
10:54 AM

Post #9740808

Great ambitions on the winter sowing you people!
I have not got started.
Thank you for the info on Delosperma-----I have seeds and was wondering?
Thanks.
Caroline

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 5, 2014
11:15 AM

Post #9740816

Mipii,
You are welcome. If I learned anything it is not to put all my eggs in the same basket. In other words, don't sow all the same seeds at the same time. Hold some back just in case...

1] 156 daylily pots in April 2012 acclimated to the sun before planted out.
2] Planted out. Photo taken in August 2012
3 &4] Began to bloom July 2013 at 14 months.

In general, it takes 3 or 4 years for both iris and daylilies to bloom. I contribue their early blooming to all the rotted horse manure I added Fall of 2011. I have had others that took longer to bloom. These below were growing next to the irises who also had manure prior to planting and bloomed early.

My daughter and son-in-law have 6 horse so I will never run out of manure. Lucky me.

Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 5, 2014
11:40 AM

Post #9740835

Caroline,
You are welcome. I see that you are in Canada. Whatzone, regarding Delosperma. I have always seen that they are hardy only down to 5, I live in 4 without them dying over winter.

Have you grown them and did they survive in your zone?

As far as sowing them, I will add a it more in detail.

I used a plastic container, such as salads come in at Alberson's, though any will do as long as it has a cover. If no fine peat moss is available, break it up by rubbing the fiber in between you hands. Wet it, and spread it in the container. Spread your seeds over the peat moss blending it a bit but don't cover with peat moss. Just enough so the seeds are in contact with the moss. Cover the container and stick in the fridge for 1 week. Allow to stand in room temp until sprouting. The seedlings are so tiny at first.

When large enough (second suculent leaf) tansfer them in bunches to potting soil. Almost impossible to seperate the reason for the bunches. Let the strong ones survive and transplant those singly in 6-packs.

I have 5 different cultivars of Delosperma, yet only this one produced seeds that were viable.

1] D. cooperi in 6-pack.
2] All seed sown

Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
12:11 PM

Post #9740856

[quote="blomma"]I am far from an expert, just learned by trial and error for 50 years.[/quote]

Yeah, well, I call that an expert...at the very least a pro! Good work Blomma, lot's to be proud of there. I have minimal space to plant out and plan on growing on begged, borrowed, rented or purchased land just for the sake of growing things I love...I'm tired of space limitations.

I also combined grit with my mixes for the Delosperma because it's a succulent. I still have high hopes, I'll let y'all know the results.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2014
12:24 PM

Post #9740865

Here's my list:
Agrostemma-purple and pink mixed (I swear I will sort the colors this year!)
Onion-Rosso Lunga di Tropea
Anagalis
Aquilegia-some fragrant varieties
Calendula-resina, Art Shades, Radio, and some seeds I saved from plants I liked last year
Campanula-carpatica, cochlearifolia, medium
Cerastium tomentosum
Consolida-blue only, white only, and mixed
Cryptotaenia atropurpurea
Delphinium Blue Mirror
Digitalis-tall purple
Coreopsis Quills and Thrills
Cerinthe-Kiwi Blue
Echinacea-Hula Dancer
Euphorbia corollata
Lychnis-variegated version of L. coronaria alba, Angel Blush, and plain coronaria
Euphorbia marginata-Icicle
Gaillardia-double-flowered annual variety. Sunburst?
Heuchera-mixed varieties
Impatiens balfourii and glandulifera (just in case they don't reseed, they normally do)
Centaurea-some annual varieties
Chenopodium-Epazote. I'm pretty sure it'll reseed from last year, but making sure.
Myrrhis odorata
Nicotiana mutabilis, alata, and sylvestris
Shiso
Parsley
Papaver-Drama Queen, Pepperbox, gigantea, Persian Star, Edge of Night, Lauren's Grape, Feathered lilac, atlanticum, dubium, plus others I don't remember.
Polygonum-variegated KMOGG
Poncirus trifoliata, Flying Dragon
Salvia sclarea "Piemont", horminum Blue Monday
Silene lacinata
Verbena bonariensis and rigida (it reseeds but I want more)
Viscaria "Blue Angel", plus mix of Viscaria from last year
Wonderberry
Spilanthes
Viola-assorted colors, plus more labradorica between some rocks I moved last year
Sedum-assorted varieties--Oracle, Lizard, hispanicum

