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Fruits and Nuts: Anyone have PawPaw fruit?

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crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 21, 2003
11:59 AM

Post #714647

Does anyone have any fruit from a PawPaw?
I've been killing myself trying to keep my seedling alive and want to get more,and realized I don't even know if I like pawpaw's ...LOL
So,anyhow,I'd like to try one to see if its worth it to me.I know there are different varieties and each tastes different,but I'd really like to try one if anyone has one to spare...silly ,I know ,but I only like to kill myself for things I like to eat...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2003
1:16 PM

Post #714706

I have heard of Paw-Paw's but never seen or eaten one. Now you have me curious!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 22, 2003
2:42 PM

Post #715365

Picking up paw paws puttin em in a basket.

I will ask my mother when I go to town today. Ernie

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 22, 2003
6:01 PM

Post #715485

OH MY!!!!!!

Are they good?
Do you eat them?
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 22, 2003
8:56 PM

Post #715576

Mother kind of remembers so I typed in paw paw and found a place called Nature Hills Nusery who says they sell these things

grow 30 feet high
takes two to fruit
fruit about four inches long
taste kinda like banana
$10.95 ea

Any way Thats what I found enjoy. Ernie
KathyJo
Fayette, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 22, 2003
11:01 PM

Post #715671

I have a small paw paw grove in my woods and was going to trade seeds , but we had this terrible hail storm this Spring and we didn't have blackberries or walnuts or anything. Looking forward to a better season next year.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 23, 2003
1:09 PM

Post #716001

Kathyjo,do you eat them?
Are they good?
Worth growing?

eweed,I can find them for sale places,I have 2 seedlings I've been nursing along.What I want is a fruit to taste to see if I personally like them...its not something they have at our local grocery store...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2003
1:43 PM

Post #716018

Karyn, everything I read says the fruit is seldom available commercially as it has a short shelf life when ripe, which is usually Sept.-Oct. You have to be careful when using a search engine because paw-paw is also a name given to papaya in some places, esp. Australia. Kentucky State Univ. has a research program on paw-paw and it contains enopugh information to make me want to grow them! http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/

Ohio has an annual Paw-Paw Festival. http://www.ohiopawpaw.org/pawpawfest.html

From another site:
"The pawpaw is a delicious fruit indigenous to this country and was eaten by native Americans and early settlers. The fruit has a distinctive creamy custard texture and a sweet mango banana like flavor. It is excellent when eaten fresh, and delicious in puddings, cookies, pies, ice cream and breads. Pawpaw fruit is reported to be higher in proteins and carbohydrates than apples, peaches and grapes, and it contains high levels of amino acids, vitamins A and C, and many minerals."
KathyJo
Fayette, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 24, 2003
11:15 AM

Post #716713

CC, This small grove I have is in deep woods and I never seem to get any fruit to taste, due to squirrels. I had done some research and one possibility for no fruit would be that I have all female or male grove. They like to branch out from the root system and therefore with such asexual reproduction, be all the same sex. I have thought to try to move a tree or two from other spots there to see if I could increase my fruiting. Or see if I could get seeds from another source and just plant the seeds there.
These are beautiful trees. I don't know if some of the commercially grown trees would produce more and bigger fruit or not. They might not be as vigorous as this wild variety.
Also because most of my little trees have branched out from the "mother" tree they would be pretty difficult to move I think. No tap root. Any ideas on this anyone?
Certainly if I am successful next year I would be happy to send you some fruit, not only for the seed, but to see how it tastes. You would certainly have to remind me. If I was to send you seed, I know they shouldn't dry out, and mailed in peat moss or something similar.
Also the blooms on the trees are fabulous. Waxy, kinda brown and unusual.
I had a disappointing season with my fruit and nuts. I am certainly looking forward to the coming year.
mominem
Ashton, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2003
1:22 PM

Post #719305

I haven't tasted pawpaw fruit, but I planted two seedlings this summer. The mail-order nursery recommended planting in those tree tubes so I put them in there, and they shot up several feet over the summer. I'm sure it will be several years before they fruit, but I think the leaves are very interesting and plan to enjoy them in my yard. Fruit would be a bonus (or not, if it's icky).

