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Perennials: what are you sorry you planted..

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thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
1:43 AM

Post #971404

I know that there is bound to be something you wish you had never added to your garden! Let me hear it!!! I know what some hate others love--- Missouri primroses---Well this picture was of the first year which they were well behaved to impress me---- then they grew up and brought all their friends... Marie

Thumbnail by thehumblebumble
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Osteole
Lamar, AR
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2004
11:56 AM

Post #972129

I guess it would have to be the pansies I planted in mid spring. that was a waste of money. They didn't look pretty for very long. Maybe I'll try them this FALL.

I doubt I plant marigolds there again...I dont know what plant I could replace marigolds that has pretty blooms from spring to fall.

Thumbnail by Osteole
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lorimaute
Springfield, OH

July 28, 2004
11:58 AM

Post #972133

MINT, I just planted a tiny sprig from my Grandmothers garden (it smelled so nice.) Now it has taken over...how to you kill this stuff? Runners everywhere.
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
12:18 PM

Post #972158

Osteole--there is a dwarf melapodium that would look stunning there---real bright yellow dime to nickel shaped bright yellow blooms---blooms for a very long time and thrives on heat and neglect! or for a perennial creeping yellow sedum would be pretty and carefree...

lori-- about the only way to rid the mint is pull pull pull and more pull---may take a couple or so years to get all of the roots.. It smells wonderful but is awesome to extricate. sorry!
Osteole
Lamar, AR
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2004
12:25 PM

Post #972164

Humble is this the plant? http://plantsdatabase.com/go/231/index.html
WOW You're right, this plant looks awesome!!!!

picture taken from plants database - see copyright info on photo

Thumbnail by Osteole
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Osteole
Lamar, AR
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2004
12:26 PM

Post #972166

I am in love with the looks of that plant!

Can you suggest a cultivar name for the creeping sedum?
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
12:33 PM

Post #972175

that is the melapodium and it is wonderful---very easy to grow and just blooms its rear off all summer

the sedum would be stonecrop---check the database for it but I do believe you would like the melapodium for a better show

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2004
3:44 PM

Post #972420

Osteole, I didn't much like how pansies performed for me either, until I planted some one fall. I had wonderful blooms over much of the winter! Still don't like how they do here in mid to late spring and of course, they are straggly now.
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
4:58 PM

Post #972564

osteol---you would love those melapodium---- they are very drought tolerant!!! So easy!!!
pins2006
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2004
5:12 PM

Post #972590

Now this is funny because the plant that I wish I'd never planted is Melampodium. In your spot, Osteole, they would be fine as long as they were the only plant there. The problem is that they grow to 2 feet tall and wide (if not more) and shade out everything in sight. Plus, their seeds are 100% viable (it seems) and they wind up everywhere. So, that can be a blessing in the right place.

If it were me, I'd plant gold lantana in your spot.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
5:25 PM

Post #972601

Wish I had never planted Lamium 'Yellow Archangel' in my front beds. This is truly one of the most invasive plants (next to mint) I have ever seen. It has taken nearly three years to get it back out of places I didn't want it...and even that requires constant diligence on my part.

Thumbnail by RikerBear
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2004
5:38 PM

Post #972624

rikerbear, I had the same lamium and never could get it to spread like I wanted. It was at the edge of my woodland shade garden.
Osteole
Lamar, AR
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2004
5:48 PM

Post #972638

Pins,

I tried Lantana one year thinking they were going to be a perennial. Your right, its a lovely plant, but expensive to replace every year.

I dont mind the melampodium growing to 2 ft. I think the variety I will buy is dwarf variety. Ive found 5 different kinds so far...

1. Derby
2. Melanie (I believe this is the dwarf)
3. Lemon Delight
4. Million Gold
5. Showstar

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2004
5:56 PM

Post #972650

humblebumble, can you send me a start of the pink primroses. I have the perfect place for them where they can't get out of bounds...
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
6:39 PM

Post #972682

darius, want some more??? Lord knows I have LOTS :) LOL
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
6:41 PM

Post #972683

Famous last words Woodspirit1 LOL

"I have the perfect place for them where they can't get out of bounds..."
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
8:19 PM

Post #972783

Osteole--Lantana just doesn't do very well here in Arkansas I don't know why? I have used several varieties and they just don't preform like they should and here they are so darn expensive---the last time I bought them in a 4 inch pot they were like $3.49 each---for annuals. I would recommend the million gold or the melanie I grew both of those and they are super! I have never had them to reseed for me but then the winters maybe a bit colder for us--who knows-

Woodspirit---yes I will send you some but lets wait just a few weeks because they don't like to ship in the heat and they are very easy to get started one you get them. Would that be ok?

Rikerbear---Just received the Ed Murry Daylily and this trade was SUPER DUPER!!!!! I thank you so much! Hope you enjoy screechowl-- as for the lamium I am still pulling it up and still pulling and still pullling... hahaha

Yea Darius want some more and the missouri primroses...????
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
8:22 PM

Post #972789

another just came to mind... I love artemesia limelight for the foliage color it can not be beat for varigation!!!! but stupid me thought I would plant it in a well ammend bed with other drought loving perennials----well----still pulling--still pulling---still pulling!

Thumbnail by thehumblebumble
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
8:36 PM

Post #972813

Oh I'm glad you recieved the fans okay humble. Can't wait the screech owl to arrive...dug the planting hole last evening so am all ready for her to arrive. :-)
Lamium the plant that keeps on giving...headaches that is. LOL
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
8:40 PM

Post #972816

I sent it priority mail---has your mailman ran today yet????
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
8:51 PM

Post #972826

Oh it's probably waiting for me at home (I'm still at work)... I'm not worried, it will either arrive today or tomorrow I'm sure.
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
8:53 PM

Post #972830

whew you scared me---not that I wouldn't send another but I hate for someone to think that I may have stiffed them! People are super quick to assume. Marie
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
9:05 PM

Post #972858

Oh heavens no! I wouldn't have started worrying till late this week actually. :-)
I know all about being stiffed on trades...and about quick (bad) assumptions by others as well.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2004
9:06 PM

Post #972859

rikerbear, and humblebumble... Thanks for the offers but I have to move again before November. Doubt I will find a place, move, and still have time for new plants to get established.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
9:22 PM

Post #972899

Keep it in mind for next year than...
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

July 28, 2004
9:38 PM

Post #972936

Oh no...artemesia limelight...I planted one this year...am I going to regret it? I did read something that it can be invasive. How does it spread? By runners? I was thinking about propogating some for the backyard because it does have wonderful foliage. The info at the store said 12" x 12", but mine is currently about 24" x 24".

- Brent
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2004
9:46 PM

Post #972962

Brent mine is a good 4 feet now and probably 4 feet wide!!!! It spreads by runner like mint. It is truely beautiful! Marie
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2004
9:50 PM

Post #972976

Brent here's what I found on it...sounds like you should start digging it up now and move it to a large pot. :-)

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/okgard/msg0321453429859.html
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 28, 2004
11:04 PM

Post #973152

Katie ruellia (pink). It grows everywere. It would have been OK if I've bought one and let it do its thing in my trouble spot, but I was very dumb and bought EIGHT. Now the thing is growing everywhere. babies are easy to pull but it's a daily routine. just HAD to have the instant gratification...serves me right
hczone6
Cincinnati (area), OH
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2004
11:08 PM

Post #973163

Ajuga...What a weed! I can't get rid of the stuff.

I got rid of my evening primrose awhile ago, thank goodness.

I've got a certain type of creeping sedum I might regret planting. I'm watching it closely...it runs wild, but it's wasy to pull up.

Black fountain grass (in some areas). It seeds very well and I'm always pulling up volunteers. Very pretty grass, but the seeds can be troublesome.
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
12:03 AM

Post #973303

purple fountain grass also---would make a beautiful lawn if kept mowed! LOL

Thumbnail by thehumblebumble
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
12:07 AM

Post #973311

Sure wish it would grow for us like that here, where it's an annual.

HumbleBumble, how about going to Preferences under "about You" on the right column and adding your zone? It would help us all.
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
12:11 AM

Post #973319

darius sure will---didn't know how to put the zone up there---Thanks for the info Darius! Marie
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
12:13 AM

Post #973323

I just put it on there darius and it isn't showing up?????
Charlotteda
Pickens, SC
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2004
12:15 AM

Post #973326

I planted verbena near my pond. It is beautiful but really spread out more than I wanted.
charlotteda
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
12:15 AM

Post #973328

tried it again Darius

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
12:23 AM

Post #973344

Musta worked because it shows up now, even on all your older posts!
Osteole
Lamar, AR
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2004
2:14 AM

Post #973585

Our purple fountain grass died Humble...My sweetie thought they were perennials when he bought them.

I found out later they were annuals. We kept expecting them to pop out of the ground. Then never did :( *cries*

Your's grow well?
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
7:28 AM

Post #974061

I can think of lots of thinks I'm sorry that I planted - but I think the #1 thing I planted that really thorns me are these snapdragons that reseed themselves, WHEREVER they please, and usually find the most obnoxious place in the world, to rest. menaces, i tell ya...
hczone6
Cincinnati (area), OH
(Zone 6a)

July 29, 2004
8:51 AM

Post #974075

HumbleBumble...are you sure that's not black fountain grass you posted a picture of? My Pennisetum alopecuroides
'Moudry' looks just like what you posted.

Purple fountain grass has darker blades, but maybe it's just the picture? Black fountain grass is definitely a hardy perennial...but purple fountain grass is an annual here.

Thumbnail by hczone6
Click the image for an enlarged view.

thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
12:04 PM

Post #974142

hc---- it probably is the Moudry----got it several years ago at Wallie World---you dont think they would sell a plant to someone and it be mislabeled do you??????? Yea Right---- I am glad you told me I will change the name plate outside... Michelle I will have loads of it that I can send you in the fall----this is really a perennial and it also self seeds, the good thing it you can move the babies around in the garden and they do bloom the first year for us!!! Writing that down on your list with the daylilys! Marie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
12:08 PM

Post #974151

Back to the original topic of this thread...

Grumble, grumble... I'm beginning to regret I "planted myself" on DG... I can't seem to get anything else done, LOL!
Osteole
Lamar, AR
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2004
12:16 PM

Post #974164

LOL Darius

Sometimes you have to just pull yourself away from the keyboard! Just walk away!!

hard eh? Is for me! :)
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
12:20 PM

Post #974171

I know what you mean darius---takes some real strength!!!! LOL Marie
hczone6
Cincinnati (area), OH
(Zone 6a)

July 29, 2004
12:24 PM

Post #974173

You can't kill that stuff, Humble! It might have been mislabeled when you bought it. My little seedings are super tough to pull out...even very small plants. It has killer roots...so don't let it get going where you don't want it. I will be moving a couple of mine because of excessive seeding of itself. I've got them coming up in the middle of my coreopsis...geez.
pins2006
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2004
1:49 PM

Post #974358

Reseeding snapdragons? Never heard of them before. Maybe it's too hot here for them. Are they the regular snapdragons?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
1:53 PM

Post #974366

Mine reseed.
jody
MD &, VA
(Zone 7b)


July 29, 2004
2:15 PM

Post #974386

Hops vines!

