it you take cuttings from a blooming plant..

Newberry, FL(Zone 8B)

does it quit blooming temporarily? i did this to two plants, they seem to be taking a break but have buds...

FSH, TX

I don't typicall cut on any Brugmansia I want to hybridize with or transplant it as replanting, cutting, etc shock a Brugmansia somewhat and stunts growth and sets back hybridizing efforts anywhere from 2 months to almost non-existant depending on the size of the cutting and how big the plant was that the cutting was taken from. Still, I prefer to not take cuttings from anything while I am hybridizing until I have enough surplus seed. I do try to keep anywhere from 6-2 plants of most of my hybridizing plants that I like so I can take a few cuttings and still have some for pollen or seed setting. I also tend to use some plants almost entirely for pollen and almost never set seed to those I am using for pollen gathering. I take the pollen as soon as it ripens and apply it to the stigma of an unopened flower on a seed setting Brugmansia. Tearing the calyx open to make a slit, then tearing the corolla open to make another slit along the bottom so rain or misters don't get the stigma unduly wet. Heat, repotting, cuttings, all of these things can delay hybridizing efforts. Of course, if the plant is in too small of a container it is best to replant early in the year so one can have more blooms to hybridize with later.

Newnan, GA(Zone 8a)

so how do I know which size pot I should be using? I have one 12" tall and 3 new cuttings 6-8". I don't want to put these in the ground, have two there.

SW, WI(Zone 4b)

I took cuttings from one last year that was 'mid-bloom, and it didn't seem to affect it at all (I did take the cuttings from non blooming branches, though) tiG, I always just start out in the pot size that it seem to 'fit' in. usually 4" for nice sized cuttings. You can always pot up!

Jonesboro, GA(Zone 7b)

Wow, Brug, you really know your stuff! I bought a small yellow Brug about 3 years ago and am just amazed at it every year. Last year it had over 100 blooms at one time. I keep it like a tree. I had never been able to root from it til this year and I think I have finally suceeded just in water. I have been looking every year for seeds but have seen none, are there some that are just males and have no seeds? I thought maybe it was a hybrid that would have no seeds.

FSH, TX

Azalea,
If you are waiting for them to self seed you are going to be waiting a very long time as Brugmansia rarely if ever self seed. Some Brugmansia hybrids are known to self seed on rare occasion like the Cypress Gardens, Jean pasco, etc. For the most part, some hybrids are exceptional seed setters, others are great for pollen, and some are great for both. The best bet for those of you who want see is to take versicolor pollen and put it on candida, aurea, insignis, or suaveolens type hybrids or any combination there of. You can of course cross a jamaican suaveolens to a frosty pink suaveolens as well with good result, but it is mostly a waste of time to cross the same hybrid to itself unless you are crossing hundreds of the same flower to itself and you don't expose that plant to any foreign pollen, then you might get lucky and get one or 2 seed pods if your lucky. You could also spray the stigma with a bit of GA-3 to induce inbreeding if that was your desire or to induce a cross that is harder than normal or doesn't have a very high success rate.
Hope that helps a bit,
Brugmansia

Jonesboro, GA(Zone 7b)

Thanks Brug - I just thought that they should set seeds like the Datura, guess this is a little more complicated. I'm not into crossing or propagating, just thought it might be fun to raise some "babies".

Alvin, TX(Zone 9a)

So how do I make a plant from a cutting? Does anyone have information on that?

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Amanda,
You can root the cutting in a jar of water to which you have added a few drops of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide keeps the water fresher for a longer period. I find that it seems to encourage faster nub formation. Change the water every few days. I put about 3" - 4" of water in the jar. When the cuttings develop nubs, you can plant the cutting in a small pot. You can also wait until small roots have actually formed before planting in a pot.

OR you can pot the cutting in a small pot. Some use 16 - 20 oz plastic cups as pots. Place the pot in a large baggie or in a humid location and in indirect sunlight. Remove the baggie when the cutting starts to put out new growth.

Alvin, TX(Zone 9a)

Thanks! I'm going to try it!!

Ottawa, ON(Zone 5a)

I had to trim a brug by removing a 2' branch that was in the way of another plant. I cut the stem into 2" pieces and laid them horizontally in damp ProMix, almost covered, and am waiting to see if anything happens...

