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Starting elephant ears from tubers in the greenhouse

Oxdrift, Canada

It's been 5 weeks today since I started 48 elephant ear tubers in my greenhouse. I finally have one tiny leaf. I have been doing this on an annual basis for many years. I keep records of when I start things but unfortunately I don't keep records like how long before the first leaf shows. I know it has always been a slow process but I guess I forgot it was this slow. Once that first leaf shows they usually go great guns. It is still over a month before I can put them out here so I am probably fine. Has anyone been doing this who can offer any suggestions on tips to speed up this process?

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Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Wow that's dedication!
I've never planted Elephant Ears, but you now have a record of how long it took. By looking on your "My Info" page under the threads you've started, you can find this one that tells you the date.

Some people also use their DG Journals.

Oxdrift, Canada

Good to hear from you Nuts. I have been reading some of your comments on the DG UPDATES forum but I don't have enough history to get involved in THOSE discussions. Too much negativeness. I prefer to discuss growing stuff.
Keith

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Believe me, you're much better off. Growing stuff and love of nature is why most of us joined in the first place.

Although I sometimes comment in those threads, I came to the conclusion a long time ago that no matter how upbeat I try to be I won't change the minds of those that want to be negative.

Stick with your garden. From the pics I've seen it's beautiful!


This message was edited May 3, 2016 10:15 PM

Oxdrift, Canada

It's amazing what a difference a week of serious heat can make. Like I said, they go great guns once they start but it takes a lot of patience to get to this point. Today is 6 weeks

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Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

What will you do with them? They are border line hardy in Atlanta. I had a stand in a protected corner of the yard that came back every year and eventually grew to about two meters high! I started with tubers the size of grapefruits. We had a colder than usual winter one year that killed the stand. I am currently looking for a Mojito for my pond.

Oxdrift, Canada

I have a very large yard with quite a few shady areas where I treat them as annuals and lift in the fall. They get about 3 feet tall here with huge leaves. They can make this Zone 3 garden look quit tropical. I am not using the whole 48 myself. I gave my youngest daughter some last year and she has requested MORE this year.

Oxdrift, Canada

The only shareable photos I have are from 2015 in my cell phone and looks like I didn't focus on elephant ears. The only one I could find was this one taken very early when the Hostas were in their splendour. Hopefully you can see them. They were pretty small yet.

This message was edited May 9, 2016 8:54 AM

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Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Bet that was beautiful when it filled in during your annual two weeks of warm weather, Ox. :>) Are hostas hardy up there?Though I've been in Georgia for many years I'm a South Florida native. Imagine the size of ears with almost year 'round heat.

Oxdrift, Canada

Most Hostas are in their glory here. There may be a few exotic ones that may want a warmer zone bur most are very happy here

Oxdrift, Canada

2016 crop at maturity

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Lake Stevens, WA(Zone 8a)

Very nice, so Tropical!
I think of Canada as Bilingual (English and French), but perhaps things are Trilingual in Oxdriftgarden?

Oxdrift, Canada

Sorry Pistil, I'm a little DENSE. Took me a while to get the Trilingual comment. Must be the sign in the Japanese garden. My daughter made it way back when the garden was first born. One word is Growth and the other is Nature. Don't know which is which but I like it
Keith

Lake Stevens, WA(Zone 8a)

I like it too!

Belleville , IL(Zone 6b)

Bottom heat would most likely make the tubers awake faster from dormancy. Just a hunch and have no idea how to create that.
When I lived in Alabama zone 7 for a while I grew some plants that spread from runners that I have no idea what type they were. They looked like Elephant ears except did not have tubers.They were perennials there also.

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