The artemesia orental limelight too but not really. I knew how invasive it was before I planted it. Mine gets at least 6'x6' and it is gorgeous! I rip out a bunch every spring but I do love it. It makes this great thick wall of beauty! It's one of the only plants I "coddle".

I haven't take a pic of it yet this year but you can see it on the back side of this bed. This was from a little over a month ago It's a lot taller now, I'm 5' and it towers over my head.

Thumbnail by jody
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pins2006
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2004
2:17 PM

Post #974390

I must be doing something wrong. Mine die when the weather gets hot. I love snapdragons and would love to see them scattered throughout my garden.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
2:52 PM

Post #974435

Jody, are you actually THAT tall?? LOL
turtlelu
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2004
6:28 PM

Post #974818

snapdragons reseed with success??!?

Y'all have me excited now. They actually like my horrifically sandy soil! Maybe they'll reseed and bloom next spring (atch this space for me companing next spring about how they reseeded with wild abandon).

I also have Oriental LImelight, although mine has only grown 1' this year. I might move it to the parking strip garden since I wanted its space for daylilies. THanks for the warning.

Since I haven't been at my house long enought o really regret any plantings, I'll complain about the previous owner.

LAURELS LAURELS everywhere! I live in the city so I only have a 3000 SF plot. Why would someone plant 5 laurels, 2 of which are Portuguese Laurels?????? And they keep trying to grow in new areas of the yard!

And comfrey! Gosh, you can't get rid of it! I was pulling out 2" diameter roots of it out of the ground last week!!!! Plus, I seem to have a sensitivity because every time I touch it I get a bunch of red bumps. I need better gardening gloves, I tell ya.

what else? Lunaria is a pest here, so is rose campion, california poppy and perennial sweet pea. Everywhere!!!!
thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
6:36 PM

Post #974830

turtle--when you want to get rid of some of the laurel---let me know! I would love some! Marie
turtlelu
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2004
6:47 PM

Post #974847

I'd be happy to send you some if you tell me how to take a successful cutting!

thehumblebumble
Heber Springs, AR
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2004
6:52 PM

Post #974855

I am not sure on the laurel I have tried many times and can't get them to root. do they spread by runners? That would be the easiest... Marie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
7:00 PM

Post #974874

I think it's only the short snapdragons that re-seed, at least in my experience.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2004
7:15 PM

Post #974908

The Oriental Limelight Artemisia spreads by underground runners - up to 3 ft. away from the mama in my flowerbed. It is very easy to pull up where you don't want it and I really do like the variegated leaves. Farther south, my guess would be, watch it!
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

April 6, 2005
7:52 PM

Post #1387720

hmmm...looks like I should have taken RikerBear's advise and those of the posters in the (now dead) link. Last spring I was trying to add variety to my main perennial garden and Artemesia 'oriental limelight' seemed like just the ticket. The tag said it would grow to 1' x 1'...that was not quite right as it grew to about 3' x 3' and I cut it back and it kept on growing. Jodi commented that she liked her's...my wife commented that she liked the plant (and she does not make comments like that on any plant that does not have purple flowers).

When it developed these odd seed-like things in the fall I cut it back so it would at least not spread by seed. I am looking at my flowerbed this spring and I see tons of Artemesia sprouts coming up in a 6' circle around the original plant. I am tempted to try and replant in a bottomless pot, but I know that I should sent it to the trash.

- Brent

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2005
8:04 PM

Post #1387740

Yeah, it DOES spread. LOL. I dealt with it for years... and finally moved away. (Not because of it, though.)
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2005
8:30 PM

Post #1387779

:-) Sorry to hear it got 'messy' on you. I will never say "I told you so" hehehehehehe
shelley1962
Churubusco, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2005
1:12 AM

Post #1388205

Boston Ivy on our wing walls - it actually grows through the seams where the walls meet in the garage!!! I can't kill it.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2005
2:08 AM

Post #1388351

Oh goodness Shelly...have you tried fire :-) What I mean is, have you tried burning the stems down at dirt level?
Sometimes charring them down like that will finish them off.
mysticwill
Brookhaven, PA
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2005
2:35 AM

Post #1388406

forget me nots, creeping sedum (it's got yellow flowers) and Black Eyed Susans!!!!! they took over 2 beds! I tried to dig some out to "share" and the roots are so thick I bent my trowel! (i have bulds in there so I can't use a shovel) ANYBODY WANT SOME???? lol!

Heather
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2005
3:59 AM

Post #1388580

My worst nightmare is Lysimachia Ciliata 'Firecracker'. I bought it for the dark purple foliage and the hot yellow flowers. It's lovely, but it needs staking for me and it has taken over the world around here. I'm pulling it out everywhere in the garden and it has layers upon layers of roots. I would still buy it for the lovely foliage and flower combination that sets off pale greens wonderfully, but I would contain it. And don't bother pulling it out and leaving anything on top of compost or leaves or anything. It will grow through and root.
Rikerbear, I can relate to your distress with the Lamium. I had that at my last house and it ran over everything in its path. Also the Lunaria I thought was pretty went crazy. The rose campion is a pest as well for me, but I don't mind it as much as its easy to pull and I sometimes transplant the seedlings if they'll look good somewhere in the garden. I like them growing under my climbing America rose. They cover up the legginess quite nicely and go well with catmint.
California poppy I pull with abandon and no guilt.
If anyone wants Lysimachia, let me know!

Humblebumble - my laurel seeds freely and I'm always pulling up seedlings where I don't want them. Want me to try to pot a couple up and see if they live? Things are growing by leaps per day right now, so it might stress them out, but I'm willing to give it a go if you want some.

Turtlelu - did you know you can whack a laurel to the ground and it will sprout up nice and shrubby? Since I love mine (I have a very large space) I usually prune them up to let the multiple trunks show and underplant, but I've whacked a few back in my day as well. Sometimes easier than pulling them out.

Pixydish
Kachinagirl
Modesto, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2005
4:27 AM

Post #1388622

I'm with Mystic on the Black Eyed Susans...they are lovely all summer, but they quadruple (sp?) every year I think! I should offer some for trade, I will have many available! Also...I have a Hops vine I was fixing to plant where it could dlimb my arbor...now perhaps I shall keep it in a big pot next to the arbor until I'm sure! Humble, this was a great idea for a thread...very helpful, thank you! Also, I wouldn't mind trying a sprig of your crazy artemesia limelight if you spy anything on my lists that intrigues you. I will...of course...keep it potted!
Karen :~D
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2005
4:31 AM

Post #1388629

This is a fun and informative thread...I should say that addressing comments to HumbleBumble are futile, as she was removed from DG for to many trades gone bad (among other things).
Kachinagirl
Modesto, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2005
4:36 AM

Post #1388636

Oh. Also good advice! Thanks Mark! I have Archangel too, but luckily I planted it in a pot! I wish I could say that was on purpose because I was so smart, but alas, I just thought it would look good there. LOL It's with a patio tree Osmanthus fragrans and Heuchera 'Firefly'. NIce to hear from you Mark!

Karen
helenkaye5
Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2005
3:03 PM

Post #1389166

Hi, I am new on this site and so enjoying all the information. I originally hail from England where gardening was not so much a challenge as I am having with this red Georgia clay! I have a very shady, extremely wet spot that is in a flood area which is giving me heartache. If anyone can suggest some plants for this area I would be so appreciative. Which leads me to what I wish I had never planted...the chameleon plant. I was pleased for a couple of years because it seemed fairly well behaved in this area but now is becoming extremely invasive. The other plant that is giving me headaches is the japanese anemones. They have seeded themselves everywhere, shady, sunny, wet, dry, but at least they are fairly easy to remove. I rip them up with abandon.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2005
3:24 PM

Post #1389194

Helenkaye5, my advice would be to just give into the 'wet area', and plant bog plants. Plants that love wet feet. Ferns, and such...
Just a suggestion :-)
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2005
4:11 PM

Post #1389301

Helenkaye5,
I'm with Rikerbear. Hosta? Is it too hot for primulas there? Lots of great plants that enjoy wet feet!
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2005
4:44 PM

Post #1389363

Ferns, grasses, hostas, calla lilies, etc etc
helenkaye5
Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2005
2:21 PM

Post #1391028

Thanks for the suggestions. I have hostas in other areas of my garden, but thought that it would be too wet for them there. RikerBear I refuse to give into my soggy spot!...I have had success with woodland blue phlox, winterberry bushes and cardinal flowers, but the jury is still out on the royal ferns and turtleheads. What I am looking for are plants that bloom in the summer and grow to about 3' tall, any suggestions? I like the idea of grasses, but do you mean plants like sweetflag...I have those and yes, they do great. Another plant I have just put in is the native american horsetail, but have since read that they are extremely invasive and am in two minds whether to remove them. Does anyone have experience with these plants? Pixydish thanks for your suggestions and unfortunately it is a little too hot for primulas, and I do so love them.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 8, 2005
3:35 PM

Post #1391234

Grasses like sedges, rushes, liriope (not a true grass but related to lilies) was what I meant
Kachinagirl
Modesto, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 8, 2005
3:39 PM

Post #1391245

I would lift the horsetail, put it in a big pot, anf enyoy it that way. It can get away from you!

K

(Edited..."ANF"? sheesh...how about AND! LOL)

This message was edited Apr 8, 2005 9:52 AM
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 8, 2005
3:41 PM

Post #1391249

Oh horsetail is evil here...I did however find a cool way to get rid of it. Improve/sweeten the soil with lime. Seems horsetail hates sweet soil and dies back rather quickly. Has worked very well for me the last couple years.
Gardengirl1204
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2005
4:18 PM

Post #1391322

I would have to say the pink Primrose that Humble noted. I planted ONE peat pellet with about 5 seeds in it TWO years ago and I am still finding them! And not even in the same area I planted them. They are very prolific and have very deep roots. Don't plant them unless you contain them or don't mind having them EVERYWHERE!!!
shelley1962
Churubusco, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2005
5:08 PM

Post #1391386

I've really been thinking about this one...Lambs Ear maybe? I don't hate it...actually like the leaves - but I end up cutting the "blooms" off and it still seems to resow everywhere. The most ivasive plants are not ones I planted...black walnut trees that come up all over and red raspberries. If I catch the trees early they are easy enough to pull out, but the raspberries! they have stickers even when they are small. In addition, our woods started having bedstaw a few years ago - it also pulls up easy but THERE IS SO MUCH OF IT!!!




