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Cooking: Cooking Questions Answered

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MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 17, 2004
4:58 PM

Post #1150848

Here it is folks! If you have questions about almost anything that has to do with cooking, baking, etc. here's the place to post them and one of your fellow DG members will try to answer (to the best of our ability)...Let's roll...

Any questions out there? We're here waiting for you...


(The following postscript added by Terry)

Please keep ALL POSTS on topic. You may post:
1) cooking questions
2) a response to answer a posted question
3) a cooking tip you'd like to share

All other posts (sidebar conversations, thank-you's for help, etc. should be handled in another thread or via private messaging.)
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2004
9:12 PM

Post #1153224

I have a suggestion. I am sure a lot of us will be preparing salad this coming holidays. Onion juice can mess up people's stomach after a few days.

The solution: take a piece of cheese cloth, about 12" long. grate onion over the cheese cloth. Once all onions are grated, take all four corners of the cheese cloth, squeeze out all the onion juice over the sink, like you would squeeze water out of a wet cloth.

Loosen the grated onions and use in salad. Onions without the juice make the salad palatable and will last longer, plus they have the crunchy sensation when eaten.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2004
5:55 AM

Post #1153875

How do you thicken tomato sauce? We tried corn starch and that helped but still to thin - we cooked it for quite a while but maybe needed more. (tasted good but skinny. )
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2004
6:02 AM

Post #1153877

If you want a thicker tomato sauce, make a roux, using equal parts of all-purpose flour and olive oil.

When I make tomato sauce, I seldom add liquid - only /4 cup of water or wine (barely add enough liquid to cook the sauce)

The sauce naturally thickens on its own without having to add any thickener.
ceedub
Whitby, ON
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2004
1:27 PM

Post #1154090

I use tomato paste to thicken tomato sauce. Cooking down helps too, but paste gives it a sauciness that I like.
VGMKY
Louisville, KY

November 19, 2004
1:44 PM

Post #1154119

Conversion Tables

Measurement Equivalents
1 tablespoon (tbsp) = 3 teaspoons (tsp)
1/16 cup (c) = 1 tablespoon
1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons
1/6 cup = 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons
1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon
3/8 cup = 6 tablespoons
1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons
2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons
3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons
1 cup = 48 teaspoons
1 cup= 16 tablespoons
8 fluid ounces (fl oz) = 1 cup
1 pint (pt) = 2 cups
1 quart (qt) = 2 pints
4 cups = 1 quart
1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts
16 ounces (oz) = 1 pound (lb)
1 milliliter (ml) = 1 cubic centimeter (cc)
1 inch (in) = 2.54 centimeters (cm)

In case a recipe calls for something you don't have consider:
EMERGENCY SUBSTITUTIONS

For: 1 Tbsp fresh herb
Use: 1/3 to 1/2 tsp dried herb (of the same kind)

For: 1 clove garlic
Use: 1/8 tsp garlic powder

For: 1 egg in baking
Use: 1 tsp cornstarch plus 1/4 cup water

For: 1 whole egg
Use: 2 egg yolks plus 1 Tbsp water

For: 1 cup whole fresh milk
Use: 1/2 cup evaporated milk plus 1/2 cup water, or 1/3 cup dry milk plus 1 cup water

For: 1 cup buttermilk
Use: 1 cup plain yogurt, or 1 cup sour milk (4 tsp white vinegar or lemon juice plus milk to make 1 cup -- let sit for five minutes before using)

For: 1 cup sour cream (in baking)
Use: 7/8 cup buttermilk or sour milk plus 3 Tbsp butter

For: 1 cup sour cream (in salad dressings, casseroles)
Use: 1 cup plain yogurt or 3/4 cup sour milk plus 1/3 cup butter

For: 1 cup cream
Use: 1/3 cup butter plus 3/4 cup milk

For: 1 cup corn syrup
Use: 2/3 cup granulated sugar plus 1/3 cup water

For: 1 cup brown sugar
Use: 1 cup granulated sugar plus 2 Tbsp molasses

For: 1 3/4 cup confectioners sugar
Use: 1 cup granulated sugar, packed

For: 1 cup margarine or butter (in baking or cooking)
Use: 1 cup hard shortening or 7/8 cup vegetable oil

For: 1 square unsweetened chocolate
Use: 3 Tbsp cocoa plus 1 Tbsp oil

For: 1 ounce semi-sweet chocolate
Use: 1 ounce unsweetened chocolate plus 4 tsp sugar

For: 3/4 cup cracker crumbs
Use: 1 cup bread crumbs

For: 1 cup cake flour, sifted
Use: 7/8 cup all purpose flour, sifted (1 cup minus 2 Tbsp)

For: 1 tsp baking powder
Use: 1/3 tsp baking soda plus 1/2 tsp cream of tarter, or 1/4 tsp baking soda plus 1/3 cup sour milk

For: 1 Tbsp cornstarch for thickening
Use: 2 Tbsp flour

For: 1 Tbsp flour for thickening
Use: 1 1/2 tsp corn flour, arrowroot, potato flour, or rice flour; or 2 tsp tapioca

For: 2 Tbsp tapioca for thickening
Use: 3 Tbsp flour
VGMKY
Louisville, KY

November 19, 2004
1:52 PM

Post #1154128

Homemade Egg Substitutes:

Eggs are among the most nutritious foods on earth and can be part of a healthy diet. However, they are perishable just like raw meat, poultry, and fish. Today some unbroken, clean, fresh shell eggs may contain Salmonella enteritidis bacteria that can cause food borne illness. While the number of eggs affected is quite small, there have been cases of food borne illness in the last few years. To be safe, eggs must be properly handled, refrigerated, and cooked.

No one should eat foods containing raw eggs. This includes "health food" milk shakes made with raw eggs, Caesar salad, Hollandaise sauce, and any other foods like homemade mayonnaise, ice cream, or eggnog made from recipes in which the egg ingredients are not cooked.

To make a recipe safe that specifies using eggs that aren't cooked, heat the eggs in a liquid from the recipe over low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture reaches 160 °F. Then combine it with the other ingredients and complete the recipe.

What is a good substitute for eggs?

Ener-G Egg Replacer - follow directions on box.
2 Tbsp corn starch = 1 egg
2 Tbsp arrowroot flour = 1 egg
2 Tbsp potato starch = 1 egg
1 heaping Tbsp soy powder + 2 Tbsp water = 1 egg
1 Tbsp soy milk powder + 1 Tbsp cornstarch + 2 Tbsps water = 1 egg.
1 Tbsp flax seeds + 1 cup water = 1 egg. Blend seeds and water for 1 to 2 minutes
until desired consistency.
1 banana = 1 egg in cakes.

Homemade egg substitute recipe

Homemade egg substitutes are less expensive and just as satisfactory. They also have few calories. Here's a low cholesterol egg substitute recipe:

1 tablespoon of nonfat dry milk powder
2 egg whites from large eggs
4 drops of yellow food color

Sprinkle powdered milk over egg whites, then beat them with fork until smooth. Add food color, and beat until blended. This makes one-fourth cup, which is equal to 1 large egg. If you use this homemade substitute for scrambled eggs, cook it in vegetable oil or margarine so the eggs won't be too dry.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 19, 2004
2:52 PM

Post #1154229

The longer you cook your tomatoes, the thicker it will be. It also depends on the type of tomatoes you use. Some tomatoes will not thicken, no matter what you do. Roma or paste type tomatoes are the best.
Chesapeake
Wingate, MD
(Zone 7b)

November 19, 2004
7:23 PM

Post #1154780

I used too much salt in a sauce I made for cream chicken. What can I do to make it less salty?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2004
7:27 PM

Post #1154820

Add potatoes to draw out the salt. (You can fish out the chunks later if you don't want them in the sauce.)
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 19, 2004
8:24 PM

Post #1154915

If you don't want to cut up the potato, you can leave it whole as well.

My DH's grandmother used to put a whole potato in baked beans to take the "gas" out of them.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2004
11:16 PM

Post #1155151

The Mexican herb Epazote takes the gas from beans. I have personally tried it. and it works; use sparingly though.

http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/kgk/2000/0500/kgk052000.html
http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/epazote.htm

MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2004
11:25 PM

Post #1155157

Fresh garlic tips

When using fresh garlic, cut off the root end to facilitate easy peeling of garlic.

To chop garlic fine, spread barely a teaspoon of salt on chopping board. Place garlic in center of salt and whack the garlic with knife. Hold the tip of the knife with your left hand and chop the garlic over the salt until garlic is finely chopped. the salt absorbs all the garlic oil, not the chopping board.
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 21, 2004
2:49 AM

Post #1157287

I'm wondering what simmering the sauce "for a while" meant? I cook my spaghetti sauce over very low heat (barely simmering) for 6 hours. No lid will help liquid evaporate. I agree it's best to not add liquid to tomato sauces unless you know for certain that you need it.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2004
3:36 AM

Post #1157342

There is already enough liquid from the tomatoes and if you're trying to make paste, you don't want to add any more liquid and wouldn't want to if canning tomatoes anyhow.

I usually put a lid on, but teeter it and don't put it on all the way or the tomatoes will burn. Otherwise, I have one heck of a mess on my stove. I would think simmering means at the lowest heat until desired thickness.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
1:18 PM

Post #1157665

Try using a crock pot to finish simmering tomato sauce after you have it well-started on the stove.
pebble
Bodrum
Turkey
(Zone 10a)

November 21, 2004
1:53 PM

Post #1157723

Here the eggs you buy from the super market are not refrigerated. also, in the bazaar, they have fresh eggs from the farm, just sitting out there, in the hot sun etc. How long are eggs good for? Here, they don't put dates on things...I do get nervous about this.

Also, the milk here is not refrigerated, they have milk that is, but most f the milk is called "long life milk" that has had something done to it...but what? and it tastes fine, I only use it in my coffee, but my daughter uses it in cereal and she says its fine.

ceedub
Whitby, ON
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
2:08 PM

Post #1157746

Pebble, I'm surprised some of those eggs haven't hatched, which is a good reason to refrigerate them!! I don't think it'll hurt them for a short while when they're really fresh to stay out of the cold, but should be refrigerated as soon as possible. Here we buy eggs in cartons with a "best before" date stamped on them - its usually about 3-4 weeks from when you buy them.

I can't help you with the milk though; obviously fresh milk comes from cows warm, but will sour quickly if its not kept cold. Long life milk is new to me. I wonder what they do to it??

Christine.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
2:24 PM

Post #1157762

Pebble:
Quoting:Long-Life Milk

Is long-life milk safe for children? Is it as nutritious as regular milk?
by Linda Somers

Yes, to both questions. Long-life milk (also known as ultrahigh-temperature- processing, or UHT, milk) does not need to be refrigerated before it is opened and has a shelf life of about three months. After it is opened, it lasts about as long as regular milk. It is safe for children, and its nutrient content is not measurably different from that of other milk.

Linda Somers is a pediatric clinical nutritionist at the Children's Memorial Medical Center in Chicago.
http://www.sesameworkshop.org/parents/advice/article.php?categoryId=45&contentId=679
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2004
2:40 PM

Post #1157779

Pebble, Darius is correct. In Germany, they sell their milk on the shelf in UHT containers. What a great idea.

As far as eggs, we've sold eggs for years at the farmers' market and all the time we hear "in France or in ...such and such a place, they don't refrigerate eggs. We can't even keep them out on the table for a few minutes, for the health dept shutting us down. Most eggs work better in cooking if they are at room temperature anyhow.

But most people in other countries don't have large refrigerators and freezers like we do. They shop daily and buy what they need to use in a day's length. I'm not sure I would want to eat eggs that have been sitting on a countertop in the hot sun for 2 weeks, but I think a day or so might be okay. Keep out of direct sun and buy only what you'll use in that time frame.

And one more thing, we have "factory farms" and "confined chicken farms" here in the US and the diseases that they tend to foster are obviously more prevalant than in operations where animals are raised the way nature intended them to be. Thus the need for antibiotics and hormones and the breakdown of organisms that would maintain such a shelf quality.

I'd love to live in a community where each morning you can go to the store and buy fresh for each day's meal. That's the way it used to be done, even in this country, but we've gotten too busy and like convenience. :)

I'm no expert, but these are my observations and guesses in answer to your question.

:) Kathy
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2004
3:07 PM

Post #1157825

That would be wondeful Pebble. If your eggs float to the top, they are getting old. The reason is that there is an air pocket in your egg and as it gets older, the air pocket gets larger, thus causing it to float. In KY, we can sell eggs for 45 after their processed date. The shelf life is 90 days after process date. So even if you buy them on the last day, you can still keep them a month and a half. I think people throw eggs away they've had in their refrigerator for a month, because they think they are old. They are still good. Just check the date.

And you can check the process date at the end of each there is a code number printed and the first 3 numbers are the day of the year it was processed. For instance, if processed on January 30, the number would read 030; if they were processed on April 18, the number would be 108 for it being the 108 day of the year (not in a leap year) :) You can figure 90 days from that date that your eggs are good until. (those eggs would be good from April 18 to July 16) *****refrigerated of course*****

Pebble, one more thing. When you purchase your eggs, you could ask the seller when the eggs were processed/layed. Then I would write that date on the carton, so you know, take home refrigerate and take it from there with the 90 day rule above. :) Kathy
ceedub
Whitby, ON
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
3:11 PM

Post #1157831

To test an egg for freshness, put it in a full cup of cold water. If the egg floats don't use it. (If I mixed this up, somebody please let me know-it could be the other way around, but I'm pretty sure this is right.)

Christine.
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

November 21, 2004
9:44 PM

Post #1158540

What is your favorite skillet, brand and size for general use. If you could only have ONE what would it be - antique, old or new doesn't matter?

Judy

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
9:47 PM

Post #1158549

Only one: Cast iron, 10-12", old but not necessarily anique.

If I could have two, the second would be a stainless steel sauté pan, about the same size, copper bottom, layeres steel in sides as well as bottom.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2004
10:24 PM

Post #1158604

When I make my own bread/rolls I always use 2 envelopes yeast since my 1 env efforts never really took off in raising. Am I just too impatient? I am talking about recipes that call for 1 envelope.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2004
10:25 PM

Post #1158607

i have a set of pans that I bought 18 years ago. They cost a fortune and are made by West Bend. They have what's called the MultiCore bottoms and are for waterless cooking, although I've just used them as any other pan. They have the vent in the lid that opens and closes. They are stainless steel and I love them. They are heavy, but are very good pans and you'd never believe how old they are to look at them.
ceedub
Whitby, ON
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
10:38 PM

Post #1158631

Anastatia, your guess is right, you are being too impatient. It's best to let the yeast do the work over time; your bread will be better textured for it. Too much yeast will also cause the tops of your bread to mushroom over the top of the pan. Bread baking is like a chemistry experiment - you should follow the recipe closely for the best results. I make my bread using a bread maker for the dough, but the essentialls stay the same - follow the recipe for best results. Happy baking!!

Christine.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
10:43 PM

Post #1158639

I've seen those, Kathy. Nice pans.

Anastatia, yeast can deteriorate with age even in unopened packages. I had a problem with dough rising until I found a warmer place for it and became more patient. Didn't take more yeast.

The Tassajara Bread Book is my favorite bread cookbook.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/157062089X/qid=1101080482/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/102-3120523-7709705
ceedub
Whitby, ON
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2004
10:46 PM

Post #1158646

Electric Bread is my favourite bread cookbook. Some mighty fine recipes for a breadmaker in it.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2004
12:16 AM

Post #1164150

I just can't get worked up about raw eggs. I don't think people get sick from raw eggs any more than they do from any other foods. I worked as a chef and must have made hollandaise a thousand times. No one ever got sick that I recall.

