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Ferns, Fungi and Mosses: Let's Talk Fungi and Such

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Forum: Ferns, Fungi and MossesReplies: 203, Views: 1,062
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Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 2, 2004
1:39 AM

Post #1174198

We were getting off the subject on another thread, just discussing some strange fungi and related things. I'm not expert, but I find this sort of thing fascinating. It's not pretty flowers, but it's nature, and each thing that grows depends on something else to make it happen. What sorts of things like this interest you?
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
3:11 PM

Post #1174738

Weez, my love of fungus is way up there, close to my love of flowers. Until I moved here in the woods, I never realized what beautiful fungus there really was out there, at all different times of the year.
One of my favorites is Crowned Clavaria, pictured here. I found a log that was full of it.
Do you get a lot of fungus up there?

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 2, 2004
3:57 PM

Post #1174801

Oh, my, that's a beauty! I'm jealous. Yes, we get several types here. Of course, I've just recently taken interest, so I don't know much about them, and I'm not sure which are fungi! Of course, we have many, many kinds of mushrooms. We're a coastal town, and when the rainy season hits, they start erupting out of the ground all over my yard. It looks like 'Night of the Living Dead'! Here's some sort of little puffball with spikes on it.

Thumbnail by Weezingreens
Click the image for an enlarged view.

philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 2, 2004
4:02 PM

Post #1174810

I love fungi too :)
Here are some Amanita muscaria I found in England.
This one's not edible of course

Thumbnail by philomel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 2, 2004
4:04 PM

Post #1174813

Yes, we get some similar to that here, I think. They usually come up around the spruce, I think. It's interesting to hear what their relationships are with plants.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 2, 2004
4:08 PM

Post #1174818

Oooooh lovely photos you two!! and very interesting - I don't know those...

Here in France there is a long tradition of eating as many as possible.
We've found a number growing here. One of the most delicious is the Parasol Mushroom

Thumbnail by philomel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 2, 2004
4:10 PM

Post #1174821

Those Parasols were huge, larger than any I've seen before, and growing under mature sweet and horse chestnut.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 2, 2004
4:23 PM

Post #1174847

I had a discussion with a botanist friend who was explaining the relationship of broomrape to our alder. It was really fascinating. It seems it is a beneficial relationship for all, involving the release of nitrogen. I'm really stupid about these things, but I find all these fellows fascinating. Here's a link to a bit of info about some of our lesser appreciated forest friends. Girdwood is situated about 42 miles south of Anchorage.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 2, 2004
4:33 PM

Post #1174861

Look forward to the link ;)
We have lots of mistletoe here - I must take some photos and find out more...
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
5:23 PM

Post #1174938

I've really just started trying to identify them in the past few years. I remember seeing something like your spiked puffball last year Weez, and could't identify it.

The Amanita is beautiful ! I don't find red ones here...I first thought the mainly liked conifers but now I see that many of the Amanita like broad-leaved trees and oaks too.

Speaking of Broomrape, a few years ago I stumbled upon a dried Squawroot in our woods. That was a first, and only. I really know nothing about them other than they're parasitic.

Winter is usually the time of year that I add books to my collection...mainly field guides.
Can anyone recommend a good fungi book? I need one badly.
RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2004
6:28 PM

Post #1175049

Do you include Lichen?
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
7:23 PM

Post #1175131

Wow, I just looked up lichens. I see them all the time...I think every other tree here has some sort of moss or lichen on it, but I always just thought they were a type of moss. They're actually a combination of alga and fungus ! I need to learn more !
Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL
(Zone 5b)



December 2, 2004
7:31 PM

Post #1175138

This unusual fungus was growing out of old spruce logs that were used as an edging along a hiking trial in my neighbourhood. Its some species of Phaeolus. Lovely pattern and colouring. the edges were very fuzzy. Mind you, this pic was taken on Nov. 12. Never expected to see such a lovely fungus that late in the year.

Thumbnail by Todd_Boland
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2004
7:33 PM

Post #1175142

DiOhio
then you surely came across this link?
http://www.lichen.com/

Also, the book mentioned on their website is absolutely gorgeous and informative.
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
7:34 PM

Post #1175144

Ok, so what is this? I had assumed it was a type of Scarlet Cup (Sarcoscypha coccinea) but now I see Ladder Lichens, Pyxie Cups and British Soldiers are Cladonia...another algae/fungus?