This message was edited Apr 8, 2005 7:16 PM
helenkaye5
Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2005
7:33 PM

Post #1391645

OK the horsetail is outta here...rushes are a great idea, but no more liriope for me...LOL...a little of it goes a very long way!
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2005
8:14 PM

Post #1391702

My Lemon balm has seeded itself all over. I do like the plant but it is starting to be a bit of a problem.
Mobi
drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 8, 2005
8:38 PM

Post #1391733

Mexican Hat, Ratibida columnifera

We thought the flowers were 'Cute'. They are...it's the plant that is out of control fertile. It is now the most prevalent weed we pull in the Dahlia bed in the front yard...big mistake.
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2005
8:51 PM

Post #1391759

OH, oh, I just spread a whole bunch of seeds of Mexican Hat yeasterday. But then what goes crazy in one part of the country can be very tame in another. We shall see. Bishops weed is a problem for others but in my garden it behaves very well.
Mobi
iamakylady53
Louisville, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 9, 2005
1:47 AM

Post #1392194

Rose Malva. That stuff reseeds like you wouldn't believe. Doesn't seem to transplant well, but oh my gosh. It's nasty little seeds appear everywhere. It drinks Round up like its Kool-Aide.
shelley1962
Churubusco, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 9, 2005
2:41 AM

Post #1392295

Oh no!!! I planted rose malva last year - Japanees beetles loved it.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 10, 2005
3:56 AM

Post #1393859

Vinca, it is slowly covering the world.
SteveIndy
Greenwood, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2005
4:07 AM

Post #1393883

Probably won't plant Cannas again. Probably the most invasive thing I've seen down here.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 10, 2005
4:10 AM

Post #1393888

I'm beginning to feel that way about Calla Lilies. :-(
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 10, 2005
6:57 AM

Post #1394071

Wow, RikerBear! Out of control callas? I'm a total calla failure! My sisters are huge and beautiful, but mine just kind of exist quietly. What's the secret?
Sweet deal today on horsetail, which I love as long as it's in pots. So prehistoric and all that. (I plan to get some gunnera and put pots of horsetail around it. Positively primitive!) I went to a local specialty shop that had horsetail out of control on the grounds. Dug up quite a few pieces and potted them at home! This is the kind of deal I like!

Oh, starting to be sad that I planted the petasites japonica before getting a little pool for it. I thought I dug it all up so I could contain it, but, alas, it was not to be. It is now popping up close to the blue poppies. I must destroy it.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 10, 2005
7:24 AM

Post #1394086

Mine are planted in a very moist shady location...they get WAY out of controll. I have dug them up and still they come back as strong as ever.
If you want some, let me know as I just dug up another huge clump this morning. Some of the tubers are as large as softballs.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 10, 2005
5:19 PM

Post #1394504

Rikerbear, I would love some! Would you like a trade?

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2005
6:14 PM

Post #1394584

Kachinagirl - are u still wanting Oriental Limelight Aretemsia? It is coming u everywhere!! I'll be pulling and chopping soon. LMK It can be a stinker to transplant, smaller is better. Has runners that are yards! long.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 10, 2005
6:30 PM

Post #1394610

Send me a 'member mail' with whatchat got to trade. :-) We can meet somewhere and do a person to person trade if you like.

Marc
Kachinagirl
Modesto, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 11, 2005
3:44 AM

Post #1395257

Yes, please Kooger. I will "Dave-mail" you. Thank you! K :~D
jerrynmikey
Atchison, KS
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2005
1:01 PM

Post #1395676

I have a friend that wants to kill me because I gave her some Loosestrife and it took over. That is after I also gave her some Missouri Primrose!!! She says that she won't take anything from me again!!! Mikey
toni5735
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2005
4:57 AM

Post #1397486

I have a love/hate relationship going with two clumps of Soapwort (Saponaria?) my neighbor gave me years ago. I love the way it flowers most of the summer and stands almost 3' tall but it spreads like crazy! I'm forever pulling it out of the grass and today I spent my garden time digging up volunteer sprouts all around the main clumps. This stuff could easily take over in one season if I didn't keep pulling it out!
mvespa
Englishtown, NJ
(Zone 6b)

April 12, 2005
8:41 PM

Post #1399004

Butter and eggs. Or is it Eggs and Butter? Whichever it is, I sprinkled seeds someone sent me as a trade and now I can't get rid of them. But they are very pretty flowers though
NellieLemon
Kirksville, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 13, 2005
5:30 AM

Post #1399969

Artemisia limelight#@$*! I had no idea it was so vigorous. In one year it completely invaded my native grasses and feverfew (which itself is quite a reseeder).

HelenK - I'm from England too ... and my Mom is here. She has the same problem you do, just in a different zone. She has lenten rose, bergenia, ferns, artemesia limelight (which I gave her) that has spread eight feet in one year, clump bamboo, wormwood, wisteria, clematis ... just to name a few ... that are doing very well.
emilyrasmus
Portland, OR
(Zone 8b)

April 14, 2005
4:22 AM

Post #1402030

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis). A neighboor had (still has) a bunch growing in his rose garden so I dug up a couple and put it into one of my beds last year. The bees seemed to like it so I watered it and fed it. Then it bloomed. I was blissfully unaware of how many seedlings that little innocent looking mass would spawn.
pins2006
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2005
12:12 PM

Post #1402267

But it smells so good as you (and I) are digging it up... lol
Crimson
Clarksville, TN
(Zone 6b)

April 14, 2005
1:19 PM

Post #1402375

Could I get these plants for postage please! I feel stupid asking for things for postage but I'm putting in gardens around my sons school, too expensive I need all the help I can, and those invassive plants at least won't die so easily with the neglect they'll have to survive this summer! I'm also looking for Purple Coneflower if anyone has a large clump they are thinking about dividing.

thehumblebumble: Missouri primroses
mysticwill: Black Eyed Susans
Gardengirl1204: pink Primrose
drdon: Mexican Hat (Ratibida columnifera)
mvespa: Butter and eggs

This message was edited Apr 14, 2005 8:20 AM
mysticwill
Brookhaven, PA
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2005
1:36 PM

Post #1402433

you've got mail-- need your addy.

Heather
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

April 14, 2005
7:02 PM

Post #1403093

The snapdragons that are reseeding here for me are 2 ft. tall ones - they reseed in the darndest places. I pull them up and replant them sometimes. I wish I could tell what the colors are first - There is a really ugly pink one - don't like the shade of it. However, there are some orange/pink ones (kind of sunset colors) that I really like and wish those were the only ones to come up.
Loon
AuGres, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2005
1:33 AM

Post #1405603

Ribbon grass...jumped the deep bottomless pot I buried in the soil

Japanese Lanterns...or is it Chinese lanterns?? :) Buggars not only took over my yard but jumped down to the neighbor's house two houses away.

Missouri Primrose

Boston Ivy

Vinca vine

Lemon Balm

and the worst...Virginia Bluebell. I'm actually moving away from it to get rid of it. :)




This message was edited Apr 15, 2005 9:35 PM
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2005
8:13 AM

Post #1406148

Veronicastrum viginicum. I've tried to dig it up about 3 times and think I have all the roots out, but it keeps coming back. Not really a bad looking plant, but I don't like it where it's located.

Susan
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2005
9:43 AM

Post #1406164

Ya know - what can be invasive or even "ugly" in one climate, can be beautiful in another. Isn't that funny! Someone once told me Bee Balm and Lupins were invasive. Not in my gardens! They are my best plants, and easy to control. I find marigolds and snapdragons invasive here, because they reseed massively for me, and I am pulling most and saving a few. For some people they would LOVE to see that happen for them.

I really think it depends on where you live - and those climate zones aren't always right. California poppies grow for me - and they reseed themselves - and I live in zone 5b to 6a (toss up).
downscale_babe
surfside beach, SC
(Zone 8b)

April 16, 2005
10:52 AM

Post #1406191

Karrie20x
I agree with you 100%! I have 2 gardens...The one down at the beach in SC. zone 8 and one in the NC.mountains zone 6.In the beach garden nothing reseeds itself except the live oak trees.The only thing that I regret planting is a type of sunflower that grows wild in the drainage ditches ( that should have told me something) it has been very invasive but its not too hard to get rid off.In the mountains lots of things seem to reseed which I love.The big problems are the wild blackberries and the wild roses.you need a full suit of armor to deal with those 2.Violets are also quite invasive,we have several kinds,but I love them so much I can't get rid of them.
pins2006
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2005
1:55 PM

Post #1406384

Hey, y'all, hold up here! Virginia Bluebell invasive? I don't have nearly enough of it. Please, next time you go to get rid of it, would you let me know so I can send postage and you can send some down here? I only get to enjoy it a couple of months each year before it goes dormant on us.

levilyla
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2005
10:31 AM

Post #1410259

RikerBear/////My husband calls Lamiastrum "Ground Cancer"...it is worse than lysimachia (goose neck loosestrife)...well almost as bad.
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 18, 2005
4:19 PM

Post #1410798

:-) Good name for it... LOL
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

April 18, 2005
8:28 PM

Post #1411317

lol! ground cancer... I will label all weeds and invasive plants that from now on!
sylvi74
East Bethel, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 18, 2005
8:28 PM

Post #1411319

I have one called creeping crud vine. . .
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

April 18, 2005
8:30 PM

Post #1411329

Sounds like an icky virus!
RikerBear
Seattle, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 18, 2005
9:09 PM

Post #1411418

I think I've had that! LOL
Kachinagirl
Modesto, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 18, 2005
10:42 PM

Post #1411583

...then there was Polygonum capitatum...Pink Knotweed. Sheesh, I didn't even PLANT the stuff, I simply left a flat sitting on the ground for several weeks. It invaded one bed, went 7 feet around the lawn (thank goodness for broadleaf weed killer) then went into an second bed. I had it for several years...then we had a really hard freeze (ok, you midwest people, hard for US here!) and it finally croaked! Thank goodness!
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/1652/

K :~D
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 19, 2005
6:35 AM

Post #1412315

Oh NO!! I just bought a gallon container of the Pink Knotweed! Wonder if it's that bad around here? You know... I did think the leaves were homely and looked like weeds. But I love the pink flowers! I hope it's not nasty here! I plan to grow it in the shallow part of the pond in a pot. Does it spread with seeds or with runners?

Have another plant to add to my 'sorry' list. It's a small dark leaved violet of a deep purple. Dont' know the cultivar, but it should be called 'wildfire' because that's how fast it spreads. Both seeds and runners. I love violets, but not this much!
levilyla
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2005
11:24 AM

Post #1416930

If you are talking about viola 'labradorica" I think it is wonderful...very small with purple greenish leaves and makes a nice combination with other early spring flowers. It is even suggested in Ken Druse's THE NATURAL SHADE GARDEN as a choice plant to encourage.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 21, 2005
3:54 PM

Post #1417404

Yes, it is probably the same plant. I love the book you reference. I have a copy and looked at the picture. Mine is darker purple, but may still be the same plant. It is so very prolific here that I am constantly pulling it out of the front bed. I used to let it go but then it covered the entire bed and started out into the gravel driveway. It wasn't the look I wanted right by the front door. It out-competes my other violets. I have a woodland that I'd like to encourage it to grow in as a ground cover,. but it prefers more sun that it would get there, I guess.
A lovely little plant, but tenacious in my area.
MollyMc
Archer/Bronson, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 21, 2005
4:11 PM

Post #1417436

That's very interesting about the Violas. I have the labridorica and she seems to be very well behaved, surprising since my growing season is endless.

Now here, you have to look real close to even find the viola in the mass of Rock Soapwort, which seems to be taking over that and the columbines.

Now I am not yet ready to admit I am sorry for the Rock Soapwort, because I will give it a chance to redeem itself for me. Today I am taking cuttings (lots) to get started and plant them on the north side of the house where I just put down large stepping stones on the pathway. They can compete with the stones to their hearts content and I will be quite happy.