ETA varieties I forgot

This message was edited Jan 5, 2014 4:21 PM
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
12:44 PM

Post #9740875

That's a cool list Celene, especially Poncirus trifoliata, Flying Dragon -- that's on my 'Want' list, where did you get them?

Did you WS in Milk Jugs?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2014
1:23 PM

Post #9740925

I WS in flats, I am too OCD for the milk jugs. Feel free to mock me. lol

I got the Poncirus at JL Hudson, and they sprouted well with WS, and some were curlier than others, I kept the three curliest seedlings and gave the rest away. My pit bull puppy "took them for a walk outside the pot" in the fall--wicked thorns and all. So, I'm starting over.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
1:33 PM

Post #9740935

"My pit bull puppy "took them for a walk outside the pot"
Oh for the love of puppies, lol...lucky girl! Thanks for the info.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2014
1:38 PM

Post #9740947

Good thing she's cute. lol Here she is pruning bamboo.

We won't speak of two kittens who re-ordered my seed box this morning. Ugh.

Thumbnail by Celene
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
2:08 PM

Post #9740962

OMG...for some unexpected reason, I feel like scooping her up and cuddling. I'll trade you five tree seedlings for her. I need a good garden helper!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2014
4:14 PM

Post #9741068

She is super duper cuddly, that's for sure. :)
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
5:38 PM

Post #9741115

I'll take that as 'yes, we have a deal'...lol!

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 5, 2014
8:26 PM

Post #9741238

Robin and Celene when is your plant sale planned for????? LOL
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2014
8:39 PM

Post #9741245

I'm guessing I'll be trading for a lot of alpines come summer Jan (if all else fails that is).

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 6, 2014
2:58 AM

Post #9741321

Thank you guys for the explanations, that's a really cool way to do it, and one I'd never thought of before. I guess that many years of experience and trial-and-error would definitely make you an expert Blomma, even if you are too modest to admit it. :) And I whole-heartedly agree, your method is MUCH more attractive than the "jugs and pots all over the place" method that I've used. DH was always sooo happy when Spring arrived and the deck got cleaned up again.

I'm sorta curious (always with the questions!); I thought one of the ideas of Winter sowing was to allow nature to stratify/scarify the seeds for you (with the frost/thaw cycles) so that you don't have to nick and soak and all that before the seeds are sown. Don't you just make more work for yourselves doing all that before sowing them? I mean, it's gonna happen anyway if the seeds are outside over-winter, right? I always thought that was the purpose of Winter sowing; to make less work for us and just let nature handle that stratification stuff. (I am a tried-and-true lazy gardener, can you tell?) ;)

This is cool, learning new ways to do stuff, thank you all for having patience with me while I learn. =) And yes, if you picture a 7-year-old in the classroom with her hand raised, asking the teacher "But, WHY!?!?"... that's me! =)
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 6, 2014
9:47 AM

Post #9741627

You're right Speedie, nicking and soaking would seem redundant if WS does it all for you. I have some seeds with special requirements -- double stratification. Instead of leaving these varieties out in containers for one warm cycle and one cold cycle I sped them up and warm/moist stratified for the required period and then I put out in the snow for the cold/moist.

I do have a milk jug with Lily of the Valley seeds that will be outside for the duration of the double cycle. I don't want to risk losing them to critters or insects.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 6, 2014
9:48 AM

Post #9741630

Speedie,
Thank you for the compliment. Depending on the type of seed, the reason for soaking is to remove the inhibiting factor that is in the seed coat that prevents sprouting. Every seed have that to one degree or another. This soaking and rinsing treatment is to remove the seed germination inhibitor present in the seed coat. Outdoors, the fall rains and melting snow in winter do the same thing over a 3 to 4 month period in order to break dormancy.

