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Recipes: MaVie's Brined Turkey

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tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 26, 2001
9:58 PM

Post #20118

Brine:
2 gal. water
1 cup salt
1 cup brown sugar or 1-1/2 cup granulated [white]
sugar
1 head garlic, crushed
1-1/2 tablespoon whole black pepper
3 bay leaves

In a large pot large enough to hold the turkey,
combine all of the brine ingredients and stir to dissolve salt & sugar.
Add the turkey to the pot, cover. Refrigerate or leave outside in the cold for 8 - 10 hrs.
Remove the turkey from pot, rinse turkey well,
discard the brine.
Pat dry with paper towel. Rub with olive oil or
butter. set aside.

Roast turkey:
1 [10-12 lbs] turkey
1 small onion, quartered
2 celery rib or stalk, cut in 2" length
2-4 parsnips [white carrot], cut in 2" length
2-4 carrots, cut in 2" length

Preheat oven to 400 degrees for 15-20 mins.
Place all veggies inside
baking pan. place baking rock inside the baking
pan. place turkey in
the baking pan, breast facing down. bake for 1
hr. take turkey pan out, turn the breast side up. bake for another hr. watch closely after 45
min. if turkey browning too fast, lower the temp
to 375 degs. baked till evenly brown. Once evenly browned, about 2 hrs. later, take turkey out of the oven.
allow to rest for 30 mins. prior to cutting.

notes:
since my oven is not properly calibrated, oven
door does not close shot,

i leave temp to 400 degs all the way. be mindful
of how ur oven works.
i calculated 20 mins. per lb of turkey for cooking time. it is a good idea to take bones off the
turkey, prior to serving. this way too, u can cut
nice pieces or be able to freeze some for future use.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 26, 2001
10:18 PM

Post #183261

Thanks tiG! appreciate that. now i can make it for the New Year celebration. am sure all the kids will love it.

edited to update the brine solution. only to make ingredients easier and simplify the ingredients, if not readily available.
this recipe is edited and updated to have all instructions in one place. this is done for those who does not want to go through the entire thread. i know it is long, sorry, but there are lots of tip also incorporated in the thread, not only from me but from others too. thanks everyone!!!!

Brine:
2 gal. cold water
1 cup salt
1 cup brown sugar or 1-1/2 cup granulated [white] sugar
1 head garlic, cut horizonally across middle
1 [1 oz.] packet Pickling Spice [available in the Latino herb section in all grocery stores.]

i used either a stock pot or a properly cleaned white 5 gal. bucket for brining.
place water inside the bucket or stock pot.
add the sugar and salt. take a wooden spoon and stir vigorously to blend both salt and sugar into the water.
add the pickling spices.
place the frozen turkey into the bucket.
brining depends on ur personal preference/s, the area where u live.
i brine for 3 days cuz that is how long it take for the turkey to thaw in my area.

Roast turkey:
1 [10-12 lbs] turkey
1 small onion, quartered
2 celery rib or stalk, cut in 2" length
2-4 parsnips [white carrot], cut in 2" length
2-4 carrots, cut in 2" length

Preheat oven to 400 degrees for 15-20 mins.
Place all veggies in baking pan.
Place baking rack inside the baking pan.
Put turkey breast down on the baking rack.
Roast for 1 hr., pull pan out, to facilitate turning the baking pan for even cooking roasting.
Pull out baking pan, turn turkey to have the breast facing up.
Roast for another hr: watch closely after 45 min. if turkey browning too fast, lower the temp to 375 degs. baked till evenly brown. Once evenly browned, about 2 hrs. later, take turkey out of the oven. cover with foil to retain the heat inside the roasted turkey.
Allow to rest for 30 mins. prior to cutting.*

notes:
since my oven is not properly calibrated, plus oven door does not close properly, i leave temp to 400 degs all the way. be mindful of how ur oven works! i calculated 20 mins. per lb of turkey for cooking time.

it is a good idea to take bones off the turkey, prior to serving. this way too, u can cut nice pieces or be able to freeze some for future use.

* any meat roasted in the oven, should be allowed to rest to avoid the juices from oozing out of the meat.

** do not worry about the salt and sugar content, the finished product will NOT be salty or sweet. the use of salt and sugar is only produce a moist and balance flavor on the turkey or meat [depending on what u are brining].

This message was edited Nov 8, 2006 2:28 PM
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2002
3:38 AM

Post #385974

bumping up for the holiday preparation. i like to prepare ahead of time to plan the holidays menu. maybe some will give this recipe a try.
Sqwidgetz
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

October 20, 2002
3:30 AM

Post #388943

Just a note of caution: Use anunadulterated turkey for this. Most turkeys, such as Butterball, are so full of chemicals,
tiG,


i've always just brined with salt and water and then roasted with white wine and butter and various spices. I can't wait to try your recipe. I'll probably try it with a chicken first though. I'm not sure who is hosting TG Day this year.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 20, 2002
4:11 AM

Post #388960

adulterated or un-adulterated poultry, are all the same to me, i always wash the poultry/meat/fish in lemon and salt. then rinse thoroughly.

rinsing poultry, meat and/or seafood >>> always an assurance for any flavoring to penetrate into the meat/fish, specially when marinating or long slow cooking. using lemon and salt to rinse has been a common practice for centuries in Asian and So. American cooking!

sugar has been suggested for the brine, cuz not all cooks uses wine in cooking. sugar in this instance, does not have effect on the brining method. sugar has been used for balancing the flavor of the poultry.

this recipe worked for chickens too. believe me, i did a lot of test prior to sharing this recipe.
Sqwidgetz
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

October 20, 2002
4:32 AM

Post #388966

Never tried the lemon and salt, just used regular water! YEAH!!! more cooking tips! I'm always on the lookout for ways to be a better cook. Someday, I hope to go to the chef school in Scottsdale, AZ.

I don't agree with the "treated" turkeys being the same, however. They have a weird aftertaste and texture.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 20, 2002
4:49 AM

Post #388969

if u're interested in cooking tips, u should see all the post i have on recipes. i do pass on some tips here and there.

i never buy 'treated anything'! all my cooking method is from scratch. i learned cooking from both my grandmothers [1 is of Chinese origin, whilst the other 1 is of Spanish origin], plus all the experiences i learned and developed when i had a restaurant and catering business.

i never had any formal education in cooking, except from personal experiences. most of my cooking is based on all natural products. i do grow my own herbs and veggies when time permits.
lupinelover
Grove City, OH
(Zone 6a)


November 14, 2002
11:19 PM

Post #409880

A lot of the turkeys sold here are "pre-basted". They are injected with a solution of oil and water in an attempt to keep them moister during roasting. It doesn't work well, tho. I also try to avoid the food items that have been treated, because I have a lot of food allergies.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2002
11:36 PM

Post #409896

i liked buying turkey in Asian stores. one has to make an appointment for the day of pick-up when they prepare the turkey on scheduled apptmt. that way i know i do get fresh turkey. sometimes, i buy them live and i dressed or clean them myself.

when i was a teenager, i used to raise and operate my own poultry farm.

or if not, order turkey from a regular butcher and give the butcher my specification to the turkey i am buying. make friends with ur local butcher. u'll be surprise with the extra service they give in return.

edited to correct spelling error.

This message was edited Nov 18, 2003 4:56 PM

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 16, 2002
10:32 AM

Post #410794

I have been wanting to try brining for several years and what a great idea to start with a chicken!!! I think I may try this recipe this week. thanks for it MaVie...

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 17, 2002
12:59 AM

Post #411334

Can you deep fry a brined turkey?
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
1:33 AM

Post #411366

i guess u can, but i have not tried it yet. as long as u know what u are doing, i guess it can be done. nothing is impossible. if u are going to try it, pls. be careful and let us know how it comes out.

Kell... yes u can try the recipe on chicken too. bakes some potatoes on the side while u're at it. am sure ur DH will love it. he may not take u out to dinner anymore and ask u to cook more of it... hehehehehe

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 17, 2002
6:13 AM

Post #411503

LOL MA Vie... he is hte real cook in the house. he much prefers his cooking to mine!

CC... have you had a deep fried turkey?? I saw these huge pots at HD with a propane tank to do this. The oil alone would bankrupt you I would think. what is it like?
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
6:40 AM

Post #411514

well Kell, this time u can prove to ur DH, u are far better cook than he is. just don't give away ur secrets... hehehehe

yeah, i've seen those deep fryers displayed @ HD. i have watch on tv how turkey deep frying is done, i think one has to be extra precautious with those boiling hot oil. personally, i doubt if i will even try. i like the easy way to cook.

deep frying turkey, one can not put any stuffings inside the bird. instead, u can dry rub the bird and allow the dry rub to marinate over night... so the fried turkey will be flavorful.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 17, 2002
12:03 PM

Post #411557

The deep fried turkey is GREAT,so juicy!.It really easy .The oil is expensive but you strain it and store it(the sell special strainers)You can use the oil again 10 or more times.Ya gotta do it outside so when its nasty out or you gotta do it the oven way.

The only problem is that sometimes the wings and legs get a little over cooked,but the rest is great.We marinate in something called "Bucks Seasoning" that they make up here.
Some people just buy a Turkey breast to use in the Deep Fryer.

I'm gunna try MaVies Brine for the next turkey...
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
12:20 PM

Post #411561

CC.. u can refresh the 'used' oil by using some potatoes that has sprouted. place the potatoes on the oil while still hot. the potato will absorb all the 'flavor' that is embedded on the oil. soon as the oil gets cooler, discard the potato >>> do not eat potato cause it will have an unpleasant taste, but ur oil will be fresh. u can also use onion skins... about 2-3 layers of the onion skin.

u can also make ur own dry rub or seasoning. the combination is enormous... mostly depending on the flavor ur taste bud appeal too.

dry rub or seasoning are different combinations of herbs and spices. they sure help a lot in improving the taste of food when marinated.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 17, 2002
7:30 PM

Post #411821

Reused oil is supposed to be a real health hazard...not to throw a blanket on deep fat frying!!
this is what I found
"Whilst frying with any oil, trans-fatty acids are formed. These fatty acids behave more like saturated fats and actually raise total cholesterol levels, particularly LDL-cholesterol.

It is important to regularly change the cooking oil used in deep-fat fryers since its trans-fatty acid concentration increases each time it is heated."

I am trying to do better... LOL, it is hard!!! I wonder if MaVie's potato does anything to the trans fatty acids?

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 17, 2002
7:45 PM

Post #411829

Who cares if it tastes good?...LOL
Anyhow,I love trans...ams

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 17, 2002
7:55 PM

Post #411839

CC... you are probably a skinny little thing... with low cholesterol... LOL I have to do better or I will be tree fertilizer!!! I want you to eat an extra serving of that turkey for me. I would love to try it!!!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
8:12 PM

Post #411852

Kell, recyling frying oil is only recommended after FIRST use!!! after the 2nd use it is supposed to be discarded properly! i do not recommend reusing after 1st recyling of oil. aside from some undue health hazard, recyled oil go rancid faster than regular oil.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 17, 2002
9:11 PM

Post #411912

LOL CC... ijus tgot your trans ams... I am so slow!

Yes, I had heard that Ma Vie... can you tell me why all the great tasting food I crave is the kind that kills me???
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
9:24 PM

Post #411928

Kell, the key in staying healthy from my point of view is to eat in moderation. i do not believe in dieting myself. i do not deprive myself of food i crave to eat... just eat in moderation... eating a bit at a time, and not stuff myself at all.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 17, 2002
9:45 PM

Post #411944

you are right MaVie, you are right! I agree totally. Now tell my hands and mouth that!! LOL
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
10:02 PM

Post #411961

well Kell, if u ever noticed! when u go to 1st class restaurants, they serve u a little of everything. not to wet ur appetite but to allow u to savor the delicacy of food being serve. same principle ;)!

the only hurtful part is, the food is so good yet very expensive. i love exploring 1st class restaurant not only to have a taste of the food they serve, but also con the chef into giving me the recipe. oh yeah u can do that! just pretend u are familiar with some of the ingredients in the dish. in no time at all, u will find the chef to sit down with u and give u the ran down of the entire recipe. slick but it works all the time. LOL!!!!

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 17, 2002
10:05 PM

Post #411962

to me the only hurtful part is that it tastes so good I want much more!!!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2002
10:12 PM

Post #411970

i hear yah girl friend!!! try the feminine fatale charm. it works for me LOL!!!

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 18, 2002
1:54 AM

Post #412112

LOL MA VIE
mom2cats
Moorestown, NJ
(Zone 7b)

November 24, 2002
4:33 AM

Post #416518

I've got a far better and healthier way to cook a turkey (and get crisp skin!) than deep frying - use a SPANEK vertical roaster! I don't know how I EVER cooked a turkey or chicken w/o one of these things!!

Here's a link for them: http://www.spanek.com/ROASTE~1.HTM
They are also available at places like Linens and Things and Williams/Sonoma stores.

They are absolutely the easiest way to cook a turkey or chicken and the meat is tender and juicy - the skin is crisp and flavorful!!! Never fails!!! I baste mine with white wine as well and it is always scrumptious. (And yes, a fresh turkey is far better than the 'commercial' ones!).
Here is the "Principles" of vertical roasting: http://www.spanek.com/PRINCI~1.HTM

I brine my poultry too, but I add celery and onion to my brine mix first. ALso, if you don't have a pot big enough to keep the turkey in the brine overnight, a large plastic (clean of course!) garbage bag will do, tied real tight. Do make sure you keep it COLD (in the fridge or basement) for health reasons! (If I were to leave it outside here, the critters would have it instead of me)!

Happy cooking and Thanksgiving ya'll!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2002
5:19 AM

Post #416528

i do not have those fancy cooking equipment like i once had. i improvised using a cake cooler rack over a rectangular cake pan - where all juices flow through.

crispy skin can be attained by sealing the skin at 400-500*F oven for 30 mins. then reducing to 300-350*F to thoroughly cook inside the meat for the alloted time of cooking. sealing the meat allows the natural juices of whatever meat u are cooking to stay inside the meat itself.

i would not recommend using fresh onion. dried onions should be okay. fresh onions has some kind of chemical reaction. sorry i am not technically knowledgable on these things. in fact, in using fresh onions on salad, i mince the onions finely. place the minced onions in cheese cloth and squeeze out all the natural juices off the onion. the natural juice of onions is what makes some people develop stomach ache or get sick. things one knows by experiences. squeezing the natural juices of the onion, also make the onion super crunchy.

the salt on the brine does not agree with bacteria, so i would not worry about it at all. just my 2 cents.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2002
4:53 AM

Post #419187

i used the brine recipe above to test it on frozen chicken. after brining the chicken overnight. i cut the chicken in half, sort of butterfly style. spread the chicken with the bones next to the wire rack [skin side up], roast in the oven at 400*F for 20 mins. lower the temperature to 350*F for the next 20 mins. the end result was close to the flavor of broasted chicken. the chicken is very moist and flavorful. another healty recipe to substitute fried chicken without the fat.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 28, 2002
11:45 AM

Post #419292

I got home from work yesterday and my DH had brined our fresh turkey as a surprise for me and it is sitting in a cooler on the backporch as I type. I CAN'T WAIT!! YUM!

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2002
11:10 PM

Post #419552

Sorry,Chuck insisted we use bucks seasoning on ours ..

and DEEP FRY

I was the best!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 29, 2002
12:06 AM

Post #419582

don't worry CC, so long as u Thanksgiving dinner turned out fine is all that matters.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 29, 2002
2:16 AM

Post #419664

Ours was great also. My son thought it was the best one yet. I thought my DH was clever to put it in a cooler on the backporch with some frozen coolents to keep it cool. thanks Ma Vie
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 29, 2002
3:41 AM

Post #419702

glad everyone enjoyed it :). wasn't that an easy way to prepare a moist and savory turkey, without all the hard work? always a pleasure to share kitchen short cuts :)!
lupinelover
Grove City, OH
(Zone 6a)


November 29, 2002
12:14 PM

Post #419768

MaVie, it was voted the BEST turkey anyone had ever had! Unfortunately I calculated the cooking time wrong, and it was done an hour sooner than I had figured. But even keeping it warm the extra time it stayed moist and tender and absolutely wonderful!

I will calculate better for our Christmas one (it is the size you gave: 11 lbs). Yesterdays' was a 7 lb bird.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 29, 2002
4:15 PM

Post #419884

Kathy, u probably failed to see the note above. 20 mins. per lb of turkey to calculate cooking time. am so glad to hear everyone liked it :). now u can try the same brine recipe with chicken. instruction 6 threads above this one. am sure u will like it too.

