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Canning, Freezing and Drying: Crisp Claussen Pickle recipe?

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momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

November 20, 2004
12:37 AM

Post #1155255

I'm looking for a pickle recipe that will render nice crisp pickles like Clausen dills, surely there is a way a layman can do it?
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 20, 2004
1:08 PM

Post #1155912

Mom, I think I've heard that if you don't cook your cucumbers and if you use a cold pack that they stay crisp. I'll see if i can find a recipe somewhere for you.
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

November 20, 2004
1:11 PM

Post #1155915

Thanks Misty, cold pack huh? I can look it up on the web also, I've not canned anyting but would like too in the summer 2005 , our tomatoes were too much for the two of us, and people at work were tired of them too --- if I have such an abundance next summer I'll see if the Food bank in Des Moines maybe could use them.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 20, 2004
1:18 PM

Post #1155988

wow, sounds like you need to set a table up in your yard with a sign, tomatoes for sale...Then you can take a trip to hawaii or something from the proceeds of selling tomatoes, ha, ha...

Also, you can freeze tomatoes until you decide how you want to process them. Just wash and put in a freezer bag. When you need them, take them out and the skins will come off easily. Oh my, extra tomatoes...salsa, sauce, canned tomatoes, tomato juice...a zillion ways to use up tomatoes. :)
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

November 20, 2004
1:24 PM

Post #1156004

yes, you're right, I really should have at least made more salsa! Most of our abundance came from the Heirloom cherry tomato's, hubby was not crazy about them. I've never thought of freezing them...I think I'd rather freeze than can though, much easier! Thanks, Duh! on my part.LOL!
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

November 28, 2004
1:32 AM

Post #1168057

I have successfully made crisp dill pickles...which reminds me I want to do them again. SOooo good. I didn't want them soggy so I soaked the cukes in ice before packing them into the jars with the spices, poured the brine over them and processed them (whatever the book said to do). After 2 weeks they were HORRIBLE. After 4 weeks they were DEVINE!!!!! I also used the smallest I could find...but they weren't tiny - and I packed them with fresh dill (I have used dry in a pinch), hot peppers and whole garlic clove.

Hope this helps.

Carol

momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2004
2:03 AM

Post #1168077

Thanks Carol, was the brine hot? I guess i thought that if I processed them in a hot both or poured hot brine over them that that would be what makes them soggy, but I've never made them so I dont know what to expect. I want to next summer.Jill
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

November 28, 2004
3:56 AM

Post #1168167

Jill...both the jars and the brine were hot. Somehow it all worked (even tho' Joy of Cooking said not to leave the whole garlic in the jar because of bacteria or something...I used jars 3 years later and no problem!!! The bath has to kill everything!!! (I hope).
momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

November 28, 2004
9:51 AM

Post #1168278

Thanks! I'll try it summer 2005 --- wish me luck! Jill
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2005
1:46 PM

Post #1466900


Fermented Dill Pickles – Refrigerated “Clausen” Type

1 gallon glass jar
12 fresh dill flower heads, or 2 tbsp. dried dill weed
2 tablespoons dried dill seed
10 to 12 cloves garlic
6 to 8 peppercorns
1/4 cup vinegar
1/2 cup salt
1 quart water

In 1 gallon jar add pickling cucumbers Rinse but do not wash the cucumbers. Add Dill flower heads or dried dill weed and seed, garlic, peppercorns, and vinegar. Dissolve salt in water and add to jar. Fill jar the remaining way with water. Add weight to keep cucumbers under brine.

Fermentation sequence
1. Clear brine – no cloudiness for 1 to 3 days
2. Cloudy brine with gas formation, 2-3 days
3. Cloudy brine – no gas formation, 5 to 6 days
Pickles ready to eat after 10-11 days.
Refrigerate pickles if you do not want to process them.

To process the pickles
Fill clean, sterilized quart jars with pickles to within 1/2inch of the top. Wipe, seal, and process in a hot water bath at 170 degrees for 15 minutes. Remove and place on towel in a draft free area. Let jars stand for 12 hours. Label and date. Store in a dark, cool area.
mvespa
Englishtown, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2005
3:38 PM

Post #1467112

Where do you keep them while they are fermenting? In the refrigerator or out?

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

May 13, 2005
10:00 PM

Post #1467769

If you process them do they get soggy?

