Photo by Melody
Are you ready? It's time for our 14th annual photo contest! Enter your best pictures of the year, for a chance to win a calendar and annual subscription here. Hurry! Deadline for entries is October 21.

European Gardening: calling all Irish gardeners

Communities > Forums > European Gardening
bookmark
Forum: European GardeningReplies: 53, Views: 679
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
mark
Antrim, Northern Ire
United Kingdom
(Zone 8b)

June 1, 2001
10:35 PM

Post #5744

how about a meeting somewhere like Daphne Shackletons garden
http://indigo.ie/~jshack/shackletonplants.html

or elsewhere?

it would be great

Mark

This message was edited Friday, Jun 1st 6:51 PM
Vinca

June 2, 2001
12:23 PM

Post #79327

Where is that, Mark?
mark
Antrim, Northern Ire
United Kingdom
(Zone 8b)

June 2, 2001
6:46 PM

Post #79428

Mullagh, Co Cavan

or we could go meet somewhere else

how many people on here are from the North and the South?

Mark
Vinca

June 2, 2001
7:01 PM

Post #79434

I don't know, Mark. Next thing, we'll be wanting our own Irish forum!
IrishMolly

June 2, 2001
8:57 PM

Post #79456

I think that's a great idea! How many Irish do we have on, Dave?
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

August 28, 2008
1:52 PM

Post #5478072

Hi Mark, not far from Mullagh - Belturbet. Would love to meet up with anyone who gardens in Ireland.
:-)) Rosie
Terri1948
Yorkshire

September 26, 2008
11:22 AM

Post #5601165

When I come over to Northern Ireland to visit my son I would love to meet up. The weather's beginning to get colder now though and nights are 'drawing in'...maybe next Spring would be a good time? Something to look forward to over the long Winter months :o)

Terri
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

January 14, 2009
11:56 PM

Post #6006368

A bit late replying I know but if you are ever in Co. Cavan Terri please look me up in the spring. I'm in a beautiful part of the country on the river Erne. You might be able to come up with some ideas (cheap ones LOL) for my new garden :-))
Terri1948
Yorkshire

January 15, 2009
11:51 AM

Post #6007711

Rose, I'll certainly bear that in mind!! My son is planning some trips out to different places once the weather improves and it would be very good to meet you.
I'm hoping to get over for the flower show at Hillsborough again this year. We enjoyed it tremendously last year. Have you ever been to it?
I noticed that the Snowdrops are coming through nicely in our garden. It's always nice to see the Spring flowers appearing...soon be daffodil time!!

:o))

Terri

roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

January 15, 2009
3:37 PM

Post #6008363

No I've never been to Hillsborough Terri but it's something on my to do list. Perhaps I can get over in spring. It's not too far from me as we are near the border - hey, how about meeting up there?
Nothing is emerging here yet apart from the poor sorry daffs my SIL keeps in her porch - they look a little leggy if you ask me.
Terri1948
Yorkshire

January 17, 2009
10:05 AM

Post #6015494

Rosie, I'll keep this in mind and (fingers crossed) if I'm planning a trip over nearer the date I'll let you know. Another place I'm wanting to go to is the botanical gardens in Belfast.

But then...anywhere there are plants is a 'must see', so I'm open to suggestions.

LOL

Terri
nipntat
San Saba, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 17, 2009
6:03 PM

Post #6016617

Hello Irish Gardeners! My name is Tai and I live in Texas, always interested in how the gardens are growing other countires. I know it is a bit cool over there- well compared to Texas... so far all I have seen of Ireland is pictures and movies. Great-Great Grandmother from County Cork.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

January 18, 2009
11:11 PM

Post #6021193

Hi Nip - here's another picture for you - the view from my house in the beautiful Earn valley. Well, it was beautiful last spring when this shot was taken. Brrrr it's been snowing today with really high winds. I managed to squeeze my car beneath the tree that came down over our lane though. LOL

Thumbnail by roseimp
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Terri1948
Yorkshire

January 19, 2009
8:10 AM

Post #6022839

Rose, I spoke to my son about possibly meeting up with you at Hillsborough show and he thinks it's a lovely idea. We'll check out what date the show is to be held this year and he'll make sure he has the time off work.
He also said it would be lovely to visit your area because he has yet to see Co. Cavan...so we might even get to visit your garden :o)
Of course, we'll bring something to plant in your new garden as a memento, LOL
Will keep this in mind and contact you via dmail a bit nearer the time. Last year Hillsborough show was on 7th June. I remember as it was the day after my birthday.