WillowWasp

WillowWasp
Jones Creek, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2003
11:03 PM

Post #712670

Thanks MaVia for e-mailing me about this...I'm gonna bump this thread so yall will remember to do this ...I love this thread and read it for begining to end...so much good information...I'm gonna do my turkey like this for our dinner...Yummy, Yummy... :o)
Dee

WillowWasp

WillowWasp
Jones Creek, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 18, 2003
11:11 PM

Post #712673

Oh and I was gonna ask...the first few ingredents of the brine
Brine:
2 gal. water
1 cup salt
1 cup brown sugar or 1-1/2 cup granulated [white]
sugar
1 head garlic, crushed
1-1/2 tablespoon whole black pepper
3 bay leaves

Do you have to boil this first and let it cool? It may have been in the post and I missed it...LMK...
Dee
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2003
11:46 PM

Post #712693

no need to boil. i used a big stock pot to sort of marinate the turkey in the brine.

fill the stock pot with 2 gal. water, add the salt and sugar. be sure to stir thoroughly until salt and sugar dissolves completely.

i never defrost turkey, chicken or cornish hen. i place the frozen poultry inside the stock pot filled with brine and flavoring.

cut one whole head of garlic in half. drop into the brine.

i find that instead of using whole black pepper and 3 bay leaf, it is much better to use pickling spice [adds extra flavor overall]. a small bag cost only $0.99 cents. i use the entire thing, pepper and all. do not worry, the pepper will not affect ur brine, it will only add more flavor.

i have some cornish and chicken on this brine as we speak. it is a favorite recipe around the house all year long.

be sure to put a plate over the poultry and something heavy to weigh it down. otherwise the poultry will be floating above the brine and will not be flavored properly.

Dee hope u try it, u will be everyone's favorite after u serve this to ur family. lmk how it turns out... ma vie
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2003
9:34 PM

Post #713514

tig - i like to brine my turkeys. i use same ingredients as you do but i also add oranges and lemons which i cut in half and squeeze juice into pot and throw the oranges and lemons into pot. the only thing i would recommend is the heating of a small pot of water which i add the sugar and salt to in order for it to desolve completely as it works better if the water is hot.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2003
10:20 PM

Post #713546

Herbie,

whatever works for u is fine. i have tested this recipe in my own kitchen for several years now. i used to own a catering business. btw... it is my recipe not Tig. Tig posted the recipe for me while i was out of town.

i do not think u would add raw poultry or meat on a hot brine. i have no problem dissolving the sugar and salt in plain water. the key is to constantly stir the concoction.
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2003
2:24 AM

Post #713724

MaVie,
What is the baking rock you refer to in the recipe?

It sounds wonderful, thank you to whoever bumped it up!!

Melissa
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2003
3:04 AM

Post #713751

Melissa,
it is one of those baking rack - where u place the roast meat in, while u are roasting. something like this in appearance http://www.nextag.com/serv/main/buyer/outpdir.jsp?search=roasting rack&doSearch=y&node=2700400&dosearch=y

if u got some cookie cooling rack, u can use that too. u can improvise. take 4 empty cans of tuna [take off the upper and lower lid], place in all 4 corners of a rectangular baking pan. then put ur cookie rack on top of the tuna cans. place the turkey on center of rack and proceed cooking. hth :).
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2003
4:28 AM

Post #713795

Can you make gravy as usual with a brined turkey? Are the drippings salty, too salty for gravy?
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2003
4:53 AM

Post #713805

yes, u can make gravy the usual way. no, i don't find the drippings to be salty at all, not even on the turkey itself. most end result after roasting: the meat is tender, even when reheated. meat is juicy, never dry at all. if in doubt, do try it on chicken 1st. but i can quarantee u the flavor to be the best u have ever made. lmk what the end result on ur test run.

i never include the neck, gizzard on the brine. i boil them the usual way. i use olive oil and butter to make the roux and use the stock for the gravy and some of the drippings from the roast. enhance the gravy with some wine, makes a lot of difference in the flavor.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2003
10:29 AM

Post #713858

mavierose - sri, didnt make myself clear. i desolve the sugar in salt in hot water then i make it cool before adding the the rest of the water.
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2003
1:50 PM

Post #713988

Thank you MaVie, I'm definitely going to try it... I just gotta make them eat Tuna first! LOL
Melissa
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2003
3:46 PM

Post #714066

thanks for clarifying Herbie :)! readers often times has misconception in reading, myself included.

Melissa, if u make tuna salad for sandwitches, try adding chopped fresh dill leaves on the tuna/mayonaise mixture. it makes a lot of difference on the flavor. whenever i make tuna salad around here, it is always everyone's favorite.
sbarr
Albany (again), NY
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2003
11:59 PM

Post #714331

I used this recipe for tomorrow's work pot luck turkey. Looking forward to lunch tomorrow! :)
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2003
9:27 PM

Post #714985

i edited this recipe to look better and incorporate everything where they rightfully belong... for easy reading.

Brine:
2 gal. cold water
1 cup salt
1 cup brown sugar or 1-1/2 cup granulated [white] sugar
1 head garlic, cut horizonally across middle
1 [1 oz.] packet Pickling Spice [available in the Latino herb section in all grocery stores.]

Take a large stock pot that can to hold a big turkey, combine salt, sugar and water. Stir to dissolve salt & sugar. Add the pickling spice to the brine solution.

Place the turkey inside the stock pot, containing the brine. Put a plate and some heavy unopened can [to prevent turkey from floating. Turkey need to be submerge in the brine.] cover with stock pot lid. Refrigerate or leave outside in the cold for 8-10 hrs.

Remove the turkey from stock pot. Rinse turkey well, discard the brine. Pat dry the turkey with paper towels.

Rub turkey with olive oil or butter. set aside.

Roast turkey:
1 [10-12 lbs] turkey
1 small or medium size onion, quartered
2 celery rib or stalk, cut in 2" length
2-4 parsnips [white carrot], cut in 2" length
2-4 carrots, cut in 2" length

Preheat oven to 400F for 15-20 mins. Place all veggies in the baking pan. Place baking rack in the baking pan. Place turkey in the baking rack, breast facing down. Bake for 1 hr.

After 1 hr., take turkey pan out, turn the breast side up. Bake for another hr. watch closely after 30 min. If turkey browning too fast, lower the temperature to 375F. Baked until evenly brown.

Once evenly browned, about 2 hrs. later, take turkey out of the oven. Allow to rest for 30 mins. prior to cutting.

notes:
since my oven is not properly calibrated, oven door does not close shot properly. i leave temp to 400 all the way. be mindful of how ur oven works. i calculated 20 mins. per lb of turkey for cooking time. it is a good idea to take bones off the turkey, prior to serving. this way too, u can cut nice pieces or be able to freeze some for future use.

Brined turkey stays succulent and juicy, even after heating.

Left over turkey is good for making salad, soup or for sandwiches. Be sure to wrap ur left over turkey accdg to future need, this way u do not have to thaw a lot but only in righ amount needed for a serving.

Turkey Dumpling soup http://davesgarden.com/t/160552/
christmascactus

November 22, 2003
12:54 PM

Post #715294



This message was edited Nov 23, 2003 9:20 AM
NoH2O
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2003
4:53 AM

Post #715877

How do you use the lemon and salt to wash the turkey?
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2003
6:05 AM

Post #715909

if turkey or any poultry is thoroughly thawed, wash poultry/turkey. sprinkle salt all over including inside cavities. once salt is evenly distributed. squeeze lemon juice all over, then massage the skin and inside cavity of poultry/turkey. rinse thoroughly twice.

if the turkey is frozen, just wash good. then brine them. after brining, u can do the above procedure described.

washing any poultry or meat with lemon, tenderizes the meat, and allow any flavoring u use to penetrate through meat. washing with lemon also takes off any unsavory smell from poultry or meat.

i hope i have answered ur question.
NoH2O
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2003
6:23 AM

Post #715916

Thanks!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2003
6:27 AM

Post #715917

u're more than welcome :)!

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


November 23, 2003
8:31 PM

Post #716268

We made this turkey last year and it was SOOOOOOOOOO GOOOOOOOOD! Thanks Ma Vie for sharing!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2003
8:53 PM

Post #716300

u're very welcome Kell :). last night, i bought 14 lb. turkey... the smallest available in the stores around here. i used the same ingredients for 10 lb. turkey. i have the frozen turkey soaking in brine now. i prepared it last night, it is still frozen, when i check this morning! btw. i had a bungie cord on the cover of the stock pot... just in case i get some 'strange visitor' @ night.

temperature outside, here this a.m. was 28F. so it is okay to leave the stock pot outside.

i soaked my brine turkey much longer than i specified on the recipe. the flavor, from my observation is even better.

so i guess, i won't be cooking this one till Wednesday. i have no concern, cuz i know the salt in the brine will preserve everything, plus the coldness outside help cuz it is almost like the turkey is in the fridge.

WillowWasp

WillowWasp
Jones Creek, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 24, 2003
1:22 AM

Post #716518

MaVia...uh...if it's 28 it's like being in the freezer...LOL...dog gone that's cold...'
Dee
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2003
2:03 AM

Post #716565

Dee, if u think that is cold, how about lower 20's for tonight! LOL!

i hope the temperature prediction is all wrong, next week it will be in the teens. for someone coming from the orient, that would be freezing!

as the turkey is soaking in the cold brine marinade, i am all bundled up and still freezing. brrrrrrrr!

WillowWasp

WillowWasp
Jones Creek, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 24, 2003
2:48 AM

Post #716596

I haven't seen (or felt) temp's like that since I left Tennessee...but tonight our forecast is for the high 30's and tomorrow night 33...got my brug's and myself bundled up already...still shivering...LOL
Dee
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2003
9:56 PM

Post #717971

very easy cranberry sauce to fix


1 (12-ounce) bag of fresh cranberries, cleaned
1 3/4 cups sugar
1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and chopped
1 orange, zest grated and juiced
1 lemon, zest grated and juiced

3/4 cup raisins
3/4 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

Cook the cranberries, sugar, and 1 cup of water in a saucepan over low heat for about 5 minutes, or until the skins pop open. Add the apple, zests, and juices and cook for 15 more minutes. Remove from the heat. Divide in half..

for a typical old fashioned cranberry sauce, reserve 1/2 of entire recipe. Chill.

for those of u with the most modern palate, add the raisins and nuts to the other half. Let cool, and serve chilled.

recipe i always prepare. the apple will thicken the sauce cause of the natural pectin in the apple. if u have a microplane or cheese grater or any grater, grate the orange and lemon skin before juicing. u can alway prepare this ahead of time so u do not have to worry about it. this is the easiet and simpliest way to prepare a home made cranberry sauce. hope u try it. goes well with the brine turkey.
BJT72
Perrysburg, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 26, 2003
1:06 AM

Post #718074

I'm going to deep fry a 3lb turkey breast this week, do you think I could marinate in this brine a day or two before I fry it???
Becky
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2003
1:55 AM

Post #718103

Becky, i do not see any reason why not. cut the ingredients by a third so it will not be too much. or if not, u can also marinate some chicken or cornish hen with ur turkey.

see i like brining poultry and meat, cuz it does make a difference in the flavor of the meat. i also found that evern if i reheat the meat after roasting, they are still succulent and not dry at all.

good luck. let me know the result of how ur turkey breast turned out.
BJT72
Perrysburg, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 26, 2003
9:53 AM

Post #718242

Thanks, Ma I will try this tonight, and letyou know how it turned out!!!
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 26, 2003
11:06 PM

Post #718691

We're using Alton Brown's brined turkey recipe this year: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_8389,00.html

We liked everything except the Allspice; it was a little too strong for our taste. I'd really like to try your recipe some time, too, MVR!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2003
11:26 PM

Post #718708

GW, u should give it a try. i tried to make the procedure and ingredients easy to follow and find.

u should try that cranberry sauce, very easy to do to and very tasty. a good pairing for the roast brined turkey.

when u buy the pickling spice, take off the allspice if that bothers u. but i think, the blend of all the ingredients is just perfect.

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone!
BJT72
Perrysburg, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2003
7:46 PM

Post #718994

Ma Vie!!!

This is the best!!!!!!! I brined the turkey breast per your recipe and then dried it well, this morning, then deep fried it, IT WAS WONDERFUL!!!!!! I know that deep frying the turkey is all the rage now, but for a small family (just two of us) deep frying the breast and brining it in Ma Vie's recipe can't be beat!! If you haven't tried this please do...

Plum as puddin' after a good dinner for two,
Becky
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 27, 2003
8:00 PM

Post #719001

am so glad it turned out good for u Becky :)! u could have also roasted or broiled it in the oven.

i just finished making the dumpling soup. yay! in this cold weather they sure are to die for!

i pre-cut the roasted turkey before serving. i set aside some for the Thanksgiving dinner and the rest, i freeze and wrapped individual for future use.

WillowWasp

WillowWasp
Jones Creek, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 28, 2003
3:55 AM

Post #719169

Our dinner was the best, everything turned out perfect. Pie's and cake's, potato's, green bean's, corn and dressing...but the Turkey took the prize...so juciy and wonderfully flavored...thanks MaVie for a great successful recipe...I will add it to my personal recipe file and use it again...
Dee
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2003
4:30 AM

Post #719182

U're very welcome Dee :). so glad to hear u're Thanksgiving Dinner turned out well. i am more than glad to share test result from my kitchen. here's a toss to all the labor of love u did for ur family!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 28, 2003
9:02 PM

Post #719546

Yep...great recipe!

I used it for cornish hen tho! It came out great! I'll definitely do this one again!

Also worked in MaVie's cranberry recipe! Delish!!!

Both those recipes are keepers!

lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2003
9:05 PM

Post #719549

Where is MaVie's cranberry recipe?
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2003
9:56 PM

Post #719599

gee whiz, i sure am so glad to share this recipe with everyone. it is almost like, i was there working with u in ur kitchen.

lizh ...look up Nov. 25, 6:56 p.m., 12th thread up.

the brine recipe was updated on 11/21, 6:27 pm., 22nd thread above this one.
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2003
10:22 PM

Post #719609

I did the first brine recipe, it turned out great, everyone raved about how moist the turkey was, the gravy was good too. It was in the brine for 3 days.

I used my own cranberry sauce recipe.

Thanks MaVie for all the advice, and the recipe.

Melissa
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 28, 2003
10:59 PM

Post #719625

Melissa... it is always a pleasure to share :)! the recipe is the same, with minor changes for easy acquisition of ingredients and easy reading.

i try my best to simplify cooking cuz i know a lot of people are intimidated with cooking. cooking is super easy to do. the hardest part is getting all the ingredients ready or trying to find ingredients.

i, myself is often intimidated with recipes, specially when i have not tried it myself. i guess the key for me to simplify the cooking procedure is to read and reread the recipe several times. then find a shortcut to make the procedure much more easy to follow.

i throw in few tips here and there so readers will know why certain procedure/s are done. these tips, i learned the hard way, and experiences in the kitchen taught me a lot.

i had a grandma who was a very good cook. the problem is, it is so hard to get along with her in the kitchen. i could remember when i was very young, if i cut the vegetable or meat the wrong way, i would be surprise with one of her hurtful tiny tiny pinch from her well trimmed nails. never the less it hurt so bad cause she would pinch where it will really hurt the most. LOL!
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 2, 2003
3:11 AM

Post #722099

Well, we're going to give your brine recipe a try this weekend, MaVieRose! Howie's not sure if we can get parsnips, though we'll look.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 2, 2003
3:19 AM

Post #722106

u can substiture parsnips with carrots. almost similar but not quite.

am sure both of u will like it.

i bet others have tried it to but never told us whether they like or not. it is only from inputs can i be able to make adjustment to suit one's liking.

GW, if the allspice bother u, u can pick it off the pickling spice blend. they look like peppers, only bigger than pepper. allspice flavor in this case isn't really that strong. all the spices in the pickling mix, sort of blend together ;).
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 2, 2003
3:21 AM

Post #722125

I think we'll leave it in there. I *believe* we could not find whole allspice when we made the other recipe several years ago and used a pinch of ground allspice -- it was just too potent an amount, I think.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 2, 2003
3:30 AM

Post #722130

the pickling spice the perfect blend for this brine recipe. btw... u can find the pickling spice in the Latino spice rack in any groceries. if u do not find one, lmk. send me ur snail addy and i can mail u some.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 2, 2003
3:51 AM

Post #722137

If we don't have a Latino section, perhaps it would be in with the canning supplies? That's where I get the pickling salt I need for medical use.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 2, 2003
4:02 AM

Post #722150

perhaps the herb section or Mexican product section? here in Calif., all groceries have Latino section, sometimes in the Mediteranian [sp?] section.