I also have been making a health food milkshake for about 20 years with a raw egg, frozen fruit, acidophilus milk, Splenda, nutritional yeast, powdered calcium and occaisional other items and never got sick off it. But it sure made a delicious energetic substitute for breakfast...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2004
12:17 AM

Post #1164154

Remember in both the examples you gave, there is some acid whitch mitigates most of the effect of raw eggs.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2004
12:20 AM

Post #1164166

well, yes, both the hollandaise (lemon) and milkshake have acidic fruits in them. But I still don't think it's a problem or I'd never eat mayonnaise. I remember when folks kept mayonnaise in the cabinet instead of the fridge...geez!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2004
12:25 AM

Post #1164186

Well, I keep my butter in a cabinet, all except maybe for 2-3 hot weeks in summer when it melts too much.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2004
2:06 PM

Post #1165043

Do you really keep your butter unrefrigerated most of the year? I've seen some products in magazines that claim you can put butter in them without refridgeration but I did'nt believe them. How is it possible?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2004
2:17 PM

Post #1165069

Herbie, it stays cool here in the mountains all summer except for maybe 2-3 weeks. The butter never does anything but get a bit soft, enough to spread it. The butter gizmos that hold butter in an upside-down cup suspended in water do the same thing.

However, if I am doing a LOT of baking, the kitchen gets too warm and I have to refrigerate it then.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2004
2:26 PM

Post #1165078

According to Alton Brown on The Food Network and his new book "I'm just here for more food":

An unrefrigerated egg ages a week in a day; keep eggs refrigerated.

The rate at which an egg goes downhill has more to do with handling than time.

The warmer it is, the faster the membranes that separate the different parts of the egg deteriorate. Properly stashed in their carton in the back of the fridge, eggs will keep an amazingly long time.

Grade AA grade eggs will drop to Grade A eggs in about a week but won't descend to Grade B for about six weeks. After that they're still perfectly edible but I would not do much more than scramble them.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 26, 2004
2:50 PM

Post #1166246

Here's a link to a "butter bell" that keeps butter fresh at room temps
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

November 26, 2004
10:03 PM

Post #1166757

Thanks for the info on the butter. Do you mean to say that you just leave the butter out of the fridge and it doesn't go bad?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 26, 2004
10:56 PM

Post #1166800

Yes Herbie, I just leave my butter out of the refrigerator, sometimes in a cabinetm more often just on the counter in a glass butter dish. It holds its shape, does not melt ANY and does not go bad. It does soften eough to easily spread on toast.
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 26, 2004
11:30 PM

Post #1166836

I have two butter boats for my butter. One holds a whole stick and one a half stick. I mostly use the smaller one. Water goes in the bottom dish and because the rim around the edge of the top part that comes into contact with the water is not glazed, it allows the water to to keep the butter fresh for weeks,( if it lasts that long ). I just love mine.

Like you, Darius, if it gets really hot in the summer I may set it in the fridge.

Another good thing about them is you can put warm or hot water in them if you need to soften butter really quick

Thumbnail by ginlyn
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 26, 2004
11:46 PM

Post #1166859

I meant to send one showing the water level also but forgot to click send .

Thumbnail by ginlyn
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 27, 2004
5:12 AM

Post #1167159

This butter keeper: http://www.thegadgetsource.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Session_ID=c44d1e5375e2c9a254266230aeee4057&Screen=PROD&Store_Code=tgs&Product_Code=028901002848 is reasonabley priced. A very dependable company, I have shopped with them for years for all my cooking gadgets and small
appliances.

edited cuz web site move their products around.

This message was edited Nov 7, 2006 2:55 AM

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 27, 2004
11:06 AM

Post #1167238

That gadget place looks good; I need a pepper mill too.
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

November 27, 2004
1:39 PM

Post #1167341

I, too, am looking for a really good pepper mill for use in the kitchen. Cook's Illustrated recommends the Magnum, and I see that it can be found on the net...I used Google to locate it. Am also looking at the Pepper Mate, which has a small compartment at the base to catch the ground pepper. Both have the reputation of being very good. Then there is also the grinding mechanism...there are some with ceramic and there are some with stainless steel. And...how easy is your pepper mill to clean? The one I now have (a wooden one, years old) gets clogges up periodically, and DH takes it apart for me and cleans it. (which is not easy to do). Seems oil from the peppercorns builds up with use.

I want one strictly for use in the kitchen, however, if you want to use it on the dining room table you would also want to consider style and looks.

With me, how practical and how well the pepper mill holds up with use counts more than the consideration of price.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 27, 2004
1:48 PM

Post #1167354

I, too, wonder about ceramic vs. stainless steel for grinding. My salt grinder has ceramic because I'm sure the stainless steel wouldn't hold up long to the corrosive aspects of salt.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 27, 2004
2:05 PM

Post #1167362

Stainless steel if type 316 which most salt or chemical intolerant things are made of is just about indestructable in a high saline environment. Not so true in a closed system with noncirculated common sea water though seems the lack of circulation and inturn fresh oxygen causes it to fail. Stainless steel is a funny material while it is strong in a lot of ways it is tough as nails but really quite soft.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 27, 2004
3:39 PM

Post #1167440

I used Thompson's acrylic pepper mill for years! Each time I need to refill, I wash the pepper mill with lukewarm water, soap and ammonia. I rinse and dry thoroughly. So far I've never had any problems.

Has anyone ever used a microplane grater? http://www.thegadgetsource.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=tgs&Product_Code=098399400204 ? It sure is a dandy tool for grating garlic, ginger, rinds of citruses. It finely grates hard cheeses too, without too much effort.

This message was edited Nov 7, 2006 2:51 AM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 27, 2004
3:44 PM

Post #1167443

I LOVE my microplane grater! Couldn't cook without and wonder how i lived without it all those many years.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 27, 2004
3:46 PM

Post #1167449

I have bought Mr. Dudley pepper mills. They are guaranteed for life, no kidding, anything goes wrong, send it in and they will replace it. Keep the receipt and the box in a safe place and just mail it back. Most of their mills are under $10 and they work fine. You can adjust the size of the grind, too.

You might want to get one of those metal diffusers for your range for simmering ..they are just a round metal kind of plate, that has two layers, and holes overall, that spreads the heat source under your pan so there are no "Hot Spots". They aren't very attractive, but you can simmer sauces for hours on a low flame without worrying about them.

Also, there are screen type covers for pots that keep the splatters off your stove , they have a handle, and are washable. They do eventually wear out from washing the gunk off them, but they aren't expensive and mine have last 5 years or more.

Some tomatoes will never thicken in cooking, and you end up with watery sauce. The better they are for sandwiches, the worse they are for sauce. They will always separate and leave a watery layer on top. Tomato paste will help a lot as it is made with romas, which are the thickest cooking kind. But long cooking is the answer for almost all tomato sauces, and you can mix the varieties as long as you use mostly paste type tomato with it, or throw in a can of paste.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 27, 2004
8:53 PM

Post #1167798

Regarding butter at room temperature - my kitchen temps stays about 66-68º most of the time, and cooler at night. No heat source in there.

I often make a "butter" of half butter and half olive oil. I have to refrigerate it or it runs all over the place.
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

November 27, 2004
9:25 PM

Post #1167824

Here are a few sites on pepper mills. One site shows a whole array of what is available. Also, prices on the same brand of pepper mill vary from one seller to another, so when I know exactly what I want I will scout around for the best price.

Hope these will be of some help to you:

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/ratingchart/422.htm
http://www.handcoding.com/archives/000654.shtml
http://www.epinions.com/Cooking_com_Unicorn_Magnum_Plus_Pepper_Mill__Herb___Spice_Tools_MagnumPlus/display_~reviews
http://fantes.com/pepper_salt_mills.htm

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 28, 2004
2:40 AM

Post #1168108

A good buy rating was for the Oxo. It's $19.99 but on sale for $9.99. http://www.oxo.com
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2004
2:59 AM

Post #1168125

Butter comment:

Darius knows her stuff about the butter. There's really no need to buy one of those butter-keeper thingies.

I was shopping once about 5 years ago with an older friend of mine and I mentioned I wanted a butter keeper. She laughed and said that was silly, butter was fine on the counter. Since then, I've been keeping about a half a stick of butter out at a time in my glass butter dish and it has never gone bad. We eat it within a week, though, so I don't really know about letting it go longer.

Perfect for spreading on breads, toasts, etc. We never use margarine, so this is a great way to keep butter spreadable and also ready for any recipes that call for softened butter. Don't be afraid :) Let that butter sit out a little :)
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2004
3:14 AM

Post #1168141

Where is the best place to buy pure vanilla? If you buy it in the larger bottles, how long does it keep?
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

November 28, 2004
9:11 PM

Post #1168990

I buy my vanilla in Sam's Club since it doesn't matter to me where it is produced. I don't think the stuff ever goes bad.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 29, 2004
12:41 PM

Post #1169713

I just started a batch of my own (even though I have 2-3 bottles on the shelf). This is a pint of Barcadi Gold Rum, with 3 vanilla beans. After a week it already smells heavenly. Smoother and a bit different taste than vanilla beans in vodka.

Thumbnail by darius
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 2, 2004
4:04 PM

Post #1174812

When I lived in Massachusetts, I left the butter out all the time and never had any problems. When we moved to Kentucky, I noticed I can only leave out in the winter, even with the air conditioner on. I hate messing with hard butter.

Someone asked about vanilla, and they have pure vanilla at Sam's Club, I believe it is 16 ounces and, of course, the price has gone up tremendously, but I believe it is about $21.00 now. Also, I believe that Watkins sells pure vanilla and I'm not sure of the cost.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 3, 2004
10:17 AM

Post #1175891

I get my vanilla from Penzey's Spices which is a "local" business which started in Madison. They have a website, but since I go to the store I can't give you the link. They have a wonderful variety of spices and flavorings, and will ship anywhere. I think they opened one in the Boston area this year. They do send out a monthly flier with all their products listed, with recipes and they can make up gift boxes too. Even if you don't order anything from them, you should check out the site to compare prices.

America's Test Kitchen did one of their famous "tests" and found no difference in the flavor of artificial vanilla vs, real vanilla...but I'm sticking with the real stuff!!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 3, 2004
10:28 AM

Post #1175896

Here's what ATK said about Vanilla Extract

"Does pure vanilla extract make a difference? In a word, no.

Although vanilla beans are convenient to use in custards, extracts make the most sense when baking. When shopping for extracts, you have two basic choices: pure and imitation. Pure vanilla extract is made by steeping chopped vanilla beans in an alcohol and water solution. Imitation vanilla extract is made from vanillin, a product extracted from conifer wood pulp that has been chemically rinsed.

We tried nine extracts (seven pure, two imitation) in a basic sugar cookie made with just flour, butter, and sugar. Most people, including pastry chefs, couldn’t tell the difference between a cookie made with vanilla extract and a cookie made with the imitation stuff, let alone the differences between brands of real vanilla.

Thinking that the baking and the other ingredients in the cookie, though few, were making it hard to discern the taste of vanilla, we decided to try our pure and imitation extracts in an eggless custard. The results of this tasting were so shocking that we repeated it, only to come up with similarly surprising findings. Tasters couldn't’ tell the difference between real and imitation vanilla. We also followed a standard tasting protocol in the vanilla business and mixed each extract with milk at a ratio of 1 part extract to 8 parts milk. In this tasting the imitation extracts took the top two spots, followed by real extracts from Nielsen-Massey and Penzeys. Although we are loathe to recommend an imitation product, it seems that most people don’t mind imitation extract. In fact,many tasters preferred the imitation."

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 5, 2004
9:47 PM

Post #1179667

I made the first part of a huge pot of vichyssoise tonight. Haven't added milk or cream yet, just leeks, potatoes and chic stock, and I'd like to put about 3/4 of it up.

Questions:
May it be canned, before adding the dairy? (I've heard not to can dairy.) Time? (It's pretty thick.)
Or should I freeze it, and if so, before or after the addition of the dairy?
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 5, 2004
10:26 PM

Post #1179699

Darius, whether you freeze it or can it, I'd wait to put the dairy in. Milk products don't freeze as well and don't have the same shelf life. If you decide to can it, you will have to pressure can it. I'm not fond of pressure canning, so I don't want to give you advice on that. And I think you're correct about not canning anything dairy. :) Kathy
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 5, 2004
11:44 PM

Post #1179807

Some times "fishy" salmom can be saved by soaking for 24 hours in milk before cooking sometimes but not if decomp has set in.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 6, 2004
12:38 AM

Post #1179888

I used to deliver trout to restaurants. I always instructed the chefs to put them in a plastic tub with holes in the bottom and then set that in another plastic holes with no holes. This allowed the ice on top to drain through the fish, and the water, slime and a little blood would drain through to the bottom. One chef, even though the trout were still fresh after 3 days with no problem, would take them out and wash them all in cooking wine and them put them back in. It kept them, if treated these ways, fresh, until I got there the next week.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 6, 2004
2:02 AM

Post #1180005

Bacteria moves in fish even though very slowly. At 15 degrees, most home deep freezers are poor devices to keep fish in for long periods of time. When you freeze fish in one, try not do a bunch at the same time and keep it out in the open till it is frozen for best results.

Commerically fish is frozen at -40 to get it done in a hurry. This also produces a better product because the cells don't distort and tear turning the fish less solid because it freezes so fast the cells don't get a chance to expand and distort . This adds months of shelf life to the fish. Commerical fishers some times keep fish on ther boats over a week and they are still a fine product they do this by cleaning them well and belly packing them with ice and taking them out of that ice and rinsing them and reicing them.Most fish held in cold storages for long periods of time is glazed in water . That is taking frozen fish and dipping it into really cold water with a bit of sugar for a sticker and letting an ice skin build up on the fish. You can do this at home but it is a real pain . Vaccumm packing is a better way to go.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 6, 2004
2:20 AM

Post #1180023

Yes, fish will stay fresh for a week. The nice thing about trout, usually sold with the head on, is you can tell by the eyes. If the eyes are clear, the fish is fresh. If it is a little cloudy, it's iffy. If it's very cloudy and sunk in, don't even think about eating it.
The commercial freezing is way outta my area of expertise. But I keep my home freezer on 0 and keep a thermometer in it. I have had no problems with my frozen fish.
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2004
10:54 AM

Post #1180305

Could someone post the 7 layer salad?
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

December 7, 2004
2:43 AM

Post #1181919

I have a recipe problem amd 2 questions:

1. I made a recipe for "orange salad dressing" this evening, it tastes too "vinegary" to me...I've already added additional fresh orange juice, is there another way to tone down the vinegar?

2. I cut up 2 different kinds of lettuce this evening, 1 red leaf & the other boston lettuce. How do I keep it from going bad so quickly? I've washed it, spun it, 'sliced it gently' with a chef's knife, and it is in a Tupperware 'lettuce Container' (the new oblong type w/2 holes to plug/unplug) , in the past lettuce does not seem to keep very long for me, I even have a newer fridge.
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 7, 2004
2:49 AM

Post #1181953

Try adding more sugar to your recipe for the salad dressing. I'm assuming it's an ingredient in the recipe? The usual basic ingredients for vinagrettes include oil/vinegar/sugar. To adjust one that is overbearing, adjust the others. Just be careful to not overdo it :) If it's honey instead of sugar, just add additional honey instead. Keep tasting it to get it "right" :)

--Hugs :)
Marcy_1
New Madison, OH
(Zone 5a)

December 7, 2004
3:30 AM

Post #1182024

Hi Momo... If you will cut your lettuce with a plastic knife...it will keep much longer for you. I can't tell you why that is...I just know it works!
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 7, 2004
4:05 AM

Post #1182068

Jill, I agree with Hug, to offset the vinegar, add a bit of sweetener, a little at a time until the taste is what you want.

