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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2004
11:41 PM

Post #841946

We bought this Troybilt tiller used in 1989. Only thing we have had to do to it was to put on new tines a few times.
Regular maintance has kept her running. Still starts on one or two pulls.
Very easy to operate, one hand guides it down the field.
We don't use it as much now, because we have farm tractors & machines.
I would recommend this tiller to anyone.
Bernie

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Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 20, 2004
2:40 AM

Post #843935

Bernie, I have a Troybilt...love it!

Altho I also have a big tractor (J.Deere) and an antique Gravely I'll hang on to my Troy. All those machines have their place here; each one does it's own special job that the others can't do.

(We should charge Troybilt for the advertising, eh??) :>)

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 20, 2004
2:55 AM

Post #843946

I wonder if the ones now are built as good as these older ones. Some company bought out Troybilt or they merged or something a few years ago.
Hey, we finally got some rain last night. Took winds of about 40-60 MPH all day to brew it up. Couple of nasty storms around the state, but no major damage or injury.
Amazing how all those weeds can sprout in a couple of hours after a rain! Old Troybilt will see some action in a few days!
Bernie
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 20, 2004
3:02 AM

Post #843954

Bernie my horse is an 81 I spent 400 bucks on a new engine last summer it is undoubtably the machine that comes closest to doing everything they say it will.

I can't say as much for the two I bought and returned three weeks ago. I tried to buy a small one to weed with but I was just not impressed by the new troys. Ernie

Shoe I don't think they would pay me for what I have to say about the new small troys. Ernie

This message was edited Apr 19, 2004 8:04 PM

This message was edited Apr 19, 2004 8:07 PM
dave719
Humansville, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 20, 2004
12:22 PM

Post #844217

I was looking at one that was 2 or 3 years old last sat. there about the same they have put a clutch to the tines and are using a 7 horse briggs the engine won't be as good at least in my opion If the clutch holds up they look good over all
This was the horse what lowes are selling i woudn't take out of the store I got one that is an 70's or 80 something it needs a new engine still works but you need to check the gas and fill the oil
Dave719
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 20, 2004
2:17 PM

Post #844296

yeh...I believe Troy was bought out by MTD (seems like everything is MTD nowadays).

Mine is the Horse model, about 11 years old, doing just fine!

Dave, "check the gas and fill the oil"!...Hehehe, I used to have a car just like that!

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 20, 2004
5:17 PM

Post #844422

Mine has an 8 HP Kohler. You can buy a replacement at
http://www.northerntool.com


Edited with Model # 6008-1405
Sells for $674.99
Bernie

This message was edited Apr 20, 2004 12:21 PM
dave719
Humansville, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 21, 2004
12:58 AM

Post #844800

Thats the engine 've been saving my pennys for my grandfather had one with the kohler on it was 30 yrs. old when he sold it still ran like new and our garden was well over an acre and that was all we ever used
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 21, 2004
3:25 AM

Post #844951

Kohlers are superior engines to briggs and because the are just built to last they have cast iron sleeves and the crank runs on real bearings.

Shoe is right about fill the oil I didn't fill the oil in my 81 and I either broke the rod or maybe the crank so I replaced it with a throw away for $400 late this summer if its the rod I can rebuild it for $50 not sure if it is worth fixing if its the crank as well.

Could be new style industrial briggs are a lot better than they use to be Ernie
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2004
3:30 PM

Post #845471

I'm a die-hard Briggs man. I've always preferred them over Tecumseh but can't honestly remember ever having a Kohler so really can't compare to them.

You're right, ernie, Briggs has been making theirs w/cast iron sleeves for quite some time now. Not sure about the crank, will have to quiz our local Briggs experts.

heycharlie
San Jacinto County, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2004
7:07 PM

Post #855864

I got my "horse" late 1990, sort of a christmas present.
Its actually a 1991, been great all these years!
The motor still works jus fine except the tines have started to slip.
-
The wheels turn and pull but when you ingage the tines they slip and won't dig.
-
Any ideas would be appreciated.
thank ye in advance
dave719
Humansville, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2004
9:52 PM

Post #855966

Is that the new style with the clutch if it is,that is where i would start looking
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2004
3:41 AM

Post #856308

Charlie...that sounds more like your belt needs adjusting or replacing.