Latino stores would carry them too, that is if there are some in ur area.

pickling spice is not that expensive, only 89 cents. send me ur snail mail, i have a stock of them in the cupboards. just click on my name. am sure i will get it.
roof57mi
columbia, SC
(Zone 8b)

December 4, 2003
11:38 PM

Post #723997

I did the brine turkey this year also. It turned out wonderful. Everyone said it was the best turkey they had. I used just the bay leaves and pepperconrns and garlic. didn't have the pickling spice and wanted to try it anyway.
it turned out wonderful just the same. Thanks
gayle
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 6, 2003
5:52 AM

Post #724971

Gayle,

so glad to hear everyone in ur family enjoyed this recipe. u're very welcome :).

the pickling spice has bay leaves, peppercorns, allspice, hot pepper in the blend. all in all it is the same thing, i just thought to make it easier and more convenient to use. rather than buying different dried herbs and spices.

what really matters is... everyone who tries it, enjoyed serving it to their family.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2003
9:10 PM

Post #725444

I picked up a jar of McCormack pickling spices at Wal-Mart tonight. We're all set, except for the parsnips; we'll probably just substitute carrots since we have a big bag of baby carrots on hand. We had to postpone our Holiday Feaast with friends because Howie's come down with the flu -- But the turkey's in the freezer and we're all set for when he's better!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 6, 2003
10:01 PM

Post #725494

i hope it turns out great for u. yes, u can substitute the parsnips with carrots... they are in the same family anyway. lmk how it turns out.

check ur email.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 13, 2003
6:17 PM

Post #730322

Mmmmmmm...Almost ready to eat, but had to post this luscious image first!

Thumbnail by gardenwife
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 13, 2003
9:25 PM

Post #730400

EXCELLENT! It was great!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2003
6:49 PM

Post #732891

Kimberly,

so glad u tried the recipe for urself and i hope it turned out as good as i do it myself.

at the moment i am away from home. i should be back this coming weekend.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2003
7:59 PM

Post #732927

It was marvelous; even the leftovers were juicy and delicious. Howie forgot to put the ingredients in the bird prior to roasting it, but even without those items, it turned out great.
kc8lcw
Columbus, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 25, 2003
12:10 AM

Post #737301

Has anyone ever tried this Brine with a goose?
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 25, 2003
1:57 AM

Post #737328

Farmgirl 21 tried this recipe with goose. she said it turned out great. she did not have to alter anything.
kc8lcw
Columbus, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 25, 2003
3:03 AM

Post #737351

Thanks MaVieRose! Merry Christmas! Now that I fixed the sink, I can continue to prepare for tomorrow. It seems like I end up with plumbing issues each Christmas -- last year, the pressure/temperature valve blew on my hot water tank, now this year, I just finished fixing the sink drain -- I was at the sink, and my feet were getting soaked -- the drain was leaking! What can go wrong next???


Dave
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 25, 2003
3:54 AM

Post #737365

Merry Christmas Dave :)! think positive and everything positive comes ur way. good luck in brining the goose. i had a 15 lb. turkey soaking in the brine since last night. i will roast it tomorrow.

i am at the moment steaming a 10 lb. boiled ham with pineapple juice and pickling spices. i will roast the ham with the turkey tomorrow too.

am now in the process of baking apple and pumpkin pies.

Have a safe and happy holidays Dave :) and to everyone who happen to read to this post!!!
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 25, 2003
4:40 AM

Post #737373

Yum. We had a nice ham at my MIL's tonight, and I get to take that lovely hambone for a pot of ham and beans. Howie's good for a bowl, but not much more than that - so, the beans I freeze and enjoy for months to come for my dinners while he's at work!

Not about turkey, but you mentioned ham. ;)
kc8lcw
Columbus, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 26, 2003
2:50 AM

Post #737776

MaVieRose,

The goose came out great! This is the first time I made a goose for Christmas. My uncle in PA always made them, and I missed having goose at Christmas. The rest of my family out here in OH, has never had goose before. I convinced them to try it today, and they absolutely loved it. We never had leftover turkey before, but today we need to find room in the fridge. The entire goose was gone before anything. I will definitely use your brine recipe on my next turkey. Happy Holidays!

Dave
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 26, 2003
2:55 AM

Post #737782

Dave, I would say that is a great success story! Congrats! (Write it down for re-reading later!)

Sounds to me like you did good! Yumm! Also sounds like maybe you started a new family tradition, eh? Go for it!

Merry Christmas...and Happy All Year!
H.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 26, 2003
3:47 AM

Post #737807

Dave - good to see you! I've never had goose, either. I've had duck, but only as part of turducken!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 26, 2003
3:56 AM

Post #737810

Congratulations Dave. am so happy for u and ur family. we sure have the right combination for the brine, as it works great on different types of poultry.

try to copy and paste the recipe for future references.

Merry Christmas and a Safe & Prosperous New Year to all.

now i need to find a good brine recipe for Salmon. i have to do a lot of testing and trial. soon as i find the right combination, i will post on the recipe forum.
kc8lcw
Columbus, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2003
2:39 PM

Post #740895

Horseshoe,

It was a success, both the plumbing and the goose.

Gardenwife,

It's good to be back -- Now that I have more time on my hands, I'll be visiting more frequently.

MaVieRose,

I will post the recipe I used for the goose shortly --

I hope everyone had a Merry Christmas, and make sure you have a Happy Healthy Prosperous New Year!!!!!!!
kc8lcw
Columbus, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2003
3:21 PM

Post #740907

Here is the recipe:

Roast Goose with Wild Rice Stuffing...

1 (12 pound) fresh goose
salt
4 cups wild rice, cooked
2/3 cup chopped hazelnuts
2 Granny Smith apples - peeled, cored and chopped
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 tsp. ground savory
3 Tbls. chopped fresh parsley
fresh cracked black pepper
1 1/2 Tbls. all-purpose flour
4 cups water

Directions:
1. Soak the goose in MaVie's brine the entire day before (and overnight).

2. Mix together the cooked rice, nuts, apples, onion and herbs. Season to taste with the salt and pepper.

3. Remove the giblets from the goose. Wash the bird inside and out. Pat dry. Fill the cavity of the goose with the stuffing. Skewer closed and lace string around the skewers. Truss the bird.

4. Rub the bird with butter, margarine or vegetable oil. Place in roaster and cover with foil. Roast in a pre-heated 325 degree F (165 degree C) oven, breast side down for 1-1/2 hours.

5. After 1-1/2 hours, remove the foil and draw off the fat. Continue to roast UNCOVERED for an additional 1-1/2 hours. When done, the juices should run clear when pricked where the thigh attaches to the body. Remove the trussing string and skewers before carving.

6. While the goose is roasting, place the giblets in a saucepan with 4 cups of water. Let simmer gently, partially covered, for several hours, until reduced to slightly less than 2 cups. Season the broth with salt and pepper to taste.

7. Pour off all but 1 Tbls. of the fat from the roasting pan. Sprinkle a little flour over the bottom (1 - 2 Tbls. or more) depending on how thick you like your gravy. Stir for 2 minutes, scraping up all the browned bits. Remove the giblets from the broth and discard. Add the slurry to the goose broth, whisk until smooth. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve in a gravy boat alongside the bird.

*****Note***** I doubled MaVie's brine recipe, and also added 1 cup of Cabernet Sauvignon.

*****Note***** Goose is not a good suggestion if you have high cholesterol. Goose is all dark meat, and may be very greasy, but you have to try it at least once in your life.

If you are wondering where to get a goose, I got mine at Wal-Mart Supercenter. I believe they only carry them during the holidays, but I'm not sure.

If you have any questions, please feel free to post them here, or email me.
Delisa
Wildwood, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 4, 2004
10:26 PM

Post #744405

I make brine turkey every year and get raves about how tender and flavorful it is. My recipe is different but basicly the same. I use kosher salt, whole garlic, fresh tyme, pepper, and honey. The recipe I have came with recipe for creamed giblet gravy that is wonderful but has many steps so I only make it once a year for Christmas.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2004
7:01 PM

Post #1153022

bump ^
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 18, 2004
7:11 PM

Post #1153042

Hi MaVieRose, haven't seen you here in a long time. Thanks for bumping this, hope things are well with you :)
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2004
9:03 PM

Post #1153217

hi MistyMeadows, my sister is visiting and helping me with the yard work. the reason why i am not online lately. i hope to be able to be online to help out during this hectic cooking season. thanks for thinking about me.
lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

November 18, 2004
9:54 PM

Post #1153284

MaVieRose, I love your recipe. I use it when I just fix a turkey breast too. I was telling a friend and she wanted to know if it would be best to use sea salt. I have been using plain salt. Thank you for the recipe. Happy Thanksgiving.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2004
10:53 PM

Post #1153372

i also use sea salt. i did not recommend it previously cuz it is not readily available in all areas. i tried to make it easier for everyone, use the same proportion. hope ur family enjoy it. it is always a pleasure to give a helping hand. Happy Thanksgiving Lizh and everyone.
sbarr
Albany (again), NY
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
1:55 PM

Post #1205637

bumping a classic
Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2004
4:23 PM

Post #1209963

I've been totally unable to decipher who the credit should go to .. for the 'brined' turkey cooking idea and/or recipe . . . but I'm sending some mitey serious .. thank you's .. to tiG and MaVieRose!!

I am SO VERY glad .. that I 'happened' to run across this 'brining' recipe ... for, both my Turkey and my 'duck breasts' .. turned out jes absolutely mouth watering and succulently fantastic!! There was not a dry piece of meat on anything. Heck, even my spiral ham turned out 'dry' in comparison ... !!! hee

I have a couple of confessions to make however .. (and fortunately, everything went well despite them, and everything tasted D-LISHUS on top of everything I may have 'flubbed' with!) .. LOL ..

I used the salt, and the brown sugar .. but, I used regular ground black pepper, in place of whole - no bay leaves to be found in the house - added ground white pepper - and, had no whole garlic in the house, so I used adequate equivalent of 'jarred' minced garlic ...

Followed all the instructions .. with placing the pot of brine holding my turkey and the duck breasts ... into one very brrr cold utility room, with our outside door 'open' (outside temps were around 0 -to- 5 degrees!) ..
However .. the pot was sortee fergotten about .. and the stuff remained 'brining' for about 24 hours!! Then, I had a wee panic .. and thought, 'well, it's a brine solution, and it'd been below freezin' temps in there .. so surely, nothing is hurt!' .. And continued on .. in such a fuss with myself .. that I even forgot about rinsing the meats after removing them from the brine!! (yep, I sure did) .. However, I did manage to remember to pat the 'turkey' dry !!! .. Managed to jes allow the duck breasts to 'drain' well ...

I cooked my turkey at a constant 400 degree oven .. with breast down .. and uncovered .. but, not elevated on a rack. I'd ever so often, check .. and pour off any excess, if needed .. in preparaton for my gravy ... (Gravy was made .. after removing any excess grease that would rise - which actually amounted to very little, surprisingly!).
My duck breasts sliced before I brined them .. and I chunked them over into a seperate roasting pan, covered them with aluminum foil .. and cooked them along with the turkey in the same oven .. but put them in during the last hour and a half ..

My 8.25 pound wee lil turkey .. baked for right at 3 & 1/2 hours .. till I thought the outside color had attained a nice dark golden coloration .. then yanked her out .. and we plowed into Christmas day dinner!!

This .. has been the ultimately very best tasting and juiciest turkey ever !! .. And those duck breast texture and taste .. didn't even resemble any 'wild' game at all!! The duck breast was jes super tender morsels that practically melted in our mouths!! .. And the natural juices that cooked from them, were as superbly delishus also! Matter of fact, I used the 'ahh-jes plain ol gravy' from the duck breasts .. on our cornbread dressing!!!

THANK YOU .. all .. so much !!

Another lil note .. Just as some of you guys have stated above also - the leftover turkey and duck .. are retaining their moisture even two days later .. just like they were fresh outta the oven!! I've never enjoyed eating .. or using .. my leftover turkey meat .. into any other dishes, for it's dryness! .. Ahh, but this year .. even po' ol P'nut dawg, will not get any leftovers .. till 'momma' is done with it all .. completely !! .. MMmmm some mitey good stuffs this year!! ...

Now, if I can jes get 'countrygardens' to give up his familys' ol german Saurkraut recipe, in time .. I'll be 'set', and well .. for New Years dinner also .. !!

Happy New Year folks !!

- Magpye








gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2004
10:49 PM

Post #1210243

It is a great thing, this brine. We brined ours for probably 10 hours this year, maybe 12. We bake it at 500 degrees for 1/2 hour, then cover the breast only with a double-layer triangle of foil and lower the heat to 350 for the remaining time. We roast it until it's about 165 degrees on the electronic thermometer, then remove it, cover with foil, and let it rest about 20 minutes before slicing (it continues cooking from the retained heat). Mmmmm-mmmm! We've done MaVieRose's brine as well as Alton Brown's from Foodtv.com (minus the cinnamon), but we always roast it Alton's way - works wonderfully! :)
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2004
2:09 AM

Post #1210410

Yummy! I brined one year before last...or maybe 3 yrs ago. MaVie has emailed me quite a few of her tips, tricks, and recipes...luv 'em!!!

Many thanks, Ma Vie!

Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 19, 2005
11:36 PM

Post #1884613

Thought I'd bring this to the top again for those who maybe have never seen the recipe. MaVieRose's turkey is FANTASTIC!!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 20, 2005
12:08 AM

Post #1884679

Thanks, Melissa! I was wondering when this would pop up!

Hmmm...maybe I'll do another turkey this year (in the hopes I won't shrink it, as in one year past).

Guess I'll do MaVie's brine and GW's suggestion above as for roasting...(then again, my DW is a vegetarian so who knows what we'll eat.) :>+
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2005
12:11 AM

Post #1884682

.Welcome Shoe. :-) I remember your incredible shrinking turkey... :-)
NoH2O
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2005
2:36 AM

Post #1884965

Has anybody heard from MaVie?
Delisa
Wildwood, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 20, 2005
7:15 PM

Post #1885743

One year I did a brine turkey and then also a large regular roased turkey breast. Everyone LOVED the turkey (the brined) I had cooked the other just in case there wasnt enough because so many people were coming.

The morning after Christmas we at breakfast we were having some turkey and one of my guests said HEY! where is the turkey from yesterday! LOL they caught me feeding them the no brine turkey.
Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 23, 2005
2:56 AM

Post #1889942

Turrrrkeey YUM!
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2005
3:21 AM

Post #1889979

This is what we're making this year. It got rave reviews last time we served it. :) YUM is right, H-Man. :D
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2005
3:29 AM

Post #1889992

Ten four on the "Turkey yummm"!

We have ours now (ten pounder) and will brine it tomorrow...then cook according to GW and Howie's recommendations above. (High temp first 30 minutes, then lower it.)

Am I right in thinking 20 minutes per pound?

Shoe.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2005
3:37 AM

Post #1890000

I think so, Shoe. We use an electric meat thermometer with a probe. We insert it in the thickest part of the breast meat and set it to 161. Breast meat dries out more quickly than the thigh meat, and stopping at 161 works great; by the time we let the bird rest 15-20 minutes before carving, its internal temperature goes up to the recommended 180, anyway. No food poisoning yet! ;0) A 14-16lb. bird should take 2 to 2 1/2 hours roasting.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2005
4:27 PM

Post #1890742

Thanks, GW. I guess I can use my digital thermometer that I use to check soil temps in the g-house! (And yes, I'll wash it first!)

As for the breast meat, are you and Howie still cooking on high for a while then using foil to cover the breast? I guess that helps to hold in moisture? Or is that to slow down the browning of the breast? (Decisions, decisions.)

:>)

Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 23, 2005
4:41 PM

Post #1890765

Yes we do still cook it that way. It is to brown the bird and then the foil keeps the breast from being over cooked.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2005
5:05 PM

Post #1890809

It works like a charm!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2005
5:14 PM

Post #1890829

Cool! Today, Alex gets to learn how to prepare a turkey! And tomorrow, cook it! (My first turkey in many years of Thanksgiving...I'm gonna pig out! Er, uh, turk out?) :>)
Thanks.

Buh-bye for now.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2005
7:03 PM

Post #1890996

Hey, and your family's there with ya this year. Doesn't get better than that! :)
Marylyn_TX
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 30, 2005
2:37 PM

Post #1900902

I was so glad to find this thread this year! My SIL gave me a HUGE stock pan last year after we enjoyed her brined turkey and she was going to give me her recipe, but she forgot and I kept forgetting to remind her. I didn't think to Google it... I don't know why. Anyway, I was just going to make the turkey the "regular" way when I saw this thread the day before Thanksgiving. I popped the turkey in the brine right away and (the hardest part of this recipe!) cleared out enough room in the fridge to hold the pot. That evening I was at the grocery store picking up a few last minute things and a nice lady with a really neat accent (I wish I had thought to ask where she was from!) stopped me in the spice aisle and asked how to marinate a turkey because she had never made one before. I told her that she didn't HAVE to marinate it, but... And since I had just done this - and because it is so EASY! - I told her how to brine it. I hope it came out as well for her as it did for us!