As far as the lettuce, I have a rule of thumb. Don't wash, cut, chop, etc. until you are ready to use it. I only "cut" lettuce with a knife if I am going to use it right away, otherwise if it is for a dinner (a few hours away), I rip it. I'm not quite sure either, but I know that your lettuce starts to turn brown and get wilted if you cut it. Both varieties that you mentioned are very tender, delicate lettuces and two of my favorites.

You might try putting your lettuce on some paper towels in the tupperware container to absorb some of the moisture from washing it, but other than that, it may not last you too long :(

I hope your salad was delicious, it sounds it.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 7, 2004
4:25 AM

Post #1182085

If you make a weak lemon to water solution, you can wash the lettuce in it and it will not turn brown so quickly. cutting does cause it to brown, so I only do that if I'm going to eat it right away. Fruit Fresh will stop it from turning brown, but check out the ingredients. I think it has MSG in it and many people are allergic to MSG.
Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



December 7, 2004
4:30 AM

Post #1182089

I worked in a restaurant all through high school and we were not allowed to cut lettuce with anything. We were taught to rip it apart with our hands and it keeps longer. It works! I'm thinking the plastic knife may work the same way.
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

December 7, 2004
9:29 AM

Post #1182253

Thanks for the salad dressing info/and salad info ... I'll try adding more honey and pray my lettuce will keep for a few days! I can't stand the bagged lettuce.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 7, 2004
10:55 AM

Post #1182293

Yep, it's probably the Vitamin C in the lemon juice that does the trick too. When I worked in restaurants, we always tore the lettuce too, and I do that at home. Of course, we used to bang a head on the counter to tear the core loose and pluck it out. This is rough on lettuce but we used so much of it each night that it didn't have time to turn rusty.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 7, 2004
12:40 PM

Post #1182359

We put nothing on the lettuce and it keeps well in the frige for several days. We take the head apart from the outside in leaf by leaf and was each leaf as we go and bag in a ziploc bag then take out what we want and tear or cut at that time usually trimming the end where it was attached to the stem. Works for us and no bugs I don't use spray or powders.Ernie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 7, 2004
12:42 PM

Post #1182364

I buy the mixed baby greens, small enough they don't need tearing... same for baby spinach.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 7, 2004
10:32 PM

Post #1183556

i simply put my lettuce in the fridge as is. i usually break it apart by hand but at times i've used a regular knife and never had a problem. also, i keep my fridge at 38 degrees. it seems to be the ideal temperature for keeping everything fresh.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2004
8:12 AM

Post #1184285

The lower you can keep your fridge without freezing anything, the better. The health department here insists on 38 deg. or less in commercial kitchens.
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 8, 2004
8:38 AM

Post #1184293

When I have a whole lot of lettuce (as on holiday time - or in the Summer) I use my FoodSaver plastic container. Sometimes I use a partial vacuum, and sometimes I just put it into the container without, depending on how quickly the lettuce will be used up. After washing the lettuce I spin it to get all of the water off, as best as I can. Then put crumpled white paper towling into the container with the lettuce. Even when I don't vacuum...the FoodSaver container lids have a really good gasket around the edge of the lid. My lettuce remains crisp and fresh for a long, long time in the fridge! Don't even need to trim it.

I also find that (before washing), giving Iceburg Lettuce, at the core end, a good thump (or two) on a solid surface such as your sink drain, will loosen the core and all you need do is give it a good twist to pull it out with your fingers. However, this doesn't always work when the core hasn't grown straight in the Iceburg Lettuce.

Also, any left-over wilted lettuce from a salad (still having the French Dressing on it) is delicious in any lunch-meat sandwich!
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2004
2:27 AM

Post #1185916

Here's a question for you cooking experts. I make 'White Chili' frequently all winter, I usually use fresh cilanto, it tends to turn the chicken broth a green-ish color, If I use ground coriander will it have the same taste as the Cilantro and will it keep the chili from looking green-ish? Thanks, Jill
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 9, 2004
3:02 AM

Post #1185978

To me, fresh cilantro has a very distinctive (and fabulous) taste and I don't really find coriander very similar to it. I wouldn't substitute it, personally.

When do you add the cilantro? I'd try adding it as a garnish or at the very end of cooking. I think it tastes best more "raw" as opposed to thoroughly cooked and adding it at the end may keep it's color from "bleeding" into your chili :) Mmmmm, sounds good :)
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2004
3:21 AM

Post #1186011

I agree with Hug, you may even try soaking your cilantro for a bit before putting in the chili.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

December 9, 2004
10:30 AM

Post #1186263

Yes, best to add at serving time. If you find the cilantro to taste a bit soapy, add a little fresh mint also.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

December 9, 2004
6:38 PM

Post #1186960

I made some candied carrots years ago...liked them! I know I used brown sugar and butter...and baked them...any one know how to do this...I want them for a potluck party so will need a large baking dish full.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2004
6:49 PM

Post #1186973

Jo, I don't bake mine, just boil your carrots with water, put the brown sugar and butter right in with the water and boil the heck out of them. The water will evaporate and they will be so sweet and tasty. Kathy

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2004
7:09 PM

Post #1187001

I boil the carrots, drain, then add brown sugar and butter. Stir. That's it. I suppose if you dusted them with a little flour and stirred, it would thicken the butter and sugar some.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2004
7:13 PM

Post #1187009

Question: I made vichyssoise; the base is leeks and potatoes in a chicken stock. Got that all blended up and it tasted wonderful.

Took out about a cup and added some half and half and it tasted bitter. FRESH, organic half & half. Anyone have any clues?
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

December 9, 2004
7:51 PM

Post #1187050

Thanks, MM and Kooger...I had my heart...and baking dish...set on baking...I know I baked them before...*snif* Jo
Gemila
Decatur, IN
(Zone 5a)

December 9, 2004
8:06 PM

Post #1187065

The last time I made vichyssoise, I used a little to much of the greener part of the leek and that was what made it taste bitter. I have no clue to why yours tasted fine before adding the half & half and bitter afterwards.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2004
8:12 PM

Post #1187075

No green part used! Thanks, Gemila.

Jo... try to improvise on one of these:
-----------------------------------------------
Carrots, Baked And Candied Recipe
http://www.freerecipe.org/Side_Dishes/Vegetables/Carrots/CarrotsBak_bbibd.htm
-------------------------------------------------
Title: Candied Carrots
Yield: 4 servings

4 Carrots (sliced)
2ts Butter or margarine
1 ts Salt
1/2 c Lo-cal cream soda
2 tb Brown sugar

Place sliced carrots in saucepan and cover with water; add salt. Cook until crisp-tender; drain. Place in baking dish. Sprinkle carrots with brown sugar replacement; dot with butter; add cream soda (or any white soda). Bake at 350F for 30 minutes. Turn carrots gently 2 or 3 times during baking. 1 serving = 1 vegetable, 1/2 fat calories = 47
http://www.recipesource.com/special-diets/diabetic/candied-carrots1.html
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2004
9:20 PM

Post #1187178

Just take the soda out and put some broth or water in. Something liquid, so the carrots don't burn. :)

Jo, I checked at Allrecipes.com Here is the link to several recipes, perhaps you will find what you are looking for there, Good luck. :)

http://search.allrecipes.com/recipe/quick.asp?q1=Baked candied carrots&lnkid=65&x=9&y=12

This message was edited Dec 9, 2004 5:25 PM

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2004
9:37 PM

Post #1187203

About broth. I ate a lot of chicken and learned years ago from Weight Watchers to save the broth. Whether it is broiled, fried, or roasted, I save all the bones and broth in the bottom of the roasting pan (I always add water to the bottom of the pan to prevent smoking and keep the flesh moist) and boil them up together and save the broth. After it cools and I refrigerate it, later I skim off the fat and voila! it's good for sauces, cooking veggies, and replacing more fatty liquids.

I also save broth from beef, even if I just fry hamburgers, and degrease it too. Here's the problem: now that chickens are fed even more hormones and antibiotics so that they are large enough for the market in little more than 1/2 the time it takes to grow them to maturity, I am beginning to question this old tactic.
I remember when a big frying chicken was 3 pounds, now they run to nearly 5 pounds. And they have big blobs of fat in all kinds of places where they never had them before.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2004
9:45 PM

Post #1187214

Speaks to the quest for free-range, grass-fed beef and poultry, doesn't it?

I haven't bought a grocery-store chicken in over a year, and almost no beef or pork. And olny free-range, organic eggs. If I cannot get hormone-free, and grass-fed, free range, I'll just eat organic vegetables. Those veggies make good stock, too.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2004
10:03 PM

Post #1187238

The leeks I just bought at Ingles were just 50¢ more, and had twice the useable amount of leek. Somebody's getting the idea, LOL.

Try and find a patch somewhere (like work?) to grow some veggies of your own. At least garlic, shallots, leeks, tomatoes and some lettuce. Beware of lettuce and rabbits, though.
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

December 10, 2004
6:58 PM

Post #1188907

Boiling fresh country eggs - store bought egg and I get along fine but for the life of me I can't get fresh country eggs with thicker shells to peel after they are boiled... help me please.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2004
7:07 PM

Post #1188919

Try these sites, Judy:
http://www.goodegg.com/boiledegg.html
http://www.deliaonline.com/cookeryschool/howto/how_0000000003.asp

I'm not sure the hard-boiled gadget they advertise on TV would work for really fresh eggs.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2004
7:34 PM

Post #1188953

Judy, we've had farm fresh eggs for years and we hear that often about not being able to peel fresh eggs. I have very little trouble. Here's what I do: I put salt in the water when I cook my eggs, for hard-boiled, I cook for 8 minutes once the water starts boiling with eggs in there. Then I run cold water over the eggs and keep them in the water while I'm peeling. Also, I tap the 'pointed' end of the egg to get started and then crack (gently) all around the shells. I hope this works for you. :) Kathy
patischell
Fort Pierce, FL
(Zone 10a)

December 10, 2004
7:40 PM

Post #1188959

I read somewhere, I think on this forum, that if you put your carton of eggs in the refrig on its side so the eggs are also laying on their side, when you boil them the yolk will always be centered. Then, when you make deviled eggs you don't have all the whites at one end and the yolks at the other. It really works!!
Pati
patischell
Fort Pierce, FL
(Zone 10a)

December 10, 2004
8:00 PM

Post #1188987

When boiling eggs, I always put apple cider vinegar in the water (my favorite vinegar) along with some whole cloves. It makes the house smell good when they're boiling, and it also tints the egg shell so you can tell which ones have been boiled. I put them back into the carton until I get ready to use them, and have had a real surprise when I cracked one to peel and found I had pulled it from the wrong carton!
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2004
9:06 PM

Post #1189111

Speaking of free range chickens, there is an interesting article in Consumer Reports on free range chickens. It seems the government is pretty lax with inspections. According to Consumer Reports, free range can mean alot of things. On some farms, just having the door the coop open qualifies as free range.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 11, 2004
3:34 AM

Post #1189644

We get asked all the time what we mean by free-range. Just the other night I told someone, "Well, let me see. We promised kale to our customers this fall, but couldn't deliver. But, we told them, if they bought one of our free-range turkeys, they got their kale...because the turkeys ate it all, down to the ground!" Our definition of free-range is that they are not in a confinement situation, at all. They are free to range the farm. You should check out all your sources because a lot of people say a lot of things and you have to have trust with your farmer! A saying I heard a lot when I was a gullible child, "Don't believe everything you hear!"
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

December 12, 2004
2:09 AM

Post #1190938

Re fresh eggs... on the first batch I added salt but regardless of what I tried I could not peel those things... the shell was just TOO thick. On the next batch I added vinegar and went through the same cold water bath, etc. They peeled very easily... these are brown eggs and it appeared the vinegar cause part of the shell to dissolve making them easier to peel. I'll try this again in a few days to verify that I'm correct in my conclusion.
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

December 12, 2004
10:44 AM

Post #1191235

DH felt guilty because he ate all the Egg Salad so he boiled eggs right quick for me to make more... he added nothing to the water; he just cut the eggs in half with a knife and scooped it out with a teaspoon. (lol lol lol)

I don't know how he managed to do that!!!

This message was edited Dec 12, 2004 6:06 AM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 12, 2004
7:15 PM

Post #1191835

Unless I was making deviled eggs where they need to be "pretty" I think Judy's husband has the right idea!

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2004
11:32 PM

Post #1192086

Do you know where I can get Goya olive oil?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 13, 2004
1:10 AM

Post #1192190

I buy Goya olive oil at Ingles, or sometimes BiLo.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 13, 2004
2:22 PM

Post #1192773

I am new to the use of sweet peppers because I don't like green bell pepers but grew so many other colored ones I tried frying them with onions and mixing in scrambled eggs and cheese and just wondered if it would be ok to put in scalloped potatoes with pork chops

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2004
2:36 PM

Post #1192829

I don't like green bell peppers either, unless they're cooked. Perhaps you will like them better once they have turned red. I think your other peppers should be fine in that recipe.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

December 13, 2004
10:04 PM

Post #1193419

Ernie, the red, orange, and yellow have a sweeter flavor; you may like them.
Charlotteda
Pickens, SC
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2004
11:37 PM

Post #1193501

Wrinkled cookies. I love to eat but I dont love to cook because I am not good at it.

When you make cookies from the regular recipes off a bag (e.g. chocolate chips), they say to put them on an ungreased cookie sheet. Of course, when I try to remove the cookies, they come up good and wrinkled ! I then tried spraying with Pam, obviously there is something about choc chip cookies cooking that eludes me because my cookies still look like those wrinkly dogs.

Can anyone offer enlightenment? I might actually have to show my cookies to others someday !
charlotte

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 13, 2004
11:45 PM

Post #1193507

Charlotte, although I consider myself a good cook, cookies are not my forté. Mine always wrinkled too until I bought a Silpat (silicone) pad, got a heavy-bottomed cookie sheet, and a pizza stone for the oven on which I place the cookie sheet. The rectangular pizza stone stays in the oven and helps other baked goods as well, even Lean Cuisine.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2004
11:57 PM

Post #1193518

Charlotte, I like to use parchment paper when I bake cookies. Chocolate chip cookies will wrinkle. You may be trying to take them off your cookie sheet too soon. Let them set for a few minutes before removing. You shouldn't have to spray Pam or grease your pan and definitely won't with parchment paper, I think you can buy it at the grocery store now. Silpats are wonderful, but expensive. If you don't do a lot with a cookie sheet, I wouldn't invest in one.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

December 14, 2004
1:48 AM

Post #1193637

I have two silpats and have never drug them out. They do not last forever and I guess I am saving them for something more special than cookies.

They now have parchment paper that is coated with silicone (like the material a silpat is made of) and that works as well as regular parchment paper. Misty is right; when removed from the oven the cookies need to sit a bit on the pan to finish setting up; then they will not wrinkle.

I never put anything directly on my cookie sheets; either line them with foil (as in roasting bell peppers) or parchment paper for cookies, scones etc.

