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Trees, Shrubs and Conifers: Camellia links

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Monocromatico
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
(Zone 11)


May 1, 2004
9:35 PM

Post #855955

Camellias arenīt my speciality, but I had searched for more information on this genus, and decided to share some of what I have found about them - at least, what I have in my bookmark list.

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I found this japanese website featuring pictures of all kinds of Camellias. Different varieties, species, and hybrids are linked, which picture named after the species/hybrid/variety name. There must be thousands of pictures.
http://www.ykanda.jp/clist.htm

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This website provides a short description of most known Camellia species of the world, and information of where they are from.
http://camellia-ics.org/_ics/register/species/ix_spec.htm

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This is the Camellia Expedition to China, organized by the Longwood Gardens (who hosts this webpage) and other institutions. They travelled across the chinese provinces of Sichuan, Yunnan, Hunan and Guangxi, searching for wild Camellias growing on the natural vegetation, traveling through mountains, grassfields, forests, and towns. Itīs also interesting how they cared to take note of the life in the small cities and their people http://www.longwoodgardens.org/Plants&Horticulture/PlantExploration/China2000/Intro.htm

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This one os only for hardcore Camellia fans only. It is a complete description of all Camellias and other Theaceae native from China. Itīs a 200+ pages text with a heavy taxonomic language. It has a very useful identificantion key for all genera in that work, and as a curiosity, has the chinese name (with chinese characters) for every species.
http://flora.huh.harvard.edu/china/mss/volume12/Theaceae-CAS_edited.htm
Monocromatico
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
(Zone 11)


May 5, 2004
3:14 PM

Post #860110

New links.

Japanese website (translated), featuring pictures of several japanese cultivars propperly identified.
http://www1.sphere.ne.jp/ando/index-e.html

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This italian website (partially translated) shows some of the beautiful italian cultivars of Camellia japonica (old and new ones), with pictures and a brief description in italian and english. There are also some curious informations on how the cultivars were bred.
http://www.cln.it/camellia/
LouisianaSweetPea
Mount Hermon, LA
(Zone 8b)

May 9, 2004
5:29 AM

Post #864025

Thanks Monocromatico for the links! In the last several years, I have become addicted to camellias, especially the rose-forms.
Monocromatico
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
(Zone 11)


June 17, 2004
7:05 PM

Post #913808

This page leads you to long and rich texts about the history and characteristics of 4 Camellia cultivars, but mainly about Azaleas and Rhododendrons
http://www.paghat.com/garden11.html

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Pictures of hundreds of cultivars
http://www.camellia.de/index/indextxt.htm

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I don't know if this will be useful for anyone, but this Italian page is rich of information regarding dozens of Camellias, some with pictures
http://www.vivaitorsanlorenzo.it/schede/camellia.htm

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This page explains the main fungus deseases that aflict the Camellias and some hints on how to deal with them. Also provides a link to an article about Camellia Flower Blight, a fungus that can infect Camellias and kill their flowers (keeping the plant alive and healthy, though).
http://www.med-rz.uni-sb.de/med_fak/physiol2/camellia/pest/blumen.htm

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General information about Camellias provided by the US National Arboretum, with a short list of hardy Camellias and some pictures.
http://www.usna.usda.gov/Newintro/camelli1.html

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"Project Paracamellia", as the author defines, is a project to make species of the section Paracamellia (which includes C. sasanqua, C. oleifera, C. vernalis, and others) more popular, since they are more sun and root rot resistant. Since the flowers are not as atractive as C. japonica, they are trying to create new atractive cultivars and hybrids from the Camellia species cited above.
http://www.panchul.com/project_paracamellia/

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The Virginia Camellia Society home page
http://members.cox.net/vacs/index.htm

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This website isn't updated since 1999, but has a nice article about Camellias (check out pages 2, 3 and 4)
http://www.gdnctr.com/wint992.htm

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This page talks about winter blooming Camellias
http://eesc.orst.edu/agcomwebfile/garden/flower/camellia.html
raelil
thomasville, GA
(Zone 8b)

June 29, 2004
7:09 PM

Post #930880

When we moved to Thomasville last August, I fell in love with Camelias and none were on my property, so I planted 4 "babies". So far they are doing well with the exception of the one in the photo. I sprayed last week in the hopes of seeing some improvement. Any suggestions?

Thumbnail by raelil
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Monocromatico
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
(Zone 11)


July 15, 2004
6:07 PM

Post #953112

I just stumbled across this page:

National Symposium on Yellow Camellia in Vietnam,2002 - This is the index of the Symposiym page. And interesting information source about these wonderful and yet uncommon Camellias.
http://web-seisan.agr.ehime-u.ac.jp/dr.yamaguchi/vietnam02/index.htm

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Raelil, I tried to find information about what could be happening to that plant. Although that plant looks healthy, I noticed that some leaves were damaged by bugs, I believe. I can only guess that it could be attacked by insects (underground, maybe), or it could be taking too much sun light.
LouisianaSweetPea
Mount Hermon, LA
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2004
9:32 PM

Post #953352

Monocromatico,

A while back, I had bookmarked this page, which advertises a yellow-blossomed camellia for sale:

http://www.camforest.com/camellia.htm#jap-sel

The description reads:

"Camellia nitidissimia (zone 9) The Yellow Camellia is actually just one of many yellow Camellias but this is the best known. The flowers are a bright yellow and the petals are thick and waxy. The flower buds are spherical like C. sinensis and these open to small flowers which hang down all along the stems. C. nitidissimia is found in Guangxi province of southern China where there is very little frost and probably can only be grown outdoors in central Florida or California. The foliage is fairly large with indented veins and a glossy upper surface. This species is the parent of several yellow hybrids after decades of work by many people around the world."

Is this similar to the one you read about?

I hope that the yellow-blossomed variety availability increases. That would be a nice variation for the garden!

Jean
Monocromatico
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
(Zone 11)


July 16, 2004
12:01 AM

Post #953512

There are around 80 species of Camellia, and as far as I know, around 10 or 15 of them are yellow. My memory tells me of C. nitidissima, C. chrysantha, C. petelotii and C. flava, with pure yellow flowers. They are seldon seen on sale, but they are mostly used for hybrids with Camellia japonica, because the big and pretty flowers of the Japanese Camellia lack completely of the yellow color.

Camellia chrysantha has a curious story. It was first discovered in 1965, in southern forests of China. Until then, it was only a legend, the "Golden Camellia", just a dream, but a dream that became true.

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