Terri
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

January 19, 2009
9:59 AM

Post #6022919

That sounds great Terri and just let's hope the weather is reasonable. Please keep in touch and dmail me anytime. I'll be bringing my partner to Hisborough who is in a wheelchair and possibly a grandkid or two.
nipntat
San Saba, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 19, 2009
2:46 PM

Post #6023433

Roseimp- what a beautiful picture! You have a wonderful view there. Snow is a real treat for us here in central Texas- of course we have no idea how to function in snow... it will be 71 f today!! We have very mild winters and hotter than- well- you know summers. Well over 95f daily. But my tomatoes love it. Pictures of our gardens are on my website. www.bushwoodacres.com.
lortay
Navan
Ireland

February 23, 2009
11:41 AM

Post #6177241

Hi Mark,
I just came upon your post, (2001!). It seems Irish gardeners are not very gregarious (although I think Terri1948 and Roseimp have the start of something???
I am not a gardener, I teach, but am always interested in meeting people with an interest in plants. There are a few hundred members in Ireland, they just seem to be rather shy.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

February 23, 2009
1:20 PM

Post #6177480

Hey, not too far from me Lortay. We are meeting up in Enniskillen next month, if you want to tag along just Dmail me. I could do to pick your brains LOL. Moi, SHY!!!! I think not.

:-)) Rosie
lortay
Navan
Ireland

March 3, 2009
11:19 AM

Post #6215127

Hi Roseimp,
I did'nt mean you (see comment on your 'relationship' with Terri) but it is curious that there are so few replies to the original post????
Might be tricky to get to Enniskillen as the students are running into exams at the moment, odd time but it's to do with work (what's that) placement.
Mind you, I could get in a bit of cheap shopping!
Good to know there is at least one member active enough to post. Keep in touch. I have not used d mail yet. Must give it a try.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

March 3, 2009
12:36 PM

Post #6215259

We'll take a raincheck then lortay. If you ever get to Cavan Dmail me - I would love to catch up with other gardeners in Ireland (BTW I'm an exile from the UK LOL)
Rosie
lortay
Navan
Ireland

March 11, 2009
12:37 PM

Post #6250912

Hi, Roseimp,
Thanks for the rain check, I will make sure I cash it during the Summer if we have one.
Incidentally, I have a 'rake' (ask your neighbours) of seedlings of a spotted white Helleborus coming up in my gravel, interested?, if not they will just be pulled out (no room). Anyone else interested? (I know there is a formum for this but I can't be bothered.)
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

March 11, 2009
12:56 PM

Post #6250971

LOL sounds interesting lortay. I'll catch up with you during the summer and see what I can dig up to swap for your hellebores.

Rosie
seemama
Kissimmee, FL
(Zone 9b)

March 11, 2009
1:52 PM

Post #6251127

To all your Irish! you will love it here with all those bright green cakes for "St. Patty's Day" They also sell shamorock, and they done believe me when I tell them it won't grow outside of Ireland. When I told my cousins wife (Donegal Gal) she had hysterics at the St. Patty's bit! Oh yeah I am English!
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

July 15, 2010
3:21 AM

Post #7969785

Hi... Just found this page - stumbled upon it really. Yes, I agree the Irish gardeners are not saying much..maybe that will change after nine years... Was this thread really started in 2001?
Anyway, my garden is mostly wild/cottage look. I have day-lilies, geraniums, clematis, poppies, sweet williams gone over now though. I cut the tops of them yesterday. Shoud I just dig them up and discard??

I hope to get some images uploaded..I even have a wasp nest built neatly into a small variegated rhodo bush which is growing in a container. I thought the nest was an old foot-ball, but read up on it. They are amazing creatures and so far are well-behaved..

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 15, 2010
3:29 AM

Post #7969788

So nice to meet you, Orange_Blossom.

My maternal grandmother was born and raised in Ennis. She was a Walker Lenihan and when I visited Ireland I passed the old family home still owned by a Lenihan.

Here I grow clematis, daylilies, geraniums, poppies, dahlias, hydrangeas and many lilies of all kinds. Why throw Sweet William out? Can't it simply be cut back?
Baa

July 15, 2010
3:37 AM

Post #7969792

Yes 2001, it seems a lifetime away.