When you put the load to it and the tines hang up like that you'll need to tighten the belt. You should have a manual that tells you how, plus a belt adjustment tool. It's fairly easy.

lindenlady
Linden, TN

May 11, 2004
7:22 PM

Post #866625

I bought a Troy in 1986 and used it heavily for 8 years and then we sold that farm and moved to a small large home with a small lot...(big mistake !!). We have since moved to a larger parcel of land, 7 acres +, and a smaller home. I had sold my Troy to a friend of ours...another mistake, but this one is okay, because he just now sold it back to me yesterday !! I had gotten a Mantis for my small garden...well that dude is okay, but not for this Tennessee clay and rock mixture. I used my old friend Troy last evening...and it sure acted like he was happy to be home again...lol

I won't let him go now for nuttin'.

Carolyn
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2004
1:39 AM

Post #866995

Hah!...what a great post! A big hearty welcome to DG, lindenlady!

Come on in and set a spell! Keep us posted on your new garden and home!

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 21, 2004
2:35 AM

Post #1011833

Well old reliable is down for a while. The carberator is like wore out. A screw came out of the butterfly, got in the combustion chamber & wreaked the piston. Got all that fixed, works fine. Now the shaft the butterfly is on broke, so we are getting that fixed. Maybe 20 years or so wears on the mechanical stuff!
Bernie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2004
12:53 AM

Post #1014296

Sigh. Even though I have no place to use it right now, I sure wish I still had my old 1980 Horse with the Kohler cast iron engine.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 23, 2004
1:47 AM

Post #1014341

Darius I have two both Kohlers died but you are welcome run one of these here lol. Ernie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2004
1:52 AM

Post #1014346

Thank you very much, Ernie. When I feel the need for a working vacation, I shall take you up on the offer!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 23, 2004
3:49 AM

Post #1014517

Ok will even let you run the one with the newest engine. Ernie

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 29, 2005
5:27 AM

Post #1370079

Old reliable is in hospital!
Seems the carbuator wore out. The parts moved to many times.
Will be back in action shortly.
Bernie

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 16, 2005
12:38 PM

Post #1406265

New carb, new piston, shortage of $378.00, she's back in fine shape.
Still can do the same good work. Went up & back on a strip for onion sets, she left everything nice & soft. We don't use her much anymore, but sure is handy to have around.
Bernie

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

June 2, 2008
6:57 PM

Post #5041647

Had to replace the head gasket this spring. 20 minutes & 10 bucks, not bad.
Still going strong.
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2008
7:11 PM

Post #5041749

MTD - I have been fighting this "Lawn Tractor" (riding mower only) for over three months. Borrowed a push mower from my BIL cause I could not stand the yard anymore. Took two days and a lot of sweat, but it is cut.

I will fix the MTD or I will invite you all to the bonfire. At this point, I would await invitations quicker than holding my breath.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

June 2, 2008
8:41 PM

Post #5042134

MTD, I love them. Bought a rider 9 or 10 years ago. finally wore it out end of 2006. It was $799 when we bought it new. Fall of 2006 we bought a new one for $1000. It's a little wider & more HP. Works great!
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2008
8:52 PM

Post #5042176

Bernie, I know that that rider had to be stored indoors. Do not have that option at this time. It is true that I am rough, on equipment, vehicles, and most plants but most stuff lasts more than 3 years for me, and when it quits I can usually fix it in short order. This thing is one problem after another.

Thanks guys for letting me vent, the frustration has made it necessary.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 24, 2009
2:58 PM

Post #6182742

Speaking of Troybilt, how many of you remember Dick Raymond and his association with Troybilt?

His book, "Garden Way's, Joy of Gardening", has become by bible for gardening. The information in the book is as quality as is the Troybilt tiller.