Molly

Thumbnail by MollyMc
Click the image for an enlarged view.

medinac
Bensenville, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2008
2:41 AM

Post #4907376

Years ago, before we moved here, the lady across the street planted Japanese Knotweed on the easement directly across from my house (to the side of hers). The stuff gets 10' tall and was just a mass of green - nothing pretty. I decided to pull it out in fall when it dried out and lost its leaves. I figured if I had to look over there, I wanted to plant pretty stuff to look at. Well, I dragged it to the back of our adjoining property to quickly burn the dried stalks. Little did I know the stuff has seeds in the stalks and I trailed seeds almost the whole way! That was about 5 years ago and I'm still digging up and disposing of remnants of the little buggers! Just when I think I have them licked, I find more! I had to resort to spraying Round up on the stuff out front to kill it all, which I always try to avoid doing if I can help it.
Also, after planting Sundrops, I avoid anything that spreads by runnners, rhizomes. Just not worth all the work!
AuntAnne
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 5, 2008
7:44 PM

Post #4910451

Mine is a morning glory vine that was in a pack of "mixed" mg vines. This particular one took off across my lawn, under my trailer home, under the porch, up between the siding and the house, it's twining around my salvia and trying to strangle it. With the wind here the way it is I can't spray round up very easily without killing things that I don't want to. I love mg's but whatever type this one is it's a pain in the ****.

Anne
Jo_in_Tx
Sugar Land, TX

May 5, 2008
7:50 PM

Post #4910482

Lantana.

It's two years old, I tried digging it up in January, and here we are May 5, and it's taking over that part of the bed already - and we're having a rather "cool" spring for this area! It was NOTHING just three months ago, and it's already about three feet high by four feet wide. Already! I pruned it TWICE in the last week.

Actually, I have a love/hate relationship with it. When I see a butterfly on it, I like it. All other times, I keep thinking of what else I could have planted there! LOL

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 5, 2008
7:55 PM

Post #4910497

I just read that MG and bindwind are cousins, or sisters, or related somehow. Unrelated to this thread, however.

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 5, 2008
7:59 PM

Post #4910508

You all are too funny! LOL

Jumping in to say I'm sorry I planted Arundo Donax. I was told it was bamboo and it was a well-behaved bamboo, at that. HA!!! I know better now.

Here it is when it looks nice.

Thumbnail by kwanjin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 5, 2008
8:00 PM

Post #4910512

Sorry, we crossed!

Yeah, bindweed. Yuck. It has taken me four years to at least keep that one at bay.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 5, 2008
9:04 PM

Post #4910765

Mint I ALWAYS keep in a container, I'm still dealing with coreopsis 'moonbeam' - any one want some? http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/535/ There's much more new growth than I had feared - maybe it should just be an all-coreopsis-all-the-time-bed.
netwiz
York, PA

May 5, 2008
9:16 PM

Post #4910812

The previous owners planted it but yucca is the bane of my existence. There were over 50 grown plants when we moved in and every time I dig one up, 5 or more grow in its place. I will be battling it for years to come!

Joanne
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 5, 2008
10:25 PM

Post #4911159

I'm a little sorry I planted labrador violets, too. Yes, they are very pretty in the Spring, but I find in my garden that they purple leaf color soon fades and then you're just left with plain old murky green violets and a lot of them, because they seem to pop up everywhere.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2008
3:04 AM

Post #4912496

Wow, this is an old thread! Started in 2004.

There's nothing I'm really sorry that I planted, but a few things I'm sorry I planted where I did. I wish my tradescantia wasn't right up by my front door--I'll probably move it when I get my other part-shade garden ready to plant.

I guess I wish I'd planted different types of plants, too. I really took the idea of planting low-growing plants in the front of the garden and taller plants to the back to heart, so I have very short dianthus and cranesbill and dwarf columbine at the front of the border with mid-sized plants toward the back. My border isn't very deep, so I ran out of room for the taller show-stoppers I now wish I'd planted. I've started to resolve this problem this year by donating some plants to my mom and buying some tall phlox and delphiniums. I guess I wish I'd planted taller plants overall. I like that bushy, semi-rampant cottage garden look, and I don't quite have it.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2008
5:17 AM

Post #4913032

Is Jsdy the Uber gardener still on here/still reading the threadl?

I wanted to know about hops and why you wish you hadn't planted it. I have a single seedling that's 1" tall right now. Some butterflies use it as host plant, and I thought I wanted it. Now I'm not so sure.

Suzy
runktrun
Edgartown, MA
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2008
11:25 PM

Post #4916108

Suzy,
I have been growing both hops and kiwi vine up the same structure for three years now. I planted both of these vines knowing full well that most folks who's hort. knowlege I respect consider them both thugs. Hops is not a vine I can turn my back on often in the wee morning hours I found myself putting down my cup of tea to hack it back off neighboring plants but so far I don't seem to mind this added chore to this plant. I love the color and texture of this vine enough to go the extra needed mile. I look around my photo files and see if I can find a photo for you. kt
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 7, 2008
3:23 AM

Post #4917381

I would like to see all the Horsetail bundled up and on the next Columbia space mission...I think if we could get all the Horsetail on a planet, say Mars, it might not get in my border again...at least not from there...from Venus it could spread but not Mars...:)

Paul from Alabama

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2008
3:34 AM

Post #4917426

My BIL said that by where he works, all the horsetail has been ousted by giant reed grass. Hmmm...
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 7, 2008
3:57 AM

Post #4917510

kwanjin, this the point where I would say good, but I think the replacement of one invasive by another isn't a good deal either but if you don't mind let me smirk at Horsetail just a moment...:)

Paul from Alabama

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2008
3:59 AM

Post #4917517

I'm going to smirk with you, if that's okay? LOL
shokami2
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2008
5:41 AM

Post #4917768

i can not get little marigolds or primroses to grow and look good here. plant them they look great then they shrink and get all nasty looking. so i gave up. no more for me. and around here we have the very invasive yellow scotch broom everywhere! gets into everyones yards! grrrrrrrr

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 7, 2008
6:07 AM

Post #4917795

oh I love my pink primroses. They are so pretty. I even brought some with me from my old house. They do travel though ..lol. I really hated my nearly wild rose bushes. I planted them in a street side flower bed and they did not stay tidy at all. They grew long octopus arms and the thorns...oh my. I finally traded those off and I was bleeding in a dozen places when I dug them, even with gloves! I adore my perilla but I have never seen a plant reseed the way they do! Literally thousands of baby plants, even when I cut all but two flower stalks off.
pennefeather
McLean, VA
(Zone 6b)

May 7, 2008
12:31 PM

Post #4918285

Carrie,

I agree with your completely on the coreopsis. I had a large overgrown patch when I bought my house three years ago. I have divided, killed, and am giving away, but it mulitplies like crazy. It's actually very pretty, but I don't need 500 plants!
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 7, 2008
5:13 PM

Post #4919568

KT, You prune it that often? Off the neighbor's plants? YIkes! Maybe I ought to think twice about it then.

yotedog
Raleigh, NC

May 7, 2008
5:47 PM

Post #4919726

Salvia 'Black and Blue'----but not TOO sorry I planted it, as it is a gorgeous, vigorous plant with that just blooms and blooms and blooms. Problem is, it also spreads and spreads and spreads, by underground runners...Not a bad plant to have too much of, but somehow, I envisioned having more than one species in my garden!

Surprised to see all the bad press for lamium---its so pretty, I'm not sure I could have too much of it, given that it is fairly low and chokes out weeds.

English ivy, of course---no one needs more English Ivy!
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 7, 2008
6:26 PM

Post #4919897

I have English ivy growing over an old septic system in my front yard. It was here when we moved in. Oddly enough, it hasn't misbehaved. It's growing in and around a bunch of good-sized rocks someone piled over the septic area and it's never invaded the lawn. I must be lucky.
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 7, 2008
8:36 PM

Post #4920455

yotedog...just a thought but planting some orange cosmos in front of, behind or in some Black and Blue salvia looks mighty pretty I think, a nice combination, I saw it once and I'm trying it out this year...I've had the salvia for years but my first year planting cosmos from seeds...coming up nicely though

Paul from Alabama
MollyMc
Archer/Bronson, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 7, 2008
8:51 PM

Post #4920508

Frankly, I am happy to hear that the Black and Blue Salvia could be considered invasive. OLut here in this sand, many things will grow and not "invade".

Molly

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 8, 2008
1:35 AM

Post #4921770

Seems somehow like the trick is to find the perfect balance of zone/rain/cold/elevation and soil/clay/sand and shade/sun/woodland et cetera et cetera to find something that will survive without taking over! ^_^ There is a concurrent thread called "what did not come back this year"...
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 8, 2008
1:38 AM

Post #4921785

I think you must be right, Carrie...if so many things are SO horrible, why do they even sell them? Seems like some of them should come with big fat warning labels...thank God for the internet.
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 8, 2008
2:18 AM

Post #4922058

carrie nailed it I think...I grow B & B salvia in fairly good soil, drains well etc...Do them fleshy white thing-a-mah-jiggies run under the soil around their base, yep they do but are easy enough to remove...I just lift them up like pulling carpet and they tear off about where I want them too if I handle them right...if you got a smaller stand of them you can use a long sharp knife and cut around the plant the area you want it to be and the runners outside that area come up lickedly split...the knife only works if your soil ain't of a hardness close to diamonds though...Just my experience, I don't think of B&B salvia as invasive where I am but just mighty happy...Horsetail on the other hand, is spelled I,N,V,A,S,I,V,E...:)
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 8, 2008
3:52 AM

Post #4922434

If any of you people have some B&B Salvia root-things you can put in a bubble envie to me, I would be very, very happy to take that old weedy thang off your hands! Happy enough to send you postage right back!

I had to look up Horestail -- never heard of it! As soon as I saw it, though I recognized it from a corner of my house where I have all kinds of noxious weeds...some sort of bindweed, some sort of wild pea, and this horsetail stuff. I usually just throw 10" of mulch over everything and it's mid July before I see it again. By then it's too hot and dry for me to care. LOL! I'm glad to have the name of it, though. I never knew what it was.

Suzy
runktrun
Edgartown, MA
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2008
12:06 PM

Post #4923070

kwanjin & Illoquin,
Hops which is technically not a vine attaches itself with short hairs (that feel like a cats tongue) dies back to the ground in the winter and come spring grows from 1-3 inches a day! I thought I had a better photo but this one shows just how golden Humulus lupulus ĎAureusí is when the sunlight is captured in its leaves. kt

Thumbnail by runktrun
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 8, 2008
3:18 PM

Post #4923822

KT, Do they reseed? I could MAYBE keep up with one, esp that Aureus, but if they start seeding all over the garden I would be most unhappy...what's your take?

Suzy

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2008
4:26 PM

Post #4924171

Yes, I'd like to know, too.
runktrun
Edgartown, MA
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2008
5:14 PM

Post #4924351

Illoquin & Kwanjin,
For the sake of clarity I believe I should mention that my experience has been with Humulus lupulus (Common hops)which is perennial and is most often propagated by division or cutting. In three years I have not seen a single volunteer and for me ĎAureusí seems to have maxed out at height somewhere between 8-10 feet. There is however a Japanese Humulus that is an annual which is even more aggressive and will freely reseed. kt

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2008
5:18 PM

Post #4924370

Thank you. That helps as a starting point. ☺
Goldenberry
Northeast, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 8, 2008
6:06 PM

Post #4924594

My chocolate Joe Pye weed has little babies coming up everywhere within a 12-foot radius this spring. I left the flower heads on the plant over the winter...never again!