Sweet William for us is Dianthus barbatus which is a biennial (unless you're Scottish then it's Stinking Billy). You can try and eek another year out of them but it will depend on if you need the space for something else or not.

This message was edited Jul 15, 2010 10:37 AM
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

July 18, 2010
6:55 AM

Post #7977485

Hi to you Pirl,
That's amazing re your maternal grandmother... I know there are Lenihans in Ennis, but have not heard about Walkers. Its a small world though.

Re sweet williams, I know it can be cut back or left, but gets very woody and really is a bit of a mess after flowering.
The weather here is dull, misty, humid and great for weed growth..
Anyway, happy gardening and hi to a descendent of Ennis!!
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

July 18, 2010
6:59 AM

Post #7977494

Thanks for the reply Baa.

I took them out as they had gone all brown and dead looking. Its such a shame as they were just great earlier on. I hadnt heard of Stinking Billy though, but its cute. I knew they were Dianthus family, but sometimes the common name is prettier.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 18, 2010
7:09 AM

Post #7977519

Thanks, Orange Blossom! Walkers were the maternal side of the Lenihan family.

So you just cut them back but not discard the Sweet Williams, right? We have some astilbe that went dormant early, due to our oppressive heat wave, and I just cut them back to the ground but I realize it does leave a rather unpleasant look to that area. Why do our eyes focus on one little spot when we both have lots of flowers to enjoy?

Seems as though the garden art industry could come up with something sweet to cover a bare spot and make it more acceptable for the rest of the season. Even the lilies, as beautiful as they are right now, will eventually leave just bare stems. There is a price for beauty but we enjoy them while they are in bloom.

I try to use as many ground covers as possible (sedums are great for that) since we both have the weed problems!

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Baa

July 18, 2010
7:20 AM

Post #7977550

Well it's Stinking Billy because the English (supposedly) named it Sweet William after William, Duke of Cumberland, or "the Butcher". However Dianthus means Divine flower, which, considering the previous, is a much nicer name.

I was mentioning Dianthus and biennial for Pirl really because they asked why throw them out and the reason being because they are at their end.



This message was edited Jul 18, 2010 2:22 PM
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 18, 2010
7:56 AM

Post #7977626

Aha! Thanks.
lortay
Navan
Ireland

July 27, 2010
8:07 AM

Post #7999870

Hi Orange Blossom and all,

Yes, Irish 'contributors' seem to be a shy lot. I sent a d-mail round to the members registered in Ireland and got one reply.
Pirl's problem with bare patches, e.g. if you throw out 'Sweet William' or have Poppies, etc. is to grow a few of the later flowering annuals, e.g Rudbeckia, Aster, Dahlias (although I don't like them), in small pots and plant out when they are almost in flower. It is a bit of extra labour but the result can be brilliant.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 27, 2010
8:37 AM

Post #7999937

Very good idea!
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

July 27, 2010
2:19 PM

Post #8000587

Thanks Pirl for advice and also to Baa for the explanation for Stinking Billy..That fits. I think the problem with the Dianthus-Sw William is that if left in the ground they will survive, but get quite floppy and woody. An aunt of mine used to take cuttings though I havnt tried it and successfully propagate in each season.
Hi to Lortay too and thanks for the tips re Rudbeckia and dahlias..I think the groundcover option is preferably though. I have a few Sedums the dark red one and the plaing one and they are good.
Anyway, happy gardening all and a special hello to the Irish lot..too busy in the garden to write here..huh!!
lortay
Navan
Ireland

July 29, 2010
3:49 AM

Post #8003842

Hi again Orange Blossom,
What are the difficulties/advantages of gardening in Ennis. Did you lose much this winter?
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

August 2, 2010
5:22 AM

Post #8012672

Hi Lortay,

Just saw your questions. I lost a cordyline like almost everyone. I didnt like it very much anyway..so not too bothered. I believe they are v deep rooted & was advised to cut it right down and it may grow again. I aso lost some daffodils and a few lilies that I had forgotten to put indoors..not very clever, also a choiysa, but many things did survive even my madonna lily and all my hydrangeas. My strawberries were excellent this year. My soil is quite heavy in places - clay really, but is loved by many plants.
How did you fare out?
lortay
Navan
Ireland