The seed inhibiting is nature's way of making sure that seeds don't sprout in unfavorable conditions to allow their survival. Generally speaking, hardy perennials takes longer to sprout than annuals. That is the reason why gardeners have to try to mimic nature with all sorts of tricks. But, as always, there are exceptions.

Soaking also softens the seeds coat to allow easier passage of moisture to the embroye. Usually overnight soaking is sufficient. For hard seeds such as iris, it is not. With some seeds, nicking first is required. Hibiscus, and morning glory seeds comes to mind.

And if that is not enough, many tree seeds and some perennials have a double dormancy. Without going into too much details, the flunctuating temp have to be repeated twice to break dormancy. Tree seeds can take 1+ years to sprout.

http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/index.htm

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 6, 2014
10:10 PM

Post #9742164

[quote="meadowyck"]Robin and Celene when is your plant sale planned for????? LOL[/quote]

DITTO!! Excellent work, ladies!! ^_^

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 7, 2014
2:57 AM

Post #9742198

That is a really excellent website, Blomma, thank you for sharing it. I wish there were links there to just the articles, I could get lost for days in those articles. ... but, I digress. ;)

I'm learning a LOT here in this discussion, thank you guys for bearing with me. So, the "double dormancy" seeds require both scarification and stratification, which can, in nature, take 2 years or longer to germinate... if not for the Loving Gardeners' hands... Am I understanding this correctly?

That may explain why my Pieris Japonica "Dorothy Wycoff" seeds did not germinate the first year I Winter Sowed them using the "traditional" (Milk Jug Sitting On The Deck All Winter) Winter Sowing method. I'll try to do some searching around for more info about those seeds when the internet is not so slow. (Dunno why it's acting so bogged down this morning).

Thank you again for putting up with me and my questions here; I am enjoying learning new things! =)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 7, 2014
7:49 AM

Post #9742366

For the seed that is super hard to germinate, I WS in pots and make sure they're well-labeled and hold them over 2 years. I got a mandrake seedling once that way. It germinated late, and wasn't large enough to overwinter with any amount of mulch.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 7, 2014
2:23 PM

Post #9742683

Celene ~ Do you have any mandrake growing now? (Double dormancy?)
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

January 7, 2014
5:44 PM

Post #9742869

This is zone 3 so too cold to grow Delosperma as a perennial.
Will do it as an annual-----starting under lights indoors.

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

January 7, 2014
6:09 PM

Post #9742886

CLScott,
Surprisingly, I can grow Delosperma in my zone 4 in spite of the recommended zone of 5. I have several cultivars and the first year I grew D. cooperi (red iceplant) I took cutting in late summer, potted them and grew them in a sunny window all winter. They got a bit lanky but they lived.

In April, I started more cuttings to plant in the garden with the parent plant. I have also grown it from seed---a slow process. Cuttings bloom quicker, starting in June in my climate.

1] D. cooperi
2] D. "Mesa Verde"
3] D. nubigenum, blooms in July
4] D. congestum, "Gold Nugget" blooms in May
5] D. "Starbright"

Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma   Thumbnail by blomma
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 7, 2014
6:37 PM

Post #9742900

I do not have mandrake growing now, but I did order some seed again. I've improved the soil in that bed, and I think I can fake a zone 7 there.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 7, 2014
8:32 PM

Post #9742970

Oh Blomma, your Delosperma are fabulous...especially "Gold Nugget", it's a beaut!

CLScott, take advantage of your micro-climates -- sheltered areas with warming rocks against a foundation etc...

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2014
3:04 AM

Post #9743032

Mipii, I was thinking the same thing; those micro-climates can make all the difference in the garden world. You can also assist in 'creating' a micro-climate by doing like Mipii said; if you don't already have warming rocks, add some; you can install other, more hardy, plants to provide protection from the elements while still allowing sunlight through. (open growth-habit shrubs -- perhaps a Forsythia along a South-facing wall? Maybe a nice Lilac, which requires a good heavy-duty cold in order to bloom?)