Eileen
Esther_z6
South Point, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 30, 2003
1:59 AM

Post #720459

I seem so far to be the only who has tasted paw-paw. The native trees around here do produce fruit, but they are on the small side (sort of kidney shaped averaging 1.5 inch across)and so full of seeds, there is very little flesh. It is hard to time harvest, too green - they never ripen, too ripe, they are black and have fallen to the ground where the squirrels and other critters have enjoyed them.

I did go to the paw-paw festival near Athens, Ohio, 2 years ago and got three big pawpaws. Size of smaller mango - texture & taste between peach and banana.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

November 30, 2003
2:09 AM

Post #720473

OOHHHH they sound so good...

I guess I'll keep nursing them along...and maybe buy some named hybrids
Agrinerd
Franklin, NC
(Zone 6b)

December 8, 2003
7:44 PM

Post #726898

I just received the first pawpaw catologue produced by Neal Peterson, the man responsible for most of the research and content on the KYSU sites. He has three new varieties that are superior to many, if not all of the other commercial varieties. His site is now up at http://www.petersonpawpaws.com. It's a bit rough yet, but the products, contact and order links are working. He'll send you a paper catalogue for the asking.
leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

January 8, 2004
11:40 AM

Post #747446

I've eaten PawPaw many times and for that reason I sought and bought 2 trees a couple years ago. I thought for sure they were dead last spring but finally began to have new leaves in late June or early July. They are native to Missouri if my understanding is correct. A few people around here do have trees.
I went to the website listed but could only get on page to open. The others came up but had no information on them. I guess they are still under construction. I've read much of the information from KU on pawpaws. A man called Lucky was involved in it and we corresponed for awhile.
VGMKY
Louisville, KY

January 15, 2004
11:15 PM

Post #754098

Don't give up on your seedlings or waiting for the seed to germinate. I have an elderly friend who has a grove of Pawpaws in the back part of his property. He shares the fruit from his trees with me. Darius, you are correct; they are very fragile fruit and don't ship very well. He brings me tree ripened fruit which fall from the tree. We salvaged several seedlings which came up there and planted them in my yard almost two years ago. Transplanting is also difficult as they have a very long tap root. Pollination is another difficult matter. They bloom before anything else does...the bees and such are not active and the blossom depends upon the carion flies to pollinate. The bloom simulates dead meat odor and fools the fly into thinking it is finding something to eat. Folks who have poor pollination are encouraged to take home "road kill" to hang in the trees to enhance pollination. I can hear some of you react like a dear friend who lives in a very upscale neighborhood and has lots of property...she said "I don't go there!" LOL

I peel my surplus fruit and place in ziplock freezer bags for later use. Who knows, Darius, if I get to the Knoxville RU, I may bring Pawpaw Bread or Cookies! Here are some recipes to consider.

http://members.aol.com/BLaneKY/recipes.htm

http://ces.ca.uky.edu/Woodford/fcs/newsarticles/2003/f082903.htm

I am sure to have plenty of seed this summer and will provide some for you. Here are the instructions for Germination and growing instructions.
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/pawpaw/ppg.htm

I hope this information has been helpful to you.
Gary/Louisville Kentucky
KYBRED
Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2004
10:27 PM

Post #781029

I grow and hybridize paw paws. If you need any seed please don't pay for them. I will be glad to send you diploid seed or tetraploid seed. Just let me know!

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 14, 2004
12:02 AM

Post #781103

WOW!!!!!!

Please Oh Please!!!!!!!
KYBRED
Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 14, 2004
9:57 AM

Post #781379

Great! you got the message!! Like I mentioned, the seeds have been stratified all you have to do is plant them.

The seed will germinate quickly once they warm up but they will only put down their tap root. It will take approx one month for the seedlings to break from the soil and show any leaves. Just keep them quite moist. You might want to pot them in a deep pot due to their tap root.

They are a lowland tree which can take lots of water when you put them out. Try and put them out when the soil is about 80 degrees. They will grow about 2' the first year.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 14, 2004
1:02 PM

Post #781436

You have mail !
Agrinerd
Franklin, NC
(Zone 6b)

February 15, 2004
5:15 PM

Post #782517

KYBRED: Why tetraploids? Shooting for a seedless? How did you come up with the tetras? I'm into breeding too, but not with pawpaws yet.
KYBRED
Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 16, 2004
10:40 PM

Post #783620

Tetraploid paw paws have much larger fruit and the trees are quite a bit more robust. The seed are unfortunately larger as well!