~ Marylyn
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 30, 2005
3:12 PM

Post #1900925

I brined for the 1st time this T day. Used this recipe. Excellent. I think I had more and better drippings for gravy then ever before. The turkey was free range. Was it the brining? I am now a briner. Like Marylyn says, popping the bird into the brine is the hardest part! I used a large bucket that I cleaned/disinfected thoroughly w/ bleach.
Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 30, 2005
4:25 PM

Post #1900974

We had a free range bird this year too. It was the brining. We also fixed a frozen bird and they turned out the same. It's so worth the extra prep work. We bought a big laundry basket at walmart and did both birds together.
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

November 30, 2005
4:29 PM

Post #1900980

We also brined a turkey for the first time this past weekend, and it was fabulous!!!
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 30, 2005
5:49 PM

Post #1901136

for those who don't brine or bake pies it all sounds so complicated and accomplished.
Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

November 30, 2005
7:01 PM

Post #1901252

I used to think so but once you get started it's fun and really pretty easy.
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 30, 2005
7:42 PM

Post #1901312

The gravy made from the drippings of a "brined" bird simply can't be beat! I'm thinking of doing another small one JUST for the gravy! LOL I was fortunate, or unfortunate, that our temperatures dropped into the teens, so I just put the turkey in the brine in it's pot out on the deck table and covered it with a tarp in case something tried to take the lid off of it. I know that wouldn't work for those of you in Warmer climes, but worked perfect here. :-)

anastatia, it's the easiest thing in the world. It's just "soaking" the turkey. :-)

I miss Ma Vie and all her words of encouragement and helpful tips, especially in this forum. :-(
pebble
Bodrum
Turkey
(Zone 10a)

December 2, 2005
7:11 AM

Post #1904113

Has anyone heard from Mavie? Gardenwife???
JustJen
Dansville, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2005
11:04 AM

Post #1904201

I'm confused, do you start with a thawed or an unthawed bird?
Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

December 2, 2005
3:07 PM

Post #1904481

You use a thawed bird. Put it in the brine overnight. We leave ours outside because it's cold but if you can't do that you need to let some of the water be ice so it keeps the bird at the correct temp. Since your in NY now you should have no problem with the temp.
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2005
7:21 PM

Post #1904870

I actually keep mine in the brine a couple of overnights, but, all Ma Vie said was required was one. :-)
NoH2O
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 3, 2005
12:09 AM

Post #1905374

Does it change the flavor of the turkey at all or just keep it moist?
Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

December 3, 2005
12:56 AM

Post #1905446

This brine pretty much just keeps it moist. The one we got from food tv where you add vegetable stock adds a little flavor to the bird.
NoH2O
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 3, 2005
5:28 AM

Post #1905772

Thanks, Howie. I really want to give this a try.
Howie
Newark, OH
(Zone 5a)

December 3, 2005
6:02 AM

Post #1905789

You will love it. We do all ours this way now.
pebble
Bodrum
Turkey
(Zone 10a)

December 3, 2005
6:28 AM

Post #1905805

do you need the sugar that it calls for?
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 3, 2005
7:08 AM

Post #1905815

I've never made it without the sugar, Pebble. Here's a good article on brining, and the author reports it can be done with or without sugar. She does say that the sugar may promote browning and take the edge off the salt taste. http://www.moscowfood.coop/archive/brine.html
pebble
Bodrum
Turkey
(Zone 10a)

December 3, 2005
7:18 AM

Post #1905821

great articles GW, thanks. I guess she brines meat too...i might try this method with chicken first. then try it for the christmas turkey, if i can find one...
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 3, 2005
6:17 PM

Post #1906336

Someone just told me today that they brined a pork tenderloin for about an hour and it was wonderful. :)
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

December 5, 2005
12:30 AM

Post #1908214

We've got a 24 pounder in the oven right now, and boy does the house smell fabulous! Since it was such a big one, we left it in the brine for nearly 24 hours. It looks plumper now than before it went into the brine, so I figure that's a good thing!

We brined it using MaVie's proportions of water, brown sugar, and salt, and then we added a tablespoon each of crushed garlic & cracked peppercorns, plus several fresh bay leaves. I heated a couple cups of the brine in the microwave, then added the herbs and let them steep for 5 minutes to be sure the flavor would get into the brine.

I made a spice paste to rub under the skin (just loosen the skin and smear it around between skin & meat), and I also rubbed the outside of the skin with 1/2 stick butter and basted with 1/2 bottle white wine during roasting. I used this same sort of mixture a month or so ago on an unbrined bird, and the results were superb. The applesauce makes a great "carrier" to help spread the herbs around easily, and it adds its own goodness as well. Here are the approximate proportions:

1/2 c. applesauce
1/2 stick butter
2 Tbsp. Penzey's "bouquet garni" herb mix
1 Tbsp. sweet paprika
1 Tbsp. garlic paste
1 tsp. half-sharp (hot) paprika or cayenne pepper
2 tsp. ground black pepper
1 tsp. ground ginger
1/2 tsp. Penzey's "bay leaf seasoning"
(or tear up a couple of bay leaves and add to the roasting pan)

I can't wait to see how the brine makes this one even tastier than the last!!
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 6, 2005
2:10 AM

Post #1909995

**Yum** that sounds good!
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

December 9, 2005
8:35 PM

Post #1916187

It certainly was!!

We're having turkey soup today... just the meal when you're snowed in! :-)
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2005
9:49 PM

Post #1916297

Hey...I'm having turkey soup, too! I'm not snowed in, but it just sounded good and I had the dark meat thawed in anticipation of a nice big pot. Actually, when I make soup, I make *a lot*, so there are actually two stock pots of it simmering. It's tomato-based with just a dash of habanero sauce and I used diced tomatoes with green chilis. There are lots of veggies in it, too. It gets you sweating a little. LOL
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

December 10, 2005
5:01 AM

Post #1916816

I made enough stock for 2 pots of soup, but half of it got reduced and frozen for later use. I add some ordinary chicken stock too, and this batch got some pureed carrots in addition to chunks of onion, potatoes, parsnips, and turnips (DH likes the taste but not the texture of cooked carrots, hence the puree, but it really added some nice body to the broth). I did dice up a few tomatoes (some of the final garden stragglers that have been ripening on the counter), plus some corn-off-the-cob and limas from the freezer. And come to think of it, I added a dash of habanero to mine as well!
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2005
8:48 PM

Post #1917910

I should try pureed carrots sometime. This batch had canned kale, fresh carrots, peppers and onions, along with frozen corn and peas. I used canned broth since I let my turkey carcass sit too long in the fridge and couldn't use it! :( Still, it was great. We like tomato-based soups, so I used a little of this and that: Salsa, diced tomatoes with green chilis, regular diced tomatoes. I use whatever's handy, sort of a "everything but the kitchen sink" soup!
Marylyn_TX
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2005
12:21 AM

Post #1918179

I brined a second turkey earlier this week and today we are having spicy turkey chili. Yummm! We spoon it into tortillas and top it with lettuce and low fat sour cream and it is very very good! It has 4 onions, 3 bell peppers, a couple of dried jalapenos, and 2 serrano peppers, so it's full of vitamin C and is very useful for clearing out our sinuses. LOL

~ Marylyn
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2006
7:37 AM

Post #2893423

i guess it is that time of the year to bump this thread.

sorry folks, i did not abandon this thread. i was just too sick the past couple of years. i am doing much better now.

to clarify a few things:
Quoting: do you start with a thawed or an unthawed bird?

i never thaw any poultry or meat that i brine. i brine them frozen. they naturally thaw out in the brine.
Quoting: Does it change the flavor of the turkey at all or just keep it moist?

no, the brine does not change the flavor of the turkey. the brine keep the turkey meat moist plus the brine's salt and sugar content is balance, therefore giving the the turkey the 'right flavor'. brined turkey or meat do not need any extra seasoning as far a i am or my family is concerned. i do make gravy on the side, but i do not see anyone using it. family and visitors claimed the brined turkey i serve taste just right.
Quoting: Does it need the sugar required

the sugar is needed to balance the salt content. both the salt and sugar acts as preservative and flavoring agent in this recipe.

if any one feel to alter the recipe, go ahead and be my guest. i posted this recipe for those who are intimidated with cooking. i thought sharing a simple and easy recipe will help someone serve a wonderful, tasty and delicious dish for their family during the holiday season.

i hope i did not miss any questions posted. if i did, pls let me know. i will be more than glad to give a helping hand. i promise i will not get sick this holiday season. LOL.

i am sorry, i wish i could cut this thread in half or third to facilitate easy access for those whose phone lines are slow. i dare not cut it cuz some of the tips might be miss by others. any suggestions????
lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

November 8, 2006
10:36 AM

Post #2893517

Thank you for bumping this up. I have been using your recipe for the last couple years and we all love the taste. Happy you are doing better. Great to have you back here on DG.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 8, 2006
3:57 PM

Post #2894352

I use this as well.

Added to say...during the rest of the year. I just soak my chicken in salt water before frying...makes all the differance. Pork chops as well. I kinda know I have soaked it long enough when the water turns redish. If your water is still clear...it hasnt done its thing.
weegy12
Rancho Cucamonga, CA

November 8, 2006
3:59 PM

Post #2894362

I'm going to try your turkey recipe for Thanksgiving. Thanks so much.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2006
5:23 PM

Post #2894602

lizh/Edna ... i am so glad to be back and well again. it is nice to know that u and ur family enjoy this simple, yet very tasty recipe.

gardenglory/Pam ... happy for u to find another way to make ur dish more appealing for ur family. i do the same thing with most poultry or meat i cook.

Weegy12/Louise ... nice to see u again. am sure after u tried it once, u will venture into brining other meat too
weegy12
Rancho Cucamonga, CA

November 8, 2006
5:26 PM

Post #2894608

You too mavierose!
Dh always tells me not to experiment for the holiday meal, is this something that I won't mess up!?!??! I just thought after trying smoked, deep fried and roasted turkey, it would nice to try something different. It looks easy enough, have printed the recipe already too!
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2006
6:25 PM

Post #2894762

I brined the turkey last year following ma's directions. It was wonderful. And this year I am going to deep fry. Brine and deep fry? I will make the gravy a week in advance using turkey wings. Open to suggestions and advice from the experienced. thanks.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2006
6:50 PM

Post #2894823

Louise... i have updated the recipe and instruction on the 2nd post [ MaVieRose High Desert, CA Zone 8a
Dec 26, 2001 6:18 PM]. if my 10 yrs and 14 yrs old granddaughters [in the Philippines] can cook this recipe on their own, with the finished products appealing to all the family and their guest, should prove how positive i feel about this recipe. no way can anyone do wrong in trying it. so long as the instructions are followed, which is why i have added some tips in this thread. some of the tips also explained why certain things are done.

Anastatia... thanks for trying my recipe. this recipe is well thought off, experimented by me in my kitchen.

my grandparents from the old country were butchers. my paternal grandma is not a chef but has mastered her cooking to a T! brining has been used in my family for several generations. i had to do some experiments to improve the way how my folks did it for so many years.

personally, i have owned restaurants in the Phil. prior to coming to the U.S. some 35 + yrs. ago. i did own a catering service in Los Angeles some 20 yrs ago for several yrs. i am proud to add that i always pass with flying colors the sanitary inspections in Los Angeles, Ca. modesty aside, people from all walks of life do approve of my cooking, i have yet to find someone who will not eat what i have to offer on the dining table.

i would suggest u roast the turkey wings with the above veggies i have suggested. roasting the turkey wings and veggies will give ur gravy the flavor u need. as i have said above, i do make gravy but no one touch the gravy. the brining did make wonders on the roasted turkey.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 8, 2006
9:01 PM

Post #2895253

"am sure after u tried it once, u will venture into brining other meat too"

Hmmm...so brining works with red meats maybe? (I have some venison in the fridge!)

For those above who haven't tried the brined turkey, give it a go, it is worth it. Very easy, very tasty. You really can't go wrong!

Thanks, MaVie!

Shoe.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2006
9:26 PM

Post #2895352

Shoe based on my common sense, brining is adding moisture and flavor into the meat... which i believe moisture contribute to the tenderness of the finished dish.

i have use brining in almost all the meat cuts i cook in my kitchen. like gardenglory/Pam have said
Quoting: Added to say...during the rest of the year. I just soak my chicken in salt water before frying...makes all the differance. Pork chops as well. I kinda know I have soaked it long enough when the water turns redish. If your water is still clear...it hasnt done its thing.


and yes, those extra blood clinking to the meat do give some foul taste to the food being prepared. which reminds me, the Chinese people parboil their meat twice prior to cooking. each time they parboil their meat, they throw water, wash the pot, boil and repeat the process again to eliminate the blood from the meat. then they proceed to cook their dish.

brining is popular in the orient cuz not everyone has the luxury of owning a refrigerator. brining and drying meat is a means for those folks to keep their meat for future use.

since u have the pleasure in accessing game meat, i would suggest u venture into brining. i wish i can have access to game meats, it will be a challenge to cook or preserve them. but as u know me, i love to experiment and find better ways to feed my family.

sharing info is a good thing. it widen our knowledge in improving how we feed our family. so, i am inviting all to share ur knowledge pls.! TIA.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2006
9:40 PM

Post #2895404

Thanksgiving/Christmas time would not be complete w/out MaVieRose's brine thread!!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 9, 2006
2:21 AM

Post #2896244

Thanks, MaVie. In the Orient, do people brine, then dry their meat? (Or smoke it, or salt it, for preservation?) Just curious.

Shoe.

critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 9, 2006
5:12 AM

Post #2896706

The answer may be in this thread somewhere, but... If I brine the turkey, is there any reason not to stuff it with dressing as usual? At other times during the year, we roast a turkey and just season under the skin, maybe tuck a couple of apples and onions into the cavity... but for Thanksgiving feasts, we need dressing, and it must be stuffed into the bird! :-)
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
7:10 AM

Post #2896790

shoe the answer to ur question is posted on the 2nd post above ur question. when drying meat, it is not necessary to brine. drying meat depends on personal preference.

critter... i never stuff turkey for the following reasons:

Stuffing the turkey before roasting is bad because the turkey meat take longer to fully cook.
If the body cavity is filled with stuffing you end up with either an overcooked breast with other parts of the turkey is overcook and dry. Or if not, you end up with the interior and stuffing undercooked and soaked with possibly undercooked turkey juices.

for those who like stuffings... here is a safe suggestion, cook the stuffing separately; if the stuffing needs to be in the turkey at the table, then stuff it in while you're in the kitchen, before serving.

i do make stuffings that is cook separately in the rice cooker. the favorite in my house is one made with sticky rice, lots of chestnuts, walnuts and the veggies like celery, carrots, bell peppers, garlic and onions that blends well with the turkey.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 9, 2006
1:43 PM

Post #2897281

I've taken to roasting my turkey upside down -- makes a tender juicy breast every time! -- and I stick the thermometer into the cavity to be sure the stuffing has reached a safe temperature. It's unlikely I'll change a long-standing Thanksgiving tradition, although I appreciate the advice... I just wondered if brining the turkey affected whether or not I should stuff it.

Also, if I want the turkey to make a pretty presentation (upside down makes the breast pale and misshapen), then I do something different to keep the breast meat moist... I loosen the skin and stuff a layer of moistened dressing beneath it.

I like your dressing with sticky rice and nuts, sounds delicious! I'll give that a try... another time. :-)

MaVie, it's so good to have you feeling better and posting more frequently! I subscribed less than two years ago, but I still "missed" your posts because everyone always mentioned you so fondly.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
2:25 PM

Post #2897400

Critter., I too start mine upside down for 1 hour then have DDH flip it for me. One trick I tried that worked was:
from the inside of the breast use your two-pronged kitchen fork and poke 2 or 3 sets of holes into the breast meat before you start to cook it. I inadvertently did that one year and altho I always put stuffing &/or seasoning under the skin, those few 1" deep holes really got flavors inside the breast. I always stuff my bird encasing the stuffing in about 2 thicknesses of cheese cloth - a "sock" - tying the ends together w/kitchen cotton string. The turkey gets moistening and flavor but the stuffing is easy to take out and put into a serving dish and there is no stuffing left to worry about inside the bird. Since I use a Butterball, I don't brine my turkey, now. However, when I did brine, the stuffing did not come out salty or whatever. The only complaint that I have about brining is that if it is sufficiently brined, the bones soak up salt and I always use the carcass for turkey bone soup. The soup I made from the brined turkey was very, very salty - inedible. I will be cooking my turkey in the convection oven of my range: 300* for 3 hrs. I am going to post pictures of the done deed and the opinions of my guests as to the taste of everything, so having said that, wish me luck.

