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Vegetable Gardening: Anaheim Peppers

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Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 8, Views: 89
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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 19, 2014
6:14 PM

Post #9793441

We had a wonderful Anaheim Pepper we purchased as a plant last summer. I saved some of the seeds. Will the seed be relatively true to the flavor of the Anaheim Pepper, or is there a big possibility of the pepper being really hot? I hate to take up space in my garden and spend a summer waiting for an Anaheim Pepper, and it be really hot.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 20, 2014
5:53 AM

Post #9793653

Anaheim pepper should be OP. So it should resemble last years plant.
On the heat, weather conditions play a part, so may not be the same.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 20, 2014
6:58 PM

Post #9794228

Thank you for the information. We really liked the Anaheim's last year. I used the seeds and all with just the right amount of heat for us.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 20, 2014
7:55 PM

Post #9794274

What he means is that the weather temps can affect the heat of the pepper. Hot, dry weather will give you hotter peppers.

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2014
6:48 PM

Post #9820055

I grew jalapeņos in North Dakota which was the opposite of hot & dry. They weird mild. You can't do much about heat waves, but try to keep your garden including your peppers mulched and evenly moist. Drought stress can turn various veggies hot &/or bitter.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 23, 2014
7:06 PM

Post #9820068

Most people that grow Jals want them hot, that's what they are "hot" peppers so by holding back on watering ( if possible) you have a much better chance of getting hot peppers. Keeping the soil moist will lessen the heat in the pepper.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 24, 2014
5:17 PM

Post #9820729

Do you think that hot peppers grown in Earthboxes (with steady water, by design) will lose heat? I'm growing a cayenne and Maui Purple in an Earthbox. I don't think a little moderation would hurt me, since I don't use SUPER hot peppers anyway.

DTR

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 25, 2014
6:33 AM

Post #9821123

I don't think you could make a hot pepper into a mild pepper in Texas. My peppers in North Dakota were unusual, I never had that happen anywhere else I lived. Gardening in North Dakota was really different for a lot of plants - the days were cooler but longer - a full hour longer than Colorado.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2014
11:45 AM

Post #9821353

David, other people I know that have grown hot peppers in EBs never mentioned that the fruit was any different. I guess we shall see...

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