Makes clean up easier and protects the cookie sheets.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2004
11:11 AM

Post #1193946

Everytime I buy a cookie sheet, it warps in the oven when it gets hot. One end or side will be sticking up in the air while another is flat like it's supposed to be. Can anyone give me a brand name that doesn't do this?
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2004
12:22 PM

Post #1193977

I don't know the name brand, but get one of the stainless steel ones that have heavy duty sides. I know that Sam's Club sells them and I also bought some from http://www.acemart.com they are truly all around and don't cost much more than the ones you might find at Walmart. I will look at mine and see if there is a name brand.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 14, 2004
12:55 PM

Post #1194012

Mine is a La Forme pan and has never warped. My cheaper ones do, but since I started using my oven stone, everything bakes more evenly. I agree with TLC that silpats are expensive and not necessary. I always used parchment paper before someone gave me the silpat.
anastatia
Vancouver, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 15, 2004
4:00 AM

Post #1195182

I made a batch of those Molasses Crinkle cookies and they did not fluff up (and later fall down) like they are suppose to. they are just flat, like a pancake. Could my baking soda be too old?

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 15, 2004
10:54 AM

Post #1195328

baking soda could be the culprit or not pre-heating the oven sufficiently...

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 15, 2004
12:47 PM

Post #1195400

I found this while looking for recipe last night. I've never tried it, but I probably should. :)

Baking Powder Test

Place I t. baking powder in a cup.
Add 1/3 c. hot tap water.
Fine to use if active bubbling occurs.

Baking Soda Test

Place 1/4 t. baking soda in a cup.
Add 2 t. vinegar.
Fine to use if active bubbling occurs.

Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 16, 2004
8:23 AM

Post #1196605

There has been some discussion about leaving butter out, but I don't see where anyone has made the distinction between salted and unsalted butter. Do not leave UNSALTED butter out if you're not gonna use it within a week. It deteriorates rapidly. SALTED butter will keep much, much longer, and there's really no need to refrigerate it. It's the salt that preserves it.

I'm enjoying all the tips here. Thanks, all!

Pen
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

December 16, 2004
10:25 AM

Post #1196627

I have a question...Does Olive oil go bad? How would I know if it is bad? How should it be stored? Is mixing 'anything' such as herbs,tomato's ect. going to 'spoil' olive oil eventually? Thanks, Jill
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 16, 2004
11:32 AM

Post #1196673

i have never heard of olive oil going bad. i store mine in the can i bought it in under the counter in my kitchin. as far as putting things into the oil i think there are a few things to watch for. don't think garlic or basil stays good for long in oil. i'm sure someone here can give you more detailed advice.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 16, 2004
12:19 PM

Post #1196720

Oilve oil will become rancid, just like any other oil. Reducing exposure to light, heat and air will extend the shelf life. I keep a small amount of olive oil in a metal can that has a cap on the pour spout. The rest stays in a bigger metal can in the pantry, down low where it's cooler.

Put your nose to the opened bottle. You will be able to smell it if it is rancid. Extra Virgin Olive oils have a longer shelf life esp. under optimum conditions.

Infused oilve oil (herbs, garlic, tomatoes, etc.) should be stored in the refrigerator unless you have a root cellar. It warms to room temperature usually in under an hour so plan ahead for using it.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

December 16, 2004
2:33 PM

Post #1196873

Amen to all of the above.

However, I do buy only UNsalted butter. Because it spoils easier it has to arrive at the market fresher than the salted butter. There is no way to gage how long that salted butter has been around. I have read that many producers of unsalted butter wrap the cubes in foil covered paper rather than the parchment type stuff to keep it fresher. However, I rarely find butter packaged that way here. But when I buy the butter, I could wrap them myself.
We leave a half cube out on the counter and it has not gone rancid for us.

When I was in Ca I went to Trader Joes and purchased some Plugra european butter which I have had before and like very much. I also purchased some Devon cream butter for the first time. It will be interesting to see how it tastes. It is supposed to be creamier.

The best butter I have ever had was made here in Iowa at a little place called the Lytton Creamery. I suspect it was raw butter as years later I was able to get raw butter through Alta Dena in CA and it tasted the same. Unfortunately, Alta Dena is no longer allowed to sell raw milk or raw butter.
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

December 16, 2004
9:08 PM

Post #1197314

FYI - My Wal-Mart now has the 2 gallon size zip lock bags. The price made me stop and think but not for too long, because when you need a larger size you NEED it. 10 for $3+.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 16, 2004
9:22 PM

Post #1197327

I really liked the 1/2 gal. sized zip-loc but it wasn't around for long.
I used to get fresh milk form a farmer near me. It had a LOT of cream at the top. So I skimmed some off, but still left enough to qualify as "whole milk" by government standards. I froze what I skimmed off until I had enough to churn. It was an experiment to see if I could freeze and later use it for churning.
I poured it into the churn and let it ripen for about 3 days. When it was time to churn, I didn't have a dairy thermometer but found if it felt slightly cool to my fingers, it was ready. If it's too warm, the butter will be impossible to get out with a strainer and if it's too cold, it won't separate into butter and buttermilk.
I used to sit in front of the T.V. to churn and watch "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartmman." When it was through, I had butter!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2004
12:41 AM

Post #1197548

Is it ok to pickle eggs in the pickle juice left over from pickled green beens and asparagas I have a quart jar half full of each and want to do some eggs seems to me the easy way is just fill the jars back up with eggs and top off with a bit of fresh vineger and maybe a couple garlicsand maybe a bit of hot pepper.Thanks Ernie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2004
12:44 AM

Post #1197553

Have NO clue!I've only seen pink pickled eggs, from being pickled in pickled beet juice, but I don't see why it wouldn't work. My question would be whether the strength of the pickling vinegar is the same?
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

December 17, 2004
3:49 AM

Post #1197795

Thanks for the Olive oil info guy's... I tried adding some fresh basil/tomatoes/garlic to small 'pint' jars and they're in the fridge but I'm going to toss them, the 4 of them are looking funky...I dont even want to taste or smell them and its been around 3 month's, Oh g*d...I think I'm taking after my mother, she never throws anyhing out!!! And its for that reason we dont let her 'ever' cook for us any more! We have a favorite 'Maidrite' joint that we frequent when ever we go visit her in Marshalltown so we have a good excuse 'not' to eat anyhing she wants to fix us. Growing up though she was a good cook and food did not have a chance to sit around in the fridge. Jill
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2004
7:54 AM

Post #1197905

AS to the pickled eggs...I have some sitting in pickled beet juice right now...but I have seen lots of pickled beets in clear juice...you can buy them in some stores...and they are used in lots of bars and resturants. Jo

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 17, 2004
11:10 AM

Post #1197980

You mean pickled eggs? in clear vinegar? The beets color the vinegar pink.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2004
1:19 PM

Post #1198147

Yes, Woodspirit...the color comes from the beets...here is a recipe that I found. Jo



Pickled Eggs

1 dozen eggs, hard cooked and peeled
2 cups vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons mixed pickling spices
1 teaspoon salt
2 whole bay leaves for garnish in the jar
pinch of peppercorns, for garnish in the jar
2 to 3 whole red chili peppers for garnish in the jar.

Put eggs and whole spices, chilies and bay leaves in a scalded quart jar with a tight fitting lid. Bring vinegar, salt, sugar and spices to a simmer in a nonreactive saucepan and pour over the eggs. Seal and refrigerate. They will be ready to eat in 3 days and will keep for two months in the refrigerator.
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

December 20, 2004
10:46 PM

Post #1202358

I have lost DH's rolling pin; please tell me what can be used instead.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 20, 2004
10:49 PM

Post #1202362

Try an empty wine bottle, or similar sized bottle. Flour it well.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 20, 2004
11:33 PM

Post #1202426

If you're rolling smaller things and not a big pie, even plastic 'glasses' will work. Wash the countertop well and when it is still damp, dust it with flour and then your dough won't stick.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

December 21, 2004
1:16 AM

Post #1202556

The wine bottle doesn't have to be empty. They make a galss rolling pin that you fill with cold water...makes rolling out pie crust easier. Jo
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 21, 2004
4:31 AM

Post #1202806

Or you could go and buy a bottle of wine and if it's too heavy, drink some of it. :) One more thought...I have dowels in my towel holders that would work for a longer rolling pin, in a pinch! :) Kathy

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 21, 2004
12:26 PM

Post #1203089

Back to baking powder and baking soda; when I bring them home I write the purchase date and the expiration date (if there is one) on the TOP of the container with a Sharpie so I can see it before I use the contents. In fact, I mark the baking powder date a month earlier than the actual date, so that I remember to pick up a fresh one rather than get caught in the middle of a baking and finding out the BP has lost it's zip. Took me 50 years to figure this out. Duh.
ggd
North Saanich
Canada

December 23, 2004
12:15 AM

Post #1204972

Anyone give me an idea how long it will take to defrost a 26 pound turkey???? I would like to get it ready on Friday night and cook it overnight?? I shoudl maybe take it out of the freezer now??

Thanks.

Glenda

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
12:17 AM

Post #1204976

There should be defrosting recommendations on the bird wrapper.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2004
1:49 AM

Post #1205155

I have defrosted them overnight in brine. The America's Test Kitchen Show on PBS recommends brining them and then roasting them upside down to keep the breasts moist. It works.
I think if you cook it overnight, it will dry out.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
2:03 AM

Post #1205174

Quoting: Defrosting times:
This is where people can make the biggest errors, either by not allowing enough time for proper defrosting, and or defrosting in an unsafe manner. Although it takes a long time, defrosting in the refrigerator for the whole defrosting time is the safest, but make sure to give yourself ample time, approximately 24 hrs per 5pounds of turkey. The second way is to keep the turkey under a continuous flow of cold running water until defrosted. In my opinion the second option should be used only in an emergency situation, or to finish the last stage of the defrosting, there is more room for food born illnesses to develop.

http://www.thechoppingblock.net/tv_recipes/turkey_notes.html

That means 5+ days to defrost in the refrigerator.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
2:09 AM

Post #1205188

After reading the 'cooking on Fri.', and thinking, today is Wed., there is no way you can get that bird defrosted in the frig. For Thanksgiving, I was kinda late and did the cold water defrosting in the bathtub. I had not read the 'running' cold water, but changing it every 1-2 hours, so that's what I did, except not so often overnight. It was just under 20 lbs. and was defrosted, and very cold, in 2 days.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 23, 2004
2:31 AM

Post #1205209

I just tried the eggs and they taste like deviled eggs without the work. Next try maybe next week I will use the Jo recipe cause I suspision even though I increased the liquid with some new vinegar it was not strong enough. Next week will be busy smoking salmon and pickeling some salted Bristol Bay sockeye and maybe smoking some sausage or pepironi or both. Ernie
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2004
4:01 AM

Post #1205308

Glenda, you should put the turkey in the fridge now and on Friday start doing the water method. I keep mine in the package and cover it with COLD water in the sink. Change your water often, it is recommended every 1/2 hr, but I'd do it every hour or so until thawed out. You can probably start cooking it, except you may giblets and the neck inside that you want to get out and that wouldn't be fun!

Do you have any cooking bags? (Seems like someone told me they will only hold up to a 24 lb bird though). I tell people they should plan on 20 minutes for each pound of turkey at 325 degrees. So for a 26 lber, it should take you 8 hrs and 40 minutes. The Reynolds Co. does not recommend cooking overnight anymore (although I've made turkeys in the past that have cooked all night at 200 and they've been wonderful). Now, I just prefer to cook at 325 like I said, as they don't dry out that way. Remember to baste that baby :) Your time may be cut back a little bit if you don't plan to stuff it.

Happy Cooking, Kathy
pebble
Bodrum
Turkey
(Zone 10a)

December 23, 2004
6:52 AM

Post #1205397

what is brining a turkey? sandra mentioned this also, I thought it was like pickling...

also, anyone have any good stuffing recipes? I remember my mother would just throw things together,. stale bread, onions celery chicken broth, poultry seasoning...am I leaving anything out?
I know that celery is an integral part of this, but we dont have celery here, just the root, I'll use some of that to get a hint of the celery flavor.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
10:47 AM

Post #1205468

pebble - brining a turkey is when you cover the turkey in a liquid. usually people use water and kosher salt but i like to throw in sliced up oranges and lemons and brown sugar. i'll tell you one thing, once i tried the brining method and thats the only way i would ever cook a turkey again. the bird comes out completly moist and the flavor is just great.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
1:46 PM

Post #1205628

pebble, I put whatever is on hand in stuffing, like mushrooms and/or water chestnuts, but add a stick of melted butter too. I live several kinds of stale breads in mine and lots of onions. Celery seed will work in place of celery, and sage will add to the flavor.
ggd
North Saanich
Canada

December 23, 2004
2:19 PM

Post #1205687

Our turkey or chicken stuffing is from our Scottish heritage. Made exactly like bread dressing, but instead of bread, you use oatmeal. My family loves this, and bread dressing never gets made anymore. I was brough up with bread dressing,a nd I must say, it is still my favourite, but the oatmeal dressing is the preferred family stuffing. I guess the only thign I do different with it is LOTS and LOTS of butter!!!

Glenda
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2004
2:34 PM

Post #1205711

I brined my turkey for Thanksgiving, did it with the salt, lemons, oranges, garlic, etc. Personally, I thought it was a waste of time and money for all that fruit. It did not make any difference with my turkey. I'll stick with the way I've always done it. Pebble, I just sent my stuffing "recipe" to another DGer and I will find it, copy, and send to you via email.

Happy Day, Kathy
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2004
3:45 PM

Post #1205808

Pebble, you soak if for several hours (overnight) and then take it out of the water, fruit and cook it normally.
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

December 23, 2004
6:00 PM

Post #1205975

My bread is almost ready to throw in the Oven (Foccacia), the onion/garlic that I carmelized in my iron skillet tastes divine (and smells heavenly too) , do I add the onion/garlic on top with unsalted butter OR do I add the onion/garlic on top with EV olive oil?
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2004
6:39 PM

Post #1206024

Mom2d, a restaurant in Washington DC, called Vidalias, serves a focaccia like this as its house bread. They have butter on the focaccia top and those delicious carmelized vidalia onions all over it. Mmmm. That was the best part of that night's dinner!
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2004
6:50 PM

Post #1206041

Question: I'm making my first biscotti today and just took it out of the oven to cool after the first baking. It's not sliced yet. Are my little cylinder rolls of biscotti supposed to be cracked-looking? They held together fine, but are they supposed to have a cracked appearance? Darius, I know you make biscotti, anyone have any input? Thanks!
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2004
7:01 PM

Post #1206055

Maybe too much flour on the outside of the roll?? I sliced them and, thankfully, they did hold together, but they don't quite look as pretty as they're supposed to. A little "scalloped" looking on one side :) lol. They're in the oven now for the second baking.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2004
8:57 PM

Post #1206125

hugahosta, I don't let biscotti get too done (barely starting to brown) before I bring it out and cool, then slice and bake until lightly browned.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2004
11:19 PM

Post #1206271

The brining method I saw on America's Test Kitchen was just salt water. If you have to thaw your turkey overnight in cold water, the salt will also help preserve it from spoiling. I would be as nervous to let it thaw for 5 days in the fridge as to thaw it overnight in cold water. Never had a problem. The salt water is what makes it stay moist; the salt causes the turkey to absorb some of the water.
SalmonMe
Springboro, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2004
12:27 AM

Post #1206362

Darius, problem is that it's chocolate biscotti :) LOL. Can't tell if it's barely done or if I'm burning the tar out of it :) LOL! I think it worked well enough, though. DH just ran them down the street to the neighbors and they looked pretty decent for a first attempt, IMHO :) My official "taste testers" okayed them anyway. Maybe I did overbake them, they were crack-ier than my gut says they should've been. Oh well, next time. Darius, do you have a thread for your favorite biscotti recipes?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
12:30 AM

Post #1206366

Sorry, since I sell it, I do not give out the recipe. I usually cook the first loaves (before slicing) about 20 minutes or so.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
2:07 AM

Post #1206529

pebble - just make sure you pat dry the turkey before you start cooking it.
pebble
Bodrum
Turkey
(Zone 10a)

December 24, 2004
5:23 AM

Post #1206737

ok, will do that. If I get my turkey this afternoon, and need to put it in the oven tomorrw, I was thinking of putting it in brine overnight till tommorrow???? is that ok? till I put it in the oven - right?
patischell
Fort Pierce, FL
(Zone 10a)

December 24, 2004
12:02 PM

Post #1206891

HELP! On an impulse I bought a package of Hillshire Farms LIL POLSKAS with the idea of turning them over to my daughter to make for snackies before dinner tomorrow. Now, I don't cook (nor even have a proper kitchen), but I do have a small, cute crockpot. Somewhere I saw someone mention they had fixed cocktail sausages in BBQ sauce in a crockpot. It would be so nice to contribute something already prepared to the occasion!