A chemical called colchicine is what is used to double the chromosomes of the plants.

Crossing the diploids with the tetraploids would be a way to produce seedless. When a plant has uneven amounts of chromosomes it is usually sterile. (seedless grapes, bananas etc.)

Thumbnail by KYBRED
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mominem
Ashton, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 17, 2004
12:40 AM

Post #783733

Wow, the flower is so pretty! How old do the trees have to be before they bloom, and then how much older before they reliably set fruit? Is there a difference in the age at which the trees fruit when they are tetraploid or diploid? Are there other differences (than the fruit and seed size)?

KYBRED: sending you email.

Eileen
Esther_z6
South Point, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 17, 2004
1:09 AM

Post #783757

The photo shows 4 pawpaws. The flower is small and brown and appears in early spring. (I only saw this the first time when a forest ranger pointed it to us on a Spring walk - it took awhile to find out which were the pawpaws across the creek on our property after we moved here, and we certainly never noticed any blooms on them before that).
KYBRED
Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 17, 2004
11:04 AM

Post #783963

Most of the paw paw trees set fruit in their 5th year if they are properly watered and if they don't suffer any significant trauma when planted out.

The paw paw trees set fruit 10 times better if there is two trees close to each other. Once established the mature tetraploid trees can set fruit that weighs a pound or more!

The seeds that I have on my tradelist are from orange/yellow fruiting varieties. There is a white fruiting strain but it doesn't seem to have the taste of the orange/yellow variety.





crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 17, 2004
6:04 PM

Post #784237

My biggest question is...

Does it taste good??
KYBRED
Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 17, 2004
7:39 PM

Post #784291

I grew up eating paw paws and love the taste. When asking people what they taste like you will get many different answers. I think they taste like a cross between a banana and a cantalope! The fruit is very aromatic. To me it smells like Juicy Fruit Gum! There is a fine line between when the fruit is ripe and when it can taste over ripe.

Agrinerd
Franklin, NC
(Zone 6b)

February 17, 2004
7:53 PM

Post #784299

KYBRED: Have you had any contact with Neal Peterson? I think you two could would come up with an interesting and worthwile collaboration that would bring pawpaws another decade closer to being a viable alternative crop. I have some information on creating tetraploids with Oryzalin if you are interested.
Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2006
3:35 PM

Post #2098626

Most people who have had the opportunity to eat pawpaw fruit fall into one of two camps - and there's usually no waffling - they either love them, or find them disgustingly insipid.
Most Americans are no longer 'comfortable' with soft, fragrant/aromatic fruits, after multiple generations of eating crisp, almost tasteless apples purchased from the grocery; hence, most people don't care for a pawpaw or a good ripe American persimmon.

I was high on pawpaws for a number of years, but I'm afraid I'm sort of burnt out on them. I still like to eat one or two, but after that, I've 'had enough', and don't care for any more for another year or so.

Nice, ornamental tree in its own right, however, and a nice addition to any native or edible landscaping scheme.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 9, 2006
4:58 PM

Post #2098852

I'm still dying to try one...
bermudakiller
Union Grove, AL

March 16, 2006
4:58 PM

Post #2116700

The banana/ cantalope combo comes closest to me, but there is a bit of mango as well, messy but good, Also like the mango underipe is rough tasting, have it wild down at the camp, bears erraticly sometime nothing sometime 1 or 2 sometimes dozens, doesn't seem to be the year either as different clumps show different patterns, best bearer in near a creek and about a foot above water level in sandy acidic soil. Paw paw pie is good, liquer is rough fresh eating is by far the best.
alyrics
Beachwood, OH

March 16, 2006
10:36 PM

Post #2117362

They have beautiful very large leaves that take on good color in fall. But I'm dying to ask this pretty knowledgeable bunch about WHY my mature paw paw seems to set fruit, then they fall off and die. Actually I can't tell if it is dried up fruit thats falling or what. It is a seed pod - kind of reminds me of sumac seed heads. I have the flowers, then they seem to dry up and fall off. Some of them almost look like a small paw paw fruit that stopped ripening and blackened and fell off. I have 2 more paw paws in the woods nearby that are about 15' tall but I don't think they flowered last year. Maybe this year. The mature tree is at least 40' tall and flowers readily.

