Photo by Melody
Are you ready? It's time for our 14th annual photo contest! Enter your best pictures of the year, for a chance to win a calendar and annual subscription here. Hurry! Deadline for entries is October 21.

Geraniums, Pelargoniums and Erodiums: Overwintering - dumb question, I know

Communities > Forums > Geraniums, Pelargoniums and Erodiums
bookmark
Forum: Geraniums, Pelargoniums and ErodiumsReplies: 28, Views: 363
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

October 25, 2004
6:03 PM

Post #1111506

...but I haven't had to overwinter geraniums in so long I forgot how to do it! My sister, in Bend, OR, just asked me how to do it and for the life of me...I don't remember. Something about hanging upsidedown in the dark garage. It gets pretty cold there. Can anyone please give me the info... Many many thanks in advance...

Aloha, Carol
DanceyTx
Midway, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2006
8:49 PM

Post #2363339

My question is similar to yours. Could I leave my geraniums in the garden through winter here in zone 8b?

Right now it's very very hot and humid so would I need to plant my geraniums in at least part shade? I have two gardens that get morning sun with shade during the hottest part of the day. I could put them there. What do you think?


Lin
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2006
9:29 PM

Post #2363473

hang them upside down? never heard of that.

I'd bring them inside and put them in a sunny window, I wouldn't hang them upside down though, given the right temp and sunshine they'll do well all winter.

I'm not sure on zone 8 Lin, If it gets below freezing, they wouldn't make it I wouldn't think, now 32 to 30 degrees they should be ok. but Iwouldn't take a chance below that.

I'm not an expert on growing them outside, I growmine in the greenhouse all year long

kathy
DanceyTx
Midway, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2006
10:14 PM

Post #2363635

Thanks Kathy. We do get below 30 deg. here so I will need to put mine in pots. I have a large storeroom with lots of east windows where I overwinter all my tender plants. I don't have much room to bring them inside. I might could squeeze in one or two inside.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2006
10:18 PM

Post #2363652

WEll, I know what you mean, before I got my greenhouse I stored all mine inthe garage one side is nothing but windows, still not enough light, I lost everyone of them, Sooo, I have the greenhouse and can fit in l00's LOL well, not that many.
DanceyTx
Midway, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2006
10:59 PM

Post #2363800

One of these days I'm going to have a greenhouse. *g* I long for that day.

In the meantime I have been lucky overwintering my plants in my 'plant room'. I've only lost two or three in all.

I have a huge bouganvilla in a huge pot that I'm thinking I may put in the ground this year. My Mom put hers in the ground and it has come back strong now for two years. We live right next door to each other so our climate is the same. If I do put mine in the ground I will have to dig a hole as big as a huge round bale of hay. LOL The thing is so root bound and I guess that's what makes them bloom. Mine blooms real well. If I'm going to put it in the ground I need to get busy.
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

June 12, 2006
5:03 PM

Post #2381964

Hi Carol,
I hung mine upside down in my cold cellar. I did this because I have limited space for pots near good light sources.
Basically, I dug about 8 of them out of the pots when the cold came and washed off the roots. I did not defoliate. Then I found some red plastic netting and wrapped the roots and attached a piece of string and hung them in pairs. A couple of times throughout the winter, I misted the roots for moisture. In April I took a peek at them and new leaves were starting so I removed all the dead leaves and potted them up. They really seem to know when to wake up all on their own!
Today, they are all alive and are in various stages of budding and blooming. I figure I saved my self a little bit of money to spend on something else, lol. I'll see if I can dig up that pic I took of them hanging upside down.

Erynne
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

June 12, 2006
5:16 PM

Post #2382008

Okay found the pic. After I potted them up, I let them sit under my new grow lights for a week and fed them half strength fert like Miracle Grown. Then they were moved upstairs to get some south-west light on a very crowded window sill for a couple of days. Finally they were moved to my unheated green house for another two weeks before being left to their own defences on my patio. I don't know that I did everything by the book but they're happy and I'm happy!

Thumbnail by Erynne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2006
6:07 PM

Post #2382160

This is fantastic erynne,

I didn't know they could be stored like this during the winter months. Learn something new everyday.

Thanks fo rsharing.


kathy
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

June 12, 2006
6:23 PM

Post #2382208

No problem! I learned this from another DGer (mornin gayle) last autumn and this was my first time trying it out. I couldn't believe my eyes when they started coming back to life. It didn't take up any space and was well worth the effort. Now I want to see how many more winters I can keep the same plants going!!!