This message was edited May 8, 2008 1:07 PM
yotedog
Raleigh, NC

May 8, 2008
9:07 PM

Post #4925232

Illoquin--be careful what you wish for!!! Send me a Dmail sometime, and I'll send you some...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2008
1:22 AM

Post #4926317

Suzy, I'm afraid that I remember B and B salvia isn't hardy as far north as we are. Don't quote me, but I remember wanting to grow it and learning it wouldn't come back up here.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 9, 2008
2:24 AM

Post #4926781

Yeah, I know it's not hardy, but I live in denial. I had some Impatiens come back after I put it in the compost pile for the winter (this past winter), and many years I have had snapdragons and Salvia Veronica come back. I keep thinking I will find the magic formula because our winter last year only got down to 0 and that was just for one or two nights. That's Z7. If I put it in a little corner where 2 red brick walls come together that faces south, or southwest, wouldn't that bump me up a zone? Well, you get the drift. I am searching for that formula. :)) Or a way to hold it over inside...I'd rather have it outside, but inside would be okay, too.

Yotedog-- on my way to dmail you :))

Suzy
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2008
10:24 AM

Post #4927636

well, my demise has been purple loosestrife. Some fool told me that it wasn't as invasive as the gooseneck loosestrife and like a fool, I believed them. The crud runs under/over anything and where it doesn't run it manages to reseed even though I try to deadhead. Second to that is my choclate mint. At least it has an upside though, when the wind blows the yard smells like minty cocoa.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 9, 2008
11:50 AM

Post #4927809

lol@minty cocoa. Mine smells like basil from all the purple perilla. the only plant other than the nearly wild roses that I wish I had not planted is my russian sage. Just too big for the scheme of things and is spreading.
runktrun
Edgartown, MA
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2008
12:42 PM

Post #4927956

I am convinced that gooseneck loosestrife and cockroaches will be the last two standing! Years ago when I first began gardening I recall clearly walking proudly from the nursery to my car with not one but three pots of gooseneck loosestrife when I stopped to chat with the owner she mentioned pointing to my purchase that I may only need one of those. Of course I smiled politely and changed the subject thinking all the while doesn't she know I am an experienced gardener and know that you should buy three of everything in order to make a great impact! Fifteen years later the gooseneck that I have battled with everything in my arsenal has traveled from one side of my yard to the other and has now creeped into my neighbors yard who thinks it is soooooooo pretty. kt
Nana3
Hanson, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2008
2:09 PM

Post #4928293

I love the look, the smell, etc...but I lived to regret planting Chocolate Mint in one of my beds...that was a nightmare. I pulled and pulled and finally got it all out of my bed. That stuff spreads like crazy.

Nana3
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2008
2:31 PM

Post #4928397

runktrun...Loved your post and got just one thing to tell you...Been there, done that...Very same plant, very same scenario...Who'd a thunk it...:)

Paul from Alabama
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 9, 2008
3:53 PM

Post #4928782

KT, LOL! Sounds like somehting I would do! I planted it from plants that somebody gave me and it looked really good for about 4 years. I always thought I would do some flower arranging with the flowers, but I never did.

The firth year I realized it was going to get the better of me, and by years 6-7-8, I spent an inordinate amount of time pulling it up, then mowing it over. It was indestructible, but luckily on year 10 or 11, we had an addition put on the house and I told the guy digging the foundation to put all the extra soil right one top of it. The soil was eight feet tall, and about 15 feet in diameter, give or take, so it was all covered, and then some, and stayed that was for about 18 months. when they went to regrade, I had them bring in extra soil to raise the grade a bit, so it is still under about 4 feet of soil. Probably still growing LOL!

Suzy
Goldenberry
Northeast, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 9, 2008
4:00 PM

Post #4928804

Oh, runktrun, can I relate to that! I moved my gooseneck loosestrife last fall to a location where I wouldn't mind it spreading. Lo and behold, this spring, a LARGE clump of it has reappeared where I *thought* I had dug it all out. Sigh.

Funny, my purple loosestrife has always been very well-behaved. When I bought it, the nurseryman said it was a horticultural cultivar and not the invasive variety. How right he was. Still can't buy it in a garden center anywhere any more, though. I live in fear that the Garden Police will come and make me dig it all out some day. ;)
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2008
4:12 PM

Post #4928855

My wife was just getting involved with flower gardening with me about a year or so after I'd already jumped in with both feet...Well not being as well read, knowledgable and all knowing about the "peculiarities" of some of our more prolific plants as I had become, let me give you the list of the first 5 plants she decided would be "ooh so pretty for our garden darling"...

1. Gooseneck Loosestrife

2. Horsetail

3. Pink Evening Primrose

4. Chinese wisteria

5. Well its not really a plant but a weed, and I know a weed is a plant that's in the wrong place but hey boys and girls...Henbit is a weed!!!!!!!

Judge, I rest my case...and I leave the sentencing of my wife to judge and jury...but go easy on her judge, I'm supposed to take her to dinner tonight...:)

Paul from Alabama

This message was edited May 9, 2008 11:13 AM

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2008
4:25 PM

Post #4928914

ROTFLOL, Paul!!!

That was too perfect! You have the scenario perfect. My vote is..."Not guilty!" Only because then I would have to be, as well.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2008
5:16 PM

Post #4929184

Absolutely not guilty, but I didn't know it was LEGAL to sell the bad kind of loosestrife in this country at all?

edited to add: we have so little dirt in our yard that we generally plant into containers anyway. If it runs amok in a container, we can only guess what it might have done in the ground.

This message was edited May 9, 2008 1:19 PM
runktrun
Edgartown, MA
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2008
6:06 PM

Post #4929348

Not only NOT GUILTY but I think your wife deserves two desserts tonight. Any woman who can share HER garden must be a saint. kt
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2008
7:27 PM

Post #4929679

That's 3 for not gulity...Give me the phone...Hello, give me the Matradee. Hi Paul from Alabama here, it will still be two for dinner tonight instead of one...Yep, you got it, they found her innocent...So fire up the grill and we'll have our usual, two fried Spams and the vegetable medley...Is the medley still shaped like the letters of the alphabet?...Fantastic...Dessert?, No we'll bring out own candy bars with us...Thanks and see ya this evening...:)

It's a shame every woman isn't wined and dined like my wife is...:)


This message was edited May 9, 2008 2:28 PM
ottahand7
Monkton, MD
(Zone 6b)

May 9, 2008
7:29 PM

Post #4929688

EUPATORIUM 'Cori' I rue the day that I bought 6 plants of this from White Flower Farm. I was looking for fall color, especially that lovely periwinckle blue that they are. Being a new gardener at the time I didn't pay too much heed to their warning that is spread by underground rhizomes. They should have said INVASIVE in bold letter or not even sell it. Every year I am gradually moving all the plants out of the beds that it is in and have moved them elsewhere. It is easy to note the roots of it because they are pure white so easy to spot. Every time I walk through the garden I lift up leaves looking for more sprouts coming up.

I gave 7 gallon pots of it to a fellow Master Gardener who is the grounds manager of a links type golf course. He planted it in an island area and they can keep in in bounds by mowing. I just hope it doesn't wreck their turf.
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2008
7:55 PM

Post #4929776

One last thing, I've contributed all I can think of to this...well all that's revelant that is...:)...But ottahand you would appreciate this...At the Anniston Museum near where I live there's a garden outside on the grounds...one morning they were going to have a plant sale there at 9am, well of course I was there about the time the sun was coming up and was of course all by my lonesome...I decided to walk around the grounds looking at all the plant displays and low and behold what did I come across first...along the walk way, it was cement by the way...is an island, a pretty large island bed surrounded by a concrete/cement walkway...and what was planted in this island in the middle of concrete you ask?...One second and I'll tell you, geez, patience...OK, ready?...Gooseneck Loosestrife...I laughed for an hour and tomorrow morning I'm going to another plant sale at the same place but this time taking my wife with me, to show her how they "take care" of their Gooseneck Loosestrife...:)

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 10, 2008
1:51 AM

Post #4931014

Ditch Lilies.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2008
4:15 AM

Post #4931483

Ottahand, That's interesting. I started some seeds last year of white boneset or white throatwort or something that starts out "Eupatorium" for the butterflies, and up came with some pretty foliage which I nurtured. It bloomed the first year and it was a dang weed! I laughed it off, dug it up, and I noticed it came back this year. I guess that means I didn't get all the roots?
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2008
7:18 AM

Post #4931796

I agree... ROTFLOL. about the Top 5. people actually sell horsetail???? i seriously did not know this. I could make a fortune off of my yard! It's a native here and a real pain in the you know it...
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2008
11:42 AM

Post #4931994

Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea' or yellow creeping Jenny. It's a beautiful plant and did not spread too badly when I had it growing in a part shade dry area under a some trees, but last year I moved it into a perennial bed to grow around the base of some other plants. It did! All too well and also spread into my bark paths. Gets more sun and moisure there and must love it. I'm getting rid of all of it if I can. In the one area where it's half way well behaved, it is so mixed up with Creeping Charlie that I can't separate them.

Susan
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2008
12:20 PM

Post #4932121

I forgot about Creeping Jenny, Susan...that is another one of my wife's first favorites...It seems to like it in the back of our Jeep Cherokee and is rooting in the carpet nicely...:)

Paul from Alabama

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2008
1:14 PM

Post #4932291

LOL Paul, very funny!!! I have creeping jenny too - I think. Is that the same as White Nancy? Lamium something-um?

C.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 10, 2008
1:23 PM

Post #4932310

no -- Carrie - they are different.

here is creeping jenny ===> http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/24123/

This message was edited May 10, 2008 8:24 AM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2008
2:16 PM

Post #4932495

Good! Because I have White Nancy which, it turns out, is not called creeping anything, but can be invasive.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2886/

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 10, 2008
2:56 PM

Post #4932647

carrie -- none of my lamium is invasive, or even spreading. i'm pretty disappointed in it. there are some areas where i wouldnt mind something that spreads wildly. actually thinking about getting creeping jenny.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2008
5:17 PM

Post #4933099

As an update to my earlier post:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4928782

I was doing some light weeding and the gooseneck lysmachia is back! I swear it is back! The roots my be really really long for it to have come up out of the regrade we did, complete with concrete sidewalk! I'll probably never get rid of it now. :(

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2008
5:36 PM

Post #4933142

Suzy, you could move...
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2008
1:26 AM

Post #4934566


I can't get lamium to grow to save my soul. But I did have it in a rather dryish spot under ash trees. I think if it were in a proper garden it might take off, though.

Oh, I planted some Physostegia (?) Obedient Plant "Miss Manners" and thought it would be very proper, but it's all over my garden now and I'll have to declare war on it come Monday (my garden day) and dig it out. The other one mistake is mint. And I should have known better, but I thought we would be making mint juleps! But not that many!!
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 11, 2008
3:51 AM

Post #4935164

Tab,. I have tried to give away Lamium starts so many times and no one can get it to grow, but I have mine on top of English Ivy under dry dry dry woods including ash trees and it has literally taken over the ivy. (Thug contests here) In fact, I noticed it has gone 20 feet into the neighbor's half opf the woods...ooops! It is not a good plant, better than ivy, though LOL!

I do wish I had never planted it, but I never go in the woods, so I guess I don't care too much.