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2004
7:34 PM

Post #1175145

Todd,
Very pretty!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 2, 2004
7:40 PM

Post #1175150

Fascinating photos... and subject!
RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2004
7:41 PM

Post #1175151

Amanita muscaria can be found in the US too. Except the color is orange- yellow, not red. I find them in NE Pennsylvania all the time.
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
7:45 PM

Post #1175154

Nice shot Todd...reminds me of a fungus we call "Turkey Tails".
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
7:51 PM

Post #1175156

Thanks for reminding me of that site RUK. I found it once before but only looked in the wildlife/people pages. I'll check it out.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 2, 2004
8:09 PM

Post #1175175

I didn't know the Fly Agarics are a different colour in the US RUK
Fascinating
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 2, 2004
9:29 PM

Post #1175284

Has anyone ever seen lichens bloom?
Is that what's happening here?

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 2, 2004
9:35 PM

Post #1175292

Dunno, but that's pretty cool!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 2, 2004
10:47 PM

Post #1175371

I'm so sorry, I forgot to link that website. It refers to an area along the Seward Highway that skirts Cook Inlet: http://girdwood.net/tacl/forplant.htm

Todd, your fungus looks like what we call shelf fungus. They grow on old logs. Some grow old & harden. For many years, Alaskans used to collect these dried fungi and paint on the white site of them: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3921681170

DiOhio, there are many kinds of lichen growing here in Seward. I've even got some growing in my yard! The heads coming out of yours are really strange. I've never seen that.

Here is a picture of some lichen growing in a pot with mimulus minima. The little fellows at the tip of the fingers is the 'bloom' (whatever it is actually called) on our local lichen.

Thumbnail by Weezingreens
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 3, 2004
2:06 AM

Post #1175601

"Has anyone ever seen lichens bloom?
Is that what's happening here?"

I just spent some time with that beautiful Lichen book:
I wouldn't write this in ink, but the Lichen in your picture comes closest in looks and description to : Cladonia coniocraea, or Common powderhorn.

those tapered things arising from the body ( thallus) are the fruiting structures, called podetia

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 3, 2004
2:10 AM

Post #1175606

perhaps you might like to see this?
http://www.kammlott.net/Lichen.html
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 3, 2004
6:18 AM

Post #1175848

How cute Weez. That reminds me of Common Liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha).

Thanks RUK, I'm gonna do a search and read about powderhorn. I've never heard it it.
This gets pretty confusing. I thought moss and lichens and find out there's so much more to it. There's so many different kinds !

The 2 pics of the British Soldiers on that site were great !
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 3, 2004
6:44 AM

Post #1175857

Sometimes I think the names of fungus are just as neat as the fungus itself.

Here's one that I discovered for the first time this April..."Dead Man's Fingers" (Xylaria polymorpha). It grows on decaying wood above ground or buried wood.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 3, 2004
6:50 AM

Post #1175860

Another black one, and a favorite, is the Gray Urn (Urnula craterium).
You have to just about step on them to see them.
They grow on or near sticks and logs of broad-leaved trees.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 3, 2004
7:00 AM

Post #1175862

And keeping with the black...Black Witches' Butter (Exidia glandulosa).
When it's fresh it's more brownish-red, and feels like Jello ! This one also grows on wood from broad-leaved trees.
Jelly fungi dry out for long periods (it looks like dried black paint), only to revive and resume growth when they get soaked with water. Witches' Butter is often seen in winter woods when melting snow moistens the logs. Each time a jelly fungus revives, it produces new masses of spores over its wrinkled surface.
Last week we had a bad storm when a cold front moved in and I found a branch laying in the driveway that was full of it.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL
(Zone 5b)



December 3, 2004
11:36 AM

Post #1175908

Here's a witch's-butter photographed Nov. 20...this is the more typical colour. It was growing on pin cherry.

Thumbnail by Todd_Boland
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 3, 2004
11:57 AM

Post #1175917

What a fun thread!
The Gray Urn is especially neat!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 5, 2004
3:41 PM

Post #1179178

These are just wonderful, guys! Next season, I'm really going to make sure I photograph all I can around here. Keep em comin!
hanna1
Castro Valley, CA
(Zone 9a)

December 5, 2004
5:09 PM

Post #1179291

I'm so enjoying these pics, ya, keep em coming, this subject has always fascinated me!!!
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 5, 2004
5:15 PM

Post #1179306

Here's another neat one I found in our woods in early August. I'm not sure what it is. I thought Gray Coral (Clavulina cinerea), but I didn't find it under conifers. It's definately different from the other Clavarias that I've found.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
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DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 5, 2004
5:32 PM

Post #1179336

And of course we have to include the Common Morel (Morchella esculenta) which many would consider the king of all fungi. It's quite a delicacy. Some years I find dozens and dozens, and other years I'm lucky to find a few dozen.
This one picture is the biggest one I've ever found, and it was a double-header, with one side measuring about 10 1/2" long and the other side measuring 9 1/2" long. It weighed almost 3/4 of a pound. There were 27 other morels right around this one, and some of those measure 8-9" long ! They were right in my front yard, behind a logwall
The first year I discovered morels here was when I was mowing the front yard for the first time that spring and almost mowed them over. There were 73 morels in that patch.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 5, 2004
8:46 PM

Post #1179594

Are morels that large tough when you cook them?

