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PlantFiles Pictures: Mango (Mangifera indica)

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PanamonCreel
Celaya
Mexico
(Zone 10a)


March 30, 2003
10:57 PM

Post #500730

Mango, Bowen Mango
Mangifera indica

About 3 Month old

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2250/

Thumbnail by PanamonCreel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 16, 2004
3:03 AM

Post #953741

That's amazing, every time I try to plant a mango, the seed usually rotts. Can you please give me your technique on how you grew that mango tree! Do you leave the pod covering the bean on? Or do you tear out the bean from the pod. Please reply.
PanamonCreel
Celaya
Mexico
(Zone 10a)


July 16, 2004
3:28 AM

Post #953789

First off, make sure that pod is absolutely clean (lots of scrubbing :).
On one side of the pod there is a parting line (cut back the fiber) which should be pried open. Best is to start with a knife on the pointed end and then gently pry the rest down to blunt end open with your fingers. You only have to crack it open a bit and do not have to remove the pod. Do all that without damaging the embryo inside.
Place the "cracked" pod with the blunt end down into a small container with about 1/2" of water inside. Change the water every few days and in a week or two a root should be emerging and once the root is nicely grown you can plant into soil.
Note that the embryo inside should be looking nicely fleshy and big. Many may be immature due to early harvesting and forced ripening of the fruit and thus may not propagate.

Good luck!

Milan
Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 18, 2004
12:41 AM

Post #956267

Thanks, but does the fruit on the pod do somthing to it's normal growth (even just a little?)

You place the cracked part of the pit facing up, right?
And (sorry if I am sounding ignorant) how does the water get into the hard pod? I have been wondering about that forever.

By the way, how is that mango in the picture doing? It looks really healthy, is it bigger?

thanks.
PanamonCreel
Celaya
Mexico
(Zone 10a)


July 18, 2004
4:06 AM

Post #956554

I guess the pod gives it some sort of protection from the elements.
The cracked part is along one side of the pod. The blunt end (the side where the fruit was hanging from the tree) allows water to enter and contact the root of the embryo inside. Usually it should be able to open the pod itself but due to long storage and early harvest (as mentioned previously) it helps the weaker embryo to crack the pod open.
The plant in the pic is no more due to it being hit by surprise frost :(.
Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 18, 2004
4:41 AM

Post #956596

Sorry to here about the frost, soo, lemme get this straight.

You make the crack on the top, on the other side of the part where the fruit was hanging? Sorry, I just wanna get all the info :)
PanamonCreel
Celaya
Mexico
(Zone 10a)


July 18, 2004
1:35 PM

Post #956914

I would make you some pictures but do not have a seed right now. Just take a close look at my original picture above and you'll see the opening along the side on the pod. It's the side where alot of the "hairs" emerge. Get a few mangos and experiment :). The secret is not to damage the embryo inside when cracking the pod open.
Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 18, 2004
10:20 PM

Post #957528

It would help alot, but that's okay. SO, you make the crack on the side, not the top? If so, what part do I make the crack on? Do you make the crack on the part with the embryo, so the crack is right over it, over the other side? (I never seen a pit with the embryo in the middle!) I tryed to make out the picture, but I couldn't see it. (the pebbles were in the way) The picture shows 2 techniques. Can you tell me which is right or wrong, or if both are wrong?

-Thanks.

Thumbnail by Dobe
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ulrich
Manhattan Beach, CA
(Zone 11)

July 18, 2004
10:51 PM

Post #957555

Great drawings, Dobe. I'm impressed. What program or method did you use? A dobe (Illustrator :~)?
Pun intended.
Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 18, 2004
11:10 PM

Post #957571

Wow, it's Ulrich. And he complimented me :). I've seen YOUR plants and stuff, boy that is impressive. Thanks alot, I used "Paint MS" alot of PC's come with it for free. It was a little sketch I didn't put much effort it :)

-later
Ulrich
Manhattan Beach, CA
(Zone 11)

July 18, 2004
11:19 PM

Post #957586

That takes a lot more talent than pointing a camera.