Erynne
beaker_ch
Columbia Heights, MN
(Zone 4a)

June 14, 2006
2:58 AM

Post #2388164

When I joined DG about six months ago, this was a topic in one of the forums. The method that was beng discussed is the method I am going to try this winter and is similar to Erynne's.

You pretty much do the same except instead of hanging them up, you throw them in a paper bag. Then about once a month, you take them out and soak the roots for about an hour. Let them dry off and toss in the paper bags again.

Erynne, you said you potted these up in April. When did they start blooming again? I was thinking they should be potted in March, but I don't want to do this too soon because the cats have a field day with any plants I have in the house.
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

June 14, 2006
12:00 PM

Post #2388875

Hi Beaker,
I practically forgot about my geraniums so many times and except for a couple of mistings, they got no other care.
I honestly didn't know when to pot them up because I couldn't find any literature on when to break dormancy but I think they broke their own and were just waiting on me!!!. Maybe March would make more sense. So when I saw new leaves, albeit light-starved ones, I immediately got them into pots. The first ones bloomed the first weekend in June. They put on new leaves and filled out very quickly. Yeah, March seems a more logical time...I will try that for next year. Thanks Beaker!

Erynne
cedarnest
Northeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

August 2, 2006
2:14 PM

Post #2578311

And to think every year i spend a small fortune to purchase new geraniums for my beds and containers.I should be able to save alot of my geraniums this way.I always feel sick when I see them die the first frost.I had no idea they could be saved yet alone replanted in spring..Think of all the money I will save to put towards other plants!!ooooo I am so glad I stumbled upon this thread.Thanks to all for the advice!! Cedar
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

August 2, 2006
3:50 PM

Post #2578642

Definitely worth the small effort!
beaker_ch
Columbia Heights, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 2, 2006
10:25 PM

Post #2580048

I feel the same way. I was just floored when I found out how easily this could be done. It's got to be worth, at least, several lifetime subscriptions to DG! Now to throw in the monkey wrench. As I understand it, the zonals, the ivies and the regals are not all equal and I was wondering if this also applied to overwintering techniques. Can the ivies and regals be barerooted like the zonals? My impression is that the regals should be treated as a house plant meaning light and water. I'm guessing the ivies should be left in the pots to winter in a cool, light place with minimal watering. Anybody know for sure?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 28, 2006
12:03 AM

Post #2665991

Hi you guys, just happened upon this thread too. This is my first year with geraniums. Mainly because I have never really cared for them until seeing one in my sister's greenhouse and it was gorgeous. So, I got seeds from T&M and started 18. They did much better than I had ever hoped they would. They are not as big as my sister's, but that is ok, they turned out beautiful.

Now for winter. I had thought about trying the method of hanging them (I had heard about it before), or just cutting them back and leaving them in their pots and putting them in a cool dark room in my basement with a little water now and then.

I was wondering why you hadn't cut yours back before hanging them Erynne? Just curious.

Jeanette
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

August 28, 2006
1:01 AM

Post #2666173

Hi Jeanette,
I can be honest and say I have no clue, lol. When I tried this last year, I hunted like crazy for info about this and came up empty-handed. All I could find was little bits of info on how to do it but nothing about why not to cut back before hanging them. Here's one link for example:
http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/1994/9-16-1994/owger.html

I pondered this for a long time and came to the conclusion that maybe the fading leaves provided a little extra nutrition to the roots while the plant was going dormant. Something like when bulbs are finished and we leave the foliage to feed the bulb as it goes dormant. This is just my own thought and all I can figure.

Erynne
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 28, 2006
5:24 AM

Post #2667036

Thanks for the link Erynne. Maybe I will try some each way. Will have to think about that. I don't have any light windows or anything where it wouldn't be warm.
Lulabelle1
East Peoria, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 22, 2006
2:19 PM

Post #2839805

Thanks for posting information on this. I remembered my Grandma overwintering Geraniums & wanted to give it a try. I thought she hung them upside down in her basement.

I'm going to bring them in today. I like the paperbag idea. My garage is cooler than the basement right now. I think I'll put them there unitl it gets really cold.
Kassia
Framingham, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2006
2:36 AM

Post #2841628

hi, I am new at this... and I still have a gorgeour geranium basket going... I put inside my garage every night because it's getting cold right now, but it still flowering... I hate to dig up now that they are still so green and beautiful... do they need a certain amount of time dormant? thanks...

Thumbnail by Kassia
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kassia
Framingham, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2006
2:45 AM

Post #2841659

this is what the basket looks like

Thumbnail by Kassia
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 23, 2006
5:03 AM

Post #2841968

Kassia, your basket is beautiful. I don't think they need a certain amount of dormant time. If you have the ideal place for them they can winter over in a nice light window. They cannot, however, take much heat. A cool place with a lot of light. Light like daylight. Not hot sun coming in the window.