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
9:02 PM

Post #1179615

Heres one I found today.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 5, 2004
10:29 PM

Post #1179702

I don't know darius, I don't eat them, I give them away. But I think I've heard people say they are more tender when they're smaller. Most people don't seem to care much what size they are.

Xenomorf, what a bright fungus ! Did you find these under conifers? If so they could be Yellow Jelly Fungi (Guepiniopsis alpinus) or young Orange Peel (Caloscypha fulgens).

There's also a Yellow Cup Fungus but that wouldn't be in your area.
There is however a Blue-green Cup Fungus that you'd see in your area. It's a very strange color for a fungus.
This pic has some of what I think is Yellow Cup Fungus (Bisporella citrina). Cup fungi can be cups or flat saucers

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
10:37 PM

Post #1179711

I was hoping I could slip this one in somehow without revealing the gory details of what it's growing on...but, it's on doggy stuff. (whince).
After a couple days of drizzle rain. Not sure what it is or if it belongs in my area or not.
it's 1/8th to 1/16th inches diameter. But the brightness is what caught my eye.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
10:51 PM

Post #1179726

Heres #2
summertime, on the mud, in the shade. 1/2 inch.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
11:01 PM

Post #1179737

#3 larger one in the shade with grass growing through it, you can see the spores around it. summertime.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
11:04 PM

Post #1179742

Underside of #3

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
11:05 PM

Post #1179745

#4 about an inch

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
11:06 PM

Post #1179748

#4 underside

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 5, 2004
11:11 PM

Post #1179754

Another shot of #2.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 6, 2004
3:44 AM

Post #1180135

What wonderous growth these are! Some look like cathedrals in the woods, and some grow to beauty from the humblest of nourishment. Thanks so much for these photos.
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2004
4:57 AM

Post #1180188

Aha ! It's Doggie-Doo Cups ! You should have mentioned that Xenomorf.

Your #3 is very interesting with the grass growing up through it. That's a monster one too.

But your last pic really made me smile. When you're out in the woods it's just not right if you don't see at least one millipede. We have a really pretty black and red one here that I see under leaf litter, and then a grayish one with thin red stripes that love my front porch. They climb the walls at night.
jessamine
Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 5a)

December 6, 2004
8:54 AM

Post #1180266

Thank you all so much for your glorious pics. They are all lovely. It seems whenever I want to get a shot of one they have disappeared by the time I can get back to them. Jessamine
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2004
1:45 PM

Post #1180461

Jessamine, you have to learn to paste your camera to your forehead ! Sometimes I think mine has become a permanent fixture.
No really, I have missed way to many shots by not having my camera in hand so now I wear one of those hip-belts/belly bags and carry it with me, most of the time.

It seems that many fungi melt away quickly, and then a lot of them get eaten by wildlife and insects.

Here's one huge bug eating a mushroom stem. I'm not sure what kind he is, but the closest ID I've come to so far is a Oriental Cockroach.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 6, 2004
4:42 PM

Post #1180810

I think I would have overlooked the Dead Man's Fingers, thinking it was something else...LOL
I also like the Phaeolus, the Scarlet cup & Amanita muscaria.
The Crowned Clavaria, looks baazar.
All these picts of mine were taken in the city in the desert, All The other picts are going to drive me back to the woods, with the camera on my forehead :) (good idea)
Shrooms #2,3 & 4, I'll have to find out what they are.
I think my golden-brown colored mushroom was a good find, the centipede was a bonus.

This message was edited Dec 13, 2004 11:07 AM
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 6, 2004
5:02 PM

Post #1180852

What brilliant shots every one - particularly like your #4 underside Xenomorf LOL
ooh and the centipede ;)
...and Todd's Witch's Butter...and Di's Gray Coral... and...
A great thread thanks Weez :oD
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 6, 2004
5:06 PM

Post #1180861

Thanks, Phil. Having started the thread, I sure haven't offered much myself! I've got to look over my summer photos for more examples.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 6, 2004
6:08 PM

Post #1180971

We can wait for the cream of your crop ;) LOL
The idea for the thread was inspired

BTW my cousin has gone now so will be in touch very soon...
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 6, 2004
9:36 PM

Post #1181377

Actually it's a millipede, not a centipede. Centipedes have one pair of legs on each segment and millipedes have two pairs of legs on most body rings. I can see two pairs of legs on most of Xenomorf's critter.
Here's a pic of a millipede on my porch wall where you can clearly see two pairs of legs on each ring.