Since I no longer have to prepare the whole dinner for 33 people (whew), I still would like to keep my finger in the pie, so to speak. Any suggestions?
Pati
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2004
1:02 PM

Post #1206927

Seems like somewhere along the way, I've had cocktail sausages cooked in a crock with ketchup (or BBQ sauce) and grape jelly. It was really, really good and very easy, but i don't have the recipe. Anyone out there know what I'm talking about ? :) Kathy
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

December 24, 2004
1:48 PM

Post #1207003

1 cup Ketchup
1 cup Grape Jelly
(if it's too sweet, add a little lemon juice)

OR

as above...just pick a jar of your favorite BBQ sauce.

I also use this with the Armours frozen meatballs(not the ones with cheese)...Yummy. Jo
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 24, 2004
2:42 PM

Post #1207050

I just found a ham shoved in the back of the freezer dated year 2002. Do I pitch it or would it still be good? If it is still good, it would save me a job of going out in the -2 degrees, (if my car starts).

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
2:45 PM

Post #1207056

Does your freezer automatically defrost, or is it a manual defrost? Makes a difference in freezer burn.

At any rate, I would defrost it and check for freezer burn; if it looks okay, I'd use it.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2004
3:21 PM

Post #1207108

I need a recipe for fudge using powdered cocoa and marshmellow cream...
The one on the marshmellow cream uses chocolate squares and I have none...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
3:28 PM

Post #1207113

You should be able to extrapolate from these:

EASY FUDGE

1/2 c. butter
1/3 c. water
1 (16 oz.) pkg. powdered sugar
1/2 c. nonfat dry milk powder
1/2 c. unsweetened cocoa powder
Dash salt
1/2 c. chopped nuts

In a small saucepan heat together butter and water just to boiling, stirring to melt butter. Sift together powdered sugar, dry milk powder, cocoa powder and salt in large mixing bowl. (If powdered sugar seems lumpy, sift again.) Add melted butter mixture. Stir until well blended. Stir in chopped nuts. Turn into buttered 8x8x2-inch pan. Chill several hours. Cut into squares. Makes about 1 1/2 pounds.

Nut And Cocoa Fudge Recipe

2 1/2 cups sugar
6 tablespoons powdered cocoa
3/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons chopped nuts

Boil sugar, butter and milk for a few minutes. Pour over cocoa and mix thoroughly. Put back on fire and boil to 248 degrees F. Add vanilla, pour into a bowl and beat until creamy. Turn into a buttered or oiled shallow tin, sprinkle with the nuts, and mark in squares. Cut when a little cooler.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2004
3:45 PM

Post #1207125

DJM, I'd use the ham. You can doctor it with any number of glazes and it will still be good. :) Waste not, want not!
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
3:51 PM

Post #1207132

kathy - try the grape jelly with a can of chile sauce. it comes out sweet and sour. have used it many times when i make sweet and sour meatballs

This message was edited Dec 24, 2004 1:53 PM
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2004
3:58 PM

Post #1207141

Woods, if you don't have baking squares you can substitute like this:

3 tablespoons cocoa and 1 tablespoon of fat (butter, shortening) per square.
I have made fudge and brownies using this substitute and it works out well. ;)

This message was edited Dec 24, 2004 12:03 PM
ceedub
Whitby, ON
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
4:00 PM

Post #1207145

Herbie, that's the way I've always made my meatball sauce too - chile sauce and grape jelly - no one believes what its made from and its so incredibly good!

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2004
5:01 PM

Post #1207224

I need a recipe that also incorporates the marshmallow cream, though.
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2004
5:13 PM

Post #1207231

Here's a fudge recipe from the Kraft site that might work:

http://www.kraftfoods.com/main.aspx?s=recipe&m=recipe/knet_recipe_display&Rpage=2&u1=keyword&u2=marshmallow creme&u3=**36*37&wf=9&recipe_id=51833
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 26, 2004
11:07 PM

Post #1209385

Darius and misty, I did defrost the ham and it smelled just fine. So I just covered it with mustard, brown sugar and cloves. Turned out great. The freezer is a manual cleaning one and there was no freezer burn, so good to know it was still good after 2 years! Thanks for your help! Doris

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 26, 2004
11:25 PM

Post #1209402

Usually (other than freezer burn) what happens to things in long storage (freezer or home-canned goods) is only that some of the vitamins start to get lost. Doesn't affect taste,
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 27, 2004
3:39 AM

Post #1209623

And it doesn't always look the same, color wise, but it tastes fine :) Waste not, want not. :)
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2004
4:51 PM

Post #1211052

Solution Needed:

I have a package of two frozen pie crusts. I want to make one two-crust (pie filling in one the other the top crust). I don't want to wait until it's defrosted to pop it in the oven.

How do I get the "top crust" out of the tin pan so it can just be placed on the top of the other crust and put in the oven. I know you are suppose to seal the two crust together, but I opt not to do that, considering my time frame.

If the "top crust" is thawed hurriedly it melts the crust too much and it can't be handled, I already tried that.

Suggestions appreciated.

Judy

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 28, 2004
6:57 PM

Post #1211161

Fix the pie in one crust. Then take the other frozen crust, tin and all, and place it upside down over the pie. It will quickly defrost and fall on the pie. May not be real pretty, but you might have a shot os manipulating it somewhat.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2004
10:48 PM

Post #1211381

Ok, that recipe will work. But I still have a question. It calls for 12 squares of chocolate. I have found that 1 square of chocolate can be substituted with 3 tablespoons of cocoa and 1 tablespoon of oil . That means I'd have to use 36 tablespoons of cocoa and 12 tablespoons of oil. That doesn't sound right. Can someone tell me what's wrong.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 29, 2004
12:10 AM

Post #1211453

Woods, DON'T USE OIL. Use butter, margarine, or shortening (butter preferably). Your recipe won't come out right.

Also remember that there are 16 tablespoons to a cup, so for 36 tablespoons, you need 2 1/4 cups of cocoa and 3/4 cup of shortening or butter) Yes, it seems like a lot, but it will work out fine, make sure you mix/melt the shortening/cocoa when it tells you to melt your squares.

This message was edited Dec 28, 2004 8:12 PM

This message was edited Dec 28, 2004 8:15 PM

This message was edited Dec 28, 2004 8:17 PM
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

December 29, 2004
1:19 AM

Post #1211520

Judy...

I have found that my 10 inch cast iron skillet works really well on my DH...no, wait...April
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

December 29, 2004
2:01 AM

Post #1211548

Anyone know where to get a "Kentucky" ham? Except in Kentucky, of course! April

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


December 29, 2004
2:53 AM

Post #1211593

April, are you referring to a "country" ham? If so, Clifty Farms (TN) sells by mailorder: http://www.apptrav.com/meats.html as does Smithfield (VA): http://www.smithfieldhams.com/countryham/

And many others - a Google search for "country ham" will turn up many other sources.
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

December 29, 2004
2:59 AM

Post #1211600

Thanks, Terry...yes, that's what I meant...this ham has many names, LOL! April
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 29, 2004
3:07 AM

Post #1211605

April, If you have a Kroger in your area, they may be able to get you one as well. Our Kroger sells them. Harper Hams always win each year at the KY State Fair, and they may have mail order as well.

A country ham is one that hangs and is well salted and smoked, etc. You just slice off what you need. Is that what your looking for?

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 29, 2004
11:47 AM

Post #1211793

tough and salty, not for me. Give me a Virginia sugar-cured ham anyday.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2004
2:32 PM

Post #1211893

Kathy my uncle showed me how he made hams 45 years ago when I went to visit for 6 months in Mississippi with all my parents relatives. I don't remember much except he did lots of ham and bacon at one time. He put them in a big box and covered them in rock salt I don't remember how long but seems like days then he hauled them out and washed them off and boiled a while then smoked them for a bit again don't know how long seems like they just hung till he used them but don't remember for sure. I do know it was hard to leave alone once you started eating it lol. Both of his sons became lawers so pretty sure his method went with him. I tried bacon once years ago from memory and that was one experiment better forgotten lol

Started some ww and copra seeds yesterday just got the ich read something new so it only fitting I give it a try while I wait for my dixondale plants to arrive in Feb. Ernie


This message was edited Dec 29, 2004 7:33 AM
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 29, 2004
3:01 PM

Post #1211932

I'm not terribly fond of a country ham either, but I do love country ham and biscuit sandwiches :) Yes, tough and salty. It seems to me Ernie, that it takes like 3 weeks to sugar cure a ham, and months to salt cure. I've never done it, but it seems like its been that long at the butchers. I'll have to ask my daughter as she works for the local butcher now.

Ernie, I'm not sure if Ralph ordered his plants from Dixondale yet, but we surely will. :)

Kathy
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2004
3:13 PM

Post #1211946

Kathy my FIL had a slaughter house and he branched in to curing and smoking but that was a quick method that brinned the ham in a saline solution and we pumped the brine into the ham close to the bone with a big hypo nothing worse than getting close to the bone and finding the meat not cured properly. I think his method was like two days from start to finish amybe three I will ask him. Ernie
patischell
Fort Pierce, FL
(Zone 10a)

December 29, 2004
6:13 PM

Post #1212124

My Grandmother always soaked the country ham in buttermilk before frying. Don't know how much or how long. For me the best part of country ham for breakfast was the red eye gravey and cats head bisquits! She always raised her gravy with coffee.
Pati
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

December 29, 2004
10:55 PM

Post #1212406

Thanks for all the ham advice...I will have to try Virgina sugar cured, too.

Cat head Biscuits and red eye gravy...yum. Now I know what to do with the left over ham! April
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 29, 2004
11:26 PM

Post #1212431

Please, What are cats head biscuits? Is there a recipe for them????? =^..^=
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

December 30, 2004
1:33 AM

Post #1212599

djm,

I got my recipe off of allrecipes.com don't have a grandma to get one from! sorry, I don't have it here in front of me...! april
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2004
2:11 AM

Post #1212629

Well, here is a bit of a story and a recipe and how to make good biscuits, if anyone is interested. Yes, it is for cathead biscuits :) I've never tried it, just looked it up for y'all. Happy Day, Kathy

http://www.mtnlaurel.com/recipes/old_fashioned_cat_head_biscuits.htm

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2004
11:20 AM

Post #1212984

hmmm, the amount of lard (we'd now use shortening) seems small.
patischell
Fort Pierce, FL
(Zone 10a)

December 30, 2004
12:53 PM

Post #1213061

I need the recipe for a Broccoli casserole made with Velveeta cheese and a Ritz cracker topping.
Pati
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2004
1:28 PM

Post #1213116

pati - this is the closest i can come up with

preheat oven to 425 degrees
position rack in the upper third of the oven.
1/2 cup ritz crackers crushed and toasted
1/2 cup ritz crackers crushed
2 pounds broccoli florets and stalks cut into pieces, boiled
valveeta cheese shredded

butter a two quart baking dish
sprinkle the dish with the 1/2 cup crushed toasted ritz crackers
drain the broccoli and add it to the dish. gently fold in the shredded valveeta cheese
spreead evently in the baking dish and cover the top with 2 tbls butter, softened and cut into small pieces.
top with the remaining 1/2 cup of the crushed ritz crackers

bake until bubbly and lightly browned on top, about 20 minutes

MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2004
1:34 PM

Post #1213123

Woods, People in our neck of the woods of KY call shortening, lard. :)
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2004
3:36 PM

Post #1213262

Thanks Misty for the recipe. Going to make those tonight. Sounds great!

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 31, 2004
1:16 AM

Post #1213939

yeah, they call it lard around here too. Ever made biscuits with bacon drippings? Really tasty. Leave out any salt. And believe me, it's no worse for you than shortening or margarine.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 31, 2004
1:48 PM

Post #1214396

Yay, let's hear it for lard!!! I always use if for pie crust, and nothing works as well to give you a flaky light crust! I understand it has less cholesterol than butter, which is what my Cuisinart cookbook calls for in pastry crust. And I save my bacon drippings for all kinds of "seasoning" and if my arteries clog up and fail me, I tell ya' I'll die a lot happier than those who spend their last years on earth eating camel fodder!

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 31, 2004
2:27 PM

Post #1214436

Use bacon drippings for making popcorn - instead of oil - YUMMY!
jcangemi
Clovis, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 1, 2005
12:55 AM

Post #1215240

Noticed several posts re baking powder/baking soda. A dear-departed friend gave me the recipe for making your own baking powder if you need it in a pinch: 3 parts cream of tartar and 1 part baking soda. I've used it a few times when I noticed my baking powder was outdated, works fine.
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 1, 2005
1:58 PM

Post #1215837

Here is a REALLY NEAT WEBSITE tha I just found, and wish to share !!!

http://www.pipeline.com/~rosskat/wizzaf.html
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2005
11:42 PM

Post #1216544

I was wondering if unlucky Lucky is still lucky.

Some pickeling recipets call for distilled vinegar some wine some apple what is the difference. Thanks Ernie

This message was edited Jan 1, 2005 4:43 PM
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2005
12:15 AM

Post #1216591

taste :) Be sure to check the labels on any vinegar if you are canning. They must be at least 5%. some distilled are 4% and these are not recommended. :) Kathy

This message was edited Jan 2, 2005 10:37 AM

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 2, 2005
11:05 AM

Post #1217147

Level of acidity, too.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 3, 2005
2:42 AM

Post #1218359

Kathy the salmon looks great it has red sweet peppers and small onions and a bit of jaleapino lol sp never mind hot pepper. It will be about three weeks till its ready, hope I remembered how to do it right lol. It takes a long time to do these little things I don"t think I could do this on a daily basis I think I will just keep my day job.

Jo I did 3 jars of eggs with your recipet so we will try those in a few days to.