Jerry

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

February 24, 2009
4:07 PM

Post #6183102

They also had a good cookbook, "Joy of Cooking".
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 3, 2009
2:09 AM

Post #6213947

Joy of Cooking has been reprinted. I passed a few out last Christmas. Agree it is one of the finest ever printed.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2009
2:23 AM

Post #6214016

Dod am Dmailing you my addy this xmas LOL.
amigatec
Haskell, OK

May 17, 2009
2:38 AM

Post #6558300

I have 3 Troy's, Horse II, EconoHorse, and a Pony II.

If it ain't a Troy it ain't a tiller.
heycharlie
San Jacinto County, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 18, 2009
4:50 PM

Post #6834697

Hi folks;
Got a reminder to renew my membership this morn, did so!

I forget sometimes how much i enjoy DG.
-
Still have me 'ol Troy, almost wore out a set of tires on a 6300 Kubota also.

What prompted this post was Dick Raymond, joy of garden, Cooking etc.
An old post:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/512947/
Some might enjoy it.
_________________

Sort of a little history on who we are: http://picasaweb.google.com/ccwade/Garden080705#
-
If interested take a look.

Thanks

charlie
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2009
5:36 PM

Post #6834806

Yeah Charlie, glad you decided to stay with DG.

"The Joy of Gardening" is my bible. Another gardening book I like is "Organic Vegetable Gardening", by Bob Percival.

Jerry

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2010
5:06 AM

Post #7688652

I'm bumping this for everyone who is thinking about a tiller this year, like me.

So, any more advice on the Troys that are built these days? No pun intended, but there it is :o)

Sally
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2010
7:14 AM

Post #7688899

I used a Troy Built twice. The first and the last time. What I got was a seed bed ground down to smitherines, chopped up worms and a texture far to fine to be right. Two years ago when I was sick two friends with Troy Builts came in with all good intent to help me. They did and the results were exactly the same as my personal experience with one of the very early Troy Builts. Troy Built is more about mail order and credit than the finest machine on earth which they advertise.

If you feel you must till a good front end tiller will be a bit more difficult to use. If a good seed bed is what you want this is what you should use.

Today the thinking is no till. I would suggest you read every line of no till you can find and get into some kind of a permanent mulch program that will do a far better job for you. Save your money for some other nice back yard improvements. This program is right, always has been right and will remain right for all time.

I'm behind a tree. Go ahead and throw your stones if you wish. The tree will save me and drop a nice mulch this fall in spite of your throwing stones. LOL

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2010
10:28 AM

Post #7689506

Docgipe, I couldn't hit you if I aimed real good! I've sort of no tilled the past few years. I know it ruins the soil structure, but DD has manure now and I want to turn large amounts in, in the fall, along with lime and leaves. I'm getting too old to shovel it all under like I used to.

My dirt is not clay or good loam. It turns well with a shovel and the clods break up, so it's sort of sandy. It isn't real high in humus because I haven't turned anything under for years.

My Dad's old tiller had the back tines. I don't know what brand he had, but it was like trying to turn a buffalo and about as hard to hang on to. He still has it so I haven't asked to borrow a tiller from him.

I like everyone's description of holding on with one hand.That's what I want. A smallish one. But I also want quality, and being able to walk into a store and buy one would be great too.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2010
11:28 AM

Post #7689630

Did you ever consider renting one for a few years of serious soil building and then go back to your no-till?
I would suggest a cover crop and Mycorrhiza being added in the fall with your manures and leaves. Then in the very early spring till under the total and add another inch or so of fresh manure. Start your planting about a month later. Start thinking of five percent organic material in your soil. When you get there think about ten percent where the really outstanding volume and quality will be great.

Some gardens like yours get a really great improvement with the adding of trace minerals. You have sandy loam which is a classified soil type by most testing centers. Greensand either Eastern or Texas product, azromite from organic sites, Ironite from the big box stores. They are all just slightly different from each other. If you get serious use one and rotate into another for three or four years.