Maybe someone with more experience with geraniums can give you better info.
Kassia
Framingham, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2006
5:46 AM

Post #2842006

thanks... I cared for this basket with all my heart,,, in and out of the house,,, but it's doing great~~~ I have place for her that will be cool and sunny~~~~ I am going to dig out the ones in the yard this week,,, I love geranious...

Hoya_24
Waterville, VT
(Zone 4b)

February 28, 2007
6:25 PM

Post #3234745

I have been overwintering geraniums (Pelargoniums) for many years now by potting them up and putting them in a cool sunny window. I now have gone seven years without buying a geranium for my flagpole plantings. I have now come to the conclusion that the absolute best way to overwinter geraniums is to take cuttings in the fall and root them. After much trial and error here is how I do it. I use to use a mixture of vermiculite and perlite moistened as a rooting medium for the cuttings and would only end up with about a 40-50% success rate. I recently discovered that using a moistened quality sterile peat based potting mix like Pro-Mix helped me achieve a 90-100% success rate using no rooting hormone. I use a sharp razor blade to take the cutting, push it into the medium about 1 inch making sure there are some leaf nodes below the soil level; cover the tray with a clear plastic bag, and keep under florescent tubes for about 15 hours/day. In about 3-4 weeks almost all will have strong roots and can be transplanted. Put in a sunny window and in two months cut back the plants, which will in 6-8 additional weeks produce an extremely nice compact plant. The cutback can also be used to start new plants. I started with 30 cuttings and now have about 100 beautiful plants, which I plan on giving away to volunteers at our annual luncheon to honor volunteers that contribute all year long at the library at which I work. Many of the Geraniums that I have propagated in this manner were originally purchased from Logee's at $7-9 a piece. I have produced large healthy plants ready for spring time for maybe $1 including pots, soil and electicity for the lights. I just thought I would share this information to help anyone looking to propagate or over winter their prize Geraniums.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

February 28, 2007
7:34 PM

Post #3234961

Boy, sounds like you have it down good. Let me ask you, when you cut it off of the main plant do you cut it up next to the main trunk? I have always thought they needed a piece of that. I remember just breaking a branch off right at the trunk and rooting that.

Very interesting. Wish I had had this information in the fall. I do believe I have lost all of my geraniums. I did have very good luck starting from seed though. I was surprised. Guess I need to first of all copy your instructions into my plant file in the computer. Then get out the rest of my seeds from last year. LOL
Hoya_24
Waterville, VT
(Zone 4b)

March 1, 2007
2:02 PM

Post #3237084

Jnette,

I have attached a photo of some of my Geraniums from last Summer that I overwintered using my cutting method. The 3-5 inch cutting only needs be taken from a healthy stem. It does not need to come from the main "trunk." Generally my geraniums will start as a main trunk with one stem. After the plant is cut back it bushes out creating many trunks or main stems to choose from. Eventually your main mother plant can produce as many as 10-12 cuttings. All cuttings must be tip cuttings. By that I mean don't take off a 4 inch tip, and then go below it and take another cutting from that area. I don't believe that would take root, or at least I have not tried it. Remember that these cuttings after taking root generally get very leggy with the shortened days of Mid-Winter, but don't despair. After taking a cutting from them, they will bush out nicely and you have yet one more cutting to root if you desire.

Thumbnail by Hoya_24
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 1, 2007
4:07 PM

Post #3237488

Those are very nice. Very healthy looking. Jeanette
Hoya_24
Waterville, VT
(Zone 4b)

March 1, 2007
6:01 PM

Post #3237883

Thank you. Doug
Kassia
Framingham, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2007
4:00 PM

Post #3298539

Hi... oh it looks so beautiful... I can smell the geraniuns... my beautiful basket was kept all winter in the garage with ocasional watering... it still looks alive, and I hope it doesn't die!!!! I go and talk to her once in while... and it still smells so good!!!!

if this one survives, never again I will let any geraniuns outside!!!!

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Geraniums, Pelargoniums and Erodiums Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Never grew these before.. Brugie 21 May 3, 2007 2:20 PM
Visions Light Pink echoes 5 May 4, 2009 8:38 PM
Hardy Geranium resource links, info, and pics? tabasco 46 Jul 26, 2007 7:26 PM
Plain ole standard geranium....how cold can i let them get?? sticks_n_stones 12 Mar 30, 2007 2:12 AM
Trying to find a source for Geranium 'Pink Penny' bobschatan 4 May 21, 2007 8:51 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America