Ann
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 9, 2006
2:39 PM

Post #2897433

Thanks, Ann, that's just what I needed to know! I appreciate the heads-up about not making stock from a brined turkey's carcass... I always do that with the bones, so you saved me from an unpleasant surprise. We may still brine the turkey this year, since I have a batch of turkey stock in the freezer already for our next-day soup!

That's a good idea about the stuffing, too... you can put the dish of stuffing back into the oven while the turkey is resting and waiting for carving, just to make sure that the internal temperature of the dressing is high enough to kill any nasties.

I flip chickens and smaller turkeys, but when we get a 20 pounder in the oven, he just stays upside down! Those big turkey turning forks just don't work well for me, so I generally protect my hands with a folded paper towel and just grab it at both ends.

Here's a tip for putting seasonings under the skin... I combine a bunch of different things with half a cup of unsweetened applesauce... That makes it really easy to spread everything around, and the applesauce also helps the meat come out nice and tender. My ususal mix involves Penzey's Bouquet Garni (mixed dried herbs), paprika, black pepper, crushed garlic, and a little cayenne. I'll have to try poking a few holes down into the meat to work those seasonings down in a little next time. We also like to put apples (cored & spiral-sliced on the apple gizmo) into the cavity of an unstuffed bird, and everyone likes to eat them -- unhealthy, I'm sure, as they've soaked up all those drippings, but so tasty!
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
2:59 PM

Post #2897489

Be sure to poke those holes from the INSIDE if the bird where you have your seasoning/stuffing - not from the outside. Another hint: I use a digital thermometer that sits on the stove or counter or clings by magnets to your stove or hood and has a probe that goes into the whateveryouarecooking. I set mine on 160* and put the probe into the stuffing. When that goes off the turkey is done. That ther. gets to the real heart of the bird! And it's always right. Like you, I have those big forks but since you shouldn't pierce the skin of any meat/poultry I can't really see their use. They were free w/whatever I bought so no big deal. Maybe sell them on ebay? teehee

Ann
Marylyn_TX
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 9, 2006
4:28 PM

Post #2897793

I make stock out of the carcasses of the turkey I brine and it has always come out great. Maybe I make it differently than Ann does, but mine is never comes out very salty at all. I just brined a turkey a couple of weeks ago. The meat is gone now, but I have a couple of quarts of stock in the freezer waiting for the next time(s) I make soup. :-)

~ Marylyn
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
4:38 PM

Post #2897814

That's wonderful that yours came out so well, Marylyn. I could have used a more concentrated brine or brined longer to make mine so terrible. Not the first time I slipped up. :>))

Ann
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
5:11 PM

Post #2897903

Critter... i never really like stuffing a turkey. one main reason is... i have a big family sometimes Thanksgiving is an all day affair in my house. i have experienced long time ago that if i stuff turkey, the meat does not last as long as they should. one incident was, by late afternoon the stuff turkey had a stale smell. i was lucky, i had cooked 2 turkeys, one stuff and the other not! this is the main reason why i never stuff turkey again! i cook the stuffing separately.

if u look closely at my instruction on the 2nd posting above this thread, the breast is cook side down at the 1st part of the cooking, then later turned right side up. cooking this way, i never had to tent the turkey with foil to avoid burnt breast. it is always evenly browned and cook properly. entire turkey is moist! even when u have to reheat it, that is when the turkey is brined. [pls. be mindful of the fact, our ovens have different calibration]

Ann, i wonder if u used sugar with ur brine? in all the years i have been bringing all kinds of meat, i never get salty stock. could u be using too much salt in ur brine. my recipe is balance, so there is no fear of a salty stock.

Ladies/Gents... if u do not like to brine, i also have another very tiring way of cooking turkey. u need to prepare way ahead of time. u need to buy one of those syringe use for horses at the pet store. marinate 6 cloves of fresh garlic [wack and peel the garlic with back of knife] with 1/4 c sherry wine, 1/4 c. mushroom soy sauce, 4 slices of fresh ginger [quarter size]. marinate these ingredients for 2- 5 days, depending on the intensity of flavor u need. take cheesecloth, place over a glass cup. pour ur marinate over the cheesecloth to separate the marinate ingredients from the marinate liquid - put inside the big syringe. inject the marinate along the breast, thighs, and meaty part of the wings, the night before cooking. refrigerate turkey over night. cook as normal.

end result of above concoction is the meat will appear with dark streaks, but will taste delicious! like i said, i find that way of cooking a turkey to be very tiring on my part cuz with a big family such as mine, it is not only turkey i have to dish on the table.

the large family i have, plus each member bring their friends along: i have plan one month ahead of time. i have to buy ingredients 3 weeks ahead of time. prepare and get all ingredients, 2 weeks ahead of time. prepare or cook what i can fix ahead and brine the meat i need to cook one week ahead of time. cooking for a big family is a big chore for me, but i enjoy it. me and my family are a wee bit picky: no one would volunteer to cook, everyone always ask me to do the cooking. i do not require any help cuz i can not tolerate mistakes. do not get me wrong, i do teach my nephews and nieces to cook, but not require anyone to help during holiday cooking. my only help around are all the kitchen gadgets and equipments in the house.

if anyone has a big family as like i do, may i suggest to cook two 10 or lbs turkey for Thanksgiving, instead of one.

one more tip to pass along: give approximately 5 hours of thawing time for each pound of turkey.
edited to put emphasis on thawing time.

This message was edited Nov 11, 2006 9:58 AM
Marylyn_TX
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 9, 2006
5:54 PM

Post #2898010

I didn't mean to suggest that you made yours wrong, Ann.. :-) Just differently. (-:

Thanks, MaVieRose!!!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
7:02 PM

Post #2898202

my pleasure Marylyn. sorry i mean to thank u earlier, but due to some info i had to give, senior moments set in. thank you for ur input. comment/s or tip/s are more than welcome... that is how we learn. thanks everyone.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 9, 2006
8:39 PM

Post #2898445

Ann, thanks for the clarification! I was all set to poke holes in from the outside, to get the seasoning under the skin down into the breast meat... I did rather wonder about piercing the skin though! I will stab it from the inside now!

I'm glad to hear the bones may still be fine for stock after brining... I will follow MaVie's recipe! I do think that thawing the turkey in the brine sounds much easier than injecting a marinade, and I'm glad to have that 5 hours per pound guideline for thawing (somehow I always guess wrong, which causes logistical issues).

What a great thread! Thanks, everyone, for all the input!
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
8:59 PM

Post #2898494

No offense taken Marylyn, I could probably count all the fingers and toes of my grandchildren and still not be up to the number of dumb mistakes I've made this month. When you're busy and get in a rush anyone makes mistakes. I threw the brining recipe away after I brined that one turkey so I don't know what went wrong but evidently something did. Looks like a great Thanksgiving feast coming up and thank goodness I only have to fix one turkey and two of my daughters are helping w/the sides and desserts and cleanup while one grandchild helps w/the drinks and fetching and carrying. We will all be able to enjoy the day however the turkey is done.

Ann
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
9:04 PM

Post #2898505

Y' All are lucky cuz i was blessed to have been born in the orient, particularly the Philippines - where East really meets West. the Philippine cuisine is strongly enfluence by Spanish, and other European countries plus all the neighboring Asian countries.

Asian cooking is mainly based on the Ying-Yang, a Chinese philosophy where balance is the main thing. a lot of people has misconception that Asian cooking has MSG, that is not true. i can only speak for myself. i NEVER use MSG in my life time. most of my cooking as my grandma taught me is to balance all the flavor so they blend perfectly.

i am so glad to be able to share all the 'knowledge' and experiences gained thru the years.

Critter [doesn't sound right] for me to address a lady, i am so glad to be healthy again. glad that we can not only share our garden and cooking plus the numerous subjects when a thread goes astray. ROTFLOL!!!
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
9:15 PM

Post #2898541

MaVR, what is on your Thanksgiving table? I would love to be on the clean up committee at your party.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
9:36 PM

Post #2898603

Anastatia,

the typical Thanksgiving dinner in my house:

Turkey with all the trimmings
Fish steamed with green onion, and ginger, laced with Sesame oil for flavor and lot of fried garlic [our version of salt substitute]
fresh green salad with home made dressing
Chop Suey [stir fried oriental vegetable
Prawn fried in olive oil and lots of garlic
lots of Filipino dish for special occasion like Pancit, Kaldereta [goat stew], Letchon [roast pork] with liver gravy
Tropical fruit salad [made ambrosia style]

these may sound like lots of food for u, it is not! remember holiday dinner at my house is a whole day affair. sometime, those that come from out of town, stay over a couple of days. oh yes, lot of out of state family and friend that come.

no need to volunteer for cleanup. it is funny u mention that. far as i can recall. there is no distinction between who is family, friend or guest. it would seem like soon as everyone come, they all make me sit with guest. everyone takes care of everything. my son is good with wine and makes a good bar tender. and by the time party is over, everything around the house is sparkingly clean! because of this, it is always a pleasure to cook for everyone.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 11, 2006
1:31 PM

Post #2903875

That fish sounds good, MaVie. Have you posted the recipe for that here at DG?

We brine our turkey, then pat it dry on the outside and oil the bird lightly. We fashion a double-layer triangle of foil and mold it to the turkey's breast, then remove it for later. We roast the turkey breast-side-up at 500 for 1/2 hour, cover the breast with the triangle of foil, then bring the heat down to 350 and roast it until the thickest part of the meat measures 160 on the digital thermometer. A 14-16lb bird takes about 2-2.5 hours at that temperature.

I think the single most important thing is allowing the turkey to rest for 10-20 minutes before even *thinking* of piercing it or slicing into it. That makes all the difference.

I'm salivating. Are you?

This message was edited Nov 11, 2006 9:32 AM
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2006
3:24 PM

Post #2904173

hi Kimberly/GW, no i have not post the recipe. actually it is very easy and so delicious recipe.

Steam Fish

3 lbs rock cod w/head on*****
3 inch fresh ginger, peeled, cut julienne style
10 pcs green onions
4 tbsp sesame oil
1-2 tbsp light soy sauce
1 or 2 lemons [depending on fish size] use vegetable peeler to get some lemon peel
[lemon peel to be place inside fish cavity: lemon juice to use in cleaning the fish]
1-2 tbsp salt to clean the fish

try to get the best fresh fish u can find in the market. or order from ur fish monger some fish ahead of time. be prepared to clean the fish: take off all the wrappings, sprinkle salt then lemon juice on the fish - massage inside cavity and outside the skin to clean fish. these two ingredients will thoroughly clean the fish, take off the sliminess and some of the fishy smell. rinse thoroughly, pat dry with paper towel. set aside.

i use a wok as a steamer. most of the time, i have to improvise due to the size of fish available for the day.

improvised steamer:
a wok with a lid that fits perfectly.
4 empty cans of 12 oz. tuna - both top and bottom taken out.
one 12 inch round cake cooling rack.

assemble the steaming implement.place wok on top of stove. place and space evenly 4 tuna cans inside the wok. spray the cake cooling rack with Spam [prevent fish sticking on the rack] - place the cake rack on top of the tuna cans. gently fill with water to avoid moving the tuna cans around the wok. turn on stove light. as u prepare the fish for steaming, the water in the wok will warm up and be ready for steaming.

make a bed of green onions on top of cake rack. scatter the ginger slivers on top of green onions. lightly salt the fish if u wish. place a few slivers of ginger, some lemon peel and 2 green onion inside fish cavity. hold the head of fish with left hand, use the right hand to hold the tail end of the fish. gentle place the fish on top of onions and ginger. place wok lid and cover tightly. simmer and steam fish between 30 - 45 mins. depending on fish size or ur preferred doness. u know the fish is cook when u try to poke a paring knife into the fish without struggle. or the eyes of the fish turns opaque or white in color.

take a small pot, pour the sesame oil. heat sesame oil for less than 5 mins. u just want sesame oil to heat up some. place ur fish on a serving platter, pour the warmed sesame oil and the soy sauce [be careful, the oil might spatter on u as u pour the oil on the fish. Enjoy.

**** i know must of u are skirmish about the fish head, but u have to remember, fish head, skin and bones are where all the flavor come from. i u wish, u can take off and discard fish head, skin and bones before serving.

pls. be mindful that the instruction/s are not written in stone. improvise on ur own, do whatever will work for u. i maybe too detail oriented, it is only because i did not want u to miss a step... it is almost like having me right next to u when u are cooking. if any one encounter any problem and i can help: u can either post here or send me a private email. i can also provide my phone number privately w/out hesitation... as long as i can help.

when i encounter a new recipe, i read, reread the recipe at least 10 times to acquaint myself with ingredients and procedure, so by the time i am preparing or cooking, i have the instructions down path. recipe instructions are written as a guideline to know the steps of preparation and cooking. actually, cooking is easy, the preparation of ingredients is the hardest part next to learning the procedure or instruction.

my son, nephews and nieces in college and other relatives call me all the time for help in cooking, so it is nothing new to me.

no! i am not salivating cuz i always have a prepared brined chicken, cornish hen or duck in the freezer. i have a portable convection oven that facilitate fast and even roasting. i always brine poultry or meat all the time cuz we do not only have them for dinner or lunch, we also use them for sandwiches or salad. i prepare ahead of time to avoid being a slave in the kitchen all the time. this way i have the excuse to mess around the yard all the time :).
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 11, 2006
3:36 PM

Post #2904209

I never thought of brining them ahead of time and freezing them. Marvelous. That fish sounds so good!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2006
3:47 PM

Post #2904249

i guess i am always one step ahead of myself, so i can do fun things that i enjoy. i always take time reading the grocery store throw away paper every week. find what is on sale. when i shop i mostly buy stuff on sale so i have them handy when i need them. here in our area, meat are on sale at the 3rd or 4th week of each month. don't get me wrong, there are stuff that i have a taste for and i do buy them at what the demand price is... to fill the craving. LOL.

u should try it, am sure u will love it. u can also substitute sesame oil with olive oil, but it is not the same. that recipe is derived from Cantonese cooking i learned from our next door neighbor years ago in the Philippines. once u tried making it, u will find it is so easy.

say hi to Howie and ur mom for me.

Thank You to everyone who prayed for me when i was very sick!!!
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 11, 2006
4:53 PM

Post #2904445

When you thaw this poultry that you brined, does the juice stay in the poultry? It just seems that it might "leak" out as the poultry thaws? Really curious about that... Thanks for all your advice. I brined a game hen and we had it last night. It's the first time that I have enjoyed white meat!

Ann
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2006
8:29 PM

Post #2904921

hi Ann, ur question is a little confusing and complicated for me to explain, but i will answer the best way i can based on 50 years of cooking experiences. u heard me right, 50 yrs. my grandma had me by her side all the time. but the true cooking sink after i was 10 yrs old.

yes, the liquid in the frozen turkey do leak out into the brine. however, the combination of the brine blend and flavor the whole turkey. the combination of flavor in the brine have a higher concentration of water and salt than the meat being brined. therefore as the turkey leaks out, the brine solution passes into the meat cells via the meat membrane. the brine solution adds water and flavor to the inside of the meat cells. to put it simply, the brine solution does not actually penetrate the meat cells at all. the brine solution flows into the spaces between cells, where the turkey leak is drawn out through membrane of meat cells, thereby increasing the flavor inside the meat cell where it flavors the meat.

u are welcome. i am glad to know u tried brining and is pleased with the result.

btw... u did not respond to my question re: salty stock after using ur brined turkey recipe, prior this thread? did u use sugar to balance the flavor?. i hope u try to make stock out of the brined poultry u tried last night. do let us know. curious minds wants to know.

i hope i have answered ur question to ur satisfaction. i have tried my best with my limited knowledge of the English language. otherwise i hope someone in the know will chime in to help us. although that had been said; i have, all my life been out there helping people... people i meet in the Farmer's markets who are not familiar with the so called 'Asian vegetable' or in Asian stores where people from all walks of life who are not familiar with bottled condiments form Asia. i have to stop and familiarized them so they are not rob of not knowing how good some food are. it always made me feel good to know that another family will eat healthy and good food tonight.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 11, 2006
8:58 PM

Post #2905019

MaVieRose, I too have been cooking for many years - way over 50 - I've been married 51 years and had been cooking for 10 yrs or more before that. Anyway, the game hen I cooked last night was wonderful because the breast meat was so juicy. As we ate the whole thing there were no bones left for me to make soup out of.
My question to you in other words (about the frozen brined poultry) was not so much about the taste but about the meat being juicy after thawing. I would hate to brine and then find out after thawing that brined chicken, or whatever, that the breast was not juicy. Otherwise, everything else is great. Thank you so much.

