Tomatos have not flowered yet.

Kensington, NY

Here are pictures of tomato leaves, the fern-ier ones are very tall, grow straight up, and have no flowers at all yet.
HeatherY

Thumbnail by HeatherY Thumbnail by HeatherY Thumbnail by HeatherY
Everett, WA(Zone 8a)

They sure look healthy!

You might stop giving any additional nitrogen, and next year give them less N to start with.

If they are already very tall, and that vigorous, but have no flowers at all, maybe they already got more N than they really needed and are putting all their energy into covering the earth with leaves instead of making fruits and seeds.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Too much Nitrogen

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

Try taking a dish towel and beating them a bit- it simulates rough spring weather and makes them think they are dying- that might help and is worth a try.
How large is the pot they are in? Is it sitting on concrete? if not they might try rooting under the pot so dont move them.

Saylorsburg, PA(Zone 6a)

Try feeding them with some liquid bonemeal.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Great idea. I have to ask what type of tomato are the fernier ones?

Saylorsburg, PA(Zone 6a)

I would like to know what the fernier ones are too! Also how long has it been since these tomatoes were transplanted? Not sure where Kensington, NY is but up until recently you probably had cooler nights than normal just as we have in NE Pa. So many things can play a role but I like the suggestion of the others that it may be too much nitrogen.

I think some tomatoes just take longer than others to produce flowers. I have 47 varieties this summer and there are still some that have not set flowers. They are in straw bales and were fed the same stuff as the rest of the tomatoes that are already blossoming. Several of them are potato leaf if that makes a difference. They certainly did not get more nitrogen than the rest. Time will tell!

Kensington, NY

Hi there everybody!
In no real order here are answers
-Kensington is in Brooklyn New York it is a neighborhood name.
_The Fernier Ones are volunteers/ winter survivors from last years crop of indeterminate
cherry tomatoes theat grea all over the place and produced more fruit than the me, my family the birds and the bugs could eat!

The others, BTW, are Wisconsin 55's I started from seed.
there could be some of this strain a neighbor gave me the produced standard size
tomatoes with a sort of point on the bottom they mostly filled out as they grew.

They are not in a pot. I have only fetilized recently one or tow times this season via
a foliar/rootmiracle grow thingy - the blue crystals that dissolve on water.

A real storm just beat em up a bit.( Bye Arthur!)

HeatherY

Charleston, SC(Zone 9a)

I don't think those volunteers (the fern-leaf ones) are actually tomatoes. Sorry, but I'm pretty sure that's a weed.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

funny ... I was just thinking the same ... I never seen these kind of tomato leaves ... but still lots too learn.
Let us know if you will get fruits from that plant.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

The first photo appears to be a weed. You don't list your zone in your info but I can figure out your location. I was late in planting, by a month, and am just now having tomatoes flower and set, including cherries. Don't do anything besides exercise patience.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I'm not sure it's a weed but I don't think it's a tomato plant. I could very well be wrong only time will tell.

Charleston, SC(Zone 9a)

Looks like annual ragweed, something you don't want to cultivate, especially if you have seasonal allergies.

Here is the Plant Files entry: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/32136/

Here is a closeup pic: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=1459012

Google images for ragweed: https://www.google.com/search?q=annual+ragweed&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=p5m6U5-6EYiSyASExIG4Dg&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQsAQ&biw=1118&bih=643

Kensington, NY

Thanks for the link, Dream. Maypop, 1lisac, I am going to have another close look at those
ferny plants!

I have a stack of allergies- pollen, mold, pet dander ( if I have never met your pet before- I have three cats and I'm fine with them)... also allergic to strong chemical smells and many pesticides.
I am in zone 7-A--I don't know why it does not say so.
We had a long cool Spring and a warm not hot early Summer. Mom's pansies are looking better than they have any right to look in July..
best
Heather

Kensington, NY

I have a thought - could they be marigolds?

Charleston, SC(Zone 9a)

Did you compare the foliage in your 1st pic (top of thread) with that in some of the closeups from my links? Likewise, did you do similar [side by side] comparisons with marigold foliage? You can find pics of various types of marigolds (including foliage) in PlantFiles and also via google images; you can use these pics to compare with your pic to search for something identical.

I still say it's ragweed. I checked it against a number of different varieties of marigold foliage, and, while a few were close, none were identical - but ragweed foliage is identical.

Can you estimate the height of the fern-leaf foliage? In one of the 1st few posts (top of thread), you described the foliage as being very tall and straight with a single trunk. Most marigolds top out at 2-3ft, while annual ragweed grows to a height of 4-6ft, usually with a single trunk.

Charleston, SC(Zone 9a)

You could post some pics of your fern-leaf plant in the Plant ID Forum to see what the folks over there think it is. You will probably get an definitive ID over there. There are a number of people in that forum who specialize in plant related fields of study. If you decide to do this, that 1st pic attached to your initial post is a good one to post for ID along with another pic showing a side view of the plant (if you can get one).

Charleston, SC(Zone 9a)

Just wanted to add one more thing. While I still think it is ragweed, I could certainly be wrong. I'm an engineer and software developer with just enough plant knowledge to be dangerous, as this is not my area of expertise. In the Plant ID forum you will usually get 2 or more plant specialists who will 'duke it out', 'arguing' in scientific terms about things like whether the leaves are alternate vs opposite, compound vs simple, etc, etc, until they come to consensus as to what it is - either that or they will just all agree from the start. Either way, in most cases, you should get a definite answer fairly quickly over there.