Sorry, didn't mean to go off topic, but there is a difference.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 7, 2004
1:00 AM

Post #1181727

Thanks, I 'did' have a doubt previously about the bug before I posted it as to which one it might be.
That was my secret pending question...Millipede or centipede.?
I've also seen millipede's wth zillions of more legs. I like the wavy appearance that happens as they walk.

But anyway...back to fungi & such.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 7, 2004
3:05 AM

Post #1181984

perhaps you know which one this is? Polyporus??
Each one of those clusters measures about 18 inches to 2 feet in diameter. The mycelium is a huge ring around an old Maple tree and every year these beautiful "dinner plates" start growing somewhere in that ring.
Location is Lackawanna County in NE Pennsylvania

Thumbnail by RUK
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RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 7, 2004
3:12 AM

Post #1181995

And here are some Amanita muscaria also growing in Lackawanna County, a large patch under a Pine tree, not quite as pretty and colorful as the European version...

Thumbnail by RUK
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 7, 2004
3:56 AM

Post #1182064

Looks like Polypore to me. But all of the polypores in my book should be found on wood.
Monsterous !

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


December 7, 2004
5:18 AM

Post #1182131

RUK,
now THOSE are awesome. the Amanita muscaria's
I would freak, if I found some of those.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 7, 2004
6:56 AM

Post #1182225

Thanks for that photo RUK. I've never seen your version. Interesting that they have evolved to be that different colour, but HUGE! I've never seen any that size either
RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 8, 2004
10:36 PM

Post #1185424

thanks!

No, I don't worry finding poisonous mushrooms, since I don't have small children or pets which might want to explore them. I simply leave them alone, just take pictures.
I would really love to be able to identify the edibles for sure. We have so many different kinds in our woods in that location, but I am just not THAT hungry. Comparing them to a picture in the book is a bit scary, I worry about mistakes. ( maybe only ONE mistake...) It is simply a shame to let those good mushrooms go to waste. I was used to eating the "beigey" Chantrelles growing up in Germany ( yum), but I don't trust the orange yellow ones here.
RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 8, 2004
10:42 PM

Post #1185433

DiOhio,
you inspired me to do a little googling.
About the Sarcoscypha coccinea - I found this link
http://home.att.net/~e.kuznik/Sarcoscypha_coccinea.htm

and then I came across this one:
http://provost-citywide.org/photo/gallery/Microstoma_floccosa.htm

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 9, 2004
2:09 PM

Post #1186475

RUK !!! You've ID'd my hairy scarlet cup !! It's Shaggy Scarlet Cup (Microstoma floccosa). Thank you so much. I love the Scarlet Cups. This spring I found a record number of them in our woods. One patch alone had over 80 cups.

So then I did some Googling of my own. Boy, that Mushroom Expert site is really helpful. I've just identified several of my other fungi pics from that site.
One of them is Polyporus squamosus, which grows on decaying logs, stumps, dead trees and is also parasitic on living hardwoods. I also just learned that parasitic mushrooms consume living tissues of other organisms, sometimes killing them in the process. The ones I found were definately parasitic. I have found these before, but these (pictured) are the largest I've ever seen. This pic shows a broad view. I'll send another pic of them next.
April 23, 2004

Thumbnail by DiOhio
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DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 9, 2004
2:11 PM

Post #1186479

This is the same fungus with my hand to show size.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2004
2:16 PM

Post #1186488

Too bad you couldn't find a big one to photograph, LOL.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 9, 2004
4:05 PM

Post #1186719

ROFL yes darius, they just don't make them large any more ;)

Thanks for all the lovely photos and info Di.
I think there is a St George's mushroom, but anyway, you photographed that one on St George's Day
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2004
4:41 AM

Post #1187894

You're welcome philomel.

Keeping with 'big'...how about Giant Puffballs ! Calvatia gigantea. I've heard they're almost as good as morels but they have to be very fresh and pure white.
This puffball can release as many as 70 trillion spores !! Imagine that. And yet it is still uncommon. I wonder why that is.