Ann
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2006
9:33 PM

Post #2905126

Ann,

the brined turkey or meat will always be succulent and juicy all the time! there is no worry about the poultry/meat being dried. the left overs, that is, if u are lucky to have any left, will ALWAYS be juicy! i know cause i tried and tested it numerous times.

brining meat or poultry in the frozen state, will allow the meat to slowly absorb the brine flavoring as the meat thaws. so have no fear, if u follow the rested proportion i posted on the 2nd post, u will always be guaranteed to produce a delicious, succulent and moist turkey on the table.

i use the same proportion for all the poultry meat i brine... which is why for the same proportion of brine, i always brine at least three 2 lbs. chicken. sometimes, i roast all three, if not i will freeze again what i do cook, but i always prefer to roast all 3 chicken cause it is much easier for me to reheat than start cooking.

for the benefit of those who get intimidated with cooking, it is always a good idea to roast at 500 degs. for the 1st hour of cooking - this manner will 'seal' the moisture inside the turkey's meat. then lower the temp. to 350 degs. for another hour or so... depending on turkey side. the last 30 mins. of cooking u need to raise the temp again to 400 degs. to assure nice crispy almost oil free turkey.

true i learned from my paternal grandma to cook, but her way is far too complicated. i have tried and tested all her recipes to simplify them so i can share my cooking with family, friends and acquaintances.

my grand daughters in the Phil. is being spoiled by my daughter, they never knew how to cook. i challenge the 2 girls last year to test my brine recipe. to the surprise of my daughter and their entire family, my two grand daughters cooked and prepared their Christmas meal last year.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 11, 2006
11:39 PM

Post #2905534

MaVie, when you "prepare" a brined turkey for the freezer, do you mean that you thaw a frozen turkey and brine it, then *roast* it, and then freeze it? I think maybe there was some confusion about thinking you meant to brine and then freeze a raw turkey, then thaw it (again) when you want to cook it... ??
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 12, 2006
1:25 AM

Post #2905969

sorry Jill, it was not meant to confuse anyone.

the following is the procedure i do for everyday cooking.

frozen poultry/meat are soaked in a brine. cured for a few days or over night -depending on flavor intensity one desires to achieved or the weight of poultry or meat to be cook. thoroughly washed and rinsed. brined poultry can either be roasted whole or butterfly style [cooks quicker than a whole chicken], practically half the cooking time. from this point, one can either roast in the oven or grill over charcoal. when properly cooking is achieved: the finish product is either eaten or properly wrap and frozen for future use.

when i buy a lot of chicken on sale. i choose mostly the frozen chicken so the poultry will slowly marinated in the brine for flavor and achieve moisture quality. once the poultry is cured in the marinate. thoroughly wash poultry. wrap properly then freeze. thaw properly then cook as needed. this practice, i do to be prepared, if company pops in without due notice, or the craving for a roast poultry is wanted in my house.

these procedures are done to make my life easier, and not be in the kitchen all the time... a practice i have done in my lifetime so i maybe able to accomplish and finished projects i want to achieve. i am sharing this information to erase the confusion, and show that there are ways to make life less stressful.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 12, 2006
2:51 AM

Post #2906142

Oh, I'm a big fan of cooking in quantity and freezing most of it for future meals! Thanks for the clarification. :-)
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 12, 2006
12:09 PM

Post #2906610

Thanks for the clarification. I was thinking that you put uncooked poultry in the freezer. I understand, now.:>))
This sounds like a good idea especially w/chickens and smaller.
Have a wonderful Thanksgiving. Aren't the people on DG great? So helpful and smart and enlightened and helping all of us.

Ann.
Jianhua
Shangshui, Henan
China
(Zone 7b)

November 12, 2006
3:34 PM

Post #2907050

MaVieRose,
I have read this thread with patience.In the north of China, we have Peking Roasted Duck,and in the south, we have Nanking Salted Duck,both of which are well-known through the land.Your recipe has similar ingredients and precedures with the two.I am very appreciated your good job.And I am very glad to see you are well and back here again.You are always with me.
Here is a picture for you. Chrysanthemum against frosts in bloom
Jianhua

This message was edited Nov 12, 2006 12:37 PM

Thumbnail by Jianhua
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 12, 2006
11:00 PM

Post #2908136

u're welcome Jill and Ann and it is always a pleasure to share and pass along tips.

hi Jianhua... nice to see u!!!! this old lady use to make both recipe u mentioned, but with old age slowly creeping on me, the procedure in cooking is now too tiring for this fail body to accomplish. do not get me wrong, i love them both. what i like these days for duck is cooking the confit ala Madeleine Kammon method. i like Madeleine's way of cooking - French style user friendly style.

Jian, thank you for ur patience in these super long thread. i am sure it was well worth ur time, with all the extra tips thrown in here and there.

speaking of tips and techniques, although i am not in total agreement with all the procedures in the video, it sure is a good learning technique for those that are new into cooking, also good for some to pick up a few tips. Enjoy!
http://www.epicurious.com/cooking/holiday/thanksgiving/videos ->Thanksgiving and Holiday cooking made easy!!!

edited to add: be sure u got some free time to watch the video link posted. it do show lots of other cooking techniques! if any of u are interested in more video basic or cooking 101 ... do let me know, as i do not read people's mind. speak up and join the fun. there is no secret/s in cooking, it is just a matter of learning the right way of cooking and knowing how one ingredients blend with other ingredients. just my 2 cents worth.

This message was edited Nov 12, 2006 7:12 PM
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

November 13, 2006
1:16 AM

Post #2908560

Great video on brining. That with your recipe, sounds makes the whole process sound doable. Thanks, MaVie and tiG.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 13, 2006
1:58 AM

Post #2908670

Betty/pajaritomt,

i totally agree about the video demo lots of subject. i hope new cooks and others will be encourage and be able to pick up lots of pointers on this video.

my offer still stands for other video demo for those interested to learn and see how things are done first hand!

ma vie
REDROSE
New Iberia, LA
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2006
2:51 AM

Post #2917795

Thank you MaVieRose that I got email from you so sweet of u think of me.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 16, 2006
3:49 AM

Post #2918027

u're very welcome Debbie. how are u doing? been a while. what are cooking on turkey day? apart from the turkey of coarse. LOL.

here is the shorter version of the same recipe, only shorter http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/670025/
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2006
7:30 PM

Post #2934350

Welp, have my turkey brining as we speak! Not sure what I want to do with the giblets yet though. Didn't know whether to brine them also or not. Maybe I'll go ahead and simmer them in good seasoned water so I can cut them all up for a good gravy when Turkey Day comes.

Thanks everyone for you posts/comments/suggestions and great info!

Shoe.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 21, 2006
9:28 PM

Post #2934638

That's a good question, Shoe! I just got my turkey today (plenty of time to thaw, since our big dinner isn't until Saturday), and it didn't even occur to me to brine the giblets... Ma Vie, should we toss them in?

Giblets are a great addition to gravy. One year when my SIL was visiting for T-day, we used giblets in place of our usual combination of cooked ground beef and pork sausage in the dressing, since any type of red meat makes her ill. I simmered a bunch of hearts and gizzards with a little seasoning and white wine, then minced them in my food processer, and the dressing was fabulous. Needless to say, I reserved a handful to add to the gravy. ;-)
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2006
9:34 PM

Post #2934655

OH my' gosh! I love hearts and gizzards! (Especially fried. I know I know, not so good for ya but once or twice a year should be fine, eh!?)

Critter, I have the giblets simmering in water, with a pinch of salt, a good dose of black pepper, and will let them cook to perfection. Heck, they smell so good maybe I should just cut them up, make a gravy and eat them over toasted bread for supper tonite, eh!?

Shoe.

critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 21, 2006
9:55 PM

Post #2934742

Sounds good to me! LOL, we should probably start a thread for giblet afficianados... My friend from China slow-cooks gizzards with ginger and, hmmm, I need to find out what else... they are so flavorful and tender!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2006
10:00 PM

Post #2934752

NO! don't toss turkey innards. i boil them with carrots, celery, onions, few pieces of fried garlic, and parsnips to make stock. cool, then pick meat from turkey neck, chop the gizzards, heart and liver. make a roux and add the stock. using a whisk to avoid any lumps. eh voila... u got gravy. this i do ahead of time.

if u want extra flavor gravy, broil them in the oven. do the normal procedure in making gravy. yummy!

in making the roux, be sure the flour[any flour of ur choice] should turn like caramel color. if flour is not properly cook , the end product will taste floury [is that the right term?] whelp! my vocabulary suck. LOL.

oops! made a boo boo, i nearly forgot the onions and garlic the reason to edit.

This message was edited Nov 21, 2006 6:06 PM
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2006
10:04 PM

Post #2934762

i also simmer innards with carrot, onion, parsnip, fried garlic and ginger till they get soft. once the innards are soft, i threw in cabbage and spinach. serve with rice. a dish cooks enjoy.

critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 21, 2006
10:14 PM

Post #2934782

No, no... I didn't mean I would toss them out, I asked if I should toss them in -- into the brine with the turkey, that is!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2006
10:41 PM

Post #2934867

it's ok Jill... j/k. hahahaha! sure got ur attentions. i try to make my gravy ahead of time, so i do not get crump up on the T-day. i like to make it easy and simple for myself. if not too tired, after the turkey is roasted, i make more gravy from the drippings and get all the flavoring inside the roasting pan. i can't seem to make enough gravy around here.

i've already made the fruit salad, ambrosia style my concoction. it's in the freezer. by the time it is serve on Thursday, it will have the consistency of ice cream. Yumm-O!

am now making the potato salad. the turkey has been brining as of last yesterday.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2006
11:00 PM

Post #2934941

my brain is in slow mode, and something dawned on me... let us clarify something here.----- since the frozen turkey is being thawed in the brine, the innards are also inside the turkey as it is thawing... therefore it is in the brine.

since i have to check and turn the thawing turkey, i have to check if the innards are thawed. if the innards are no longer frozen, i take them out. rinse thoroughly. simmer slowly, then make the make ahead gravy.

whew! so glad i thought about that or there will be another confusion. thanks for ur patience and bearing with me.
joycet
Franklin, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 2, 2007
5:50 PM

Post #4150699

Bump...I gotta try this!!!
WantabeGardener
Jerome, MI
(Zone 5b)

November 2, 2007
8:44 PM

Post #4151218

It is a good bump...it is so good..done it many times..from this..forum..gives high praise for sure...

Smiles..Diana...
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 3, 2007
1:42 AM

Post #4152230

it's that time of year!
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2007
4:21 PM

Post #4206741



All this talk of brining ... it has me thinking I want to try it this year. I have two 10 lbs turkeys and am thinking I'll put them in a large Igloo cooler to brine. Am I understanding that they begin brining while still frozen and thaw while in the brine? Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Debra
WantabeGardener
Jerome, MI
(Zone 5b)

November 18, 2007
4:30 PM

Post #4206765

Aw...you will not be sorry you did it..As far as from the frozen state...someone else will have to help you out..lol..mine where thawed.. I put them in a cooler..but I put the brine in a bag...with the turkey...only did one...I did not read...right either..I forgot to wash the brine off...but it was only a little salty...did not wreck them..hehehe..good luck...

Smiles..Diana...
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 18, 2007
5:20 PM

Post #4206928

If you go back to Ma Vie's first post on this thread, she says she leaves hers in the Brine about 3 days, starting with a frozen bird, which is what I've always done. Getting ready to put mine in the brine tonight.
I've been doing this for several years now, and the turkey always gets rave reviews!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2007
6:51 PM

Post #4207120

Debra,

brining from personal experiences is an assurance for a well balance, flavorful and moist turkey. when this recipe was formulated, where i live was 30ish degrees outside the house.

i choose to brine a frozen turkey to ease the worry of problem of space in the fridge, plus lighten the borden of cooking. as the frozen turkey is slowly thawing in the brine, it is also slowly absorbing the flavor in the brine.

brining is a way for me to ease the problems and worries of the holidays. if it work for me, am sure it will work for others too... the very reason why i shared this recipe to everyone. as i have always said, my recipe/s are not written in stone: alter what ever it is u feel need improving, after all it is the dish u have to serve ur family. this recipe is my little contribution to alleviate everyone's cooking chores for the holiday/s.

am not pointing any fingers, we want to avoid any errors be sure to rinse the brined turkey at least 2 or 3 times [inside the cavity and out of the bird, before u roast or cook it. if u did not rinse, i am sorry to say, u will have a salty bird and gravy [if u use turkey drippings] in ur gravy.

yes, i am confident with my recipe, but i am more please to know i made the difference in other family's holiday dinner. thank you everyone. i hope ur bird will be as good as the 1st one u've made [the first time u tried this recipe.]

i made a shorter version of this same recipe http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/670025/ all u need to see is the first thread for the recipe. i thought i made a shorter version but it got longer too ... hehehe.
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2007
10:17 PM

Post #4207591

Thanks for all the info - we will definitely brine this year! I'll try to report back on my results.

Debra
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2007
5:03 PM

Post #4210199

u're very welcome Debra. i am sure u will take the honor when u serve the brined turkey on any holidays, plus ur family will love u for it.

allow me to share how my family reacted on brining. i shared this same recipe with one of my SIL, 4 yrs. ago. she called me yesterday to tell me she procrastinated using this recipe, until her daughter convinced her to use it last year. her entire family loved it. the funny part was... her son ask her to brine chicken after the holidays. she brined and roast two chickens. end result was my nephew and brother, had each one chicken to themselves. during their dinner, my SIL only had the bony part to eat. we both laugh. she said, since then, she made sure there is one brined and roasted [1.5 lb. chicken] for each person for lunch or dinner.

the same SIL, also uses the same brine and roast recipe to roast a leg of pork. her family and guest always raved with the dishes she served. btw... she serves both turkey and roasted pork [Lechon, we call it in the Philippines with home made liver sauce i gave her.]

i forgot to mention, since brine turkey is moist and filled with flavor, u will not need anything to go with it. left overs are great with sandwiches as is... that is, if u are lucky to have any left over. LOL.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2007
2:48 PM

Post #4213439

MaVieRose, do you stuff the turkey? We always stuff our turkey, and the juices from the bird go into the stuffing/dressing, making it so moist and delicious! Do you think brining would have any effect on stuffing the bird?
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

November 20, 2007
3:05 PM

Post #4213518

I'm excited! Mixed the brine last night and there are two birds in two seperate bags in the cooler. I forgot the pickling spices while at the store so substituted Emeril's poultry rub. Everything else is according to the recipe. Can't wait to taste these on Thursday.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2007
4:54 PM

Post #4213873

Pat, i never again tried to stuff the bird, after a disastrous first try. in my family stuffing is cooked separately. i am from the Philippines originally. we normally use sweet glutinous rice as "stuffing", cooked Paella style with lots of seafoods in the mix. from personal experience, the glutinous rice never cooked properly in the bird's cavity. i had to dump all meat near or close to the cavity, good thing i had a back up turkey and roast pork on the side. from then, i was afraid of food poisoning which is why i never tried stuffing a turkey again. i prefer not to risk my family's health. safety in cooking is my #1 concerned, the very reason why i test my recipes before sharing to be sure i have everything down pat.

i learned cooking and food preservation from my paternal grandparents. paternal grandpa and his brothers were in the butchering business, while my grandma owned several stalls/store of meat product. one stall or store is separate from the other. one for chicken, one for pork and one for beef. as a child, it did not make sense to have so many store. as a grown up, i would guess it would be to avoid food cross contamination. as a child i was always by my grandma's skirt. i grew up learning different components of a meat and how to use them. i was also taught how to preserve meat like making sausage, and drying.

the only way, i know salt in brining will affect stuffing is when the brined turkey/meat is not thoroughly rinse.

brining the turkey by itself produce very moist and super tasty turkey in my opinion. i am sure there are so many ways to accomplish a moist turkey, but i can only speak from my own experiences.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Debra, u are in a different ball game, using Emeril's poultry rub. poultry rub is to rub or sprinkle the seasoning on the bird. i am not sure it will have the same result, as i have not tried it myself. am sorry, i wish i knew or have experience that way of cooking a bird.

using the pickling spice in the brine plus accompanying ingredients, will naturally flavor the brine during the brining process which in turn will slowly penetrate the limbs of the meat as the meat thaw. the very reason why the meat will be flavorful and juicy. the brine do not need any cooking. each ingredient in the brining process will naturally enhance each other.

in the original recipe of my grandma, there were so many different spices that need to be bought separately, i do not like to go that route, it will be expensive. i want a tasty and full of flavor end product. using my common sense led me to recommend a cheap but filled with flavor alternative ---> Pickling Spice. i chose to recommend pickling spice from the Latino section [very affordable at 79 cent per packet] as oppose to the very expensive [almost $5.00 container] Spice section of any store.

i wish u the very best. i hope it does turn out accdg to ur expectation. pls. do let us know how it turned out. this i love to hear... maybe another experiment in the making????