August 3, 2010
7:37 AM

Post #8015247

Hi,
Ironic that you lost a (Mexican) Orange Blossom! Even thought I am much further north, we did not suffer as much. Cordylines were killed in some places and not in others. I agree that they are best left and dug out.
I work over on the coast at Malahide and, because of more tender plants, they had just as much frost kill as we had. Very little died completely though, most regenerated.
Interesting that Blueberry grower has their best harvest for years as well. You cannot know what way plants will react.
Most areas in Meath are also on clay. It is a good soil for growth if you can drain it a bit with sand and compost, otherwise it is very difficult to work.
I am planting a Choisya this year as I have cleared an area which has some shade. I will probably plant the golden one as it does better in shade than in sun. (Nicer colour).
Cheers,

Resin

Resin
Northumberland
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a)

August 3, 2010
1:47 PM

Post #8016061

Very surprised you lost Cordylines and Choisya - up here (northeast England), I've not seen any damage on the latter, and only one or two tender red-leaved Cordyline cultivars damaged; all the 'normal' green Cordylines were undamaged.

I'd suspect yours were killed by something other than winter cold.

Resin
lortay
Navan
Ireland

August 4, 2010
3:19 AM

Post #8017249

Hi Resin,
I enjoy your posts and I.D.s always.
I did not get kills of Choisya here, unlike Orange Blossom (in Clare) but Cordylines were killed all over the county but not on the coast. It was patchy (as is often the case) due, I assume to shelter, etc. of some. Palms were killed in the Botanic gardens in Glasnevin, but there was very little damage on things like Ceanothus, Olearia or Hebe which one would expect to be damaged in severe winters.

P.S. I am posting a Deutzia in the I.D. forum which I can't identify but have seen an illustration from Glendoik gardens. Have not seen it anywhere else.
Cheers.
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

August 14, 2010
2:23 PM

Post #8039748

Hi all,

Just on the subject of Choisyas. I have still got one Aztec Pearl which incidentally I raised from a cutting very slowly and it survived the frost, but is not doing very well. It needs some tlc at the moment. The yellow one vanished, sadly though.
The frost helped to break up the soil as it went so deep and many hardy plants survived. Lortay, yes clay can be a bother, but quite rich if minded.
I have a love of Welsh poppies (Meconopsis) a most hardy perrenial to -15 & I have seeds of these + some aquilegia if you Lortay or anyone is interested? Let me know.
By the way, I am keeping a gardening diary, which I find so handy..helps me remember where & what I planted!

Happy gardening
lortay
Navan
Ireland

August 19, 2010
5:27 AM

Post #8049105

Hi,
I have yet to see a good plant of 'Aztec Pearl' in this area, despite C. ternata doing just fine.
A diary is a great idea; sadly, my gardening (and life) is on the basis of 'a wing and a prayer' most of the time.
I am not mad about the Mec. and Aquilegia, but, in turn, I will have seed of Cyclamen hederifolium and Helleborus orientalis and foetidus if they float your boat.
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

August 24, 2010
11:58 AM

Post #8059671

Hi Lortay,

I have some Helleborus, the last one I acquired has a white flower, but had no idea they can be raised from seed? I have never tried cyclamen. Are they difficult to grow? I love propagating and sowing things. Its what I love about gardening.
Re the diary...am not that organized, but had a huge unused old diary and put it to good use! Its one way of keeping track of things I sow & the progress etc. I do take photos also, but not great at cataloguing them.
Do you have a favourite flower then?
Those seed would indeed float my boat. Thank you
lortay
Navan
Ireland

August 31, 2010
4:26 AM

Post #8072136

Hi Orange Blossom,
Good to hear from you.
I am just back from a few days holidays and spent a few hours in Ennis (it rained) after visiting Cragganoun (?) and Knappouge Castle.
We also visited Vandeleur walled garden in Kilrush.
On the way back, we 'hit' Haywood House in Abbeyleix and Mount Usher in Wicklow. (I think my wife has had enough gardens for now).

Hellebores are often easy from seed. H. foetidus is a minor weed in my garden and H. hybridus forms seed readily.
Cyclamen hederifolium is in flower at the moment and will set, literally, hundreds of seeds. Last year they germinated all around the 2 plants that I had (1 pink, 1 white). I have planted some small C. coum which flowers in Spring and expect it will do the same..

I have about 2,500 plant photos from all over the country and I find the Picassa is a great way of organising them. You can 'tag' each photo and it is easy to find after that.