I've done something similar in my Western-facing front bed. It gets full sun there, so I sneaked a few, more shade-appreciating perennials behind/amongst the Jerusalem Cherries and Otto Luyken, and they are thriving happily. :)
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

January 8, 2014
5:46 AM

Post #9743121

Thanks to all for info on Delosperma.
Yes, some micro climates could do a WS.
Caroline
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2014
8:20 PM

Post #9743628

[quote="Celene"]I do not have mandrake growing now, but I did order some seed again. I've improved the soil in that bed, and I think I can fake a zone 7 there. [/quote]

Just curious...did you order your seeds from J.L.Hudson?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 15, 2014
6:51 AM

Post #9748317

To be honest, I am not sure. I certainly could have gotten them from JL Hudson, but I also remember maybe Horizon Herbs.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 26, 2014
6:41 PM

Post #9777556

Everyone's done wintersowing? I just got a few extra packs, and I'm adding in a late flat...

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

February 26, 2014
10:29 PM

Post #9777645

Celen, no I am still WS. My iris seeds are still outside in a bin on the north side of my house. They won't sprout until spring with 50 to 70 degrees---if it ever comes. Right now they are under 4" of snow.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2014
2:44 AM

Post #9777701

Depending on where ya are, and what you're sowing, you've still got some time to play - doesn't look like Spring is in any hurry to get here. < =/

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 27, 2014
3:39 AM

Post #9777722

That is for certain, we've got more snow and cold temperatures headed our way.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2014
2:01 PM

Post #9778931

We haven't had snow since December here. maybe the tides will turn and we will get snow all during spring...who knows? Often times we get snow in March, April and sometimes into May.

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 27, 2014
10:25 AM

Post #9799136

Wow some great lists ↑up↑ there!! I had initially planned on setting my jugs out Jan. 1 but ended up getting it done way later, Feb. 27! I also edited my list of 100 down to 59, with the majotlrity of them sown in your run of the milk milk jugs, and a few 2 liters for the ones that are notoriously resentful of transplanting or having long taproots.

Agastache Urticifolia, Giant hyssop 'Alba' (3)
Ageratine altissima, White snakeroot, 'Chocolate'
Amsonia hubrichtii, Hubricht's blue star
Armeria maritima, Sea thrift 'Alba'
Aruncus dioicus, Goats beard
Clematis terniflora, Sweet autumn clematis
Crocosmia 'Lucifer' (4)
Eupatorium altissimum, White joe pye weed 'Prairie Jewel'
Geum, Avens 'Mrs. Bradshaw' (3)
Heuchera, Coral bells 'Palace purple'
Hibiscus coccineus, Texas star hibiscus 'Red' (4)
Hibiscus coccineus, Texas star hibiscus 'Alba' (3)
Hosta, NOID
Knautia macedonica, scabiosa rumelica (3)
Lagarus ovatus, Hares tail grass
Lantana, NOID (Camara?)
Mirabilis jalapa, 4 o clocks, Tall Med. Pink
Mirabis jalapa, 4 o clocks, White & yellow mix
Orlaya grandiflora, Minoan Lace (3)
Papaver, NOID
Passiflora incarnata, Purple passionflower
Persicaria orientalis, Kiss me over the garden gate
Rudbeckia, Gloriosa daisy 'Double gold' (3)
Salvia azurea, Pitcher sage (3)
Salvia coccinea 'Coral nymph' (3)
Salvia coccinea, Red (3)
Stipa brachytricha, Korean feather reed grass
Veronica longifolia, Speedwell
Veronica spicata, Spike speedwell
Zinnia elegans 'Seņora'
Antirrhinum majus, Snapdragon (3)
Echinacea 'Cheyenne spirit'
Echinacea, NOID
Echinacea purpurea 'Pow wow white' (3)
Gomphrena globosa, Globe amaranth (4)
Impatiens balsamina, Balsam (3)
Ipomoea quamoclit, Red cypress vine (3)
Lavandula Vera, Lavender
Leucanthemum x superbum, Shasta daisy 'Alaska' (3)
Monarda, Beebalm, Light pink (4)
Monarda, Beebalm, Magenta
Muhlenbergia capillaris, Pink muhly grass
Perennial mix (3)
Portulaca grandiflora, Double moss rose, White (3)
Butterfly bush, NOID (4)
Stipa tenuissima, Mexican feather grass (4)
Achillea millefolium, Yarrow 'Cerise queen' (3)
Aquilegia, Columbine, NOID (near black)
Asclepias incarnata, Swamp milkweed 'Ice ballet'
Asclepias tuberosa, Butterfly milkweed, Yellow
Callicarpa Americana, American beautyberry
Cephalaria gigantea, Giant scabious
Cleome houtteana, Spider flower 'Rose queen' (3)
Conoclinium greggii, Gregg's mistflower
Cornus kousa, Kousa dogwood
Hesperaloe parviflora, False Yucca, Yellow
Physostegia virginiana, obedient plant
Sesbania vesicaria, Bladderpod sesbania
Vitex agnus-castus, Chaste tree (4)

