My rain water harvesting pics

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

I had mentioned about the subject/project sometime ago. Now the pictures are ready and thought it might be wise to share here.

The collection pipe is fitted to the roof of our kitchen. It was a 6" pipe, cut laterally to make two lengths. Have used cheap methods to divert the water into the barrel. I have used a plastic bottle by cutting the side to fit to the collection trough and into the barrel. The overflow will slowly pass into the smaller barrel. I have used a 1 gallon PET bottle for the filter by cutting its base and putting its nozzle into the opening of the barrel. Have used 4 layers of sponge to keep out smaller dirt. The leaves and other bigger particles fall into the kitchen filter kept at the entry point. Cleaning the filters is very easy. It is working very successfully.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Here is another picture beside my main watering tank (for gardening). This was easier since the downspout had to be cut and diverted with two elbows. The overflow of this will fill the cement tank on the left.

Thumbnail by Dinu
So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Good job, Dinu!

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Another point where I collect water. Improved a bit.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Another tank.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

This is at the same place as the first picture on top. I built a tank.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Fremont, CA(Zone 9a)

I love it! But, I am reminded a bit of Rube Goldberg. Your use of bottles as funnel/adaptors is terrific!

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Thanks pot. There is so much use of these pet bottles - it can save the expense of a PET elbow while giving the flexibility of the angle like here. It also collects the heavy sediments that esp. flows with the first few minutes of rain which can be cleaned by just by opening the bottle cap. This part has to be cleaned often but it is easy and worth it. I have diverted a small part of the tiled roof water to enter this overhead tank water of which is used in the kitchen and toilet. It is not a heavy flow as the area I have chosen for collection is small.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Highland, IN

It reminds me of an updated version of how my grandmother used to save water in rain barrels for gardening. Since she was taking in well water for home consumption, saving water was a directly practical matter, not just "green". Just goes to show that you don't always need a big expensive solution to make the most of what you have. :-)

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

You are quite right, lacewing. Necessity has always been the mother of all inventions!! How true this proverb is. A bit of commonsense....and you have what you wanted.

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Hi all,

All the above I showed above and done in the last few years are all gone.... :( Those of you who would have followed my other threads would know that I have now moved over to the other half of the property following a family partition between brothers and I've decided to stay in the one half of the portion which was legally decided to be ours. So all the pictures except one were in the other half. Now I'm making a new set of harvesting. I've now a underground sump to store water - about 6000 litres capacity. I've decided to divert roof top rainwater into the sump through a filter system. My good friend suggests me to use this method where water flows first to the bottom then as it fills the filter barrel, it gets cleaned and overflows into the sump. I've not yet fixed the system, but things are in place. Only thing left is to connect the inflow down pipe to it.

Here is the basic idea.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

This is the filtering system.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

...and these are the actual materials I'm using. I'll have to check if the inflow pressure is enough to filter it upwards as it fills the barrel through the holes made stragetically in the inflow pipe in the barrel and overflows. It is also hoped that the sand and sponge stages are not resistant to smooth flow. The heavier dust will settle down slowly between gravel and while flushing out using the drain outlet, most of this fine dust is expected to be washed out. I'll have to practically see it working. My friend says that it will not be a problem.

This message was edited Oct 8, 2008 8:28 PM

Thumbnail by Dinu
So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Dinu, what's the sponge material?

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Sponge = Foam. It is about 2 inches thick. I should have said that! Once I install this fully and see it working, I'll post an article like you did.


This message was edited Oct 8, 2008 8:48 PM

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

How long will the foam last once immersed?

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Since we are in an area with heavy traffic of late, fugitive dust is settling more on the balconies. So all these run in with first rain. I try to clean up that occasionally during the dry days. In spite of it, there will be more flowing through the crevices of clay tiles [gabled roof]. Only rain brings it down while the ones that enters further into the crevices will settle there for years! Sometimes, the breeze makes it fall into the house slowly. As such, the sponge requires frequent cleaning in my case, but in areas with less of this fugitive dust, cleaning may be done occasionally. Only experience in individual cases could be a guide. I also intend to keep some weight on the foam to prevent it floating upwards and pushing the charcoal pieces. I forgot to add that I've a steel mesh ready to place at the overflow outlet pipe to hold any floating charcoal from entering the sump. I've been using one foam for one year now and it is doing well still in my old tank [see post of July 22]. I clean it occasionally and a lot of dust that it held washes out! If we don't clean it properly, the dust clogs the flow. That old system is based on natural gravity. Here in my new venture, it is the opposite. Cleaning the balcony frequently will go a long way to prevent cleaning the foam and make it last longer. Also the 'first filter' mechanism will hold a good portion of the heavier particles that flows in, which we can drain out frequently. Hope my expression is clear.

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Thanks for the explanation (and details), Dinu. Sounds very workable!

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

It works! All ready and in place. Had a first real full flow yesterday. A slight problem is there but will tell that in my article I'm planning. Most pictures are ready.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

In the meantime, I wrote an article here on DG. Now, I tried to divert most of the rainwater by connecting the downspouts [does not look neat, but it's effective] so that it comes down into barrels for my future use. Storage is not high capacity, but at least something. Here is one I've made outside the house.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Next to these, one more, connecting 3 balconies.

Thumbnail by Dinu
Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

I wanted to use the old copper vessel. There was no space inside the house to keep it. Hence this came out and sat there to collect rainwater. It's been in continuous use for almost a century, in my guess!! If polished with tamarind and salt, the copper shines! Presently, it is neglected.

Thumbnail by Dinu
So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Dinu, that old copper pot is wonderful!! (and here the old timers use a citrus like lemons with salt to scrub the copper bright...)

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

Yes, lemon will help, but I'm finding time at a premium to do that. It again oxidizes.

Mysore, India(Zone 10a)

This is how the setting looks from the front entrance. This is the main collection point. The filtered water is diverted into the sump below the filter [blue barrel]. If I want, I can disconnect either at the first filter or after the filter stage and before it enters the sump to divert any unwanted or extra water.

Thumbnail by Dinu

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or register to post.

Upload Images to your reply

    You may upload up to 5 images
    BACK TO TOP