Ladies, i hope i am able to respond to ur inquiry/ies... ma vie
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2007
5:44 PM

Post #4214023

ma vie, what you said about rinsing the turkey is the only drawback I see, too. I have an electric roaster, and the bird, inside and out, get heated to a high temp, so the food poisioning is not an issue. The issue comes if we 'leave the turkey sitting out' too long. We are always careful about that. I will not use this recipe for Thursday, but I definitely am going to try it. I think I'll go this afternoon and get the smallest turkey I can find.

Enjoy the holiday! Pat
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2007
6:18 PM

Post #4214129

Pat,

if memory serves me right, u could be right. i have a huge family that came to the house. all in all, there were about 150 people from both sides of the family. Thanksgiving is always an all day affair in my house in days gone by. although every thing was cooked from scratch, by the end of the day, the stuff turkey does not look savory at all. at that point whatever was left was trash! a new batch was freshly roasted for dinner time.

u do not need a turkey to try brining. i have used the same brining concoction with 4 chickens [2lbs each] in a bucket, same with pork or any meat i darn please to brine.

the other day, my SIL, latest addition to the family had a good laugh together. i gave her the brine recipe 4 yrs ago. she procrastinated using it. her son ask her to brine and roast 2 chickens. when lunch was serve both nephew and my brother had each of the 1-1.5 lb brined, roasted chicken. she never got any except the bony parts. LOL.

i have tried using the same recipe brining fresh pork ham, lamb, beef to name a few. all were succulent and super tasty.

thanks you and yours have a great holidays,
ma vie
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2007
6:29 PM

Post #4214167

ma vie, you have a great holiday, too!
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2007
10:07 PM

Post #4214881

I'm so glad this thread got bumped. I was just getting ready to look for it in all the dozens of threads I have on my 'watched' list.

We're going to brine duck this time and I need to get it started. *smiles*
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2007
8:38 PM

Post #4218080

MaVie, can you post a photo of the crowd for us after T day? Oh, why not do a TDay thread of pictures and stories? I don't have a camera for my suggestion but maybe I will get one. The photos of those w/ crowds have got to be posted.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2007
11:21 PM

Post #4218454

Anastatia ... i would like to oblige ur request, but u are 10 yrs late on this request. a lot of the elders and so is one of my son who died early this year is no longer with us. most of the kids, both my children, nephews and nieces are scattered all over the U.S. and the world. these kids are too Americanized, they do not follow the Filipino close family ties. it u noticed i said in the previous thread "of the years gone by".

i am very proud of my family, as i am sure, they are of me. in the days gone by, we had 4 generations on both sides of the family. i am the eldest amongst all the grandchildren. at the time, i took the liberty of leading and putting the family together for family reunion during holiday seasons.

cooking is my passion, although i am separated from siblings and family, i still enjoy cooking to share with neighbors that live alone.

although there is no longer a family to show, i will try to take photo of what i will fix tomorrow before sharing with other. i hope others will join in with photos of their brined turkey or whatever it was they they brined.

whew! it is not easy to respond cuz trying to remember brings sadness of the gone happy yesteryears.
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2007
1:31 AM

Post #4218825

*sends a huge hug high on the winds to drop down softly around Ma Vie*

In sharing your stories and recipes and tips, you've made all of us a part of your family now. Thank you!!!


The duckling that I'm currently brining is still a wee bit frozen. I had it in a stockpot inside a cooler on the back porch. It's now in the kitchen so I can pull out the neck and giblets in an hour or so. They're still kind of stuck at the moment. LOL

Our own Thanksgiving celebration has been postponed for a couple of days. But that's okay. The actual day of celebration is unimportant. :)

And I'll try to remember to take a picture of our small feast.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 22, 2007
8:01 AM

Post #4219564

thank you Donna, i needed one big time. i have always considered DG members not as a friend but family. even in real life, friends i met always considered me as family, in as much as they wanted to be part of natural family. my parents are always shock when they see "new faces" coming to my house, and these new faces addresses my parents as mom and dad.

it must be cold where u are, where i am during daytime is very warm, but night time is cold.

i brined a 20 lb turkey Monday, i was surprise this morning the bird is totally thawed. that is all new to me, i have not experience that before. someone has the same experience, was very concerned due to the advance stage of the bird thawing too soon. i just told her to add some ice to maintain the 35 degree temperature. it should hold untill tomorrow when she is ready to roast the turkey.

i hope ur duck turn out great! Happy Thanksgiving Everyone, to you and yours,
ma vie
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2007
9:09 AM

Post #4219602

Hello again, Ma Vie.

I'm sure you're quite busy getting everything prepared for your friends and might even be asleep by now, but I wanted to wish you a wonderful Thanksgiving celebration. :)

Holidays can be difficult when you reflect back on those who are no longer here physically, especially folks you have lost recently. I still weep sometimes when I'm sharing stories about my own grandparents and father, and they all passed years ago. But oh, such wonderful memories!

And it doesn't surprise me that you meet people who want to be a part of your family. You are so charming here in just written words!

Have a great Thanksgiving, Ma Vie. I already know that the food will be good, and am pretty sure that your guests will be wonderful companions. Have a little glass of wine and kick your feet back at the end of the day. You deserve it!

As one of my dear Canadian friends likes to say, "Hugs and smiles across the miles". I'll be thinking of you. :)

Donna
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2007
1:06 PM

Post #4219739

We're not brining ours this year...*sniffle*. I wanted to, but I am not the one cooking it this time. I was in an accident November 6, so Howie has been doing a lot around here while I am still recovering. He's had enough on his plate, so brining isn't a priority. I can't blame him for that!

I'm trying not to assume it won't be as good this year. LOL On the plus side, her pastor said we could use the church's fellowship hall and kitchen for our family gathering since our house is so small and there are about 20 people coming. That is a tremendous relief! It'll just be us there. We will all eat at one table, there won't be any TV and we can play games at the tables. AND...there won't be a big mess at home afterward. Yay!
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

November 23, 2007
4:45 PM

Post #4222293

OMG! Everyone agreed - the best turkey we've ever cooked! It was obvious when carving the turkeys that the white meat was moist but, when eaten, it was delicious! I will never pooh-pooh the idea of brining again. I only have two regrets - 1) I didn't take photos of the turkey and, 2) we don't have any left-overs. :(

Added note: the Emeril's poultry rub worked out just fine. I think most any seasoning mix would work well. I didn't rub it into the bird like a rub is designed to be used, I just added it to the brining mix for flavor. It would be interesting to experiment with different seasonings while brining chickens.

Thanks for sharing your recipe, Ma Vie!

Debra

Here's 1/2 of us visiting before dessert was served.

Thumbnail by fleursdefouquet
Click the image for an enlarged view.

WantabeGardener
Jerome, MI
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2007
4:56 PM

Post #4222330

Oh what a nice picture...We must all had success storys...heheh I did two cornish game hens...so great...added Orange juice..not diluted, in the brine...wowow..best hens we have ever had...but too much..heheh...always...on Thanksgiving..too much food...lol...So there are many things you can brine..I wonder about red meats..? Maybe I missed that in this..post...

Well Happy day after everyone...

Smiles...Diana...

ViolaAnn

ViolaAnn
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 5a)

November 23, 2007
5:51 PM

Post #4222532

May try a brined turkey at Christmas. One question - I usually buy a fresh turkey. I saw references above to brining them as they thaw. But how long would you recommend brining for a fresh bird?

Ann

Depsi

Depsi
Orofino, ID
(Zone 6a)

November 23, 2007
10:50 PM

Post #4223242

OHMYGOODNESS All, I used the brine recipe from MaVie and no kidding, it was the very best. I was skeptical about the pickling spices but everything just went together perfectly and yes, it was all very moist. One tip I use that has worked for me for many years is I dry the bird very well, season the inside, stuff it, then salt & pepper the outside, then spray the pan, rack and backside of the turkey with butter flavored Pam, place it on the the rack in the roaster and spray down the top side with the Pam. It has always worked wonderfully for me and the pans are a breeze to clean up. Deb
PiggyPoo
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

November 23, 2007
11:31 PM

Post #4223405

Greetings MaVie ;)

Just want to let you know, that the turkey that thawed so quickly here, was indeed kept in the very cold ice water, and it worked out just fine yesterday. And yes, the very best bird we've ever had. My thanks and compliments to you for the help. The other thing I discovered being a HUGE advantage to brining was I actually had space in my fridge for other things, with the lack of a 20+ lb bird in there!!

I'm definitely sold :)
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2007
8:06 AM

Post #4227046

Our brined duckling at lunch was a fabulous hit! Not that I'm terribly surprised... hehehe

We didn't have to twist "Grandma's" arm to take home some of the duckling along with portions of the side dishes for a couple of "TV dinners". Our 19-year-old son cleaned up all the leftover side dishes at dinner time, then chose to have a cupcake to fill the rest of his tummy instead of a little more duck. Well, he *is* still kind of a kid. ;)

I'm just glad we have another duckling in the freezer... and a turkey... and I mentioned to my love that maybe we need to start buying and brining chickens and Cornish hens. He gave me two thumbs up on that idea.

This method is so incredibly easy! When we combine it with the very slow roasting written about in one of Adelle Davis's books, there's just no way to make a mistake. And by washing the brine off, you get the flavour of the bird which remains with a gentle seasoning. Very nice.

The only thing I forgot was to take a photo of the feast! Oops.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2007
5:05 PM

Post #4227853

Those of you that brined a big bird, what container did you use? We had our usual 13 # so a HD orange bucket sufficed. But a 19 or 20#? "Mom, I can't take a bath cuz there is a turkey in the tub!"
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2007
6:09 PM

Post #4228046

We used a large, rounded plastic tote for the biggest birds. It had a rope handle on each side. It was larger than a laundry basket, probably 2' across at the top. Last year, we used our very large Igloo cooler. There was a 1/2 inch or so of bird above the water line, but we put ice pack on that part and just turned the bird after a while so everything was evenly brined.
PiggyPoo
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

November 25, 2007
6:53 PM

Post #4228195

I used one of our camping ice chests, and put the brining solution in a big trash bag, inside of another trash bag, then added ice inside of the chest. Worked great

Depsi

Depsi
Orofino, ID
(Zone 6a)

November 25, 2007
8:03 PM

Post #4228402

I did the same exact thing PiggyPoo did...Deb
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

November 25, 2007
9:04 PM

Post #4228625

Ditto here ... doubled trash bags in an ice chest and just enough ice to keep the birds cool. I had plenty of room for two 10# birds. And easy to clean up! Just throw the trash bags away and rinse out the ice chest. Even though the brine was contained in the bags we rinsed with a little bleach water to be on the safe side.

gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2007
9:44 PM

Post #4228741

Next time we brine, we'll use trash bags in addition to the cooler. That would make it a lot easier!
PiggyPoo
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

November 26, 2007
2:05 AM

Post #4229540

A little rough taking the bird out. It took a lot of solution to cover my 20+ lb bird. so it was very heavy! Next year I'll do two smaller ones.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 26, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #4230026

Two smaller will take less time to roast, too...If they'll fit side-by-side in your oven.
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

November 26, 2007
12:37 PM

Post #4230474

LOL! One of the things I'm thankful for at Thanksgiving and Christmas - a double oven!
joycet
Franklin, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 26, 2007
3:39 PM

Post #4231007

Well, I fixed my brined turkey yesterday and I can tell you that I will never fix it any other way. Oh yum...
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2007
8:32 PM

Post #4304586

It's Monday, and time to brine the turkey for our extended family celebration on Saturday.

Our 14-pound bird will take about 3 days to thaw in the brine. We're adding one extra day since our outside temperatures are hovering around the freezing mark, and the bird will be on the porch. Then we'll slow cook it overnight on Friday using the Adelle Davis method I've mentioned before. :)

I just need to scrub out our cooler because I still need my stockpots for canning sauerkraut. I'm so grateful for all the wonderful tips that Ma Vie and others have provided on this thread!

Ma Vie, would you like some of our snow? hehehe It sure is pretty outside. :)

Have a wonderful brining holiday season, everyone!

*then sends a big hug on the wind down to Ma Vie, because everyone needs at least one a day*

Donna
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2007
8:43 PM

Post #4304601

hi Donna,

we do have snow also. it's terrible cold in neck of the wood, at least for this o'le lady :). we will also have a white Christmas on this end. u may not believe it, but i live in the higher mountains of So. Calif.

i am at the moment experimenting on "brining pork fresh ham" i'll roast it in the oven, hoping to come up with super crunchy skin and very moist meat. i will let u guys know how it turns out. it is brining right now. i started it yesterday,

hugz back at you Donna.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO EVERYONE!
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

December 17, 2007
8:46 PM

Post #4304608

Uh oh! Sounds like another irresistable recipe! Ma Vie, we plan on cooking both a turkey and ham for Christmas. Of course the turkey will be brined after such success at Thanksgiving. Please RUSH your reaction to the brined ham. That sounds sooooo good!

Sening you and your family very warm holiday wishes,

Debra
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2007
9:06 PM

Post #4304647

Debra, i wish i could rush the process, but i can not fight with Mother Nature with the time. besides, i am somewhat of a perfectionist, i want to be sure the recipe is fool proof and will not fail, specially to those who do not cook regularly or are new to the kitchen.

i also have to do several batches to test on. the spices for pork is so much different from poultry spices. i have to find some that are very accessible. i had difficulty finding juniper berries in my neck of the wood. i do not know if it is readily available in other areas. not to mention it is expensive.

i wanted to develop a pork recipe that is user friendly.

bear with me, and we will have another good recipe.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2007
9:10 PM

Post #4304652

I've never seen juniper berries in any store. Probably can get them online from someone like Penzey's.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 17, 2007
9:51 PM

Post #4304766

Juniper berries are sometimes available at health food stores so you might try there.

MaVie, will be looking forward to your brined pork results!

Shoe
Kidneyguy
Verona, ON

December 18, 2007
1:53 AM

Post #4305387

Oh MA Vie I am so looking forward to your Prined Pork recipe. Shoe is right I bought juniper berries at a Health Food store last year and I have also seen them dried at a Scoop and Weigh/Bulk Barn type store. Oh yum I am getting my mouth ready for this taste...
Happy Holidays sweet lady.
Dianne
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

December 18, 2007
3:38 PM

Post #4306937

Thanks for bumping this... I think I'll do my first try on a large (chicken) hen.
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

December 18, 2007
6:56 PM

Post #4307564

FlowrLady, you won't be sorry!

Like Dianne, I'm very interested to learn how Ma Vie's brined ham works out. I've never cooked a 'fresh' ham. Colour me a "city slicker" (although I'm more of a "big town slicker")! hehehe

My first thought was that it might become too salty... but then I remembered how the salt and sugar balance one another when using it with the birds. :)

And I've long wanted to try a recipe with Juniper berries. I wonder if their flavour is similar to that of pine nuts or perhaps even capers (which I also realize are from two different types of plants). Could anyone describe that flavour for me?

*~*~*~*~*
As a side note, I would be happy to start a new thread if Ma Vie says it's okay. I know there are so many wonderful tips on this one, I would hate to miss one. I think I could capture most of them and have Ma Vie double-check for accuracy through D-mails. Perhaps after the New Year when life slows down a bit for all of us?

Donna
Ponditis
Payette, ID
(Zone 7a)

December 18, 2007
11:21 PM

Post #4308383

I can go out and pick juniper berries from my shrubs anytime I need them and they are delicious. Hard to describe the flavor in cooking as I don't think there is anything else that tastes like them other than possibly gin. (Gin is made from juniper berries)

If you have access to a juniper you can nibble on a berry and find out the pine taste they have or just chew on a pine needle. Their fragrance while cooking makes my mouth drool.

Ma Vie,

Thank you so much for all your recipes and trouble you go through to make sure that these recipes are easy for new cooks to use. I have been cooking since I was 5 years old and always welcome a new and easy recipe.

I would love for this thread to become a sticky and a new thread started for those on dial up.