Kathy the walla walla seeds are looking like little green hairs in a few places I would guess an about three more days most will have sprouted that are going to. Ernie



darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2005
2:44 PM

Post #1220753

Herbie43, did you ever try leaving your butter out on the counter?
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2005
7:36 PM

Post #1221210

Yeah "eweed"...Lucky is doing just great! All of my fears were groundless! It's been a year, now. He is healthy, sassy, and full of spunk. Just had him to the Vet for his check-up. Thanks for asking. :-))
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2005
8:42 PM

Post #1221279

Hey guys, You know i love ya, :) but ...I've been asked (by the powers that be) to moderate this thread to keep the "chatter" out of it, as it getting so long and hard to download. Answers to specific questions that are helpful to all are tremendously welcome. If you have a personal posting, please do it in the form of DG email to the person you are talking to unless you feel it is something noteworthy to all who read here. Please, please, please...or we're gonna lose our sticky...:( Thanks to all for your incredible understanding. Kathy

P.S. I'm just as guilty and have to watch myself too :)

This message was edited Jan 4, 2005 4:43 PM
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 5, 2005
12:30 AM

Post #1221615

I have a dumb question:
When a recipe calls for an ingredient in ounces, does one assume that is a weight measurement or a volume measurement? Sometimes the weight/vol in ounces is about the same, but sometimes not close at all. I've always wondered. ???

Pen
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

January 5, 2005
2:02 AM

Post #1221760

Pennzer, Good question and I've never really thought about it because I always use measuring cups and not weights. Of course, measuring cups are by volume and I would assume that most recipes are based on volume. If it is in a typical everyday (so to speak) cookbook, I would assume that the use of a measuring cup is what they mean. If you had a professional baker's cookbook (which I don't have) I know that a lot of their ingredients are based on weight as they have to use large quantities. I'm sorry to be so vague, but I hoped this has helped answer your question. Happy Day, Kathy

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 5, 2005
2:08 AM

Post #1221770

I have always heard that weight measurements are best for dry ingredients... BUT when I bought stainless steel dry measuring cups the note with them said not to use them for liquid measurements.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

January 5, 2005
2:11 AM

Post #1221776

hmmm, interesting As a "professional" baker who does not use professional recipes, ha, ha...i've always heard that to weigh your dry ingredients gets the best results in your recipes.
mariajose
Lafayette, IN
(Zone 5a)

January 5, 2005
3:27 AM

Post #1221921

An excellent, easy marinade for salmon, discovered this on a picnic with my sweetie - we had limited resources at hand and absolutely love the result.

Grate or finely chop garlic into soy sauce (we always use the light soy sauce). Marinade the salmon for as long as you wish. Grill. Tasty!
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 5, 2005
3:29 AM

Post #1221925

Kathy, glad to hear I'm not the only one who doesn't know this. Maybe a good rule of thumb would be that oz. in liquids means vol, and oz. in non-liquids is wt. But I can't believe that many domestic cooks keep kitchen scales handy.

Darius, your dry cups are exact measurements to the top--so you can level off with a blade and not have to diddle around lining the top up with a line on a liquid measuring cup (like the Pyrex ones). If you used them for liquids, your liquids would have to be filled to the very top and would be spillable. I keep a set of both, for that reason.

I have a recipe that calls for 6 oz. choc chips. Out of curiosity, I put a 6-oz. pkg of chips in a measuring cup, and there was a lot more than 6 oz. by vol, so in this case I assume the recipe meant 6 oz. by wt., especially since they usually come in 6 oz., pkg. and I know that ounces on packaging means weight. I'll need to remember that since I usually keep choc chips and such in a canister and not in the original pkg.

On the other hand, dairy products, such as sour cream, measure exactly by vol. what the pkg. shows--an 8 oz. container is 8 oz. by vol.--dunno about the weight, maybe they are the same in this instance. But for some ingredients I just have to guess what they mean.

Pen
mariajose
Lafayette, IN
(Zone 5a)

January 5, 2005
3:31 AM

Post #1221926

Regarding biscotti - I found the combination of orange with espresso chocolate chips makes outstanding biscotti. We use orange zest and a tad of orange extract in the dough. Dark chocolate chips would be a good combination with the orange if you prefer it to the espresso choc chips.
TuttiFrutti
Spokane Valley, WA
(Zone 5b)

January 5, 2005
5:09 AM

Post #1222019

I wonder if weighing the flour helps to account for the affect of humidity? Hmm...

Okay, now *I* have some questions to toss out:

1. I've read that freezing hard-boiled eggs makes them rubbery. Since we like hard-boiled eggs grated up on our dinner salads, I'm wondering if we'd really notice the difference in texture. Has anyone ever tried?

2. If one freezes whole eggs, do they still work as well as fresh for baking and omelets and such?

3. How well does milk freeze and what are the limitations on its culinary use?

You see, there's this dairy sale going on at my favorite grocery store this week... ;-)

Donna
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 5, 2005
5:53 AM

Post #1222041

Donna,
I think freezing eggs is fine. My mom does it all the time.
Milk is OK to freeze but will separate some and loses some quality in flavor. I would think it would be just fine as an ingredient in recipes but maybe not for drinking.

JMO, Pen
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

January 5, 2005
11:54 AM

Post #1222153

pennzer - when we started our small food business we had to send a sample of our product plus we had to tell them exactly how it was made. they insisted that all ingredients be in weight measurement.

can you freeze provolone cheese?
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

January 5, 2005
12:02 PM

Post #1222156

I freeze milk when I have to go away for a period of time...or if it is on sale 2 for one!...but don't freeze it in the Gal container...takes too long to thaw...It is fine for drinking too...takes a while to thaw so you can mix it back together...Jo

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 5, 2005
1:17 PM

Post #1222224

Here's the problem with this huge thread. If you have a particular cooking question, you have to read through the whole thing to see if the answer is there. I think this should be broken down to threads about a particular issue, like the one on butter or the one on measuring. I for one, would never want to read this whole long thread just to see if my question has been addressed here (and it might not even be here). What do y'all think?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 5, 2005
1:19 PM

Post #1222229

Good point, even though my response is "chit-chat"
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

January 6, 2005
2:38 AM

Post #1223453

I dunno...I think it's fun reading everything that everyone is writing. April
mariajose
Lafayette, IN
(Zone 5a)

January 6, 2005
9:18 PM

Post #1224620

When I first came upon this thread the other evening it was already quite long and jumbled, which was fun initially, but it became uninteresting because of the lack of organization. Cooks (and gardeners) tend to like organization. I like the multiple (or multitudes of) threads idea. (Look at what happened when some guy named Dave posted a thread inviting people to chat about gardening.) I've been secretly hoping for a full-blown cooking forum even though this is a gardening forum. Cooking is a natural partner to gardening and it is great to have a cooking discussion with knowledgeable folks.

For now, when I am looking for specific information in a thread (or even simply in forums in general), I do a keyword search and usually come up with what I want.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

January 8, 2005
1:13 PM

Post #1227630

Is this what you are wanting/ Please post comments here.


http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/477435/
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

January 8, 2005
1:24 PM

Post #1227642

Wow! That was a lot of work for you to do that. :) If one of us had the ability to check and delete chatter after a few days and just keep the major points, wouldn't that be awesome? Kathy

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2005
1:53 PM

Post #1227668

Hey, great synopsis on that link, TLC!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2005
3:30 PM

Post #1227831

The pickled eggs that I did this last time are not as good as the ones I put in the used juice. I followed jo's Recipe but after boiling the brine I strained the spices out. The eggs taste like vinegared eggs lol can I save them by adding spice to the jars or do I need to feed them to the quail and try again. Thanks Ernie

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2005
3:57 PM

Post #1227865

great work, Arlene. That's what needs to be done, something on that order. Deleting chatter, compiling tips and hints and a different thread for each question. Maria has a point about different threads for questions/answers as they get lost, even with the chatter deleted.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

January 9, 2005
11:25 PM

Post #1230147

Ok, I will try to do it and if I say something wrong or don't give someone credit for what they contributed please email me to help keep it correct.

I am presently in Ca and away from the computer a lot. When things settle down, I will get back to working on it.

If I find I cannot keep up with it I may need to ask for help, but for right now I think I will be able to do it.

I will NOT be offended if someone draws to my attention omissions or errors.

Thanks,
a
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 10, 2005
2:00 AM

Post #1230388

Great job, Arlene. I copied the whole list! Doris
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2005
3:55 PM

Post #1231164

I copied and pasted to an email and sent it to myself and saved in and also printed a copy and carried to the kitchen. The only thing I saw that was missing Arlene was "Jim here's a big hug." Other thatn that it was perfect.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

January 11, 2005
7:24 PM

Post #1233148


((((((((JIM)))))))))

Ok; I am "caught up" To Jan 10th
Hyperlinks don't work but will fix later. In the meantime you will have to copy them and paste into the Address line.

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/477435/

(If you think this is helpful, I will continue to keep it up when time allows; at some point I will need to start a part 2)
dodecatheon
Wauconda, IL

January 16, 2005
10:44 PM

Post #1241811

I have a question on freezing potatoes.

I made a big pot of vegetable soup yesterday, and potatoes were part of the vegetables.

I want to freeze some of this soup..so how do I go about it? In the past, when I have frozen cooked potatoes...they got this really weird grainy, watery thing going on. Any advice on how to prevent this? April

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2005
11:23 PM

Post #1241847

Usually not a problem in soup.
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 17, 2005
12:03 AM

Post #1241896

What is a brioche? I made one the other day thinking it was like a coffeecake. It didn't cross my mind when it called for only 1tsp sugar, It turned out fine, I braided it like it said, but what I have is a bread like thing, not sweet at all. It has an egg and milk wash, but did I fail somehow? or is this type of thing NOT considered a coffee cake?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2005
12:20 AM

Post #1241921

Quoting: brioche n.

A soft, light-textured bread made from eggs, butter, flour, and yeast and formed into a roll or a bun.
djm906
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 17, 2005
1:19 AM

Post #1242017

Okay, then I didn't wreck the recipe. It is not what I expected at all, it doesn't taste too bad, but it did call for a cup of raisins. Actually the recipe made 2 of them (brioche). One half of the dough was to have a half cup of raisins and the other half batch was to have a half cup cut up gruyere cheese or swiss. I thought that sounded dumb, so Iput in a whole cup of raisins instead. It doesn't have much flavor, but I discovered its great in the toaster! ( Could've also used another cup or more of raisins!)
Darius, I am so glad you told me what it is, so its more a fancy type bread then. Well one has to experiment, the recipe did sound good, but probably won't make it again. It sure did smell good baking though! Thanks so much.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2005
1:23 AM

Post #1242023

You are most welcome!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2005
2:49 PM

Post #1505663

Arlene, want to add the info. from this thread to your "sticky" info?

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/515261/
hypertuffer
Hominy, OK
(Zone 6b)

September 6, 2007
5:49 PM

Post #3944232

Hi, all .I'm needing a recipe for" magic milk ". All I remember is non fat dry powdered milk with butter added and some other things . My Mom used to make it and with the price of milk up I thought i'd try it on the Family. They hate powdered milk. My brother and I used to drink Magic milk like crazy. Isn't it funny how we can get forced back to basics and then it seems to be such pleasent memories.Thank goodness for Grands,to help us stay on track...hay ,I may post this in frugle living too!Thanks for the help.!
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 10, 2007
10:45 PM

Post #4179798

Greetings,

Hello Hypertuffer, fellow Oklahoma neighbor! Glad you
bumped this thread. :-)

In sorting through Fattigman recipes, one calls for twice the
number of eggs.

Could anyone tell me, based on experience, what the difference
would be in using twice the amount of eggs in a recipe?

Many thanks,
KM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 10, 2007
11:44 PM

Post #4179995

Richer and creamier, but depends on the recipe. Too much can cause the item to set up like a quiche.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 10, 2007
11:53 PM

Post #4180022

Hmm. The Fattigman is actually a deep fried cookie. I wonder
if the extra eggs make it crispier?

KM
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
2:09 AM

Post #4180535

Even though I come from Norwegian and Swedish roots, we never made this cookie.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 11, 2007
2:43 AM

Post #4180692

I'm not a cookie baker, so no help from me...
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2007
3:13 AM

Post #4180788

magic milk is totally "new" to me, i had to look it up http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/magicmilkshakes.htm , http://www.sandia.gov/ciim/ASK/documents/fsn-homeactivities.pdf

Eggs in recipe ... i do not have sweet tooth, nor any kids around. i am not into cookie or cake baking. i hope some of this links help u ... http://www.43things.com/things/view/1663713/create-the-perfect-fluffy-spicy-sugar-cookie-recipe , http://www.baking911.com/cookies/problems.htm
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
8:17 PM

Post #4182677

Updated to say I just made Fattigman cookies with a roller
and everything.

What a waste of time and materials. My apologies, for those
who truly love this treat, but even the dogs frowned at this one.

Next time I'll just stick to Rosettes if I'm going to make a deep
fried treat with powdered sugar.

Blegh!
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
8:18 PM

Post #4182681

LOL
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2007
5:05 AM

Post #4194744

Arlean Hi well its true I am a much improved sauce maker this year but should be since I had 80 or so full sized plants to experiment with. One thing I did do was plant forty Romas just for sauce and salsa.Anyway I just heeded some of the advice I got here and had at it. Ernie

Thumbnail by eweed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 15, 2007
12:06 PM

Post #4195081

Wow, eweed,

You must have been very busy with that many plants; did you have any help picking etc. ? I had 40 plants and they wore me out.
atalanta
Sherman, CT

March 13, 2009
11:38 PM

Post #6262975

I live in Western CT, not at altitude, and have a strange problem boiling eggs. They take about 40 minutes at a simmer to get truly hard-boiled. This is true with both supermarket eggs and farm eggs. Does anybody know if hard water might be causing this?

Thanks.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
11:42 PM

Post #6262994

Can't be the hard water, I don't think. I have hard water and although my eggs take longer than where I lived before, it's more altitude than dissolved minerals in the water.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 14, 2009
1:12 AM

Post #6263417

atalanta, water is very hard where I live, and we are nearly 3,000' above sea level, so I don't think either of those factors could be an issue--but what a strange problem! Do you have a candy thermometer? Hang it in a pot of water, turn the burner on and note the temp after the water has been boiling for 5 minutes and report back here...
to the Food Detectives.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2009
3:23 AM

Post #6264023

You need to boil them, not simmer them. Hard boiled: 8 minutes once water starts boiling; soft boiled: 3 minutes once water starts boiling.

I used to live in Western MA (as a matter of fact, just returned two days ago); similar altitude, I don't think that's the problem and I have very hard water where I live now and don't have a problem.

Put some salt in your cold water and then put eggs in COLD water. Finish as above.