I remember paw paws from my grandparents farm as a kid. They are a unique taste that I remember liking. The texture is like a ripe mango if I recall. Of course you can't buy a ripe mango here you have to get them in S. America so maybe not too many have had them. Also persimmons - which I would love to taste off a tree again.
Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2006
8:50 PM

Post #2119349

There's a Talponia spp. moth that lays its eggs in the pawpaw flowers, then when the larvae hatch out, they burrow into the stem of the fruit, and cause it to abort.
Here's a short blurb from the KYSU Pawpaw page:
"The worst pest is Talponia plummeriana, the pawpaw peduncle borer, a small moth larva (about 5 mm long) that burrows into the fleshy tissues of the flower, causing the flower to wither and drop. In some years this borer is capable of destroying the majority of blossoms."
alyrics
Beachwood, OH

March 17, 2006
8:52 PM

Post #2119353

Oh that is just great. I wonder how you find out if you have this disgusting creature. Or what to do about it!
a

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2006
11:44 PM

Post #2119687

don't you need 2 flowering for pollination?
could it be that the fruits abort because there was no pollination?
maybe when the 2 younger trees bloom you'll get fruit on the older tree
alyrics
Beachwood, OH

March 18, 2006
11:31 AM

Post #2120508

Thats what I was thinking too crestedchik - but I was hoping that someone who has grown them would know more about it.
bermudakiller
Union Grove, AL

July 21, 2006
10:23 AM

Post #2529964

Between late frosts, hail and drought, there is a total crop failure here, anyone else get any fruit?
Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 21, 2006
1:36 PM

Post #2530388

bermuda - I've not had a chance to check the wild pawpaws around the farm, but I've got a small-flowered pawpaw(A.parviflora) that I selected from plants on my parents' farm just outside of Auburn AL, grafted onto A.triloba rootstock that has its typical heavy crop of fruit(though I'm growing it for sentimental reasons moreso than for the fruit).
We had a major hailstorm here in early April that beat most of the fruit &/or blossoms off of almost all the other fruit trees - don't know how the pawpaws fared.

crestedchik & alyrics - yes, you need at least two different varieties(either two seedlings or two different grafted selections - or a combination of the two) in order to get reliable fruit set. As KathyJo indicated, sometimes isolated clumps/groves are actually just a clone of one single seedling - as the root system spreads out, it sends up suckers, and although there may be 20 or more stems/trunks in a clump, they might all be, for all intents and purposes, the same plant; without another genetically different variety nearby to provide pollen(and appropriate pollenators present), these clumps of trees may not be able to set fruit.
alyrics
Beachwood, OH

July 21, 2006
1:47 PM

Post #2530424

Lucky - how could wild paw paws have set fruit then? I'm not even close to claiming you're wrong but it doesn't make sense to me. My grandparents farm only had 1 paw paw up near the house that I remember. Also, are they kind of a short lived tree, and don't they like - or tolerate a bit more moisture than most? I have one down near a creek bed that broke off at the top - must have been in a storm, its now produced a new leader.

They had an old persimmon too. That huge tree has to be 120 + years old. They have Indian graves on their farm and Grampa covered them up with the biggest rocks he could haul to keep (us) the kids from digging them up. That old persimmon was right in the middle of them. The farm's been in the family since the mid-late 1800's.
sterhill
Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 22, 2006
3:14 PM

Post #2534214

I have the A.parviflora. It was a native plant in my backyard. I did not know what it was until I sent the pix through the identification forum. http://home.comcast.net/~sterhill/paw_paw/mystery.html

This year the two larger purchased plants had a couple of flowers that never developed but the wild one - the parviflora - still has some small fruits. I was told that it was self-pollinating. I've had the purchased plants about 4 or 5 years and this was the first flowering.

Here is a pix of the fruit on the wild one as of a month ago...

Thumbnail by sterhill
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 22, 2006
5:46 PM

Post #2534748

A.parviflora is self-pollenating.
To my knowledge, there are no other parvifloras within hundreds of miles of my grafted selection here, and it still bears a heavy crop every year.
Unfortunately, parviflora fruits 'aren't much to write home about' - small, mostly seed with a thin rim of pulp around them.