I don't have any really good pics of them, but this one was found in Oct.2002 in our woods. You can see leaves around it to compare size. I'd say it was bigger than a basket ball and I found 8 of them of equal size, or just a little smaller, in a fairly small area.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
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DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2004
5:00 AM

Post #1187911

Here's another one of my favorites. It's Bird's Nest fungus, possibly Striate Bird's Nest fungus (Cyathus striatus). I find clusters of it every year in different spots. This year I had it growing on the veggie garden straw mulch, in a flowerbed on wood mulch, and on a wooden plant container sitting near the pond.
The "eggs" inside the "nests" contain a multitude of spores. Rainwater splashes the eggs out of the nest and their outer walls decay, spreading the spores and allowing them to germinate. You usually find several together, but there can be as many as hundreds in one patch.
This is one of several found in a group this past October on wood mulch. It's a fairly old 'nest' but the eggs havn't splashed out yet.
Editing here to tell you to disreguard the name and the date on the photo. The date is a typo (1 should be 10) and the name is of a bird's nest fungus that grows in gardens fertalized with manure. Since this was on mulch I think it's the Striate Bird's Nest fungus.

This message was edited Dec 10, 2004 1:12 AM

Thumbnail by DiOhio
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DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2004
5:08 AM

Post #1187921

Here's another group of Bird's Nest fungus I found in September on a Butternut. That's a first I've ever found them growing on a nut. These are really fresh, as you can see. I've never seen them this fresh and it looks to me like most of them still have the protective covering over most of them (there is a term for this...I just read it this morning on the Mushroom Expert site and now I can't remember it) Anyway this protective covering stays on until the spores are mature. On the one in the top center it looks like the covering is starting to peal away. I don't know what's going on with the little yellow growths...maybe germinating spores?

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2004
5:24 AM

Post #1187938

Thiese bright lemony-yellow mushrooms really caught my eye. I believe they're a type of Hygrophori, with a cluster of Scarlet Cups (Sarcoscypha coccinea) found at the end of May.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2004
5:28 AM

Post #1187944

I was hanging out wash one day and almost stepped on this one in the yard. I think it's Russula Hygrophorus (Hygrophorus russula). It really was pink.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 10, 2004
10:10 AM

Post #1188080

Fantastic!!
I thought I'd found a giant puffball in our wood and made my way towards it carefully, through over and round the brambles. When I eventually got close enough, it turned out to be an old whit kiddies' ball!!!
What a disappointment :( LOL
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 10, 2004
8:08 PM

Post #1189004

Years ago, when my second husband and I lived in a little cabin on this property, I purchased some plastic mushrooms at a garage sale. I stuck them among the trees, and when my brother came up to visit us in Alaska, he commented on the lovely big mushrooms (they were big enough to wear as a hat!) My husband told him that they were quite good to eat and to cut a couple for dinner. My brother felt quite foolish when he bent down with his pocket knife and hit plastic. Seeing some of these photos, I'm not so sure they were as incredible as I thought!
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 10, 2004
9:12 PM

Post #1189122

Ah - I'm not the only one to be fooled then LOL
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 10, 2004
9:25 PM

Post #1189144

So what is your story, Phil?
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 10, 2004
9:30 PM

Post #1189149

I was just referring to the white football incident above ;oD

Though on quite a few occasions I've made for enticing looking fungi, only to find that they are lumps of chalk (common in Kent where i lived in the UK), stones, shells, flowers, etc etc. You name it, I've probably hoped it was a mushroom *g*
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 10, 2004
9:49 PM

Post #1189179

I've been going through my computer photos looking for fungi pictures, and came across a few. I've also done a search and found this photo on a thread from a year or two ago: http://davesgarden.com/forums/fp.php?pid=363194

Honestly, Phil, I tried to find my old thread about 'moon mushroom'. Remember the cleft fungi that looked like it was 'mooning' me. I cannot find it anywhere. Do you suppose it was banished from the Garden... poor little fellow.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2004
9:53 PM

Post #1189184

We've had several days of rain nand some warmth. If it's not too cold tomorrow, I shall take my camera in search of fungi. BUT any I find will rewuire someone else to identify them. LOL.

I'm just fascinated with how they look, and grow...
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 10, 2004
9:59 PM

Post #1189196

That's my problem, darius. I don't know one fungi from another, but I find them fascinating. I could also use a better camera. I try to get down on fungi level to take the pics, but as fat as I am, I'm still a foot off the ground! LOL! And, then, of course, there is the issue of getting back up.

Now here is a fine mushroom specimen from my son's garden. He's a better welder than a gardener, I'm afraid!

Thumbnail by Weezingreens
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2004
10:45 PM

Post #1189252

Love it! Yes, he's a good welder, cannot speak to the gardener part!
RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 10, 2004
10:57 PM

Post #1189284

interesting stuff from all of you. Those Bird Nest fungi are really neat, I have to look for them next year.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 10, 2004
11:34 PM

Post #1189329

Yes, RUK, those were interesting. They look like they have little pebbles or bird's eggs inside, don't they.