Lani



MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 19, 2007
12:00 AM

Post #4308500

no worry folks. thanks Darius and Horshoe. several months ago, i ask my son Mike to find me juniper berries in the local stores in the Palo Alto, San Jose and San Francisco area.

i knew i will be needing the juniper berries soon. sometime back, i tasted a pork dish in one Las Vegas exclusive restaurant. being so curious, i had to ask the chef to give me an idea what the distinct flavor i could not decipher. he was very kind to tell me, it was the juniper berries! since that time, it has been hooked on that dish and i promise myself to recreate that recipe it not create something close to it, the chef did not share his recipe. btw... juniper berries are not cheap either.

from some basic cooking i learned from the great cooks in the family whose existence on earth has terminated, and from my own cooking experience.. i am now, inclined to develop this brined pork roast, cuz i longed so much to taste that flavor again! but this time, it is my own recipe. if i am not happy during the 1st few test, i will keep on looking for the "right flavor" for pork. similar to successful poultry recipe.

there is already an existing version of the turkey brined recipe, but everyone keep on returning to the original thread, this thread Tig created. the other thread http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/670025/

eventually i will open a new thread for the Pork Brine recipe as soon as i find some result. if i am not happy with 1st few results, i will keep on working till i find the right recipe that will suit me. i overheard once from a friend chef from Italy, residing in Los Angeles. he says "a good recipe is created by a special cook who has very distinct and delicate taste bud. i tend to agree with him. modesty aside, i have been blessed to produce good tasting dish on the table for my family and friends.

speaking of recipe, i have a super special fruit cake recipe, pass on in our family for several generations. i have tested, altered this "secret" recipe to suit my taste. if i share this recipe, soon this recipe will no longer be a secret. besides, is there such thing as secret? not in my book. secrets are never meant to be kept. in a way my recipe was a secret for the longest i keep it. no member of my family knew it. all there is of this special recipe was the finished product, the whole family loved when i sent their lion's share of the cake. if interested do let me know, i will be more than happy to share.

the fruitcake recipe might be late for this year, but if u treasure it as i did, i know u will not regret to have to test it in ur kitchen. i can guarantee u this flavor of this recipe or my name is not ma vie.

here are some info on juniper berries http://www.apinchof.com/juniper1105.html , http://bristen.com/zgourmet/JuniperDetail.htm , http://www.recipes4us.co.uk/Specials and Holidays/Juniper Berries Origin Uses Recipes.htm

caper's info... http://www.apinchof.com/capers1038.html , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caper , http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-capers.htm
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 19, 2007
12:20 AM

Post #4308570

sorry Lani, we must have cross post. there is another thread for the brined turkey recipe. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/670025/ it is the same recipe, but people always come to this thread.

i much prefer to create the new thread, so i can incorporate the whole recipe, not just a referral kind of link. i hope everyone understand. the 2nd link, is the same recipe, only the spices were changed for convenience purposes, and lesser price but will produce the same flavor and moist end product.

if my nine year old grand daughter can make this recipe by herself [i was told she made this recipe with chicken to surprise her mother on her birthday.], it is good example for me to know. it proved to me that this recipe is really an easy simple recipe.

Happy Holidays to Everyone.
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

December 19, 2007
9:10 AM

Post #4309603

Ma Vie, I've read all of the articles you provided about juniper berries and capers. THANK YOU! I love capers, and was introduced to them through various dishes at "Romano's Macaroni Grill" which is one of the restaurants referred to in those articles.

I fully respect your choice on setting up new threads. I just wanted to offer my help if you wanted it. :)

*chuckles at Ma Vie's comment about secret recipes*

Why keep them secret? I agree with you; everyone loves a great dish so why not share it?

*then waves at Lani and smiles*

While I can't say I'm a fan of either gin or tonic (tonic tastes like Alka-Selsor to me - yuck!), I would still be interested in trying a dish made with juniper berries. I've been known to chew on a few pine needles, and really like the smell and flavour. Perhaps it's time to plant a juniper here. *winks*
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 20, 2007
2:46 AM

Post #4312147

SUCCESS, SUCCESS, SUCCESS!!!

whooooopppppppppppeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!! jumping and doing happy dance! allow me to compose myself. i will open a new thread for the Brined Pork. flavor is great! no hint of the spices used. a well balance moist and very tasty soft meat. skin is crunchy as expected.

i ran out of battery power for the digital camera. i will be right back.

although the recipe is a success, i will definitely be working on the recipe and procedures. this is my initial try to brine pork, for this recipe. i am hoping to find reasonable spice price and availability. find the difference between use of difference spices.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 20, 2007
3:14 AM

Post #4312265

Congrats, MaVie!

Looking forward to more info! and Pics!!

Shoe
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 20, 2007
3:28 AM

Post #4312295

thank you Shoe :D.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/798566/

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 20, 2007
1:56 PM

Post #4313043

Oh, Goodie!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 23, 2009
9:32 AM

Post #7199677

i guess it is that time of the year. i am bumping this recipe, for people to have enough time to prepare and make choices. and for new members who joined us in cooking.

i've seen so many subjects about TG [Thanks Giving] lately, hopefully this recipe will help others who has not ventured in the brining meat of all kinds. this same recipe has help so many DG members in the past, and will make another TG dinner hassle FREE!

good luck and more power to everyone. talking about less hassle during TG cooking. this is it!!!
lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

October 23, 2009
12:44 PM

Post #7199930

MaVieRose, you are so right. You really can tell the difference when you brine with MaVieRose's recipe.
Maybe a new thread. New DG's
members won't have this on their watch list.☺
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 23, 2009
1:15 PM

Post #7199999

hi Edna,

there was an updated recipe, same recipe that i edit for better reading. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/670025/ but, some people keep coming back to the original.

there are also other thread discussing this recipe, unfortunately i was not able to respond, i prolly was hospitalized at the time http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/673233/ i found it by accident finding this brine recipe.

by far ever since i had this formula, Thanks Giving had been stress free and so easy to cook the bird.

i've been doing fine lately, how are u?

ma vie
tomatofreak
Phoenix, AZ

October 23, 2009
4:34 PM

Post #7200545

Where did tiG go? I'd like to thank her for starting this thread and to MaVie for all the incredibly good recipes and advice here! I'll be a new briny convert this year. (You can't all be wrong about how delicious your turkeys were.:-)) I might have to try that cod, too. It all sounds very yummy.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2009
6:53 PM

Post #7203938

Alma,

i was visiting my son at the time this recipe was posted by TiG. i bragged to her, how it was almost effortless for me to cook a very tasty, yet super moist turkey. make long story short, i gave her the my recipe. she then post it here to share with everyone.

TiG is now busy with her brugs' business and web site. i believe she is very busy with both. she has been long gone from DG.

good luck and do let us know how ur TG [thanksgiving] cooking adventure turned out this yr.

have u tried the pork dish i shared with u, cooked in oyster sauce yet?
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

October 24, 2009
11:55 PM

Post #7204866

Since trying this recipe the first year it was posted, I'm no longer allowed to serve turkey without brining it. Everyone loves it!
tomatofreak
Phoenix, AZ

October 25, 2009
6:32 PM

Post #7206992

I have two fat chickens in the fridge and I'd love to try this brine. I think both would go in my biggest pot. However, I want to take the bony pieces off to make broth. So can I put chicken *halves* minus the backs and wings in the broth and have it come out well. I'm planning to grill the chicken after it's brined.

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2009
7:12 PM

Post #7207153

I think I'd put the whole chickens in the brine, then cut them for grilling once they are brined. You can still make your broth with the backs/neck/wings, etc. (Personally I like to save all the leftover bones, fat, backmeat, etc and make a broth with them after the meal!)

Shoe, already looking forward to this years brined turkey, or chicken, or, or...hmmmm.

MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2009
8:06 PM

Post #7207324

Alma ... as Shoe advised, brine, grill or roast them whole. then make ur broth with the bones or bony parts. that is what i do all the time. try make ur chores easier, not more or difficult on urself.

one reason why i enjoy doing things i do is b/c i always find ways how to make things easier for myself both in the garden and the kitchen. as mentioned previously, i brine, grill or roast ahead of time... gives me plenty of time to play in the garden.

hi Shoe, how are things with u? have u tried using ur collapsible herb dryer yet?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2009
8:44 PM

Post #7207416

Howdy, MaVie...

I had my dryer out this year, longingly looking at it to put it to work. However, we had such a wet and cool year it never seemed like we'd have enough dry (or NOT humid) days in a row to give it a try. Never fear though, this past week I pulled up a bunch of pepper plants and was thinking of putting some picked peppers in the dryer and hanging it in the greenhouse where it gets nice and warm, sometimes downright HOT in there! Thanks for that gift, it is a real treasure!

Shoe (off to wander about outside one last time before I lose the last of my daylight, and also wondering what to do with this Bok Choy..hint, hint!)

Thumbnail by Horseshoe
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2009
9:53 PM

Post #7207597

the weather never worry me to dry anything. i simply hang the collapsible dryer in the garage, place anything and everything i want to dry in there. one yr, i had bumper crop of German sweet peppers. i dry them in the collapsible dryer, then dry them more @ 250 degree oven over night. make long story short, i had supply of sweet paprika after grinding the dried peppers in a coffee grinder. some of the dried peppers, i used to stew pork or beef in the crock pot. no recipes used, just use common sense on what will work. meat, dried peppers, a few black pepper corn and bay leaf and 1 onion. cover enough water to soften and flavor the meat. if adventurous enough, add 1 cup marinara sauce, boil away excess liquid to make thick gravy.

bokchoy i stir fry in garlic and onions, perhaps add 1 slice apple to add sweetness naturally. use it also in making soup or boiled chicken or meat. if u have plenty, experiment in making kimchi.

when i grew bokchoy, if the weather cooperates, i do not pull the whole plant. i pick some of outer leaves and use what i pick for cooking. these way i do not worry about space in the fridge. Asians, dry or pickle bokchoy too for winter use and preservation reasons.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 25, 2009
10:13 PM

Post #7207649

Good info. Thanks! (I have 45 heads of BokChoy left in my garden so have plenty to play with~!)

Okay, off to pull out the dryer and get it to working for me this week!

shoe
tomatofreak
Phoenix, AZ

October 26, 2009
1:30 AM

Post #7208375

OK, will do; I was just wondering if brined chicken would change the taste of the broth. Maybe I will just use the carcass. KISS, KISS... I have to remember to Keep It Simple, Silly!
MichaelZ
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

October 26, 2009
2:16 AM

Post #7208534

Tomatofreak, as long as it tastes good it is good. I have a go-to broth that I make on a regular basis and it will always taste about the same, but I try to never waste a carcass. The flavors will vary depending on the original cooking recipe. Don't sweat it unless you are doing McDonalds where it all has to taste the same every minute of every day. If that is the standard we are better off finding a brand name broth and buying it by the can and not being adventurous. My advice, have fun and save money...not to mention the crap that goes into making the can and preserving the broth. I am not a purist and I do buy things in cans and I keep a couple of cans of Swanson broth in case of emergency.

For health reasons I do suggest chilling as quickly as possible (I throw in a couple of frozen plastic bottles of water) before freezing and before using give it a few minutes of hard boil. I even pre-boil canned stock.

I guess, all I am saying is be careful AND have fun. Not necessarily in that order. :-)
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 26, 2009
4:29 AM

Post #7208896

yes Alma, the flavor will be better. remember the brine was made to balance taste and improve flavor. be sure to rinse off the brine from the meat, after brining. someone made the mistake of not rinsing off the brine from the meat, and had somewhat salty result.

i had tested and improved this brine recipe since 2001. the latest improvement done on this thread http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/670025/ do not worry, it is still based on the same formula.

if u have had the opportunity to read the lengthy info's on this thread, i have mentioned flavor of this recipe is well balanced flavor. gravy made from the dripping is just right also in flavor.

when i brine any type of meat, i always make stock out of the bones from the brined meat. stock produced better flavor when the bones & meat are brined and the veggies are roasted.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 17, 2009
7:26 PM

Post #7283227

BUMP!!
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #7284155

Thanks Pat. have brine a turkey or chicken or any meat yet? this and part !! is one and the same recipe. u should try it and never regret it. in fact, u will love it due to moist, tasty meat and balance flavor for any use u wish to serve it.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 18, 2009
4:28 AM

Post #7285128

MaVie, I believe every word you say, but no, I haven't tried one yet. But it sounds so good I want "newbies" to know about it, too!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 12, 2010
1:30 PM

Post #8208374

IT'S THAT TIME, AGAIN! NOT, "CRYIN' TIME." "BRINING TIME!" ^:-)^
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 12, 2010
5:13 PM

Post #8208760

I have been waitin' and waitin' for this bump.
this is the recipe from PioneerWoman. We have been deep frying our birds for the past 3 yrs. and I make a batch of gravy in advance w/ turkey legs etc.
I am going to try this Thanksgiving 2010
3 cups Apple Juice Or Apple Cider
2 gallons Cold Water
4 Tablespoons Fresh Rosemary Leaves
5 cloves Garlic, Minced
1- cup Kosher Salt
2 cups Brown Sugar
3 Tablespoons Peppercorns
5 whole Bay Leaves
Peel Of Three Large Oranges
bring the above to boil then turn off heat. Cool completely & then submerge turkey for 16+ hrs. .After the the turkey has been in the brine for 16+ hrs remove and submerge in cool clear water for 15 min. Remove & pat dry. Cook turkey.
Melissa_Ohio
Southwestern, OH
(Zone 6b)

November 21, 2011
7:55 PM

Post #8900823

bump bump bump :)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 22, 2011
1:44 AM

Post #8901065

This thread has had 4,323 views!! I wonder if that's a record?
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 22, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8901456

I guess it's appropriate for this thread to be bumped up this week~! Happy Thanksgiving everyone.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2011
8:12 PM

Post #8903515

thanks for bumping.

i do not know about record of views. this thread shows we are brining since 2001, before brining became a fad.

some tips u may use:

freeze whole onions 15-20 before peeling or chopping to prevent tears. good tip if u hate crying while peeling or chopping onions.

easy peeling garlic - get two even size bowls. separate garlic cloves from garlic head. place all garlic cloves in one bowl. cover with the 2nd bowl. hold both bowls tight and shake vigorously for garlic to peel. i normally do 5 heads of garlic if i do some heavy cooking.

hope these tips help u.

Happy Thanksgiving to ALL!
Jianhua
Shangshui, Henan
China
(Zone 7b)

November 26, 2011
6:35 AM

Post #8906221

Hi, MaVieRose,
True is it that this thread can be dated back to the year 2001. Almost ten years!
While scrolling up the long queue, ponder of stream runs through inside me. MichaelZ, pebble, WantabeGardener, and TuttiFrutti, those who left words in here left us and might be going on gardening up in the paradise. Life span is not without limitation, but we should try to be with happiness every day. I appreciate your attitude to life -- offering help to others all the while . I am convinced that a great number have benefited from this practical recipe.
Happy Thanksgiving!
Jianhua
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 9, 2011
12:14 PM

Post #8922853

Sorry Jianhua for not having responded promptly. i had a mild heart attack on 11/27. i was taken by paramedics to the hospital. i was release on 12/01. since i got home, i was resting to recuperate. i am fine, no bad damage on my physical being.

yes, i do indeed missed all our dear friends. when i was taken to the hospital, i thought i was to join our dear, dear friends. i missed them all cuz they were close and dear to my heart. they all must have a very nice garden in paradise.

most people u mentioned, and has gone by did send me private DM with their inquiries and other things to say. u forgot to mention Donna/socal.

again i am sorry. hope to make up for lost time.

ma vie
lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

December 9, 2011
12:29 PM

Post #8922877

MaVia, so happy you are home from the hospital. First I have heard about this. Hope you are doing well now. Sending prayers and hugs.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 9, 2011
2:43 PM

Post #8923053

MaVie,
A speedy recovery blessing is being sent your way! Thank you sooooooooooooooooooo much for all you have shared with us here in the Garden!

Godspeed!

Linda
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2011
4:12 PM

Post #8923141

Howdy MaVie... I've been thinking about you a lot lately, wondering how you have been, what your latest adventure is, and of course, "What's cookin'!?"...

Sorry to hear of your ill health but sure am glad to hear you are home again and doing well. It just proves you can't keep a good woman down, eh!

Looking forward to hearing a good progress report from you.

Shoe
Jianhua
Shangshui, Henan
China
(Zone 7b)

December 24, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8941363

MaVieRose,
Very glad to hear that you've recovered from the mild heart attack.
Time is coming into the year of 2012, a year of dragon, according to Chinese lunar calendar. Here I'd like to express my greetings to you all:
Merry Christmas and happy winter holidays!
wish you in the new year good health, good feeling and good wealth.
Jianhua

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2011
6:45 AM

Post #8941384

MaVie, glad you are recovering just fine. I've missed your food posts.

Jianhua, how lovely to see you posting and to know you are well! I was born in the Year of the Dragon so I hope this one will be good also. Felicitations old friend!
flsusie
New Port Richey, FL

November 19, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9337352

bump
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2012
3:45 PM

Post #9337430

Thanks, Susie
flsusie
New Port Richey, FL

November 19, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9337474

Thanks, but thank MaVie!!!!! This recipe should be on every turkey along with the cooking and thawing instructions. It adds moistness and enhances the flavor of the turkey without changing the flavor or overpowering it with too many seasonings, and it's super easy.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #9337485

After using MaVie's recipe more or less for several years, this year I'm brining a duck in a citrus brine. The salt/sugar ratio will stay the same.

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