Some A.triloba selections are reputed to be at least partially self-fruitful, but all will produce heavier crops if there are other, genetically different, plants nearby to cross-pollenize with.
escubed
Brookline, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2006
5:33 AM

Post #2573593

Sorry to throw cold water on the excitement but my understanding is that zone 5 is too far north for the fruit to ripen. The tree will survive but you won't get any mature fruit. I was also thinking about growing it and even saw a nice specimen at The Garden in the Woods of the New England Wildflower Society but they assured me that they never got any ripe fruit. It has been years and years since I had any but I do remember my mother making a wonderful paw paw bread (like banana bread) one of the times I brough some home after a Boy Scout hike in southern Illinois. Reading all the great information makes me wonder about growing it in a container on the deck...
escambiaguy
Atmore, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 1, 2006
2:53 PM

Post #2574445

I bought two pawpaws last year and planted them between two pecan trees where they get shade most of the day, but I was scared of scorching them as seedlings. Should I transplant them to a sunnier spot this fall? They are about 2ft tall.
alyrics
Beachwood, OH

August 1, 2006
4:16 PM

Post #2574806

Ohio State says that Asimina triloba is native to zone 5, northeast Ohio and produces edible fruits. http://ohioline.osu.edu/b865/b865_04.html

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 1, 2006
4:38 PM

Post #2574931

yeah baby!!!!
thats what I want to hear!

I figure if I can get artichokes to winter over outside I should have a chance with a pawpaw!!!!
escubed
Brookline, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2006
5:44 PM

Post #2575193

Now I need to know how you get your artichokes to survive the winter. I planted them for the first time this year with thoughts of digging them up and storing them in the garage. And I'll have to get the A. triloba too. So much temptation in the world.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 2, 2006
4:25 PM

Post #2578746

I have already eatten 2 artichokes from it
I've always dug them up and tried to winter them and always loose them
This past fall I had no time and left them in the ground
When I went to start planting in the spring (it was may) I saw them starting...
Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

August 11, 2006
5:31 PM

Post #2611384

cchik,
You shouldn't have any problem getting pawpaws to survive and fruit in z5 NY. Don't know where you're located in relation to Amherst, but here's a nursery that offers several good pawpaw varieties, as well as seedlings and seed:
http://www.geocities.com/nuttreegordon/0Kgordon.htm
heebiejeebie
Buffalo, NY

January 28, 2007
6:26 AM

Post #3130323

I went to that nursery yesterday and they seemed REALLY deserted!
Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 28, 2007
12:28 PM

Post #3130588

hbjb,
I've never been to JHG's nursery, but I know his reputation, world-wide, as a nut/minor fruit tree propagator, and have purchased plant materials, mail-order from him - and have been well-pleased.
I don't know how much of his business is mail-order and how much is local, on-site - but I'd hazard a guess that most of it is mail-order.
If you went there expecting a typical 'garden center', like at one of the big box stores, or even one of the smaller mom & pop operations, where they don't actually grow their own nursery stock, but purchase it from large propagators, I'd suspect it probably didn't look like much to you.
January at a nursery in NY? No, I wouldn't expect it to be bustling with activity.
alyrics
Beachwood, OH

January 28, 2007
12:50 PM

Post #3130618

Hey I'm glad this thread got bumped again. Maybe this will be the year I will get some PawPaw to eat.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

January 28, 2007
1:21 PM

Post #3130687

amherst is only a few hours away and in May I go to a show in Buffalo
I'll have to check it out

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 30, 2007
9:04 PM

Post #3139432

The best time of the year to find Paw Paws is the end of Sept. when they start ripening. You might try farmers markets to buy them. Also the best way here in MO that people grow them is in a patch of at least 3 trees close to a water source of some kind. They taste very much like a banana custard. Good luck in your search.
starlight1153
Seale, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 30, 2007
10:23 PM

Post #3139706

I clicked on that above link. I was readign Gordons commentary and had to go back and read a couple of times. Was shocked when I read about 3cc battery acid. Somebody wanna tell me what battery acid for and why it not killing the plants. Read and seen some strange and different things, but this one blew my mind away.

moondogman
Anderson, IN
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2007
3:16 AM

Post #3168374

After reading a bit it looks like the soil is very alkaline from the lakebed and the battery acid is used to acidify the soil. I used to use muratic acid to acidify fish tanks for south american fish that liked there water slightly acidic.
bookworm28
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