Paul
defoecat
Pleasureville, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2005
12:17 AM

Post #1467985

In the winter when there is no fresh cucumbers, I have this great pickle recipe made from bought pickles. I large jar of whole dill pickles.(64 ounce, I think) Rinse them then slice into sterilized jars. In a saucepan heat the following: 1/4 tsp garlic powder 1/2tsp red pepperflakes, 2 tsp pickling spice (whole) loose, 2 cups white sugar and 1 cup Brown Cider vinegar. Heat to boil, stirring constantly. Pour this over pickle slices in jars. Seal. Let set 5 days, turning them upside down each day. They are a not too sour dill pickle, with a teriffic crunch. This whole process takes about 30 minutes. This makes 4 pint jars. We just love these. I sometimes make these as gifts for christmas for the neighbors. Just a little something. I put calico cloth on the lid and tie with a ribbon.
LynnCanGrowIt
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

May 20, 2005
10:38 PM

Post #1485631

I have made the Klaussen Dill Pickles using a recipe from my LLBean cookbook. They turned out fantasticly well...and when refrigerated, they were much the same as the Klaussens.

The 'tricks' are in the use of salt and a precise amount of minimal cooking. Misty and Aloha are correct. The sterilized jars of filled whole pickling cucumbers were cold packed with hot brine, then processed to the PRECISE time indicated. The recipe called for dill (which I grew and had gobs of) and garlic.

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2005
10:44 PM

Post #1485641

Lynn
Can you post the recipe?

Paul
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 21, 2005
10:58 AM

Post #1486619

That would be awesome. :) Kathy
LynnCanGrowIt
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

May 21, 2005
11:52 AM

Post #1486675

JULIE CARTER'S DILL PICKLES
(Source: The L.L. Bean Book of New New England Cookery, by Judith and Evan Jones, p. 627)

About 16 small cucumbers, 4 inches long (or 12 larger, but slim cucumbers), enough to fill 4 pints
12 large garlic cloves, peeled
4 heads fresh dill
2 hot red peppers, or 1 teaspoon crushed hot red pepper flakes

Brine:
2 1/2 cups vinegar
2 1/2 cups water
1/4 cup salt

Wash the cucumbers. Leave the small ones whole or chunk the larger ones. Pack into 4 pint jars that have been sterilized. To each pint add 3 cloves garlic, 1 head dill, 1/2 hot red pepper or 1/2 teaspoon pepper flakes.

Make the brine: put the vinegar, water, and salt in a saucepan and heat to the boiling point. Pour hot over the cucumbers in the jars. Seal and place in a water bath that is barely simmering, not boiling, for 5 minutes, marking the time as soon as you put them in. If you leave them longer, they will get soft. Store for several weeks before using.
Makes 4 pints.

momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 22, 2005
7:26 PM

Post #1489461

Thanks lynn! I'll try it this summer!
greenox
New Fairfield, CT
(Zone 5a)

May 29, 2005
2:23 PM

Post #1505617

For the canners. To make it more fun and not get stuck in the kitchen on your nice day off, if you can get help and set up outside with a simple gas burner, water bath canning tomatoes (salsa, sauce, stewed tomatoes with basil ,etc) yields a better product than frozen. When you open one of those jars when the snow's piled high, it's like summer in a jar. Waterbath canning just means you get the water to a rolling boil and "process" for the required time. This works great for acidic veggies. The Ball blue book has some standard recipes. My own grandmother's bread and butter pickle recipe is very similar to Ball's and although they're work, a food processor, can help and they are worth it, indeed!

The Ball Blue book is one of the bibles of canning and tells which veggies, recipes can be water bath canned and those that need to be processed in a pressure cooker.

One question, I have a large pressure canner. Even when following directions to the Ball recipes to the "T", the results are sometimes mushy and dissapointing and the water boils out of some jars. I also would like to know if anyone has a suggestion where to get the pressure gauge adjusted?

Thank you! Happy Canning!
Green-Ox
LynnCanGrowIt
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

May 29, 2005
6:49 PM

Post #1506021

Greenox, we set up a propane burner outside when we're canning with water-bath. You are right about the outdoors being a better setting -- besides, it IS more fun outside. My husband works the burner and watches the water (who says a watch-pot never boils???). I am in the kitchen sterilizing and prepping the lids while the canned goodies are either in a pot or waiting to be cold-packed. When it is 'time', he comes to the kitchen and helps pack the food. Together we wipe tops, add lids, and then carry the sealed jars to the bubbling water-bath.

lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

June 19, 2005
2:21 PM

Post #1559457

hedandan, do you leave the pickles OUT of the refrigerator while they are fermenting? How long will they keep in the frig without processing?
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

June 21, 2005
5:24 AM

Post #1564136

Cool room temperature is best for fermenting pickles. We're just now fishing a few remaining pickles out of the bottom of a crock that's been in the fridge since last August.