Latest purchase is Choisya 'Sundance' and my favourite shrub (at the moment) Abelia x grandiflora. With this, I prefer the green form as the variegated ones are a bit loud for my taste. I also got a pink Gaura and a Lavandula stoechas, although the last 2 of these I bought succumbed in the winter.
Nice to catch up.
Vincent

Thumbnail by lortay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

September 13, 2010
3:28 PM

Post #8097302

Hi Lortay,
Well, I was away too in sunny Kerry. We were lucky with heavenly August weather & not a drop of rain. Yes Craggaunowen & Knappogue& Vandeleur all worth a visit.
Thanks for tip re Picassa, though I was trying to upload a photo of my cordlyline yesterday & think my USB cable is faulty. The cordyline has two healthy shoots now. Wouldnt you know..as Im not over fond of it.Typical!
The Abelia is lovely in flower. Im not familiar with Gaura, but have had Lavender, but not the French one which is tall? My Choisya Sundance has vanished. I liked that one too. I have the Aztec Pearl which is struggling where I have it. I had to move a Sarcococca(Christmas Box). Is it difficult to establish does anyone know? I wanted if for flower arranging and its not doing so well.
Hope you hadnt to buy an umbrella in Ennis?!
lortay
Navan
Ireland

September 30, 2010
3:23 AM

Post #8129113

Hi Orange Blossom,
Sorry for the delay, I have been off work with illness, so just back.
Kerry is fantastic when you get the good weather in particular. Some good gardens down there too!
As regards your photos; I usually load directly onto the computer via the camera chip as it slots directly into the computer. Picasa is often free with Windows now or can be downloaded from Google.
The alternative is 'Flickr' the Yahoo based web sharing photo site. This is great as well because you can share photos, but also store them online. Search for 'Flickr'. Then search for 'Vincentdunne' or 'Plant Geeks'.
There are several forms of Lavandula stoechas, I now have 2 blue ones (un-named) and a paler one labeled as 'Milan Purple' which I think is false.
Sarcococca is really easy to grow once it settles in. For flower arranging, it depends a bit on the species. S. confusa is the one usually grown, but if you can get S. ruscifolia, it is even better. They need some shade and good rich soil to give their best.

Thumbnail by lortay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

October 6, 2010
4:05 AM

Post #8140548

Hi Lortay,
Sorry to hear you were ill. So true, that health is weath..
Thanks for the tip re the sarcococca. It seems to like its new location and will do well now I hope. I will look out for the s. ruscifolia. Im behind in my spring planting too..Had it all done in early Sept last year, all to no avail due to the dreadful winter last year. Hope its not repeated this year.. I have lots of berries on my variagated holly, which by the way, seems to be suffering from a viral attack - at least a part of it seems to be suffering and is leafless..will get that camera sorted so that I can show it.. Is it early for a profusion of berries?
Will really get going re the photos. I know how to upload from the camera, but as my daughter often borrows my usb lead, I fear its not working properly, so will have to get it checked out.! Anyway, thanks for all the advice, which I will take on board.
lortay
Navan
Ireland

October 7, 2010
5:54 AM

Post #8142438

Hi,
It is not too early for berries on Ilex. Like most berrying plants, they are having a bumber year. I have never seen Pyracantha, for instance, doing so well. I have not done anything about planting for Spring yet, as the Summer plants are still continuing to thrive. The only things I have removed are Nasturtiums, which were in a dry place anyway. Thousands of seeds if you want the joy (curse) of a pale yellow Naturtium for ever and ever. lol.
Looking forward to photos (no pressure then)
Vincent
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

October 7, 2010
3:26 PM

Post #8143423

Hi,

Yes silly me re the berries..was walking in a local wood today and saw millions of berries on a holly tree which thankfully has survived.
Re the Nasturtiums, I also have saved seeds from mine also. I have some of the variagated ones & some are still in the garden yet. Pale yellow sounds nice. I would'nt call them a curse..& they are so tough. I have never traded seeds & havnt a clue how to. Im always giving friends & neighbours cuttings etc..That's easy. I gave a friend some Alchemilla Mollis (Lady's Mantle) yesterday. Now, that can be a curse, if you dont remove the flowers..otherwise they pop up everywhere.
Will be displaying photos soon hopefully.
lortay
Navan
Ireland

November 12, 2010
5:30 AM

Post #8207671

Hi,
Just dropping in to the thread again.
I have not been doing much in the garden lately. Just planted some dwarf daffs. where the Nasturtiums were (are) to give some display before they start growing all over the place next year.
Speaking of seeds, I discovered that I had forgotten to take the seed heads of my Dierama so I can look forward to dozens of seedlings in the pebbles next year.
I have had a few frosts already (early this year) which has hammered Fuchsias and Salvias. But they will be fine if we don't get the extremes of last year. The sub shrubby Salvias are great value and flower twice in the year, just not very hardy.
As I work along the coast in north Dublin, I sometimes forget how much colder it is, just 20 miles inland in Navan.
Cheers, happy gardening.