Well, I found the picture of that ugly ol' shelf fungus that was growing along the roots of our sickly spruce. It's so dark it's hard to see.

Thumbnail by Weezingreens
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
12:31 AM

Post #1189408

RUK, You don't have to wait till next year. You can go look tomorrow.
I took these pics today...They're fairly fresh.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
12:34 AM

Post #1189411

These are old ones but a few still had 'eggs' in the nest. There were a few dozen in this particular flowerbed, on mulch. Pic taken today.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2004
12:35 AM

Post #1189412

I just love those! They really do look like "nests"!
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
12:36 AM

Post #1189414

And I'm sure now that the little yellow growths are baby nests. This one was under a cluster of nests on the wood planter.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 11, 2004
12:43 AM

Post #1189421

Come on, you guys, I know my fungus is really ugly, but anyone know what it is?
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
4:48 AM

Post #1189732

It's hard to say what that is Weez. A lot of fungus will turn black when it's old. Do you know how long it's been there? It just looks like a melted pile of something but I can't see it real good.
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
5:11 AM

Post #1189752

Philomel, I had to laugh at your story about seeing a kiddie's ball and thinking it was a Giant Puffball. The very first time I ever found a Giant Puffball I thought..."Oh now how did a kiddies' ball get way back here in the woods !" Of course I was shocked when I realized what it was.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 11, 2004
8:41 AM

Post #1189844

I certainly do remember your 'mooning mushroom' Weez
I equally seem to remember it disappearing at some stage :(
oh well...
You haven't still got the original photo?

LOL Di - your experience was my dream come true *g*

Perhaps I'll take a while off tomorrow and go on a fungus foray. See what I can snap
I do love them all and would really like to find one of the bird's nest ones

bootandall

bootandall
Blenheim
New Zealand


December 11, 2004
9:41 AM

Post #1189858

these puff ball's are near to me. Look like puff's ball's to me

Thumbnail by bootandall
Click the image for an enlarged view.

philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 11, 2004
11:06 AM

Post #1189880

LOL Boot - somethings from outer space??
Or somewhere to detect things from outer space??

...or tasty puffballs?
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
2:55 PM

Post #1190154

WOW, thems some big puffballs Boot ! LOL

Maybe someone can tell me what these are. When I first found them I thought some kind of stinkhorn (Phallaceae) but they don't have the the oval egg at the base. The white ones are young, I believe, and will turn into the yellowish 'bullet' shaped one. They look like little ghosts.
Found the end of May this year on a rotting log

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
2:58 PM

Post #1190159

Here's another one...looks like it's half way to becoming mature.
They were really smooth and jelly-like

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
3:04 PM

Post #1190167

I'm not sure if this is a Chanterelle or not, but is was large and pure white. The slugs were feasting on it. That one slug was about as long as my little finger ! Glad he wasn't on a hosta.
Found the end of May of this year.

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
3:08 PM

Post #1190172

Not sure what these are either. Found on a rotting log with lichens, May 28 2004

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
3:11 PM

Post #1190176

Another pic of Crowned Clavaria (Clavicorona pyxidata)

Thumbnail by DiOhio
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Floridian
Lutz, FL
(Zone 9b)


December 11, 2004
4:15 PM

Post #1190240

At the Florida Botanical Gardens - Pinellas County, Florida 10-30-04

Thumbnail by Floridian
Click the image for an enlarged view.

bootandall

bootandall
Blenheim
New Zealand


December 11, 2004
6:07 PM

Post #1190399

I really like this thread. The pic's are magnificence,
Heres a Pic from the south.

Thumbnail by bootandall
Click the image for an enlarged view.

philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


December 11, 2004
7:10 PM

Post #1190490

That's a beauty. Awesome lichen!
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 11, 2004
9:12 PM

Post #1190620

What cuties boot. Neat closeup of the lichens too. I see lichens and get hungry for a salad for some reason.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 11, 2004
10:33 PM

Post #1190681

These were growing out from the bottom of my baseboard in the closet when I cleaned before moving in. The wall behind is just sheetrock over 1x2 spacers over concrete block, 10 feet underground.

I pulled them off without having my glasses on so I didn't know what they were at first.

Thumbnail by darius
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 12, 2004
12:47 AM

Post #1190826

great pics!!
And I love the lichen, Bootandall.