Numbers in parenthesis are weeks to germination.

This message was edited Mar 27, 2014 11:40 AM
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2014
11:59 AM

Post #9799173

That's quite a list too Becky, can't wait to see/hear about everybody's results!

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 28, 2014
7:11 PM

Post #9800099

I took some pics with my iphone lens stuck right where the screw-on cap should be. So far, 25/59 jugs have germinated! I'm hooked for good now! With these higher temps (70-80) I've realized I need to water them once or twice a week, especially the ones that get a little more sun.

Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 28, 2014
8:31 PM

Post #9800141

Good job, lot's of action there! Did you have drainage holes in the bottom? Mine do not...just hoping that's not a crucial step.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 29, 2014
6:55 AM

Post #9800332

If you need to get drainage holes in your containers, a soldering iron is much easier than poking holes with a knife, if the container is already planted.

I have a few WS sprouts, but it's going to snow again today. Seriously. Ugh.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2014
7:42 AM

Post #9800379

Thanks Celene, I only want drainage holes if I absolutely need them. Sealed containers with the perfect amount of moisture added at the onset...kind of like the DINO method. At this point it's a wait and see if I screwed-up thing.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 29, 2014
8:11 AM

Post #9800401

I did that the first year, and I ended up with dry soil and condensation on the inside of the containers. One of the reasons I went to flats for WS.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2014
8:48 AM

Post #9800425

Robin - thanks, I'm such a proud mama right now! Yes those pics are from over a week ago, some of them have really taken off since then, especially the balsam. I used a 1/2" bit in a power drill to put four drainage holes in each jug.. one hole in each bottom corner. I would think that the containers would need to have drainage or you'd end up with soggy soil and possible rot. It seems like a lot of the failures I've experienced with gardening in general, not just WS, are due to watering issues. Either I over-water, under-water, don't provide enough drainage, provide too much drainage, do I add rocks to this crock and not another, blahblahblah, see I am constantly learning what NOT to do, school of hard knocks LOL

Celene, that's a good idea to use the soldering iron for adding drainage holes to already-planted containers. I hope your sprouted flats do okay with more snow headed your way.. I assume your flats have lids? Sorry, I know that's a stupid question, I am just very visual, and I imagine some of my sprouts would be pressed up against the roof of a shallow lid. Two mystery plants in my perennial mix are already a few inches tall!

Speaking of, my next hurdle will be trying to determine when is the right time to take the tops off my jugs. Is it a weather thing, to keep the seedlings from cooking inside the jug? Or is it a size thing, where the plants are literally outgrowing the confines of the jug (roots and/or tops)?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 29, 2014
9:14 AM

Post #9800450

I only have tiny sprouts, but they've survived with actual snow cover. The first year they did not die, I was amazed. I use regular 1020 flats with clear lids, and I move to the taller "greenhouse" style lids when the plants get bigger. If it's super cold, I may throw a layer of bubble wrap over the flats. Having the seedlings already in cells is easier for me.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2014
9:22 AM

Post #9800454

Oh Celene, you had to go and say that... I'm going to dismantle my containers and check now, although I'd have no idea if the seeds have rotted since the temps here aren't anywhere near germinating temps yet.