Good luck with the Mango.
Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 18, 2004
11:31 PM

Post #957596

Thanks.
PanamonCreel
Celaya
Mexico
(Zone 10a)


July 19, 2004
12:42 AM

Post #957672

Nice artist work there, sorry for messing it up a bit ;)

Thumbnail by PanamonCreel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 19, 2004
3:48 AM

Post #957881

Thanks alot, I'll try it. Did you find that way out for yourself? By the way, would the root come out of the side? Or bust through the blunt end? And can I have your email, so if I have any more questions?

-Thanks.
PanamonCreel
Celaya
Mexico
(Zone 10a)


July 19, 2004
2:26 PM

Post #958391

Some Info I got from the Web the rest figured out by experimenting :).
The root should come out through the crack in the side. You can actually see the immature root on the embryo when looking inside.
Just send me an E-Mail via DG if you need some additional info.
WalterT
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10a)

July 19, 2004
5:03 PM

Post #958607

Greetings Mango Maniacs!
I have been growing mangos from seed for years and have developed a good method. In southern California they grow well in frost-free locations. At my previous house I had a tree that grew 15 ft. tall in about 10 years. It began bearing fruit after 5 years and there is nothing like a tree-ripened mango. The fruit that is imported from S. America or Mexico has been picked green so it will be hard enough to stand the trip to the US and it also has been refrigerated therefore many seeds are not viable and may even have begun to rot. Some even sprout and grow inside the husk! To make sure the seed is viable, I first eat the flesh and clean the husk a bit then let it dry for a few days so it can be handled easily. Speaking of eating and handling: mangos are in the family of Anacardiaceae along with poison oak/ivy, so if you are at all allergic to those plants, be sure to wash your hands and face well after eating a mango and working with the seed. Otherwise you may break out in an itchy rash a few days later.
After the seed has dried enough to be handled easily, take a sharp knife or scissors and remove the fibre from the edge of the husk so that you can open it very carefully. Remove the seed so you can see if it is healthy. You will see the embryo at one end from which the root and plant will sprout. Have in advance prepared a cradle from a strip of hardware cloth nearly as wide as the seed is long, in the shape of a U with wings. Cut out a notch at the bottom of the U at one side and place the seed in the cradle with the root end over the notch.
Then place the cradle in the mouth of a deep jar with the wings of the U stickng out over the sides of the jar. Add water to cover the bottom of the seed and place the jar in a sunny window where it will be warm but not hot. Add water as needed. In a few days the root will start growing downward and then the sprout will unfold and grow upward. Make sure that the root does not grow through a hole in the hardware cloth but rather through the notch you cut for it.
Mango trees have long, deep tap roots so transplant your seedling into a DEEP pot when the root reaches the bottom of the jar. The seedling lives off the substance in the seed for several weeks and grows very fast at first. Fortunately I live in a frost-free area of S. California and don't have the problem of having to lug a big heavy pot in and out of the house according to the season. After a few years a mango tree can probably stand a little LIGHT frost, but not much.
Good luck! WalterT. in San Diego
WalterT
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10a)

July 19, 2004
5:18 PM

Post #958623

Here is an image of green mangos my garden in San Diego, CA. They ripened in late fall and were sweet and juicey. WalterT.

Thumbnail by WalterT
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 19, 2004
5:34 PM

Post #958641

Wow, nice technique, You grew that mango tree from seed??
I wish I lived in a frost free zone, I live in Fresno, CA, It frost there like crazy.
WalterT
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2004
6:46 PM

Post #960263

Hi Dobe and All Mango Maniacs:
Yes, I grew that tree from a seed. Don't know which cultivar is I had not yet educated myself about Mangos.
Here is an image of a Tommy Atkins mango - 50 cents in on one of San Diego's supermarkets. Alongside the mango you will see the cradle I make of half inch hardware cloth as I described previously. One way to get well-ripened mangos is to ask the produce man at the market if there are any mango culls in the back that are going to be thrown out. Tell the guy you want them for the seeds. I once got a bag of 10 for a dollar that way! Some were edible still! Not a bad deal. Try different markets as some won't cooperate.

Thumbnail by WalterT
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dobe
Fresno, CA

July 22, 2004
1:08 AM

Post #962362

YEAH, that's a smart idea, I was thinking of doing that too! Nice mango in that image back there. By the way, how old is that mango tree you have?

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