Suzy



This message was edited May 10, 2008 11:52 PM
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2008
10:07 AM

Post #4935609


Well, I'm coming up to get yours! I thought the lamium was so pretty where it was and wish I still had it! I think it was 'Orchid Frost' from Bluestone

http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/search.html?mv_session_id=dAvWVDCb&co=yes&ma=yes&mc=1&tf=name&to=f&rf=*&sp=results_pics&st=db&fi=products&mv_value=nametype%3Dscientific&ml=45&mv_value=srchtype%3Dkey&from_search=1&sf=%3Acode%3Aname%3Acommon_name%3Ashort_desc%3Adescription1&se=lamium&su=1&op=rm&sf=is_coupon&se=1&su=0&op=ne&sf=disc&se=0&su=0&op=gt&hide=1&submit.x=11&submit.y=3

I'll give you some Obedient Plant in trade!

I WSed a couple of different eupatorium seeds and haven't seen any results yet. I grew 'chocolate' ffrom Bluestone too, and it died on me. Also a purple flowered one. I don't know what I'm doing wrong with these! They were fine for my butterfly garden but I can see the 'weedy' characteristics in some of the others I have growing along the woods for the butterflies.
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 11, 2008
10:42 AM

Post #4935635

My Mom's Obedient Plant was so pretty last fall that I took a couple chunks of it and planted it in front this year. I have no doubt that I will be sorry in a couple years because I've had it before and know how it spreads.

Right now the plan is to move it to the back where I'm working on redoing a large area and putting it there. Can't right now because I'm working at getting rid of another plant I wish I'd never planted. It is a type of Dutchman's Pipe vine. I've never seen it flower and it has the nasty habit of sending out long roots and coming up 6-10 ft from where it's planted. Not sure If I'll ever get all the roots out. I've had to dig up some dayliles to get the roots out from under them. The vines are all mixed in with the golden Creeping Jenny and the Creeping Charlie. Maybe black plastic over everything might be the way to go?? Too bad there are a few plants in there I do like, otherwise I might be able to just spray the whole area with some strong weed killer and let it set for a year or so, then start over.

Susan

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2008
1:59 PM

Post #4936170

See, this is how plant trading begins! Go for it, ladies...
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2008
4:16 PM

Post #4936680

I'm not sure who was going to do the trading, but I'm going to add to it.

Yotedog...since you have to weed your salvia black and blue... could I trade you something for it?? I absolutely love the stuff, have tried it twice and failed, and finally figured out that either the moles or gophers is what was doing it in. I have plenty of other things that I would trade that aren't necessarily on my trade list. Please, please!!!!!...
thanks, redchic
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2008
4:23 PM

Post #4936721

I don't know why I didn't mention this before, but I also have to add english ivy. I didn't plant it, but I'm certainly sorry that some one else did!!! whoever was at this place before let it grow uncontrolled/uncontained for over 50 years and it has taken over two acres... trees and all. The only thing that slowed it down some on one side was Japanese knot weed! and i mean a lot of it, half acre or more. Well, 7 years after starting I finally have the knotweed knocked back to 20 or 30, spread out, scraggly stalks. But the Ivy I only have out of the trees and pushed back about 14 feet. Every year I seem to get about two more feet gone. But seedlings of it show up all over the place!
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2008
11:27 PM

Post #4938198


Yes, I think we should start a Black & Blue Salvia trade thread!

I need another one, too!
Kelli
L.A. (Canoga Park), CA
(Zone 10a)

May 12, 2008
3:21 AM

Post #4939163

I don't know if this is considered a perennial or not, but I wish I had not accepted the Aloe saponaria that was given to me. It's not super invasive, but it's too thorny to weed around and it is prone to aloe mites. I'm sure that DH is sorry that he planted the mesquite tree where he did. It's gotten bigger than we ever expected.

Some of the invasive stuff that came with the house - vinca, Mexican evening primrose, blackberries, and Brazilian pepper tree.
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2008
3:25 AM

Post #4939173

tabasco...congratulations, you are the only person I've ever heard of that has grown 'Black & Blue" and doesn't have another one...:)

Kelli, sounds like my wife lived there before you...:)

Paul from Alabama
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
3:44 AM

Post #4939232

Nope... there's two people! Bet ya can't guess who the other one is!
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2008
3:49 AM

Post #4939256

redchic...Ever since I've known you it was only the most exclusive clubs for you...:)

Paul from Alabama
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2008
4:01 AM

Post #4939306

I'm another one -- Paul, B&B doesn't reseed up here, and it doesn't (appear to) come back!

Tab, You are welcome to it all!

Lincolnitess, Do yo have any idea exactly which Dutchman's Pipevine? The reason I ask is because I have some seedlings in the basement for the Pipevine Swallowtail. One kind has round leaves with variegated folioage - A. fimbriata and the other likes wet soil, wooly pipevine, A. tomentosa. If either of them are that bad, then maybe I'd better not put them out. Maybe keep them in a big pot?

I have heard the same thing about Maypop Passion flower (about it coming up 6 feet from where you planted it), but so far, mine hasn't May popped at all!

I got some Obedient plant in a trade last year...but the plant tags she sent were written in a light green sharpie that faded and I don't know which plant it is to even keep and eye on it. I think I traded for some dumb takeover things -- Monarda, Sedum and Obedient plant. Speaking of trades, the varigated Solomon's seal yo sent a couple years ago is really doing well and looks great!

Suzy
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
4:05 AM

Post #4939327

all right! I'm exclusive! or so Paul says. :-p
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2008
4:06 AM

Post #4939337

well, you do have chic in your name...
PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2008
4:10 AM

Post #4939348

Suzy...Like Groucho Marx used to say, "I don't want to belong to any club that would accept me as a member"...:)

Paul from Alabama
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
4:11 AM

Post #4939353

Chic or no Chick...I always wanted to be exclusive in the B*B salvia club! Don't you Suzy???
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
4:12 AM

Post #4939359

But, then again... paul may be right in with groucho. Hmmmmm???
tropicalaria
Tri-Cities, WA
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2008
6:19 AM

Post #4939584

I have a beautiful ajuga...all through the lawn. And only in the lawn. It has low purple leaves and very pretty blue flower spikes in the spring. Frankly, I don't have much use for ornamental lawns, but it does look a bit odd.

I have horsetail all over, just a few here and there. This seems odd to me since our ground is all sand and rock, on the alkaline side, and extremely dry. Nonetheless, it comes up in places that I have never watered, all around the house.

My wife has been asking me to plant mint for 10 years. She has almost given up by now. I have a pot of it, just for her, which I have to watch closely to stop from creeping out and rooting into the ground. I am cultivating corsican mint, however, which I consider an entirely different entity.

Honestly, I find it hard to believe that it is legal to sell virginia creeper here. I pull huge quantities of it every year, and yet it still comes up everywhere, climbing under the house siding, smothering the grape vines, running through the grass. Horrible stuff that breaks into pieces when you pull on it, runs for tremendous distances, and reseeds vigorously.
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
6:34 AM

Post #4939595

i agree with you tropical. I'm not big on lawns, so I would actually find the purple ajuga lawn far more interesting and... no mowing!! And the horsetail... don't get me started! It's everywhere! Fortunately I'm not the one who planted it. If your wife wants proof of the mint, i'll send you a picture of what occurred after a well meaning friend weeded the stuff and wasn't careful about what he did with the weed pile!
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2008
8:25 AM

Post #4939638

Suzy, I think my pipefine may be Aristolochia durior. Not positive. I know it was one of the few I could find that was perennial in zone 5 and that it didn't have the larger blooms that some do. Leaves are heartshaped and plain green, not wooly. I going to replace it with some Honeysuckle vines. Not the Japanese ones LOL. I've heard those are invasive too.

Oh, and how could I forget Adenophora confusa? I've sprayed them with Round Up every year for at least the last 5 years, but some new ones are always popping up mixed in among my perennials. Those nasty white roots go on forever. A good lesson in not growing perennials that are very easy to start from seed. Now why can't I get Foxgloves or something else I want to do as well?

Susan

This message was edited May 12, 2008 3:34 AM
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2008
10:55 AM

Post #4939733


I have to say the Ajuga 'bronze beauty' is very attractive in its space (so far!) and an interesting idea for a lawn.

I have the wooly pipevine in a large pot and he doesn't seem to like it too well, but I dare not plant it in the ground, it sounds like. Is it something that can be propagated from cuttings, I wonder? I would like to have another pot of it for the other side of the house--for the butterflies it may bring in...

Same thing for Maypop. I'd like to plant some along the woodland edge for the butterflies. So far I've kept it in a pot for fear of over production.

LOL Well, I would like to get a hold of another B & B salvia too. Maybe our 'club' should start a co-op to order some from somewhere. I thought I planted mine in a perfect situation, high and dryish, but I think the rains got to it anyway.

PaulFromAL
Piedmont, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2008
11:21 AM

Post #4939797

tabasco...You don't need a coop...You need to move to Alabama...:)

Paul from same...:)
yotedog
Raleigh, NC

May 12, 2008
12:58 PM

Post #4940101

Ugh Oh, I've got Maypop-----in the ground. Oop's...
gldandrews
Andrews, NC
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2008
2:33 PM

Post #4940477

Rose Campion. It is every where. In the garden, on the Road banks, In the neighbors yard,In the cracks of the drive way. Oh did I mention it is EVERYWHERE. LOL

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
3:18 PM

Post #4940694

Oh dear! I have lots of Rose Campion that I'd planned on putting in my front garden. Maybe not now?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 13, 2008
2:08 AM

Post #4943266

Now, I think in z. 5 UT you might be okay with rose campion. It's dry there, right? So much has to do with finding the right climate for a plant, but not too right. Did that come out sounding right?

kwanjin

kwanjin
West Valley City, UT
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2008
3:05 PM

Post #4945091

Maybe I'll just keep it in a pot? Where I was going to put it is watered a lot.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2008
6:51 PM

Post #4946078

Doesn't Rose Campion reseed instead of having invasive runners? If you use the flowers as cut flowers, would that take care of the problem? I am asking because it is in flower here.

Suzy
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2008
7:02 PM

Post #4946121

Yes, it's best way of traveling is reseeding. That worked for a while for me until I had to be gone for a few weeks one time, at the time that I should've been cutting them off. Viola 150 more of them the next season. I actually don't mind weeding the campion so much, here, in my soil, it pulls out very easily and doesn't return from whatever root remnants there might be. i love the grey foliage, so I let it stay and just deal with it. I have many, many worse plants than that.
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2008
2:11 PM

Post #4949719



I just yanked out 4 bushel baskets of 'Obedient Plant' if anyone wants some. It was supposed to be "Miss Manners" cultivar but I don't think so!

I'm still watching for the 'Black & Blue Salvia trade thread' to start up. I had to put mine to rest yesterday too. Just didn't make it through the winter and I'd love to try another one!