Alvin, TX(Zone 9a)

Interesting .... I trimmed lots of new little growth like this off the trunks of mine yesterday ... I left it just sitting on the ground. Surprisingly, it's raining yet again today (dripping with sarcasm), so I guess this evening I'll slosh through the mud, grab the cuttings and stick them in cups of dirt. Guess we'll see what happens!

My coworker has never heard of these and is in love and wants a cutting of mine ... :)

Lodi, CA(Zone 9b)

Wow.. this is an interesting thread.... all the way back to 2001... too cool

Jonesboro, GA(Zone 7b)

I find that it is easier to root more mature stalks, partly woody instead of the new green tips. The green ones tend to rot for me. So, I usually don't try to start new ones until I cut them back in the fall. If you take a low side shoot off the main stalk, it should not affect the bloom period.
I put them in water for a few days til the "nubbies" (lenticles) form, then pot them in a loose sandy or perlite mix til the more stable roots form and get to be a couple of inches long, then pot them up in a larger pot with good soil. If you just wait til the longer roots form in water, and plant them, you will find that the "water roots" are very fragile and may break off in the potting process.

Gulfport, MS(Zone 8a)

Does anyone ever hear from Eric anymor? Last I knew he was heading to Texas and then to Iraq?

Central, AL(Zone 7b)

I'd like to share my observation. In our zone, an unknown pink brug. whose blooms started out yellow then turns pink. This blooms rather late in our region. Then the first frost will get them. So I did some cuttings while they were in blooms. Trimmed those flowers off, and shared them with friends/neighbors. By far, those rooted promptly, and when the weather warms up. They resumes their blosoms, while the parent plant still is not making flower buds. (So it seems that the cuttings were able to store up all that energy, and rebounce so much quicker than the parent plant whose has to regrow from the base?).

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

Eric is in Belgium now.

I use above the 'y' cuttings in hanging baskets now. I tried it with Orange Sunshine this year and it's way cool. Next year this hanging basket plant will be planted in the ground and I'll start new baskets with above the 'y' cuttings.

Gulfport, MS(Zone 8a)

That is a fantastic idea, to put them in hanging baskets!!! I had one that bloomed this year that almost toughed the ground.

Do you have a problem with them wilting and drying out quickly?

Moose Jaw, SK(Zone 3a)

Jen you can find him on BGI.

Watertown, NY

I just planted a small flowering brug in a big hanging basket so she can hang in my house all winter. I waited a long time for this plant and I don't want it out of my sight.

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

I used the largest basket I could find and it's been OK till just the past month, it is getting a bit big for basket now.

I think next year I will look for a super-duper huge basket and do 3 different colors, just for fun. I'll use that water-absorbing polymer in next year's baskets, I kinda forgot to add it this year. I think maybe it was all that rain we got that made me forget it does dry up here eventually, but it seemed like it was going to rain forever.

Emory, TX(Zone 8a)

How about trying the anti stress 2000?

Jonesboro, GA(Zone 7b)

Just looked this stuff up on Google - never heard of it before - sure wish I had known about it before our drought set in this spring - http://www.antistress.com/ASMan6.html#I
It makes sense that it would help the poor drying plants. We finally got about an Inch & half of rain last Friday - everything sure greened up in a hurry and now my brugs are suddenly loaded with buds and blooms. I hope we don't have an early freeze to stunt them all again.

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

I guess it's either flood or drought for us, huh? We just went through several years of drought (and lower than normal rainfall in the years that weren't official 'droughts') and then this year He turned on the faucet over Texas and let it pour! We had never seen our little road flooded like it was, and it got so wet I lost a favorite rosemary, but the Brugs seemed to love it!

Emory, TX(Zone 8a)

I just found out about last week and ordered it the same day!

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

I will have to try that anti stress stuff, I have heard others talk about it so, what's to lose? If it keeps some of the more valued plants from stressing, it could only be a good thing.

Emory, TX(Zone 8a)

That's what I thought too! Hope to see you this weekend!

Canton,IL &Dent Coun, MO(Zone 5b)

I have what is going to sound like a stupid question. Back in the spring a friend gave me a plant that looked nearly dead. it was a stick about 3" tall and a part of a leaf. she handed it to me and said if it can be saved I know you can do it. Having no idea what it was and no pots available I planted the "dead stick" in my front garden. well it is now august and I know it is a Burgmansia. However it went from 3" to nearly 5 feet! I live in Illinois and I know it wont survive a winter here. How do I dig it up and get it into a very large pot without killing it in the process?