If you're canning pickles, Linda Ziedrich (_The Joy of Pickling_) recommends adding a few clean sour cherry leaves to the bottom of the jar... the tannin in the leaves helps keep the pickle firm. She also has instructions in her book for "low temperature pasteurization," which replaces the traditional water bath with processing in 180 - 185 degree water (temp has to be watched carefully, and I think time is longer). I did dilly beans that way last year, and they were fabulously crisp.
mominem
Ashton, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 21, 2005
10:38 AM

Post #1564285

critterologist, Could you post the recipe you used for the dilly beans? I tried to make some and they were less than delicious...

rayleigh
Lineville, IA

July 14, 2005
12:50 PM

Post #1622968

I make my neices husband dills every year. He loves them and will eat all I make. The grand children like them to. Get mrs wage dill pickle mix there is two different kinds. You don't process as it say. Pack cukes in jars I usuall split mine maybe add a clove of garlic,can store liquid in ref, if you don'e use it all at one time. just put on lids no need to seal, store in ref. I have an extra ref. These are very crisp.
mominem
Ashton, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2005
3:07 PM

Post #1623223

rayleigh,

so these are basically raw cucumbers with hot pickle mix poured over them? How long does it take until they taste like pickles, and how long do they keep?
kissmydrafts
happy valley, OR
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2005
9:10 PM

Post #1699802

I've made LynnCanGrowIt's posted "JULIE CARTER'S DILL PICKLES" pickle recipe several times with great results. Crisp and delicious dill pickles every time! Thanks for posting this recipe.

Thumbnail by kissmydrafts
Click the image for an enlarged view.

momof2d
Des Moines, IA
(Zone 5a)

August 17, 2005
10:40 PM

Post #1699952

kiss my drafts, thanks! I've made them too but I've not tried them yet, I'm waitung for the 1st weekend in sept. , I made them in the 3rd week of July, keeping my fingers crossed that they're nice and crisp!
LynnCanGrowIt
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

November 10, 2005
7:18 PM

Post #1868253

KissMyDrafts, Glad to know the recipe worked for you! It is a good one, and pretty easy, too. Hopefully those others who made the recipe had success, as well.

All of our canned goodies will be tasting so great over the colder seasons.
Lynn
kissmydrafts
happy valley, OR
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2005
6:30 PM

Post #1894666

Hi Lynn,

Good news. I had left a jar of this year's batch with friends over the summer. They opened it up and the husband's comment was "these taste just like those Claussen pickles". Yet another testimony of goodness.
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 16, 2006
8:04 AM

Post #1980205

I have seen recipes that also call for grape leaves. Have never tried it, but was given to understand that the grape leaves have something to do with keeping the pickles crisp. Does anyone know?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2006
11:41 AM

Post #1980292

hedandan, I have been given to understand the same thing about using grape leaves.
cuckoo4rblackbe
Savannah, MO
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2006
11:03 PM

Post #1981474

Never heard of grape leaves in pickle recipes before. ...

cuckoo
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2006
1:18 AM

Post #1981761

Hmmm...I've had stuffed grape leaves! Delish!

And some folks here think I wear them in the summertime! (Some folks think I wear them in the winter time, too! But that depends on the wind.)

:>)
ChiaLea
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 23, 2006
5:02 PM

Post #1995176

THIS ALL WAY WORKED FOR ME------10 MED. CUCUMBERS
8 CUPS SUGAR
2TABLESPOONS MIXED PICKLING SPICES---3 TEASPOONS SALT---4 CUPS CIDER VINEGAR


COVER THE WHOLE CUCUMBER WITH BOILING WATER AND ALLOW TO STAND OVER NIGHT----DRAIN, THENREPEAT THIS PROCEDURE ON THE NEXT THREE MORNINGS --ON THE FIFTH DAY,DRAIN AND SLICE THE CUCUMBERS INTO 1/2PIECES.
COMBINE THE SUGAR, SPICES,SALT AND VINEGAR IN A SAUCEPAN AND BRING TO A BOIL. --POUR OVER THE CUCUMBERS AND LET STAND FOR 2 DAYS. ON THE THIRD DAY,,BRING TO A BOIL AND SEAL IN HOT STERILIZED JARS
hedandan
Hammonton, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 23, 2006
7:52 PM

Post #1995499

Found an answer to my query by using Google:

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/questions/FAQ_pickle.html

Q. I have an old recipe that calls for adding a grape leaf to each jar of pickles. Why?
A. Grape leaves contain a substance that inhibits the enzymes that make pickles soft. However, removing the blossom ends (the source of undesirable enzymes) will make the addition of grape leaves unnecessary.
-------------------------------------------
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/Pubs/columncc/cc990430.html

Why are grape leaves called for in some old fashioned recipes?
Grape leaves contain tannins that inhibit enzymes which make pickles soft. They are safe to use. If, however, good quality ingredients are used and up to date methods are followed, crisping agents such as alum, pickling lime and grape leaves are unnecessary. To produce a crisp pickle, use vegetables within 24 hours of harvest. Pick cucumbers early in the morning and keep in a cool place as they deteriorate rapidly at room temperature.


critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

January 23, 2006
8:46 PM

Post #1995587

In _Joy of Pickling_, Linda Zeidrich mentions using grape leaves or sour cherry leaves in pickle jars to improve crispness, and I'm thinking that somewhere in her book she also mentioned seeing Russian recipes using oak leaves for this purpose.
PeggieK
Claremore, OK
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2006
4:28 AM

Post #2573413


Bump. Cukes are growing in our gardens. :)
JN29896
Waterloo, IA

August 4, 2006
5:06 PM

Post #2586547

what is the best recipe for claussen dill pickles ?
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 10, 2006
2:00 PM

Post #2606895

Hi Gang! I am new to this thread. Darius, I believe, is in and out of the canning forums and told me that pickling vegetables is a good cancer inhibitor.
I have only been making a farm for 2 years so everything is new to me. I hunger for info!

I see above a pickling book. Is there anymore anyone can suggest?

I am particularly interested in pickling tomatillos and green beans.

Also, my hubby just realized he likes Italian style pickled veggies in his antipasto. So I am looking for that kind of pickling also.

I used to make kim chee but that was all I know!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2006
2:22 PM

Post #2606976

Cyberageous, I referred to fermented vegetables which are pickled but not processed and canned. Processing kills the lactic acid and the lactic acid is what inhibits cancers and polyps.
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 10, 2006
7:02 PM

Post #2607836

OK Darius-but a big DUH!
So can I pickle a harvest w/o canning or refrigeration? Now I am confused plus bummed. I thought I had a healthy idea for my garden.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2006
8:03 PM

Post #2608011

Carol, order this book and READ it, LOL
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/155312037X/sr=11-1/ref=sr_11_1/103-8166390-3905438?v=glance&n=283155

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2006
8:04 PM

Post #2608012

Forgot to say, yes, you can. But read the book, it's only $9.95
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 11, 2006
7:35 PM

Post #2611752

I will get that book! I was going to start pickling green beans today but I have to wait for my migraine to go away.

I can't find my Ball Blue Book so I'm not real sure how to do this. I found recipe ideas but not much on how to process them.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2006
8:11 PM

Post #2611863

Carol, look online for USDA canning guidelines.
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 12, 2006
5:47 PM

Post #2614944

Darius- so far that is where I am getting my info. I plan to start canning monday when Mike is gone and I am caught up (yeah right) here. I got my new exoctic banana bulbs last night and am a bit bewildered- I never got trees this way. I am sure they are fine but scarey for the $ I spent. I look at it at an investment. That and once I can figure out rhisome propagation. I got 2 eating bananas and 1 cooking banana this time. Probably the last time I will ordere plants- I'm tapped out. Between the water chestnut trees and the new bananas, that was the end of my plant fund.

Now it's hurricane prep time and I am enjoying it! That is also an excuse to can! I can't get out for fresh stuff and I don't have too much garden yet. I don't like commercially canned goods. Too many chemicals and they taste like tin.

I plan to get creative with the Italian style veggies- I hope I am successful!

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

August 21, 2008
12:20 AM

Post #5443917

In the above recipes is it white vinegar or pickling vinegar that's being used?

Pam
(who has a ton of cukes coming)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 21, 2008
12:29 AM

Post #5443977

Pam, I do fermented pickles, which uses NO vinegar... just salt and boiling water. This kind doesn't get canned, as the canning kills the lactic acid which is SO beneficial for us. These may be kept in the refrigerator, or in the pickling crock in a cool spot as long as there is an air-lock so unwanted yeast doesn't get inside and foul the pickles, sauerkraut, etc.

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

August 21, 2008
12:47 AM

Post #5444110

Darius do you have a recipe for yours here?