February 14, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #3187033

In researching Paw-Paw's I've found they are the larval food for the zebra swallow tailed butterfly (think that's the right name)- so I'm wondering if the tree will grow reliably in the gulf coast area. The fruit would be a real bonus! It sounds good. I saw a dwarf variety on one of the growers listed - I don't have a lot of space for two trees. Anyone know about these?
Now, battery acid as soil conditioner - that's one I hadn't heard of. (a new use for recycled batteries!!!)
Chills
Saint Clair Shores, MI
(Zone 6b)

February 14, 2007
9:38 PM

Post #3189474

There is a florida native pawpaw (with larger flowers) but I am not aware of any material being written about the fruit. Also, for the poster from Ohio, there is an annual Pawpaw festival in Ohio where fruit tasting as well as products made from Pawpaws are tasted. (I hear the Pawpaw beer is good, but the desserts are worth the trip alone).

~Chills
Lucky_P
Hopkinsville, KY
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2007
8:45 PM

Post #3218311

Chills,
About 18 months ago, I made a batch of pawpaw cookies and brought 'em in to share with folks here at work. Within 15 minutes, a dozen people who ate them were experiencing vomiting & diarrhea. Including me, and my daughter, who ate a couple when they came out of the oven. For most of us, the 'malady' ran its course in 24 hrs, but the director was out for 3 days.
I still catch h-e-l-l about it - in a good-natured way - lots of ribbing about my pawpaw cookies.
I threw out all the pulp I had frozen.
Doubt I'll ever get anyone here to ever try one again.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 24, 2007
10:54 AM

Post #3219631

What caused it?
I mean is there edible and unedible pawpaw?
did they at least taste good...going down...not coming back up...
MarthaMoye
Jacksonville, NC
(Zone 8a)

July 19, 2007
9:15 PM

Post #3756215

Hello PawPaw people! (Well, OK. Maybe not... like some, I've never tasted a Paw Paw...) But that's what leads me to ask this question... What does the fruit look like when it's ripe? Right now, there's only one fruit on my 7 year old Paw Paw tree (finally!!!), and it's green and sort of hard. Will it change color? About what time of year will it be ripening? (I'm in a zone 8.) I'm so excited that I might just get to try a Paw Paw! Thanks for any help that you all can give me.
-Martha
Chills
Saint Clair Shores, MI
(Zone 6b)

July 20, 2007
4:29 AM

Post #3757643

Lucky...That's weird. I've read about university researchers making baked goods using pawpaw and I've tried breads with pawpaw in it at the festival a couple years back. (didn't try the beer, though).

You will be able to tell your pawpaw is ripe by the smell. The fruit will also tend to change color (either lighter or darker, depending on the kind) and it will also soften.

~Chills (who is still waiting for his 6 trees to produce, but two of them did bloom this year, one before the freeze which dropped all its flowers and one afterwards)

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 20, 2007
11:35 AM

Post #3757984

Martha
was there more blooms and fruit and they fell off?
or was there only one bloom and thats it?
how tall is it?

I'm still struggling on with my 2 small seedlings
but I took a big step by finally planting them in the ground
I've been keeping them in large pots and just sinking them pot and all in the ground
We were bringing in fill to get the low lands up above the lake level (in spring I end up with 2 acres under water)so I didn't want to plant them where they might have to be moved or buried
I planted them where the blueberries grow well figuring it's acid soil there

The one took the transplant well
The other died back to the lower branch but I now see new growth coming out below the lower branch so I think it will make it

I haven't invested anymore money in any more trees 'cause I want to try a fruit before
I spend more on something that I may or may not like

In researching I want to buy a Susquahanna...

But PPPLLLLEEEEAAAASSSEEEEEEE
If any one gets an extra fruit
PPPPPLLLLEEEEAAASSSEEEEE
can you send me one
I'll pay the postage
If I can send hatching eggs priority and they make it , a fruit wrapped
in bubble wrap should make it
I'm not worried about what it looks like
I just want a taste

gee
sound like begging to me...rotflmao


Chills
They didn't set any fruit at all?
how big are the trees?
are the blooms pretty?
are they all the same variety?
Hybrids?
They take the cold well?