Floridian, what is the cool looking thing?
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2004
4:39 AM

Post #1191093

Haha ! darius I've had mushrooms grow along my baseboard in the spare room on the north wall too ! Right where the carpet meets the baseboard. After seeing that I imagined that one day when I'm old and moving a lot slower, for as much time as I spend on the ground in the woods, I'll have them growing on me too !

bootandall

bootandall
Blenheim
New Zealand


December 12, 2004
10:37 AM

Post #1191231

I can't ID these little gems but I do like looking at them.
here is a pixie cup, ID from Ken in oz, in May as was my last one, autumn.

Thumbnail by bootandall
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RUK
Fair Lawn, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 12, 2004
1:59 PM

Post #1191383

bootandall,
the pretty pixie cup looks very much like one of the Cladonias listed in the "Lichen of North America".
Floridian
Lutz, FL
(Zone 9b)


December 14, 2004
4:33 PM

Post #1194325

Great thread!! Wonderful pictures!!

I don't know how that picture got in here...It's an "Eyeball Plant" http://davesgarden.com/pdb/go/997/index.html that I saw at the Bot. Gardens. It's supposed to be in the PDB Ü

I have lots of mushroom pictures that have never been IDed. I finally decided it was time and bought a field guide of common Florida mushrooms from the UF library. Little did I know that it would basically be a text book...whew! some heavy reading! LOL Hopefully it will get easier to use as I get more familiar with mushrooms. I still have so many flowers to ID though...

We have little birds nest fungus that come up each spring...hundreds of them form a large mat in one of our borders. We find many different types on our property during rainy season, I just love them!

Here's a real survivor...one tough shroom. This one lives in the Florida Scrub and grows right in pure white sand, in full sun. It is tough skinned, dry and leathery as opposed to moist and fragile. You can lightly scratch this mushroom with your fingernails and not leave a mark on it.

Stacey

Thumbnail by Floridian
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

January 9, 2005
9:30 PM

Post #1229991

What a wonderful thread .. and most magnificent photos !!

Hee .. DiOhio .. seeing your Black Witches' Butter .. reminded me, of one particular walk out in the woods several years ago .. jes as dark was settin' in ...

Surely we all know how ya can be lookin' about and hear the leaves rustling on the ground a bit .. and most curious folks .. will lean over and dig a bit under the leaf litter, in hopes of seeing what may have been making the 'rustling' ... ? ...

Then .. another 'rustle' and a bit louder .. so you take one more lil gander under the mulch .. but all you get to see is one somewhat fattened tail end of a something .. that resembles a snakes tail ...

Welllll, it startled me so, that I lost my footing .. and to catch myself, I quickly grabbed hold of what ever was closest to me, which was a limb/branch near by ... Only to find that what you've placed your hands around, is a large wet somewhat sticky feeling globular mass of something - of which you've no idea of what it is, you've grabbed hold of !!! .. So, ya let go - real fast!! And, naturally .. I then, simply continued my wonderful but totally ungraceful unchoreographed avalanchalant .. fall !!

Wasnt' sure really what scared me the most - - what may be attached to the other end of the somewhat fattened tail .. or .. what in heavens name, was on the tree limb .. that I'd just tried to grab hold of !?! ...

At any rate .. the next day .. (after recovery) .. I went back to take a better gander at the limb .. and sure nuff, it looked jes like that photo of your 'Black Witches Butter' ... And it twernt near as much of a booger in the day light either! And .. the fat tail .. yep, belonged to one of them big ol wood lizards .. of which I landed on ... And, now you know the rest of the story ..

I was so got off with my fool self, something terrible. And even more so .. jes plum disgusted! ..

Yep, I hummed taps ... and cried too. Was none too proud of the results my panic caused ...



Weez, will it be okay .. if I post a few pics of some mushrooms, and similar stuff .. here also .. ? ..

There's a giant growth I found in our woods just below the house here, just recently - that I'd swore to my hubby .. was a tree that someone had cut a relatively deep notch in, and shoved a big rock into .. years ago! ... For this rock looked to have 'grown' with the tree .. up the trunk some 10 or more feet off the ground! I'd climbed up and stood on top of the 4 wheeler rack, and still couldn't touch that 'rock' with my hand .. but was able to bump it plenty good enuff, to determine that it jes had to be .. a 'rock' !! .. hee ..

I don't know about this such stuff either .. but am sure willing to learn more. And would appreciate any of you guys .. helping fill in the blanks ... If'n ya don't mind much .. that is !

- Magpye
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 9, 2005
9:35 PM

Post #1230001

Post away, Magpye, and if you happen to have a picture of yourself lying in a heap with that gunk all over your hand, post that too!

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


January 9, 2005
10:55 PM

Post #1230110

This is Shaggy Mane - Coprinus comatus. It's said to be delicious. This is the one that dosen't get inky.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

January 9, 2005
11:17 PM

Post #1230139

Now .. Xenomorf .. that 'Shaggy Mane' .. could win hands down .. and walk the runway for shroom beauties .. in an instant !!