I am preparing a few boxes of Verbena bonarienses seedlings to send off to butterfly gardeners, and if anyone here wants some seedlings, d-mail me with your address. First come first served. Some find it invasive in the garden, especially in the south. Others have a difficult time getting it to grow, so I don't know how it will work for you, but the butterflies do love it whereever they are...



thistle5
Alexandria, VA
(Zone 7b)

May 14, 2008
11:11 PM

Post #4951809

pycnanthemum-mountain mint, it's the only thing that's ever spread speedily in my garden(besides REAL weeds). At least it smells good, when you pull it out... I'm going to plant eupatorium this spring, I hope it will spread a little, & even though I saw some cool chartreuse & purple foliaged lysimachia(2 different plants) at the garden center, I am resisting...
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 19, 2008
9:25 AM

Post #4972428

My B&B salvia certainly returns reliably here in St Louis.
In fact, it borders on being too aggressive.
But it flowers beautifully during a time of year when flowers are hard to come by.
So I put up with having to pull up some runners each year to keep it in bounds.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2008
6:41 PM

Post #4974469

Maybe I am not growing B&B in a good place...Robin, can you tell me where you have yours, and how well protected it is?

Suzy
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
12:35 AM

Post #4975857

Ours grows about everywhere.
It's initial location was in nice loamy soil w/ morning sun and afternoon shade.
I don't have very many locations like that, as you might imagine.
But since then, we've transplanted divisions to a moist shady hillside and to much poorer soil in partial sun.
It has done fine in all locations, though my experience w/ the latter two is only a year or two.
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
12:46 AM

Post #4975903



Weerobin--is St. Louis in hardiness Zone 6?

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
1:01 AM

Post #4975981

Yes, Tabasco, we're in 6a.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 20, 2008
3:46 AM

Post #4976886

Well, Mine wasn't happy last winter and didn't come back, but I don't know why. It was in a raised bed and should have been happy-happy-happy. I now have it in a sandier soil, maybe that will help.

Thanks for the info. Your winters are a lot like ours, same with your summers, but you do have a 2 week longer growing season...but that shouldn't have mattered one bit.

Suzy
georgiehopper
Pleasant Valley, MD
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
11:52 AM

Post #4977532

Anthemis tinctoria.. I hate that stuff... reseeds like mad and I find it everwhere..parts of the lawn are now an anthemis lawn which I don't mind, but I have pulled it out of my beds and thrown it into the compost pile...probably another mistake.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
12:36 PM

Post #4977679

Verbena bonariensis. Two years in my yard and now it is coming up everywhere. I have spent all my spring garden time trying to get rid of it. It is everywhere. Hopefully mulching this weekend will help.

Karen
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2008
4:23 PM

Post #4978587

Paul,

Don't blame your wife for the gooseneck loosestrife. A garden designer put it in my garden plan. The three that were installed proceeded to kill everything else in the bed with their relentless march. I used round-up, but ended up eradicating them by pulling them up by hand, and being stunned to find that a plant would send a runner four feet away! Fortunately I caught it within three months of installation. The thing that fascinates me is that it's in garden catalogs!

The other thing I've noticed is that you have to be very wary with "gifts" from some gardeners. They can't bring themselves to kill the loathsome thing so they make "gifts" of invasive plants. I've declined things only to have the person drive up with a boxful of the plant. I've learned to smile, say thank you, set it aside and do some research. I've been offered lily of the valley, violets, obedient plant (what a misnomer) and monarda (and not the mildew free kind). Code words like "spreading", "vigorous" and other such mean the plant is headed for the trash.

Donna
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2008
4:39 PM

Post #4978652

Donna - I love your note on code words like "spreading" and "vigorous"--it's so true! It's like the way realtors use terms like "cozy" (tiny!) and "great starter home" (needs a ton of work; that's why it's so cheap!).
tropicalaria
Tri-Cities, WA
(Zone 7b)

May 20, 2008
8:03 PM

Post #4979594

Nothing, without exception, goes in the ground here without some prior research. Occasionally I put things in that I know are likely to spread, but I do it with full knowledge of the possibilities and a decision to deal with the consequences.

Underground runners, though, are particularly difficult to live with.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
8:24 PM

Post #4979695

Oh, I only wish my husband had read this thread five years ago!
sadie_mae
Central, KY
(Zone 6b)

May 20, 2008
9:06 PM

Post #4979861

Verbena bonariensis is one I wish I had never planted too! It not only reseeds everywhere but also survives here as a perennial. I told myself last year that I'd dead head it, forgot to do it and now am pulling out seedlings and the original plants.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2008
9:27 PM

Post #4979926

I have a billion verbena b and nicotiana alata. But here they do not survive as perennials (for which I am grateful). So I takes the clumps of seedlings (easily 100 in a couple of square inches for nikkis) and scratch them out with trowel in spring. It cracks me up that White Flower Farm has been selling these two plants for almost $20 for a group of three. Nicotiana alata can uproot the roots of other plants (I have to keep them from offing my japanese primroses every year). I have a bed with 8 peonies and I allow the verbena to form sweeps between them - and I've learned not to let all zillion of them go to seed.

I do have places where I pit the pushy ones against each other - Anemone x hybrida Honorine Jobert, saponaria Bouncing Bet and northern bayberries have been battling each other to a draw for the last three years. But I have to watch it. Soapwort plays dirty. Every few weeks I cut around it with a shovel.

Donna

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
9:49 PM

Post #4980008

Gosh - someone is sending verbena b. as a DG share. But I'm putting it in a pot. How do you get anemones to be perennial, Donna? We plant them but they never even come up, and the packages always say iffy re z. 6.

Carrie
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2008
10:57 PM

Post #4980287

Carrie,

Are you perhaps referring to anemone coronaria? I understand that comes in packages. That isn't hardy here. I read on a site that it's only semi-hardy, and keels over at about 28 degrees. But Japanese anemones, which is what I put in 9 years ago, thrives. It's not obnoxious - it has spread over 9 years from four plants to probably the equivalent of 12, but it's very easy to pull out.

Or do you mean the tubers, anemone blanda? They come back for me too.

The key to verbena b is to avoid allowing it to go to seed. Early on I deadheaded it and had no problem. It was only when I left plants for the birds that it went nuts. One hard winter I saw bluebirds jumping up and down on the plants to dislodge the dried seeds. If you pull out the plants (easy to yank out) or deadhead them it's fine. They don't travel by underground runners and damage other plants.

Donna (on my way out to scratch out my billion nicotiana alata seedlings).

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
11:55 PM

Post #4980538

Donna, I don't know which I'm talking about (nervous laugh) but they come in packages with beautiful pictures on them of red and purple flowers, the packages have corms or tubers or bulbs or something in them, Home Depot sells them in the fall with other fall-planting bulbs, and they've never once come up. Although I heard recently that whatever those things are, you're supposed to soak them first, which it doesn't mention on the pretty packages! Don't worry about me, and don't let me totally side-track this thread! I'm keeping my verbena b. in containers, so I'm not too worried about it getting away!

Carrie
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2008
1:02 AM

Post #4980916

Carrie: You misunderstand. The roots on the verbena bonar. are not a problem- very small and easy to remove. It's the airborne tiny seeds which go EVERYWHERE.

Karen
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2008
10:30 AM

Post #4982277


Hi, Carrie-- you d-mailed me about the verbena bonarienses, but I haven't sent it yet.

I love it in our garden but we have a kind of 'natural' look to our garden--planted mainly for the butterflies and birds--and Verbena bonarienses plays well with the daisies, liatris, bronze fennel, coneflowers, zinnias and milkweeds. And yes, it makes a lot of seedlings if you let it go to seed, but they are easy to yank. I like to prune it down a bit when it's about 10 inches high so that the plants are bushier, too.

I understand Verbena bonarienses is less easily controlled in the South. And it is interesting that WFF sells it for $20 a pop (and other places too) when it is so easily grown (easy for me at least).

If you want to pass on it, just let me know. It sounds like maybe it's not the verbena you were thinking of. (Maybe the purple one 'Homestead' would be more to your liking.) (-: t.



Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

May 21, 2008
11:50 AM

Post #4982401

I am sorry I planted a share from my neighbor. At first I thought it was some kind of penstemon, and I asked her about it because I saw hummers going to it. So she gave me a little clump. I moved it last fall because it was too tall for where I had put it and now every day I go out and there is some popping up here and there. I figured out that it is actually Narrow leaf Obedient plant, and it is much worse than the regular type! OMG : (
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 21, 2008
3:40 PM

Post #4983361

Carrie,

Take Tabasco up on the offer of verbena Homestead Purple. GREAT plant! It's one of the few I buy every year from Bluestone, since I can't germinate it. I put it in pots every year and it's glorious. Same lovely color. Shorter. Nice mixer. Nice alone. And it won't spread. In my zone it doesn't survive the cold.

Tabasco - what a nice offer!

Donna

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2008
3:44 PM

Post #4983385

Tabasco,

I am up to the challenge! We have yucky soil - not much grows unless we plant it! I will probably kill it anyway (by mistake). Do you want to do an actual trade? Dmail me.

Poor Meredith - we all feel your pain!

Carrie
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2008
12:24 AM

Post #4985604


LOL well, Carrie, I don't want to force the VB on you! But I'll go ahead and send it, no trading required. If I go to the Post office and find out the postage is too much I'll ask you to chip in a bit.

Donna, if you would like some please send me a d-mail with your address...happy to oblige! I won't be sending until next week--after the holiday.

And it can't be that bad--it won the Royal Horticultural Society AGM (Award of Garden Merit)!

http://www.rhs.org.uk/WhatsOn/gardens/rosemoor/archive/rosemoorpom03aug.asp

And you know, it's easy to winter sow. At least that's how I did mine...

I wish I could find my photos of it in the garden but they are on my old computer...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2008
12:52 AM

Post #4985694

I like it better and better - and thanks for reminding me about the holiday weekend! I had forgotten . . . d'uh.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2008
1:52 AM

Post #4985946

Oh, I liked the verbena bonar. too, until the reseeding got out of hand. That's the only reason I've decided to eliminate it, not at all because I didn't like it.

Tabasco: Were you referring to starting Homestead Purple from seed? I thought it was propagated vegatatively. That's another I really liked. I bought plants twice but neither made it through a winter.

Karen
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 22, 2008
2:11 AM

Post #4986032

Dear Tabasco,

Thank you! You have a D-mail. Is there someting I can send to you? I have lots of lilies - Orientals, Orienpets, Trumpets. I have nepeta Dawn to Dusk (pink and white) which is gorgeous, and assertive, but not aggressive. I have fragaria vesca reugen - woodland strawberry that has no runners and makes a lovely edging plant.

Let me know what kind of thing you would like.

Donna
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 22, 2008
3:42 AM

Post #4986443

Donna: Completely off-topic (sorry) but which of your lilies do you find perennialize the best?
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2008
11:45 AM

Post #4987198


No, k., not Homestead purple from seed. Sorry. Maybe it could be rooted from cuttings, though. Anyone try that? It's supposed to grow well here--but not invasive. At least at our house.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 22, 2008
1:08 PM

Post #4987507

Hi Happy.

No problem. I've been growing lilies for nine years, so I have a good idea. The ones that I put in years ago and have had good fortune with are as follows:

Regale (species/trumpet): it not only perennializes, it increases (reasonably). Very easy to grow. Gorgeously scented. Great disease resistance, but I find it needs staking.

Anastasia (orienpet): the perfect lily, with strong stems, huge flowers that last, disease free, fabulous scent and not only perennializes, but multiply. I have never understood why it's so expensive. I started with three bulbs (5-6 years ago?) and have moved the excess twice. I must have 15-20. I paid $32 for 3. I've seen them priced at $40. Makes no sense (Brent and Becky's bulbs have then for a reasonable price.) Tolerates temps in the 90's.