Thumbnail by lortay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lortay
Navan
Ireland

January 27, 2011
7:05 AM

Post #8333043

Hi Orange Blossom,

I am just back at work after 7 weeks off sick. The plus side is that I missed all the snow and frost, not having to drive to work thru it.

It is ironic to look at my last post and realise how my fears for the Salvias, etc. came true in a big way. I don't think you had as much snow as we have had but I wonder what your temperatures were?
Interestingly, following on from my comments in the last post, that althought the snow was quite bad along the east coast, they did not have the killing frosts that we had in Navan where it hit -11 and -12.
Hope to hear from you soon.
Orange_Blossom
Ennis
Ireland

May 1, 2011
3:48 PM

Post #8532905

Hi Lortay and fellow gardeners,

I have to confess that I have been away from this site for a while. I have been trying my hand at writing etc but, I am spending time in the garden rooting out all the dandeloins & other weeds. It never ends.
I have a lone red-currant bush, which I grew from a cutting taken from my Dad's house long ago, from a very old bush which I reckon is nearly 100 years old and still going. Im minding it like a baby, but nothing fases it, the bad weather or bugs and its great.. one of my treasures. I have no idea which one it is, but will publish a photo of it when it is fruiting. You, Lortay (Vincent) might be familiar with these.
My budding Cordyline was killed off last winter again, but I see it is springing up again. It has quite deep roots, though if the winters continue to be vfrosty, it will eventually die off I expect. At the moment, I have several alliums, which seem to increase eyear. I raised some Oxalis Deppei from bulbs - have a dark centre - and have quite a few now to plant out. I wonder will they survive our winter weather?
All the best for now. Hope you are keeping well Lortay?
Happy Gardening, weeding etc.
Mary0007
Dublin
Ireland

May 14, 2011
10:46 AM

Post #8562438

Bay Laurel Plants – PROBLEM = Leaves curling and turning brown

Hi I planted about 50 Bay Laurel Plants (Laurus nobilis) about 4 to 5 feet tall from a nursery and the problem started with just one plant with its leaves curling and turning yellow then brown on the top of the plant… and then spreading to nearly all leaves.

Now about 10% of them have the same problem and spreading ... no solution yet.

One chat board suggested the Bays were in the pots too long and became pot bound. So now replanting with a good compost soil mix to see if that will solve the problem.

Another chat board suggested they were over watered….

I also have a female dog ... and maybe it going to the toilet might be causing it ...

I really would appreciate any advice / tips... Based in Dublin

Many thanks

Thumbnail by Mary0007
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Baa

May 17, 2011
3:11 AM

Post #8568606

If the leaves are curling prior to browning could it be a pest?

This is the Bay Sucker which might be a possible invader
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=505

lortay
Navan
Ireland

May 18, 2011
6:49 AM

Post #8571186

Hi Mary,
I don't think the damage you show is pest related as long as you don't count your dog as a pest. Bitch urine is well known as a cause of browning and death in plants, particulary as your losses seem to be intermittant.
However, if these plants were bought recently, they were either not grown in Ireland or grown inside. The vigorous growth would suggest that this is the case. Therefore an alternate reason for your damage and losses would be root damage in moving or failure of the plants to adapt to new soil/new climate. e.g. the recent prolonged bout of windy weather is causing serious problems for recently planted trees.
Unless you have been flooding them or your soil is very wet, you can rule out overwatering. Spring has been very dry.
Without knowing the full story, I would suggest removing the dog from the plant area, pruning back the plants by one third and check for dryness at the root. Even if you are watering, the rootball may still be dry. Good luck.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other European Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Growing Sweet Peas what is the English Secret? gardendragon 22 May 1, 2009 4:40 AM
where are you? mark 265 Apr 18, 2009 12:30 AM
Old Address in Edinburgh Dinu 7 Mar 26, 2013 10:31 AM
What's occuring in the backyard? Baa 201 Jun 2, 2007 12:59 PM
BIRDS IN THE GARDEN Patbarr 265 Apr 28, 2007 9:55 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America