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SOLVED: ID for New Mexico plant

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7a)

I live in Albuquerque and have spotted this plant at several homes in our area. It appears to be a sort of succulent with bright yellow flowers and seems to attract bees which makes it interesting for me. Can anyone tell me what this is?

Thumbnail by june_nmexico Thumbnail by june_nmexico
Raleigh, NC(Zone 7b)

Looks like Euphorbia rigida (or possibly another species, there are a lot of them!)

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7a)

Thank you, Tom. Here in the desert with ongoing water restrictions it is hard to find garden "survivors" and since several people have them I thought I might have a chance!

Just did a quick Google search and what I'm looking for seems to be Euphorbia amygdaloides. You are right -- there are a lot of varieties!


This message was edited Mar 19, 2017 12:13 PM

Göppingen, Germany(Zone 7b)

I don't think it's amygdaloides - that one is no succulent and tends to struggle in my tame middle-european summers - rigida should be closer to your needs.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7a)

Thank you, pmmGarak. I'll have some research to do. New Mexico is high altitude, low humidity and very hot summers. Our weather is more friendly to wild life than plant life!

Raleigh, NC(Zone 7b)

Compare the foliage... Euphorbia rigida has more lanceolate and grey/glaucous leaves than E. amygdaloides.

Contra Costa County, CA(Zone 9b)

I think that now you are at least in the correct species you can ask the local nurseries which does best in your area.
Check the overall size, too. Some get larger, some are dwarfs.

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