The Vamp (asiatic): no scent but a non fading disease free red that blooms early in the season and multiplies.

Artistic/Brushstroke (asiatic): prolific increaser, no scent, but early blooming and disease free.

Silver Sunburst (trumpet): huge flowers, great scent, beautiful, disease free. Tolerates high heat (90's).

Emerald Angel (trumpet): same great qualities as Silver Sunburst.

Silk Road (orienpet): just like Anastasia above. Great.

Ariadne (asiatic): delicate looking but tough. Disease free.

Rosepoint Lace (asiatic); like Ariadne; they are related.

White Henryi (species trumpet); increases, but may need a bit of staking.

Sorbonne (oriental): when I had problems with another Oriental, the company sent me three of these as a replacement. You can put them in less than favorable places and neglect to water them and they come back year after year.

Crystal Blanca (oriental): related to Casa Blanca but has shorter stems and does not scorch in the heat as Casa Blanca does.

Hope this helps. I must have tried a dozen other lilies that did not work, and it's great to be able to save someone else the aggravation and expense involved in failures. If you would like more info and some pictures please Dmail me.

Donna

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2008
6:31 PM

Post #4988858

Donna, that's fabulous information.

I'd like to add one more that I don't remember whether I mentioned that I'm sorry I planted - ordinary Achillea, the weedy, aggressive kind of yarrow. I may have said this already. And I don't know how much is due to its aggressive spreading or to DH's sneaky "helpfulness". But all my columbines are overgrown with yarrow now! :-(

Carrie
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 22, 2008
7:04 PM

Post #4989005

Donna and Carrie: That is so so so helpful. I am incredibly grateful. Wow. Thank you. Thank you!!! I have been wanting just that information forever.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2008
7:15 PM

Post #4989046

Not me, Happy, just Donna! You didn't want to know about weedy yarrow forever, I don't think.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 23, 2008
3:37 AM

Post #4991131

LOL -- you are right, Carrie -- at first I thought you were going to add something about lilies, and then didn't fix my post.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2008
3:35 PM

Post #4992842

'Sok, I don't mind a little false credit now and then. :-)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 23, 2008
6:00 PM

Post #4993553

I'll tell you, isn't it the truth that sometimes that's the best kind!
tropicalaria
Tri-Cities, WA
(Zone 7b)

May 25, 2008
7:50 PM

Post #5001809

Now, Donna, what about the kinds of lilies that didn't work?

^_^
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 25, 2008
9:03 PM

Post #5002103

Well...

Stargazer. I find it's very fragile, and if I lose one, the remaining bulb doesn't exactly jump up to multiply. I think it's a gift pot lily and not meant to go into the ground. I put in 3, and I've had ONE for at least five years. It doesn't get taller, bigger or more productive. I'd rip it out but my husband asked for it in the first place.

The orientals Tallahassee, Lavender Lady, Pesaro. Never turned up.

The Orienpet Luminaries. Naturally, I've never paid more for a lily.

Other than Luminaries, they have all disappeared from the catalog company I bought them from. But that is the company that graciously gave me not three, but six Sorbonnes, a wonderful lily, as you can see from the pic. They suggested it because it is reliable. And it has been.

Donna

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

runktrun
Edgartown, MA
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2008
12:51 AM

Post #5007508

We here in New England have given up on all lilies with the exception of dayliliies thanks to the Lilly leaf beetle. kt
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2008
1:19 AM

Post #5007657

Kt,

Yes, I've been reading about it for the past few years. Such a shame. It's really sad. I'm sorry I reminded you.

Donna
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2008
1:44 AM

Post #5007819

Runktrun: I'm so sorry -- I had no idea about the lily leaf beetle.

DonnaMack: Thanks again. I though most lilies disappeared after a year or two; I didn't realize they would perennialize.
bluesmaven
Fort Worth, TX

May 27, 2008
4:19 PM

Post #5010200

hostas have broken my heart. I have 20 or 30 bought all at the same time but some now show signs of hvx. :( I wish I'd never heard of hosta.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2008
6:32 PM

Post #5010775

Bluesmaven,

I had never heard of hvx. I don't have hostas, but I went onto a website to educate myself. What a horrible disease! Apparently a lot of garden centers don't know about it and are still selling plants that will show the (quite fatal) infection in a year or two. And the articles I have read in really good garden magazines (Garden Gate, Horticulture) don't mention it, but recommend hostas for a variety of landscaping solutions. The ease with which it spreads is unbelievable. I have several friends who acquire all their plants through trade, and have hostas. I let them know that they should not accept any from anyone.

Thank you for the head's up.

Donna
bluesmaven
Fort Worth, TX

May 29, 2008
3:27 AM

Post #5018509

Yeah it's such a sad thing. I love hostas.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

June 4, 2010
8:45 PM

Post #7859940

Batchelor Buttons!
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2010
5:01 AM

Post #7860348

The perennial ones?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2010
7:36 AM

Post #7860627

I'm sorry I ever planted any Monarda - they just spread so fast and get so tall! And I keep planting new ones that are supposed to be shorter ... slow learner. I'd love more bachelor buttons!
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2010
7:42 AM

Post #7860642

Monarda definitely spread fast! I have to keep the Jacob Kline for the hummingbirds though. They love them. I also have to keep some purple ones I grew from seed because butterflies love those. So I am happy with them but man do they want to be the only plant in the garden they are in!
My friend gave me a small piece of some perennial Bachelor Buttons, or some people call them Mountain Cornflowers? Are those the ones you like or do you mean the reseeding annual types?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2010
7:45 AM

Post #7860650

I like the annual types - sometimes I scatter seed from a package and they do nada, but if I WS them they sprout but I forget to transplant them! (Poooor me.)
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2010
7:54 AM

Post #7860673

I tried them a couple years in a row (wintersowing) and I forgot to transplant them as well. I think I managed to get a couple in but after the neglect, they were pitiful! I've seen pictures of other peoples that let them reseed and they look so much better than what I got. I have been trying not to mulch, so I can allow annuals to reseed but man there are a ton of crab grass seedlings now! It looks like a full lawn trying to fill in my flower beds right now! I need to get out and pull some but I have no motivation for some reason!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2010
7:56 AM

Post #7860680

Yup - I'm with you there. Same with cosmos.
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2010
8:00 AM

Post #7860686

I did good with cosmos one year but last year was a flop. I had like one nice one and it had reseeded itself! lol :)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2010
8:11 AM

Post #7860728

That's good. I know what you mean about mulch! We had a path lined with forget-me-nots (they were claimed to be perennial). Turns out they were only perennial as long as they reseeded which they needed light to do, so when you mulch over them in the late summer, they forget to come up ever again. Some perennial!
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2010
8:21 AM

Post #7860765

I just ripped out all the forget me nots that had done a good job of filling in after only one year of letting one plant go to seed. It seems someone decided to surprise me and sprinkle a packet of seeds in my front walkway garden. lol They weren't the ones with showy flowers (if there are any) so when they started to look a little yellow I ripped them all out. I think there are much prettier things that I wouldn't mind over running the garden. : ) Of course I haven't tried others, so I might change my mind!
janaestone
(Di) Seven Mile, OH
(Zone 6b)

June 5, 2010
8:32 AM

Post #7860789

I've spent five years now trying to dig out pink evening primrose - I absolutely hate that stuff. I started out with a small clump and ended up with it taking over and destroying one of my front beds - and that was in one season! Never again, I won't even give it away when I find it; it goes straight to the firepit. I've had some problem with the obediant plant but it's fairly easy to yank for me. After reading this thread I am definitely going to replant the 'Oriental Limelight' into a pot. Luckily, I just planted it last week so I can still get it out of the ground.
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2010
7:32 PM

Post #7862332

Boy I'm glad I passed that one up.. It is really pretty though.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 7, 2010
5:35 AM

Post #7866033

Meredith, the FMN can't germinate w/out light. A little well-placed mulch should help protect you.
Meredith79
Southeastern, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2010
6:19 AM

Post #7866151

Thanks Carrie! : )

catzgalore

catzgalore
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 7, 2010
7:10 AM

Post #7866302

I have really enjoyed reading over this thread. However, it is getting rather long, and I would love to continue it. I hope no one would mind if I started a continuation thread. Here goes. Please join in on the 2nd thread :)
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1105209/
JolieB
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 18, 2010
9:05 AM

Post #7899343

Deleted, didn't see Part 2 continued in another thread.

This message was edited Jun 18, 2010 10:06 AM
museumgirl
Royal Oak, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 31, 2011
6:24 PM

Post #8463762

Lemon Balm and Trumpet Vine! I should have known better. Anything that someone was eager to give away...and the lemon balm doesn't smell lemony to me-it smells like feet!
the trumpet vine has been hacked out for two years, and is still trying to take over the neighborhood. Oh well, live and learn!

pbyrley

pbyrley
Port St Lucie (+ Wk , FL
(Zone 9b)

August 1, 2011
8:15 AM

Post #8729452

I wish I hadn't planted my two apple trees. One is Gala and the other is Fuji. The Gala was planted in 2007 and the Fuji in 2008. Neither has ever bloomed so I haven't had to worry about coddling moth and all the other bad things that I've learned from DG since planting them.

I have a good Stihl 20" chain saw and it should help me get rid of these two useless ground user-uppers so I can plant something that will fruit -peach trees anyone?

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 4, 2012
4:24 PM

Post #9152308

This is something i wish the previous owner had not planted. Lemon balm, it is everywhere! On the up side, when we wack it, it smells wonderful!

Thumbnail by lavender4ever
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 4, 2012
9:53 PM

Post #9152766

I can't remember if I already said this, but I regret planting Persicaria virginiana var. filiformis 'Lance Corporal' (http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53502/), and trumpet vine... both have proven very invasive.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2012
7:55 AM

Post #9153071

Coreopsis 'moonbeam'. I had in a whiskey barrel, it needed dividing, so I split it in half and there were 2 (two) stalks left over. The halves both died, but the two stalks have taken over the entire yard!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #9153078

Probably already said that above!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 5, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9153159

Really? I love Moonbeam -- I think I'd be happy if it took over. But probably not...
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

June 5, 2012
5:50 PM

Post #9153775

An elm tree seedling in 1976. It's roots lie on top of the ground and I am tired of stumbling over them. It has great shade, though. Luciee {;^)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 8, 2012
5:07 PM

Post #9157517

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/535/
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

August 9, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9236214

I can't even remember them all. But I am now starting to pull all the seedlings from sweet rocket as there was no way I could get ahead of it before it went to seed---I have hundreds of square feet of it. A plant that looks slightly similar is wild phlox. I was driving along a country road and saw the magenta blooms. I always wanted phlox so I assumed this was the same as garden phlox and really it looks almost the same--but it spreads and is impossible to dig out. Every tiny root grows into a plant and the roots are long shaggy things covered with plants ready to grow. Today I saw a huge black swallow tail butterfly on a cluster so for now I guess I am just going to enjoy it--anyway it smells nice at night and the clump is now close to fifteen feet across---my wife calls it my flocks of phlox------------------Weedy

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

August 12, 2012
4:28 AM

Post #9238653

I started a new thread:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1275104/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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