I'd like to try a couple different ones (so would still like to know what type of vinegar was used in the above recipes).
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 21, 2008
1:10 AM

Post #5444274

For pickles made with a vinegar brine, I usually use either cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. White vinegar can be used, but it tends to be a little harsh, flavor-wise.

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

August 21, 2008
1:36 AM

Post #5444421

:) Thank you Critter! It's been years since I had the room to grow cucumbers (and pumpkins, watermelon, etc.) I can't even begin to imagine where my recipe books are (we moved since I last made pickles).

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

August 21, 2008
12:47 PM

Post #5446032

When using any vinegar make sure that it has a minimum acidity of 5%.

Paul

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 21, 2008
1:15 PM

Post #5446153

Lactic Acid-Fermented Cucumbers
(For 1 quart/liter preserving crock)

3 cups cucumbers quartered if large, or use fork to poke a few holes in small ones (for fluid exchange)
1 bay leaf
½ tsp. sea salt or pickling salt
½ small onion, sliced in rings
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 Tbs. fresh horseradish root, chopped or shredded
1 tsp. mustard seeds
lots of fresh dill
1 stem fresh tarragon
3-4 whole coriander seeds
boiling salt water to fill container (1-1/4 Tbs. salt to 1 Qt water)
1 Tbs. white wine vinegar, optional

Horseradish keeps pickled cucumbers crisp for a long time.

Pack the cucumbers, onions, garlic, horseradish and herbs firmly in layers into the preserving jar until jar is 80% full. Fill up the jar with salted water (and whey if you have any), making sure there is ½ inch layer of liquid covering the cucumbers and seal tight. Leave the container at room temperature for 10 days, until they stop fermenting, then place in a cool/cold spot. Cucumbers will be ready to eat after 2-3 weeks of cold storage.

Note: I make mine in a large batch my a 7.5 liter Harsch Fermenting Crock which has an air-lock to keep unwanted yeast out. I can store them in the crock in the cool root cellar for months, unless we eat them first. Smaller quantities can be stored in jars in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.

whey amount: Use 2 TBS. WHEY for every 3 Tbs. salt



This message was edited Aug 21, 2008 9:28 AM

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

August 21, 2008
8:10 PM

Post #5448214

Thank you for that tip Paul! :)

Ü Thank you so very much Darius! I've cut and pasted your recipe. I'll have to keep an eye open for a crock like yours.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 21, 2008
9:08 PM

Post #5448379

Pam, you can make them in a jar with a rubber gasket and the old-fashiioned bail, as long as the gasket/bail fits tight.

You can also use clean grape leaves to crisp the pickles.

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

August 21, 2008
9:42 PM

Post #5448493

Don't have that either Darius but will keep an eye out for it as well (sooner or later we will find one of them and I've got your recipe saved when we do :). Will also keep an eye open at auctions (usually there we spot items like what you listed above).
Cottage_Rose

(Zone 5b)

September 3, 2008
9:01 PM

Post #5504066

Lots of great info here!
Thanks to all who took the time to share their recipes.
Shirb
Thief River Falls, MN
(Zone 3b)

September 24, 2008
11:58 PM

Post #5595279

Hi, I found this recipe from a 'Top Secret' cookbook. I have tried it and I added some red pepper flakes and mustard seed too. It is a good recipe.

Clausen Kosher Dill Pickles
2 dill flowers
2 garlic cloves, peeled & halved
1 1/4 lbs. (8−10) pickling cucumbers
6 long sprigs fresh dill
1 tbsp coarse kosher salt
Put dill flower and garlic in bottom of mason jar;
add the cukes, put sprigs of dill in center of
cukes, add salt, fill jar with half boiled water
that is now cool, and half vinegar to within 1/8th of top.
Put on seal and ring, shake to dissolve salt,
set upside down on counter away from sunlight
and heat. Let sit 4−5 days flipping the jar
either upright or upside down each day.
Let sit upright 2 more days then refrigerate.
Lasts about 6 months.
Clausen Kosher Dill Pickles 128
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 26, 2008
3:32 PM

Post #5601992

my pickles are crisp like clausen pickles, but I use pickle crisp in them, which is no lnger available , next year I'll try to find the same stuff in bulk so I can keep using it in mypickles. Nothing ever worked before this stuff.

I cold pack mine and hot water bath them, they are always crispy whether their cold or right off the shelf.
Susie2
Brazoria, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 26, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #5602118

Never heard of pickle crisp, but it sounds interesting.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 26, 2008
6:32 PM

Post #5602651

it's food grade calcium chloride. which I have another thread about, looking for some cause pickle crisp is no longer available and I can't find the calcium chloride food grade .

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