:) Kathy
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 14, 2009
4:22 AM

Post #6264226

Actually, you don't need to simmer them either. As soon as water comes to boil, cover and remove from heat. They will be perfectly done (yolks fully cooked) in 15 minutes. You could leave them covered longer and they won't overcook.
deann
Au Gres, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 14, 2009
10:29 AM

Post #6264696

I have hard water where I live too, and I hard boil my eggs the same method as pennzer uses.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 14, 2009
12:39 PM

Post #6264923

My water is so hard you have to use a jack hammer to pour a glass. I boil my eggs the way Misty says and I chill them very fast. When I do it Penzers way the shell sticks and they are hard to peel.Ernswa ze Lap Top Cook

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2009
12:48 PM

Post #6264949

If I put room temp. eggs in a cold pot of water, bring to a boil as Kathy suggests, cover and let stand until cooled, my eggs always have a "not-quite-cooked" spot in the center. I think my water boils at around 208º, maybe less.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6266156

I never use room temp eggs and I immediately put in cold water after they are boiled. I always take my eggs from the fridge and put in the cold water and then boil :)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2009
6:29 PM

Post #6266235

I don't store my eggs at room temp., just bring what I want to boil out of the refrigerator. I found that by doing that (esp. in eggs for baked goods) I get better results.
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

March 15, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #6271298

Penncer, that is how I boil eggs but after done I put them in ice cold water, the peel with no problems once they have cooled. Have very soft water.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
12:11 AM

Post #6272652

Yes, easier to peel even if you just run the eggs under cold tap water. However, peeling fresh eggs is always more difficult than peeling older ones. If you must boil fresh eggs, use the opposite technique: let the boiled eggs cool all the way thru, then immerse them (one at a time as you get them peeled) in water heated on the cook top for a few seconds and peel immediately--like blanching a tomato before you peel it. What you are doing by heating them briefly is getting only the outer shell hot, which expands it and gives more separation between the shell and the egg. The membrane under the shell will still be tight, but it will be easier to peel than if you don't do this.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
12:12 AM

Post #6272656

Well, duh... that's logical.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
12:45 AM

Post #6272820

Darius, what kind of pan do you normally use for boiling eggs? I'm wondering why your eggs are still underdone by using the steeping method. Maybe your pan doesn't hold heat well? I guess that's a long shot--can't imagine you having such a pan around. Are you at high altitude?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
1:04 AM

Post #6272916

Y'know, that could be a factor... someone in my family burned up my good 2 quart pan, and I've been using the bottom of my cheap double boiler. It's on my list to replace, once I get my recent computer bills paid off.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
1:16 AM

Post #6272975

Aha! I bet that's it. Do you have a heavier pan, perhaps in a diff size, to test the method in? Maybe this is another cooking mystery solved by...
The Food Detectives.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
1:47 AM

Post #6273145

Nope. I'd have to go to a sauce pan... too shallow, or a soup pot... waaaay too large. My somewhat larger pots have been ruined one by one by good intentions of friends over the years. At a weekend house party, my housemate's girlfriend (now his wife) FRIED potatoes in my Calphalon soup pot. My mother ruined my Calphalon 3 quart pot by cooking tomatoes, and Calphalon would not stand behind their guarantee for the finish. (Annodized)
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
3:50 AM

Post #6273769

Sounds like we need to give you a shower, Dare. At least you need some get-me-bys. Maybe check out eBay? Those Pyrex saucepans are very cheap and are not bad cookware. I know how you love to cook, and I know you have computer work to pay for, but you need to stop the gap. And from shallow sauce pan to soup pot is a big gap. I know you'll want good stuff when you purchase again, but there are some great bargains on eBay. Condolences on losing your nice Calphalon pieces.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
3:53 AM

Post #6273779

An interesting video...on peeling potatoes...I hope it opens here...

Edited to say it didn't work...so google

Peeling Potatoes by Dawn Wells...Mary Ann from Gilligans Island. Jo






This message was edited Mar 15, 2009 9:06 PM
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
4:09 AM

Post #6273809

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4W0qIPJmoo

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
1:32 PM

Post #6274647

Cool, Jo... but I don't peel potatoes because the skins are very high in nutrition. Of course, I have organic potatoes.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2009
1:55 PM

Post #6274748

I figured that Darius!! LOL Jo
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2009
4:24 PM

Post #6275434

I only use stainless steel cookware. ;)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
4:59 PM

Post #6275645

Kathy, most of mine is now heavy SS, and a few old cast iron skillets. I gave away all my pyrex, too. I liked the original Calphalon, but the stuff in the last 25 years isn't nearly as good. I won't use teflon, except for a small egg skillet I treat (and heat) carefully.
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

March 16, 2009
5:57 PM

Post #6275948

I too use stainless steel all-glad pots and pan , also quite bit of the Le Creusete cookware but for eggs I do have a couple of non-stick all-clad

I peel everything that has peels, even fruit, just don't care to chew on them nor the taste of them.

Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 10, 2009
10:54 PM

Post #6531065

May have already been asked/answered...

When you have a recipe that says to "broil _____ 5 inches from the heat" what does this mean? I know what a broiling pan is...assuming the oven has a "broil" temperature (???) don't know, have never broiled anything...so do I need to set oven to a temp or...? Dumb question but I'm no where near an oven right now to check... TIA

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2009
11:07 PM

Post #6531117

Broiling is achieved by a heat source ABOVE the dish being cooked, whether it's an electric stove with a top heating element at the top of the oven, or a gas oven with a separate broiler compartment under the oven.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 10, 2009
11:22 PM

Post #6531155

merci!
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 11, 2009
8:07 PM

Post #6534994

Recipe calls for "quick cooking oats" another "oatmeal" I've interchangably used both and noticed the outcome was fine...any reason why I might need to use one vs the other?
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 11, 2009
9:55 PM

Post #6535572

Regular oatmeal may make a difference in the texture and may suck up more moisture?
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2009
9:03 PM

Post #6601073

a helpful tip I've run across in my recipe collection gives no reasoning behind this idea, what do you make of it:

Quoting:"Perfect together: molasses an dlegumes, such as dried beans, lentils, chick peas, black-eyed peas. Add 1 tablespoon molasses per cup of legumes. Use for soaking legumes, as well as for cooking them."
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2009
9:04 PM

Post #6601077

Also, in recipe for refried beans is it normal to call for pinto OR kidney beans? Isn't one used exclusively???

The recipe also says to soak beans overnight but to also cook them in the soaking water (no rinsing????!) is that normal?????

This message was edited May 26, 2009 4:11 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2009
9:29 PM

Post #6601197

I always rinse the soaking water from the beans, although I understand it can wash away some nutrients. As to the kidney OR pintos in refried beans... pintos are traditional but I have used both with no difference I could tell. The seasoning in beans, and sauce on a taco/tostado, obliterates the bean taste anyway.

I can see using a little molasses in beans... it makes sense but I'm not sure why. Perhaps to increase the absorption of liquids sooner?
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2009
9:58 PM

Post #6601295

It said it would "perk up the flavor"?

Thanks for the other info!
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2009
11:11 PM

Post #6601583

I wash my beans before adding soaking water...let them stand overnight...and leave the water in them.

I think the molasses would give them a slight "baked bean" taste...which I would not want for my every day beans...Jo
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2009
1:01 AM

Post #6602023

Jo do you use molasas in your rice dishes when you don't use beans. Ernie
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2009
2:53 AM

Post #6602665

You KNOW I don't like RICE...and it just so happens that I don't cared for "lasses much either!! LOL Jo
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 27, 2009
9:24 AM

Post #6603355

My grandmother's secret (with no scientific basis) was to put a wee bit of sugar in everything . . gravies, chili, soups . . it made a very slight difference in the taste but she thought it was important to do.
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2009
11:11 AM

Post #6603472

TWC, I always use a bit of sugar in everything, it brings out the flavor of whatever is being cooked, especially vegetables.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2009
1:34 PM

Post #6603977

I can't eat plain steamed, boiled carrots. Mom always put in some tablespoons of brown suga :)
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2009
2:29 PM

Post #6604224

My Mom also used a wee bit of sugar in her veggies...and gravy...so I do too...I wouldn't think of cooking green beans or cabbage with out that tat of sugar. Jo
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 27, 2009
4:13 PM

Post #6604659

hmmm . . . must be something to it.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2009
5:35 PM

Post #6605043

Sugar in coleslaw I guess...
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #6605153

What are "t-bone steaks"?
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 27, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #6605496

T-Bone steaks are . . . yum!

T-bone steaks - cut from further forward in the short loin and contain a comparatively smaller section of the tenderloin - next to it the portion is larger and called Porterhouse steaks.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2009
11:08 PM

Post #6606402

My mother allways used a bit of sugar in most things but she was a true Southerner. She used sugar and vinagar in her canned green beans and they were coveted.

Hi Arelene I will have a good rib steak anyday of the week.

You all better listen to Maria I have eaten her food and baby shes got it lol.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 27, 2009
11:20 PM

Post #6606438

Hi, Ernie!
I'm going to try a little sugar and vinegar on my fresh green beans this summer; never thought of that and I bet they are good cold, too.

I actually like a rib-eye if I can find ones not too fatty; DH likes a New York steak; too firm for me.
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

May 28, 2009
12:50 AM

Post #6606828

TLC, rib eye is my favorite steak done medium rare, I think it spoils it when cooked all dried out, by that I mean well done.
Green beans are great cold adding thinly sliced onions and a touch of very good olive oil.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2009
1:44 AM

Post #6607093

Melody's Mom...Yoyo1...made green beans at one of the KY RU...they were delicious...she posted the recipe and used vinegar, olive oil...and I think either sugar or splenda...I will try to locate the recipe. Jo
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2009
2:02 PM

Post #6608914

My Mom was a true Yankee who put sugar in the carrots ;)
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 28, 2009
3:44 PM

Post #6609311

I love to put white sugar and butter in the carrots, it makes them nice and sweet. Just put it in when boiling your fresh carrots (or frozen). I put in a couple tablespoons in a pan and a few pats of butter. Yep, I'm a true Yankee too...and darn proud of it.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2009
7:06 PM

Post #6610100

:) glad to have ya Misty!
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2009
8:28 PM

Post #6610372

Okay why do all the biscuit recipes call for cooking them on UNgreased cooking sheets? What is the harm in using non-stick spray? Can't it only help???
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 28, 2009
8:43 PM

Post #6610435

They have enough shortening in them that they won't stick? On the other hand, you add cheese to the mix . . . they might tend to stick. Why go to the extra step of greasing a pan if it's not necessary?
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2009
9:16 PM

Post #6610576

A squirt of non-stick spray is hardly an extra step for me though ;)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2009
9:22 PM

Post #6610614

I use a pan release recipe for almost everything... found it here on DG several years ago. I make up a batch and keep it in a mason jar in the pantry... goes on with a pastry brush but I've been known to dab a paper towel in it and use that to rub a pan.

I don't remember what the recipe was called but I have it in my files if anyone's interested.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

May 28, 2009
11:35 PM

Post #6611161

I don't mind greasing a pan but I don't care much to have to go behind that and dust with flour . . . I get it everywhere but the pan.

I would be interested in your recipe, Darius, if it's not too hard to find.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2009
11:44 PM

Post #6611214

If you bake and cook everyday then this is a must to have in your cupboard! Absolutely *NOTHING* will stick to your pans with this, it's so much cheaper than using cooking spray and works even better than Pam cooking spray, no chemical fumes and will not leave burnt on black residue on the edges of your pans like cooking spray will and will keep forever in your cupboard --- for baking recipes using chocolate you may use 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder in place of white flour or 1/4 cup each cocoa powder and flour --- this may be increased or decreased sucessfully just make certain that *all* three ingredients are the same amounts or the mixture will not work as well ;-)
by KITTENCAL

5 min | 5 min prep
Makes 1 1/2 cups (or depends on how much you make)

1/2 cup corn oil or canola oil or vegetable oil
1/2 cup vegetable shortening, room temperature (Crisco shortening is good)
1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1. Place all ingredients in a mixing bowl.
2. Using an electric mixer beat until mixture has increased in volume slightly and resembles marshmallow cream.
3. Place in a storage container, and store on the counter, or in a cupboard.
4. In hot weather, it may be refrigerated, but remember to take it out of the fridge, as it should be room temperature for easiest spreadability.
5. The mixture tends to separate slightly upon sitting in your cupboard or refrigerator so mix before using, then brush pans using a pastry brush or a clean paper towel.
http://www.recipezaar.com/recipe/print?id=78579

Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2009
12:05 AM

Post #6611331

thx dairus!

twin, I've never greased and floured, suppose a real baker would ;) but I've never yet.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 29, 2009
12:15 AM

Post #6611384

Thanks, Darius...I'm going to make this up then put some in a small jar so that I don't have to let the big jar come to room temperature when I want to use it...this way I can just take the small jar of it out and let it sit on the counter for a while. Jo
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2009
12:29 AM

Post #6611447

You know...I just won't do a biscuit without something on the pan, ha, ha... I even go one step farther and put a piece of aluminum foil (then I recycle it) on the pan and spray or grease it.. ;)

I'm sure it's because of the grease, but some biscuits are made with butter and I keep hearing my home ec teacher saying "butter burns"...

So what the heck and what's it going to hurt anyhow.

Oh my gosh I was raised on grease and flour the pan. I did something the other day. Was making a strawberry cake (oops, out of a cake mix); had already mixed the mix and all ingredients when I had to grease and flour. Well, I looked and I (me, Kathy, unbelievable) did not have even one tablespoon of flour in the house! So, I used the next best thing...confectioner's sugar! It worked like a charm (although it's a little funky if spraying with Pam..you have to spread it around a bit). The cake came out of the pan better than any one I have done with flour or dry cake mix! Might have found a new trick... :)

:) Kathy
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2009
12:26 PM

Post #6613119

Recipe calls for "white cornmeal"...have you ever heard of white cornmeal?!?
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

May 29, 2009
1:02 PM

Post #6613229

Yes, I use it all the time
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2009
1:22 PM

Post #6613309

Yes, I've heard of white cornmeal. I think you can get it at Kroger.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2009
2:00 PM

Post #6613438

thank you!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 30, 2009
5:27 AM

Post #6616728

Darius I don't understand just bake the bread and mail it to me that way I can't fail.
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

May 30, 2009
11:01 AM

Post #6617029

LOL, Ernie
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 30, 2009
2:07 PM

Post #6617530

I haven't used yellow corn meal since WW2...when that was all we could get. Jo
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #6632084

making bread

some recipes call for warm water and give the universal temp as 110-115° and then some recipes don't suggest a temp and just call for the warm water.

is it specific to a recipe the temp of the water or really, does it just have to be warm?
treelover3
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 5a)

June 2, 2009
9:37 PM

Post #6632577

Our local Walmart carries White Cornmeal.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

June 2, 2009
11:08 PM

Post #6632948

85 degrees to 115 degrees is fine for yeast; if it reaches 140 degrees it will die and your bread will not raise.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2009
2:05 AM

Post #6633823

I have never made bread without a thermometer, as I know yeast will die as Arlene said.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2009
1:05 PM

Post #6635368

hehe misty.

thanks twin!
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

June 4, 2009
1:52 AM

Post #6638926

If you make bread a lot you get so you know by touch what is not "too" hot. As a 4-H girl I was taught to use a thermometer; my girlfriend and I entered the State Fair with a bread-making demonstration and we practiced so much, we didn't need a thermometer anymore.

Now days, methinks a thermometer is a good idea; only bake it during the winter and could goof.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 9, 2009
9:45 PM

Post #6665044

You've got pasta. You've got a jar of sauce (commercial, yes, don't hang me please)...

the sauce never tells you how much sauce it will cover without being to much or being way to little arghhhhhh! i always estimate but if I'm off it ruins the dish.

sauce is 15 oz...how much to nicely cover as a restaurant would? how many ozs of sauce?
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

June 10, 2009
12:08 PM

Post #6667684

That would depend on how much sauce you prefer; my DH likes his pasta "swimming" in the sauce; I prefer a zippier sauce that flavors the pasta but doesn't drown it. Sorry, that's the best answer I can come up with.