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

July 21, 2007
3:15 AM

Post #3761148

Hi everyone ...I am a little confused here ...in Australia the Paw Paw is very common...like mangos...the reason I am confused is that I have always thought Americans called Paw Paws ...Papayas and that they are eaten for breakfast in the hot months...so hearing that people don't know what they taste like amazes me!
Is it a climate thing? or are your Paw Paws something else (not papayas) Could someone please enlighten me? :)
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2007
11:18 AM

Post #3761635

*G*. You're right. What you are thinking of we do call papayas. This was in one of the earliest posts;

"You have to be careful when using a search engine because paw-paw is also a name given to papaya in some places, esp. Australia."

There is also a different fruit we call paw paw, and it's native to the US. There are several good links in this thread that will show you the differences.

HTH
Margo

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

July 21, 2007
1:35 PM

Post #3761918

Gee Margo thanks ...I did not know that...that site was very interesting...some of those paw paws have pretty flowers...I can sure see why everyone is interested...what with the History...attractive tree ...pretty flowers and edible fruit ...always a treasure that any gardener ...I found it in my garden "bible and it says zones 5-10 in a woodland setting...it is a member of the custard apple family...frost hardy if sheltered...moist well drained soil...hates dry periods. Well I am familiar with and love the Custard Apple...so you have to love it's rellies...good luck everyone! :) chrissy

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

July 21, 2007
2:00 PM

Post #3761977

Oh I forgot to say Lucky_P...your story about everyone getting sick...I found that these paw paws could be dangerous for the following reason...my dear hubby loves Custard Apples...and ate one- seeds skin and all...it was pretty big ...next thing I know he went into violent cramps vomiting and "the runs"...I rushed him to the Hospital and when I told the nurse what he had eaten he was rushed into Emergency.He was very ill...and they explained that it was the skin and seeds of the fruit that is very deadly and he was lucky to have survived!...that white sap that oozes out is very bad for you too...anyway because it is related I thought that I should point that out to you all because after your story...I think that it must be the same and perhaps someone accidently put the skin or seeds or both into the stuff your folk ate...so be on the safe side just in case and don't eat the seed or skin...only the flesh.
Chills
Saint Clair Shores, MI
(Zone 6b)

July 21, 2007
5:11 PM

Post #3762513

Crestedchick...

The blooms are a dusky maroon-purple not exactly pretty but interesting and a welcome sight. The largest tree I have is maybe about 8 feet tall . I have 3 seedlings and 3 named varieties. The ones that bloomed were named variety plants (Susquehanna and Rappahannok). No fruit was set, sadly.

The only problems I have had with regard to cold damage was on two of the seedlings I had planted in Tubex plant shelters. The next spring I found that all growth above the level of the shelter from the previous year had died. It seems that such shelters can prevent proper hardening off of trees planted within them. One of the seedlings still has its shelter on it and there have been no further problems (but I did take the other shelter off and that tree has done just fine without it).

~Chills
MarthaMoye
Jacksonville, NC
(Zone 8a)

February 13, 2008
12:52 AM

Post #4530486

I live in southeastern NC near the coast, and this past September I FINALLY got to taste the paw-paws from my tree! (Actually, just one paw-paw fruit was produced!) I only ate the inside part, and saved the seeds. The fruit inside smelled like tropical fruit and had the consistency of custard. The taste was sweet and "tropical", with a hint of vanilla. Very unusual flavor. (I don't eat a lot of tropical, exotic fruits!)

The tree is about 7 feet tall and seven years old. When I planted it, it was quite small... it was only in a one gallon container. At some point, I'll see if I can get those big seeds to sprout.
-Martha

This message was edited Feb 12, 2008 7:56 PM
thistle5
Alexandria, VA
(Zone 7b)

February 29, 2008
2:08 AM

Post #4603048

Martha,
I'm glad that you got to taste your pawpaws, I'll be getting my first this spring, I guess I'll have to wait awhile for them to mature, I'm hoping they'll be nice shrubs in the meantime.

I have a small backyard, & plan to plant them along the western fence, sort of underneath some pines (which may be removed). Right now, back there, I have some camellias, nandinas, pieris, mugo pines, & a small oakleaf hydrangea. Sounds pretty shaded, but they would get almost full morning sun, & the other plantings are pretty sparse...

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