Watertown, NY

You won't kill it, just dig it up and put it in a pot. Many of us have been doing this for years. Mine go into a cool basement for the winter. They do just fine.

Jonesboro, GA(Zone 7b)

Trinawich - when you dig up your brug, trim off some of the roots and put it into a large pot, water it very little for winter. Unless you have a GH or sunny room to store it in. It can go in your basement and go dormant. You may think it is dead, but new stalks will shoot up in spring. The leaves will probably fall off and the stalk may go brown. If it goes brown, you may as well cut it off to about 6 inches above the soil, it should come back fine.

Canton,IL &Dent Coun, MO(Zone 5b)

Thanks. I don't have a greenhouse per se, but the entire east side of my house is glass. so will it flower or just be leafy all winter?

Jonesboro, GA(Zone 7b)

It could flower if it has enough light, water and fertilizer and a pot large enough for the roots to grow.

Central, AL(Zone 7b)

Trina, have you thought about some supplemental light for your plants during the winter? I used my basement, gave it some florescent light. Viola! my brugs blooms off and on all winter long here.

Kenmore, NY(Zone 6a)

I'm in the same position as Trina ((hi girlie!!)). Was given 2 brug sticks by my MIL that she bought from QVC. Not even knowing what they were, I planted them in the same pot. One has "Y'd" and has blooms, the other hasn't finished the growth stage (and Y'd) yet. Being in the same zone as Trina, I am unsure what to do for the winter. I fear if it goes in the basement, it will die, as most of my winter basement plants do. Since it is a pot that is not big enough anyways, I was wondering if I could cut it up and start new ones.

My question is - where do I cut on the one that has Y'd, and also on the one that hasn't? There's so much great info on this forum, I'm confused now. It's definitely root-bound at this point, so want to do something with it before winter.

Gulfport, FL(Zone 9b)

If you want to make rooted cuttings from blooming branches AND maintain opportunities for pollinating, consider air-layering. I use small peat pots affixed to individual branches. While roots are forming, I still have access to blooms for pollination. When the branch is fully rooted - even if it has flowers or pollinated pods, I can prune off the rooted branch and repot without loss of blooms or pods.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Photos of your plants would help visualize what the cuttings would look like. Given that I'm guessing what the plant looks like, on the one that has "Y"ed, if you want next spring's plant to look more like a tree, make the cut a little longer than you want the main trunk to be. Leave the original "Y" as well as 2 or 3 more layers of "Y"s on that cutting. You can root fairly large cuttings. Remove other branches and root them as well. On the one that hasn't "Y"ed yet, make the cutting as long as possible and don't remove the growing tip. If you can keep it alive during winter, it may continue where it left off. Remove all but the small leaves.

Many of our members successfully overwinter their Brugs in their basements. Althought their methods for overwintering differ, they are successful because they keep the soil in their potted plants barely moist. When they do add water, it is by the cupful or less. It helps if the soil is packed with roots. Don't transplant into a larger pot just before you overwinter them.

Brug can have a large root system so next spring, don't put more than one cutting per pot. They will compete for space and fertilizer and won't perform as when in their own pot.

Kenmore, NY(Zone 6a)

lots of good info, bettydee and gordo. I'll let the DH read & help with this one.

Gulfport, FL(Zone 9b)

Here's a simple air layering method.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lBHBx8M8BM&feature=channel_page

Kenmore, NY(Zone 6a)

thanks gordo. told my husband about it, he's more familiar with air layering than I.

Ottawa, ON(Zone 5a)

Winterizing my brugs: After the first frost (usually mid-October here in Ontario) I pull off the burnt leaves and blooms and cut off the fleshy green stems. Then I take cuttings of the stems that have developed beige bark, about 18", so the original tree looks like a skeleton.

I put the main trees in the basement (no lights) and water them sparingly over the winter: once a month, just a cup or two of water to keep them alive. The cuttings: plunge them in a bucket of water a foot deep, with a splash (a tablespoon) of peroxide (H2O2) to minimize rot, (add another tbsp each month). They will root like crazy. In April, pot the cuttings and bring the mothers into the light to start growing, and repot if necessary (probably). The 'skeleton' will sprout all over with some feeding. I start off with 20-20-20 and then move to 15-30-15 when they have good leaf volume to produce bloom.

I have not had guaranteed success with cuttings above or below the "Y". I've done both. I think each plant has its own blooming schedule, and the weather is a big part of it. Feeding heavily usually works for me (15-30-15, twice weekly at half-strength).

Good luck!

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