Lol Becky, hard knocks is the school I went to too, live and learn...and learn...

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 14, 2014
12:45 AM

Post #9811991

Celene, I can imagine it's very tidy looking with the flats. I like the visual I'm getting..

Yes Robin, I'm kind of a dunce here at the SOHK! Lol! I almost roasted all my jugs to death! And a few jugs look like they'll literally burst open if I don't plant them soon! Ai ai ai never enough hours in the day..

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 14, 2014
2:30 AM

Post #9812007

Still, got any photos of your near-to-bursting milk jugs please? < =) I love the look of Winter-sown containers full of little babies ready to be planted out!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 14, 2014
5:37 AM

Post #9812080

Mine are sprouting, but no flats bursting with seedlings. Yet. lol
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2014
8:34 AM

Post #9812279

Celene, you're ahead of me! I checked on mine, they have condensation, enough moisture but no sprouts yet...

I'll wait an hour and check again.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 14, 2014
8:53 AM

Post #9812304

Okay here are my worst jug busters! Lol first is the perennial mix, I think I see a lupine in there? Second pic is the impatiens balsamina, I really can't decide where I wanna plant these.. Anyone grow them before?Do they look better as a group or peppered here and there among other plants? Last pic is ipomoea quamoclit, red cypress vine.

Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2014
9:58 AM

Post #9812384

Those are bursting! You're such a good WS'er, I bet you're hooked now.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 14, 2014
10:16 AM

Post #9812405

Ha, not good yet, only half my jugs germinated. And aside from this freak cold front we are experiencing today, temps should be back up in the 80s again this weekend. Hardly the weather for winter sowing LOL

But hooked, yes I am! And my first WS 4 o clock came up this week, so I may get a few more jugs to sprout after all :)
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2014
10:45 AM

Post #9812431

Sounds good -- good job!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 14, 2014
7:24 PM

Post #9812905

Okay, I love I. balsamina. I like them weaving in and out of borders, or in groups. They also look palm tree-ish in a large container.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2014
8:36 PM

Post #9812960

I'm gonna try I. balsamina for the first time, I thought it was tropical and didn't need to be cold stratified. Was I wrong? Celene, how did you sow it?

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 15, 2014
5:10 AM

Post #9813149

Robin, it didn't need to be wintersowed, but I had so many seeds I wanted to try. I looked up each one in various WS databases and made a list of everything that could handle this method of sowing. I still have about 40 packets that could have been WS but they are more the native varieties and my "weeds" I love so much.. They are getting their own "wild" bed later this year.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2014
11:28 AM

Post #9813483

Well its good to know I didn't miss my chance for Balsam this year...thanks Becky!

I don't have the room to have specific beds, I just get to artfully mash them altogether. If its a good looking weed, it stays. If it becomes a problem, it goes.

I did dig a new bed last year and hope to share pics with you guys later in the season...even though my efforts are woefully smaller in scope than you guys, I'm hoping to get some 'bang' for my buck!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 15, 2014
7:50 PM

Post #9813840

I. balsamina does not require cold stratification, it just wintersows easily and saves me the indoor space for plants that need warmth for germination.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2014
9:34 PM

Post #9813889

Thanks Celene, even though I get an answer, I equally appreciate another point of view! I'm always learning, I guess if I wasn't...I'd be dead...

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 18, 2014
3:13 PM

Post #9815859

Wow Still, they really ARE bursting with babies, huh? They all look excellent!!

Mipii, always learning is the fun of it, huh? :)

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 18, 2014
5:09 PM

Post #9815926

Haha yes robin I do the same, I discovered wild cleome here last year and it was the star of my bed midsummer when everything else couldn't take the heat!