You are absolutely correct about turning a rear tine tiller being like turning a buffalo. It would likely be easier to get a donkey to sit down and offer to shake hands. They do not work well in small places. A front tine tiller will bounce you about and require two hands. Those other fellows lie about one hand on in the corn patch anyway. That is why I suggest renting. Don't listen to me or any other jake in a forum. I have not used a tiller during my last thirty five years of growing under one form or another of mulched gardening. Don't even own one today.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2010
11:43 AM

Post #7689663

I never thought about renting. We usually buy what we need. I'll do some reading and take all into consideration. I don't have a real large garden. I make compost too, but it's never enough. We eat a lot of our peelings, so coffee grounds are the main throw away around here. I crush the egg shells for the birds in the winter.

Quite a few years ago I had quack grass that over took the flower bed. I removed all the plants, dug and sorted each shovelful by hand to get all the roots out. I found a patch of rusty cinders in the soil and removed it while I was at it. I wish I had pictures, but that was before I got my digital camera. The dirt was dug a good 6'' deep. It then became another garden. Since then I haven't done more than than turn a row, rake and plant.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 8, 2010
3:34 PM

Post #7690149

It would be pretty hard to plant 13000 onion plants into hard ground! With the tiller the soil is nice & loose 8" deep.
I would like to see you weeding between the rows of beets & carrots. We usually plant 7 or 8 rows 300 feet long. Takes nearly 1 hour to go through with the tiller. We have it set so it throws a bit of soil into the row & that smothers small weeds.
Most of our garden we go after with our tractor & big equipment.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 9, 2010
4:37 AM

Post #7691246

Country, sounds like perfect dirt for carrots and I like the idea of weeding between the rows quicker, (in my small area,) too. I'm sitting here looking at chickweed slowly taking over the half of the garden I've done nothing with yet.

pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 9, 2010
12:42 PM

Post #7692432

I've been ripping out chickweed left and right. Right now it looks good but give it a few more days and plenty more rain and it will kill more good stuff. Grrr...

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2010
5:07 AM

Post #7693894

Pepper, that's my goal for today. Ripping out more chickweed and cutting out dandelions. Eventually it will get done.

I did get horse manure yesterday and am sprinkling it around here and there :o)

Have a great day every one!
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2010
5:51 AM

Post #7693976

The youngest tender dandelion is supposed to make a really good salad green (believe it or not) there was an article about it in "Mother Earth News" awhile back - I'll see if I can find a link to it.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/2008-04-01/Dandelion-Recipes.aspx

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/Dandelion-Greens-Recipe.aspx

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/Dandelion-Salad-with-Goat-Cheese-and-Tomato-Dressing.aspx

This message was edited Apr 10, 2010 10:12 AM
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 10, 2010
6:43 PM

Post #7695505

I've had them before and they are good. Especially mixed with mesculen.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 11, 2010
5:05 AM

Post #7696162

Dyson, I'm thinking chickweed is edible too. I always said that if we ate this stuff it would disappear. The first article made me hungry. The second made me laugh with the addition of the bacon or sausage, but it all looks good!

Pepper, it's a wonder I haven't tried it yet. I've nibbled on borage and lambsquarters in the garden. Just never made a meal from them. Now gathering wild asparagus. Even DH is up for that!
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 11, 2010
5:04 PM

Post #7697841

I love wild asparagus!! I have some growing in the pasture next to the shed but haven't picked it for a couple years. It kept getting away from me. I need to check it in the morning before work.

Here's an article on chickweed. Very interesting. http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/chickw60.html
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 12, 2010
2:37 AM

Post #7698719

Thank you for that link - as you said interesting.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2010
4:39 AM

Post #7704372

Pepper, that was a good one. Sometimes I wonder if what I have in the yard is the edible one. I had heard of the chickweed ointment, but forgot about it. We have an Amish community not far from here and they have a lot of the old salves and such.
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 15, 2010
2:54 AM

Post #7706740

Just found this -

http://frugalliving.about.com/od/eatforfree/tp/Monthly_Foraging_Guide.htm

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

April 16, 2010
8:20 AM

Post #7709853

Dyson, I'm going to bookmark this. I just had asparagus for dinner, I always taste the sheep sorral for the fun of it and have yet to taste a violet bloom. Mushrooms are to die for! I use the plantain. I crush it and spread the juice on itches or cuts. I haven't tasted much of anything else, yet.

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