As to your tomato plants, I agree with what has been said already. Switch to a low nitrogen fertilizer and then wait. They should bloom and set fruit soon. Approximately how tall are the tomato plants, and do you know roughly how long it has been since you transplanted them into the garden? I think you said you had been using the blue Miracle Grow that you mix with water. If it's the regular Miracle Grow, it's 10-10-10. It would be better to change to something with a lower 1st number (and/or higher 2nd number). I started my tomatoes with regular MG, but then switched to Miracle Grow bloom booster after the plants were about 2ft tall. I now have lots of blooms and some green tomatoes, so that worked. (Mine started to bloom after about a month in the ground.)

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

That sure does look like ragweed to me also!

Kensington, NY

Hey everyone!
Mystery plants are about three feet tall. I pulled a bunch today that might have been shading the tomatoes.

The variety of marigolds I suspect is Nematocidal Marigolds, I tried searching on the plant files
and got way way too many responses to look though- I have got to get the Latin name from the
package if I can find it. BTW those marigolds got really really tall before they popped up small yellow flowers.

Thanks for the fertilizer advice, esp the MG.

Kensington, NY

Tomatoes starting to flower at last!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Good grief! Now you need to have warm enough weather to enjoy those tomatoes.

Kensington, NY

The weather's FINE...!
I love *this polar vortex-highs in the mid eighties not the low hundreds, and the nights are cool with a sweet breeze!
HY

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

Here ya go Heather :)

Good luck and happy gardening!

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

Oh shoot, where's that link I posted?? Let's try this again.. The plant files listing for your nematocidal marigolds:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/31792/#b

Charleston, SC(Zone 9a)

Sorry guys, but I still think the mystery plants are ragweed. I don't mean to be difficult. Just calling them as I see them. I see the similarities between the foliage of the 2 plants, but the leaves of the plant in the photo at top are not identical to those of the specified marigold. My money is still on ragweed. One thing is for sure. When it finally blooms, and I'm guessing that will occur around September, you will know for sure which plant you have.

Kensington, NY

Hmm, well I have just little ones now- I yanked all those tall ones out of the tomato patch because they were too tall and blocking the tomatoes' sunshine . Don't know what ragweed does, but the marigold I remember got very very tall before it ever dreamed about blooming

Well I will see if I can plant a small one in the direct sun and get it to grow and bloom. If it is the marigold I want seeds.
Heather

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

Well if they do indeed turn out to be the nematocidal marigolds, I'd love to trade for some seed :))

Kensington, NY

Stay tuned, Still Plays!

I love your DG Handle...I want it on a Tee shirt, to go along with the one my guy wears - he works driving the G train for NYC Transit ( the Subway) so his tee shirt says
" Still Plays with Trains"

Heathery

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

Funny Heather, I saw it on a tshirt before I "borrowed" it ;))

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I love a mystery even if it has to do with plants. Lol I'll be interested to see what the mystery plants actually is.

Emmett, ID

It's August and time to lop off the tops of your tomato plants!

AND cut back on the water a bit too.

No matter what stage your tomato plants are in, no blossoms or baby tomatoes or what, when you lop off the tops EVERY AUGUST NO MATTER WHAT, your plants will get all excited and decide -- finally -- to reproduce, by making wonderful tomatoes.

It's always surprising how many people don't know that.

By cutting the water back a bit too, you are super concentrating their flavor too.

Have fun!

Staten Island, NY(Zone 6a)

Thanks MtnMam, I will take your advice and top of my tomatoes plants .I was really getting sad to see my plants were seem to stop producing .Will let you know what the results are.

Kensington, NY

Thanks from me too! How far down do you cut them?
Mine are btw all over the map:blooming, budding, some green tomatoes. Lop off the tops and they get busy, huhn?
This is wonderfully convenient for the indeterminate cherries, which produce like crazy but also grow all over the place before they do. Tomato time!

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

I didn't lop the tops off of my tomatoes, but I did get rid of all unhealthy looking foliage from the bottom and worked my way up. The tops are the healthiest looking parts of the plants now, and growing taller every day. This works well for me as I'm training them up an arch, and each one is blooming like mad again :))

Emmett, ID

Hi all, so nice to be talking with intelligent people!

Yes, topping tomato plants, every branch, about 2 inches or so off makes the tomato plants realize something bad is going on, so truly, they know they MUST finish ripening their seeds (I.e., ripe tomatoes), or they will not reproduce.

Be sure to cut back on the watering too. Let the ground dry couple inches from the top and it hurries the process as well as give you outstanding tomato tastes. Best of luck to you smart people!
M

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I think a lot of the growing techniques vary with where you live. It is in the 100s here so there is no way I could cut back on watering the ground dries out daily. I'm also growing some in Earthboxes, this is my first yr, but there is no way to cut back on water using those.

I would never think of topping mine, not in this area anyway. Starter plants are for sale now so there is time for a whole other crop of tomatoes, at least here in the South. So far all of my plants have survived this Texas summer and are still producing. I want the plants as big as possible to produce as many tomatoes as possible. I have 75 plants and my fall harvest is usually my largest....we are not in any rush for tomatoes to ripen, in this area.

MtnMam, what zone are you in? If your interested there is a Tomato Forum on DG where many Tomato Gurus offer their expert advice.

I have never heard of topping tomatoes at this time of year in this area. Here we would do that in Oct. maybe.

(Becky), Lipan, TX(Zone 7b)

Lisa you have 75 plants?? Wow that is a lot! 😮

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Yes, I'm nuts, I know it. Lol that's one reason I don't plant out until the weather is stable. I just can't protect that many plants and there has been more then one time that no freeze was predicted but I woke up and the temps were below 32*.

Last year I planted 4 plants early, the soil was still cool, and the plants just sat there. I think they produced 1 week earlier then the plants that went out a month later. I'm surprised that my plants are still setting fruit but when I pull out the spent flowers there are little tomato buttons in the there. This summer hasn't been really hot until this last week and the next week doesn't look much better. The long Beans are just starting to bloom and set....they love this heat.

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