Thanks speedie!
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 18, 2014
5:47 PM

Post #9815945

You bet Speedie, something to look forward to everyday! When my jugs grow up they want to look just like SPWD's.


Edited because I couldn't spell 'to'!

This message was edited Apr 18, 2014 7:49 PM
cytf
Staten Island, NY

April 19, 2014
5:16 PM

Post #9816691

Here in my zone balsamania reseeds itself every year , I cannot get rid of them so I just incorporate them in my garden beds and they are beautiful and they transplant very nicely.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 19, 2014
5:34 PM

Post #9816701

Mine reseed as well, but this year I purchased some seeds for fancy flowers--spotted and swirled. They're good to fill a blank spot in a bed...where a perennial is sleeping or creeping, filling in after spring ephemerals, etc.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 20, 2014
8:14 AM

Post #9817060

Lol okay great to know! Ooh spotted and swirled!
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 20, 2014
8:23 AM

Post #9817068

Yes good to know info, I'm in the zone neighborhood of CYTF and Celene. Celene, you're gonna have to brace yourself for some whining...we're gonna want to see pics of those babies!

You know...just to ooh and ahh.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 20, 2014
10:27 AM

Post #9817154

It's a little early for sprouts, but maybe you guys can help me combine colors for the Mango Twist. I am not good with the whole peach/orange thing.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 20, 2014
11:38 AM

Post #9817174

Peach and orange go great alongside blue and yellow...heck, there are no rules. Give us a snapshot of your bed when it's blooming.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 20, 2014
1:44 PM

Post #9817210

Celene, I learned to pair complimentary colors by consulting the color wheel. Since peach is a combination of orange and yellow, according to the color wheel, it would look best paired with a bluish purple. Maybe hydrangea, mainacht salvia or purple delphinium would look good. Ornamental grasses look good everywhere, and you can't go wrong with white flowers also.. They go with everything.. Like the little black dress of the plant kingdom :)

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 21, 2014
1:44 AM

Post #9817545

[quote="StillPlaysWDirt"]Like the little black dress of the plant kingdom :)[/quote]
LOL, perfect description!! =)

Yes, the colour wheel is the perfect way to see what colour combos we like!! You could do like Still says and use complimentary colours (those found on the opposite side of the colour wheel) - blues/ violet-blues would be on the opposite side of the wheel from peachy colours. Or, you could go with a couple adjacent colours, to create a harmonizing 'flow'. Or you could use what they call the 'colour triad', using 3 colours that are evenly spaced around the colour wheel... so for your peach colour, there would be a blue/green and then a "hot" pinky-purpley-violet.

The fun part of it all is that there is no "wrong" answer, it's just... whatever you like! =)
cytf
Staten Island, NY

April 21, 2014
9:18 AM

Post #9817869

Transplanted some of my winter sowed lettuce yesterday, it was a nice 55 degree day.

Thumbnail by cytf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 21, 2014
2:56 PM

Post #9818155

That looks yummy cytf!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

April 23, 2014
7:55 PM

Post #9820121

poppy and lettuce from wintersow Garlic with ground ivy , yes weeds already , I posted this on a few other threads , only because I'm happy ^_^

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 24, 2014
10:15 AM

Post #9820439

Cytf, love the WS lettuce, reminds me of healthy fast food :)

Juhur, you should be happy! You are a seed germinating machine! LOL

Pic time! First one is my jugs that need potting up already, next is the jugs that sprouted, but either waiting for more sprouts or they're still too small to handle. Last one is all the jugs that are left, I'm still waiting for signs of life.. Wouldn't you know some of my "most wanted" are sitting there doing nothing, giggling quietly whenever I walk by..

Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt   Thumbnail by StillPlaysWDirt      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

April 24, 2014
11:00 AM

Post #9820468

SPWD (Becky) ( my first glance was ; Wow what I set up you have !!! ^_^ ) could not get near that many here ,lol When they all grow though , there are very few satisfactions that compare !^_^ Seems that happens frequently to me also , the one (s) you want most seem to not happen , only disappointment in seed starting ..
My devices and machines , are like yours , jugs and cans , people here were correct the jugs worked better this time .. That above and some onions is about all the success I have really had ,, slow happening year for me ,here .

This message was edited Apr 24, 2014 2:03 PM

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 25, 2014
7:44 AM

Post #9821192

Aw Ju, well at least it's early season for you still. Seems I missed the early planting and may have a lean garden this year (veggie harvests anyway..). What to sow now is the question? You know, I'm second in line to get the robin next!!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2014
7:32 PM

Post #9822754

SWPD (Becky) I thought I answered this , I must of missed something , O h , Yeah ,, and that Robin is Flying (C- Heavy ... I am trying about all I can deal with
Some for me , Bunches for Butterflies ..
Alfalfa , Buckwheat , today , Moved a Spicebush , that is not looking to good , to a more (hopefully) favorable location . things are coming along , With more to come ,
A few in the Wintersow cans look okay , but overall , that failed this year , Looks like a Scabiosa , Campanula , and perhaps an elderberry might be all ..
Do have a clematis cutting returning though ,, yea ...^_^

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 26, 2014
9:08 PM

Post #9822814

Yes the milk jugs worked great, and my family drinks 4 of them a week so I'll start saving and scrounging them in October or so to get my 100 for next year. I used 2 liter coke bottles for the ones that are notorious for disliking their roots being disturbed, or have a long taproot.

I did learn that gorilla tape is the way to go if you don't plan on opening up the container much before it's time to flip your lid. I was able to re-secure it afterward, but in my opinion, it was way too sticky to work with. Will just use a boxcutter to slice the tape on the container next time.

What kind of butterfly plants do you like? Any and all? We have so many wild milkweeds here. Asclepias asperula I think? Maybe asclepias viridis, can't remember right now. Anyway, if you like I can send you seeds this summer. They are host plants for monarchs so I'm happy we have thousands of these plants all over the place so far this year. One year we had so many butterflies they hung on the branches of one particular tree so thick, the leaves appeared to have an orange, autumn-like color. This was before their numbers declined :(

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2014
10:04 PM

Post #9822840

That is Syrica , my garden )in my Avatar .This year , mostly weed viewing for Butterfly host plants. I am finding a few ,usually more than I need ..
I will be back to talk type more . I want to read zones before I answer ..
cytf
Staten Island, NY

April 29, 2014
7:37 PM

Post #9825698

StillPlaysWDirt, I had a good chuckle about your jugs are just giggling as you pass by , you are really funny. I usually have good luck with lettuce every year. Out of the 12 jugs I sowed only 3 do not have great results.One of them I got 4 Basil seeds to sprout but I am pleased with that because I just plant them between my tomato plants to warn of bugs.

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 30, 2014
8:12 PM

Post #9826660

Ok Ju, just lmk if you want some, I'll collect a lot so I can share.

Cytf, Nooooo.. now you're laughing too!! LOL!! Good job on the lettuce, I'm making a note of that so I can WS mine this year too!!

StillPlaysWDirt

StillPlaysWDirt
(Becky), Lipan, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 1, 2014
12:07 PM

Post #9827170

Well I spent the last 2 days dividing WS jugs.. Some for me to keep, and some to share with other DGers at my first Roundup in a few weeks :))

So far, I've done 36 Hibiscus coccineus (18 each of white & red), 10 salvia coccinea 'coral nymph', 10 salvia azurea, and 6 orlaya grandiflora. Have tons more to do, but figured I'd get the roundup offerings a headstart above the others.

Some of these plants were so easy to WS, I still can't believe I waited so long to try this out, great success :))
cytf
Staten Island, NY

May 2, 2014
10:24 AM

Post #9827907

I did Hibiscus too and was really surprised to see a few germinating, because I read on the net that they are suppose to be sowed in spring.Well I am happy to have a few to give to my garden club friend .

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America