Make the sauce; cook a box of pasta and ladel the amount you want over; freeze the rest.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 10, 2009
1:49 PM

Post #6667992

I figure a jar of sauce for about 5 people (and a lb of meat); then go up from there.
:) Kathy
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 10, 2009
2:07 PM

Post #6668050

Turned out that 8 oz for that jar would have been perfect but I used 12 oz pasta :)

Least it'll be noted here so I can reference it again.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #6742528

Sheesh, just spent 5 mins scanning this and recipe forum looking for this thread hehe. Then got smart and just looked for you misty :)

How many cups are in a 12 oz pack of choc chips, 2 cups right? Less?
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2009
9:12 PM

Post #6742572

is there such a thing as a mixed bag of pb and choc chips????
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

June 26, 2009
9:51 PM

Post #6742686

Not that I know of.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 26, 2009
11:45 PM

Post #6743049

YEs, 2 cups :)

If you bought a bag of chocolate chips and a bag of peanut butter chips; mixed them together and then split them evenly and back in bags...you'd have two of them ;)

Hugs,
Kathy

This message was edited Jun 26, 2009 7:46 PM
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 27, 2009
1:46 AM

Post #6743665

:) thanks kathy that's what i was thinking.

sometimes i wrote those recipes with no brain I think, years later trying to put them into typed format and I'm going "what???" on ingredients lol.
Kidneyguy
Verona, ON

June 28, 2009
2:37 AM

Post #6747746

Yes we have mixed bags here in Canda. Aren't we glad we habe KAthy to fall back on????
D
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2009
11:39 AM

Post #6748551

Yea, I've been called a mixed bag before LOL...

:) Kathy
Kidneyguy
Verona, ON

June 28, 2009
12:06 PM

Post #6748609

LOL Kathy!!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2009
3:14 PM

Post #6749169

I don't know about the mixed part but the other part just may be smack on LOL
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2009
6:08 PM

Post #6749756

Hi Ernie, How's the onyuns doing? Did you get some this year? They are coming along nicely, although we had terrible weather when it was time to plant them and we lost many before we could get them planted!
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2009
8:01 PM

Post #6750270

Kathy I have ignition onions are great this year so are the shallots and leeks.Garlic is a flop sniff sniff.Oh well I will just tell myself smaller is better lol.I got the shallots from shoe a couple of years ago he got them from the grocery store, I tried that this winter with some red ones and only one made feeble roots. Kinds amazing plant one shallot and get 10 back when grown welll.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 1, 2009
7:39 PM

Post #6764352

If a brownie recipe calls for cocoa powder and you have unsweetened chocolate squares (1 oz each) what would be the substitution measurements? Or vice versa...

MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

July 2, 2009
1:43 AM

Post #6765988

I know if your recipe calls for 1 square of unsweetened chocolate you can replace it with 3 tablespoons cocoa powder and 1 tablespoon shortening or butter.

:) Kathy
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2009
7:49 PM

Post #6798638

Anyone know what is "buckwheat honey" and why a recipe would request it specifically? It's for a ginger cake.
treelover3
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 5a)

July 9, 2009
8:14 PM

Post #6798747

Buckwheat honey is honey made from the nectar collected from a field of buckwheat. Same as clover honey, etc.

When bees collect nectar from a specific plant it will affect the flavor of the honey. Any larger grocery store should carry a few different types of honey and I would bet that buckwheat will be one of them.
Mike
p.s. clover honey is very mild whereas buckwheat honey will be a much stronger honey.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2009
8:29 PM

Post #6798819

Oh! Thank-you! I knew of the clover honey. But I honestly didn't expect a recipe to be so specific when honey wasn't it's main flavor :)

Thanks!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 9, 2009
9:10 PM

Post #6798968

I have never seen buckwheat honey on the east coast. I expect it's more regional in the grain belt...
treelover3
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 5a)

July 10, 2009
3:02 AM

Post #6800252

There is a honey producer at the Minneapolis Farmers' Market every Thursday and they carry buckwheat honey as well as basswood, clover and a few other exotic types. Buckwheat honey is a VERY dark honey and quite strongly flavored as well.
Good luck in your search.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2009
11:27 PM

Post #6832381

Found the mixed bag of pb chips and chocolate chips. Didn't note if those were semi-sweet or milk? I hope milk. But it's a national brand. And surprisingly I didn't see a separate 12 oz bag of just pb chips.
cocoloba
St John's
Antigua and Barbuda
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2009
10:51 PM

Post #6843531

I bought one of those butter bells and the first time I went to use it all the butter fell out into the water...what on earth did I do wrong, I followed the box instructions?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 20, 2009
11:01 PM

Post #6843564

Mine occasionally does that. I finally figured out it seems to depend on how much water is incorporated into the butter by the manufacturer. When I buy local farm butter, it works fine; same for some brands of organic butter. But private-label butter (such as Sam's Club) seems to fall out more readily.

I'm interested to hear what others think or experienced...
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2009
1:50 PM

Post #6854707

Okay, I've never even heard of a butter bell. ??? I'll have to google that one, ha, ha..
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 24, 2009
3:45 AM

Post #6857938

Well, don't throw things at me, but you can keep salted butter out of the fridge for quite a while--no need for a butter bell. I put a half stick in a small Gladware-type dish with the lid on, and keep it in a kitchen cabinet. Even though I live alone, I will use it up before it goes bad. The salted lasts much longer than the unsalted. The only reason to buy unsalted is so you can control the amount of salt in your recipes--so I just use less salt in recipes than I would otherwise. I also think the salt makes it taste better when just using as a spread. --pen

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2009
2:20 PM

Post #6859051

Pen... I keep my butter out on the counter, and only went to a butter bell when my sister's cat decided he could jump on the counter during the night! The regular covered butter dish was an easy target for him to knock over for access to butter...
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 24, 2009
2:26 PM

Post #6859074

This is amazing! Ppl talking about leaving BUTTER on the counter! I'd told DH growing up we just used margarine (I didn't know how terrible it was for me or I'd of not used it) but it was what my folks could afford. And we'd left that out on a dish, I married and DH said that was not good to leave that out and now I'm hearing folks have left butter out for years and not died from it :)
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

July 24, 2009
2:46 PM

Post #6859170

First time I was in LA.CA, I checked out one of the local grocery stores.

The isle with honey was a real surprize - I was used to having a few choices, but here was a selection of at least 20 different flavors - orange, grapefruit, strawberry, avocado, sage, wild heather, etc.

Sinced the fruit and vegetable producers hire beekeepers to polinate the crops, they can produce so many varieties.

Even the local swap meets out in the SO CAvalleys had bee products - pollen, honey of various flavors, honeycomb.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 24, 2009
2:48 PM

Post #6859183

I couldn't resist searching "is it safe to leave butter out?" and wow it's amazing! see, I use margarine just at the table but cook with butter---because it spreads easier. But maybe now I can leave butter out!

http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/383534
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

July 24, 2009
2:48 PM

Post #6859187

I remember the bacon dripping can on the stovetop for years - none of us ever "died" from that either.
treelover3
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 5a)

July 24, 2009
7:02 PM

Post #6860220

Margarine can be left out almost indefinitely.

I have heard that margarine is only one molecule away from being plastic, and that's why it is not really good for anyone to eat it.

The only difference between butter and margarine, besides the superior taste of butter, is that there is no cholesterol in margarine. Calorie-wise butter and margarine are the same - they are both pure fat.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 24, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #6860618

True, both are fats. But one our ancestors easily digested for years and the other not so much is how it was explained to me LOL. :)
cocoloba
St John's
Antigua and Barbuda
(Zone 10a)

July 24, 2009
10:48 PM

Post #6861022

I used 'can't believe it's not butter' for years until I read it was really bad for you and very happily went back to butter, oh how I missed it :)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2009
11:23 PM

Post #6861159

In truth, butter is not the enemy Americans once feared. Researchers have upset the old-fashioned “lipid hypothesis” that blamed heart disease on animal fats. Plus, we are now discovering how incredibly healthy foods from pastured animals can be. Butter from grass-fed cows is higher in many nutrients, including vitamins E and A, beta carotene, and essential fatty acids.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

July 25, 2009
5:13 AM

Post #6862384

That comment makes me smile, darius. It reminds me of back in the late 80s, early 90s when the big scare of how bad butter was for you was on the airwaves nightly! My dad said something to the effect of - no one will ever convince me that something man-made is better than God-made. Give them a decade and they'll find out they were wrong. Of course, he was right. lol
cocoloba
St John's
Antigua and Barbuda
(Zone 10a)

July 25, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #6862938

Just to think all these years that I punished myself not eating butter!
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

July 25, 2009
3:03 PM

Post #6863266

Butter sits on my counter top every day...and if I do use margarine it's Smart Balance...I also love their peanut butter...Jo
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 29, 2009
9:16 PM

Post #6881463

A 1 1/2 quart baking dish equates to what size pan please?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

July 29, 2009
9:22 PM

Post #6881488

Wouldn't that be an 8x8 inch baking pan or dish?
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 29, 2009
9:41 PM

Post #6881557

I'm not sure and googling the question only gave me more recipes :)
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

July 30, 2009
3:06 AM

Post #6883097

I'm thinking 8 X 8 only the quart and a half would be deeper.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2009
6:57 AM

Post #6883710

from Joy of Baking web site...

1.5 quarts (6 cups):

8 x 2 round
9 x 1.5 round
8 x 8 x 1.5 square
7.5 x 3 bundt
11 x 7 x 2 rectangular
8.5 x 4.5 x 2.5 loaf
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

July 30, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #6884216

yes I looked at my 8x8 and that's like a 2 qt so I suppose that's what I'll use for the recipe! thanks ya'll!
shonuf
Frisco, TX

November 11, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #7264515

I have a cake recipe from my grandmother that calls for pork fat instead of shortening. I am having trouble finding the pork fat as most meat arrives at the market pre-trimmed and the local butcher shop saves his fat for the hunters who bring in their meat for him to process into sausage. I was told that I could substitute lard but the cakes came out heavy and greasy. Is there an acceptable substitute for the pork fat and do I need to change the amount?
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

November 15, 2009
4:12 AM

Post #7275314

Hey...sorry to interupt...as I come from the beginning of ths thread... a conversation about eggs and how long they will keep without refrigeration: A long time!!!!

We lived and sailed for about 6 years and prepared for a long trip from Ecuador to Southern Chile. About 35 days. Our fridge was small and on long trips (needing all the elec. for emergencies) we filled the fridge with block ice. So...no room for the eggs, besides, fresh eggs last a long time. We bought 5 doz. eggs for the trip. I made sure they were very fresh (I picked them out from under the hens) and VERY clean. Shells are porous so it is important that no 'dirt' is on them...we didn't use chemicals, just water. Half of the eggs (we had no idea we wouldn't be gone longer than 35 days...weather has a habit of changing) I coated with vegetable oil...not heavily...

37 days later, arriving in Chile, we had fresh eggs for another while...no problems. No one sick. Eggs were delicious. The world lives a long time without a fridge...
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 15, 2009
4:54 PM

Post #7276359

When my grandmother gathered eggs she washed them in a very dilute water/bleach solution and left them out on a table in the cellar. No one ever got sick from those eggs either.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2009
5:11 PM

Post #7276409

My sister has hens and doesn't wash eggs unless they are dirty. Usually can just spot wash them. I have cleaned a few and you can feel the sticky coating on the eggs. It's best to leave that on. It is a natural antibacterial coating the hens provide.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

November 15, 2009
5:32 PM

Post #7276458

Kooger...I have heard tell of that, and that's why we cruisers recoated them with a light oil. Any 'dirt' would soon be worse on a boat in the middle of the ocean... even here. I don't refridgerate my mayo either...pour it out of one of those squeeze bottles. Only have to refridgerate them if you dip something unclean into it. Believe me... :)
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 15, 2009
7:50 PM

Post #7276770

Well, sadly, mine are for sale and the inspectors require me to wash and refrigerate the eggs. Our sell by dates are 30 days in KY...they are good for 30 days after the sell by date.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

November 15, 2009
9:12 PM

Post #7276967

MM - well, for the inspectors it is important to have rules...!! Glad you can comply. Without rules no one can be wrong and then where would we be? Responsible for ourselves? Oh heavens...!!!! (Can you tell I am sick of rules? It is more important that in shipping plants it is more important to have the correct form and to dot all the "eyes" than it is to have clean plants!!!)

Carol

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2009
10:03 PM

Post #7277105

lol - responsible people? you have got to be kidding! not in this day and age. I too am sick of rules and what 'others' think is best for us.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 16, 2009
2:51 AM

Post #7278015

I didn't say I liked rules, but if I want to sell them, I have to abide. ha, ha... That's what puts the bread and butter on my table...but I eat my own eggs!!!! :)

For the record, we farmers are being regulated to death...it makes us want to spit sometimes!!! towards Washington!!!

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2009
4:42 AM

Post #7278312

Yeah, I have heard horror stories abt rules and more rules. Not good.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

November 16, 2009
5:14 AM

Post #7278391

MM, I hear you. The Farm Lobby is thumping on Washington so so so SO hard...they are so afraid their day is due and ...guess what...IT IS!!! Soon it is going to get it's due. The uS spends more in petrochmicals for agriculture than it does in car fuel and home heating. LETS GET REAL...
cocoloba
St John's
Antigua and Barbuda
(Zone 10a)

December 3, 2009
1:35 AM

Post #7330025

looking for a recipe for corn pie, as in sweet corn pie.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 3, 2009
5:25 AM

Post #7330644

is this recipe u look for Caribbean Corn Pie Recipe ?

Caribbean Corn Pie Recipe
A standard Caribbean dish from Trinidad

Ingredients

* 1300 g of Sweetcorn (about 4 normal cans)
* 250 ml water
* 2 tablespoon brown sugar
* 200 g French's mustard
* 550 g Mature cheddar cheese
* 20 cl evaporated milk or rice drink
* 6 free range eggs
* 5 tablespoons Cornstarch
* Freshly ground black pepper
* Salt
* 1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence (or mixed herbs)
* Breadcrumbs
* Angostura bitters (optional)
* Chilli powder (optional)

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 150ºC (300ºF)
2. Put half of the sweetcorn in a blender
3. Measure the cornstarch into a mixing bowl and add 50ml of water, mixing until smooth (add a bit more water if necessary)
4. Pour the cornstarch mixture into the blender, adding the rest of the water, 2 pinches of salt and the sugar
5. Pulse blend until you have a thick creamy mixture
6. Drain the other half the sweetcorn and put it in a large bowl
7. Add the creamed corn mixture to the large bowl
8. Finely grate the cheese and add most of it to the large bowl, leave back a small amount to sprinkle on top of the pies
9. Beat the eggs thoroughly and add them to the mixture along with the mustard, evaporated milk (or rice drink), herbs and a splash of Angostura bitters
10. Mix everything together well
11. Pour the mixture into one large or two smaller pyrex oven bowls
12. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top
13. Sprinkle the bread crumbs on top of the cheese
14. Sprinkle the chilli powder on top
15. Place in the oven and bake for 100 minutes or until the center of the mixture does not wobble when moving the oven bowls
16. Take out and allow to cool for 20 minutes before serving
17. Refrigerate and serve heated or cold

source --> http://www.grouprecipes.com/12880/caribbean-corn-pie.html

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

or Fresh Corn Pie
SERVES 8 (change servings and units)

Ingredients

* 1 (9 inch) deep dish pie shells, flute edges high
* 4 eggs, lightly beaten
* 1 1/4 cups whipping cream
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1 tablespoon grated yellow onion (or finely chopped)
* 1 1/2 cups fresh corn kernels
* 1 cup grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
* paprika
* 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh parsley

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 425º.
2. Prick crust well on bottom and sides with fork, par-bake pastry crust with parchment paper and pie weight beans for 5-7 minutes until firm but not brown. (Remove beans and parchment paper.)
3. Stir together rest of ingredients except paprika and parsley. Pour carefully into pie shell.
4. Sprinkle with a little paprika.
5. Bake 10 minutes, reduce heat to 350º and bake 30 minutes longer or until center is almost firm. Cool about 10 minutes.
6. Garnish with fresh chopped parsley if desired.

Source --> http://www.recipezaar.com/Fresh-Corn-Pie-115582

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