An absolutely gorgeous mushroom !! .. However, what is 'inky' in mushroom lingo ? .. Would you elaborate a bit for me ...

- Magpye

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


January 9, 2005
11:42 PM

Post #1230170

Magpye,
While I was searching for the name of Shaggy Mane, I read somewhere that there is another 'shroom that looks and grows similar to this one (closely related), but when it matures it exudes an inky type of substance. (I'm fairly new to shroomology... lol :)
Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

January 9, 2005
11:58 PM

Post #1230204

Thank ye kindly tho' .. Xenomorf ..

.. 'Shroomology' .. 'ey ?!? ...

A good'un !! And .. Hey! It'll sure nuff 'work' fer me, I tell ya !! ..

- Magpye
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 10, 2005
1:17 AM

Post #1230326

It almost looks like it has feathers... sort of like a white bird napping with it's head tucked under its wing.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


January 10, 2005
6:48 AM

Post #1230653

Gorgeous isn't it - great photo Xenomorph.

I've gathered and cooked this one often in the UK. It needs cooking down as a lot of liquid comes out in the cooking, but when cooked it's delicious.
In the UK we call it Shaggy Ink Cap or Lawyer's Wig :)

However Coprinus comatus does go inky when going over and you have to pick it young enough, before that starts. Well, the ones in the UK do ;)

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


January 10, 2005
4:01 PM

Post #1231175

That's what I was waiting for this one (& 2 others that grew in my yard) to do. Get inky, that is. But it never went inky.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


January 10, 2005
5:13 PM

Post #1231290

Oooh that's strange - was the weather particularly hot and dry?
I wonder if it's your local conditions, I ve just seen where you live
I've seen them shrivel without inking in a heatwave.

BTW I love the name 'Lawyer's Wig' - it does conjure up a great picture...

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


January 10, 2005
5:21 PM

Post #1231302

They sprouted up right after/during the monsoon rains in August (warm & humid). We were in the middle of a drought before that.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


January 10, 2005
8:20 PM

Post #1231555

I'm foxed then, very strange
But anyway - do give them a try next time they pop up. I just 'fry' them in butter with a bit of seasoning and serve them on toast or with other savouries.
Allow time to eveporate off the liquid though

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


January 10, 2005
8:26 PM

Post #1231565

OK, I'll try it. Thanks.
philomel
Castelnau RB Pyrenée
France
(Zone 8a)


January 10, 2005
8:31 PM

Post #1231572

:o)
As with most fungi, they do cook down rather, so gather as many as you can.
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 11, 2005
4:13 AM

Post #1232229

Enjoyed the story and the laugh Magpye ! You created an excellent picture in my mind.

And Xenomorf, what a strange and lovely mushroom ! I've never seen that one. And the cactus in the background really is strange for me. When I think of fungi I think of woods and leaf litter and organic matter and your pic shows the complete opposite. Nice.
oceangirl
Cape Cod, MA
(Zone 7a)

January 12, 2005
10:06 PM

Post #1234885

Cool fungus pictures everyone!
I posted this one in the fall and kennedyh ID'd it for me-

a quote from kennedyh:

[ Your fungus in the moss is interesting. I think it is The Black Trumpet Craterellus fallax
[HYPERLINK@www.bluewillowpages.com]
If it is, it is apparently an excellent mushroom to eat!]

Thumbnail by oceangirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 12, 2005
10:09 PM

Post #1234888

They look like little chocolate tubas peaking out of the grass!

Xenomorf

Xenomorf
Valley of the Sun, AZ
(Zone 9b)


January 21, 2005
3:33 PM

Post #1249911

If anybody would like a forum on this subject 'Fungi & such", I have put it up for suggestion in the 'Daves Garden' forum. Voice your desire there if you would like a forum.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 21, 2005
8:47 PM

Post #1250444

I think it would a good addition... I wish there was a spot in the PlantFinder, as well.
starshine2001
Franklin, NC

January 28, 2005
6:30 PM

Post #1262391

I'm looking for the woodland ground cover wintergreen (procumbens) with the red berries, and I'm posting to this forum because so many of you are seeking fungi in shady areas in the woods where wintergreen grows. I would love to have 10-12 little clumps so that I could plant a shady wooded area in my yard. I have little worth trading, but I do have a clivia/Kaffir lily that is so crowded in its pot that I am finally going to have to divide it. I would be happy to trade a part of that plant, roots and all, for wintergreen.
Any takers?

starshine2001
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 29, 2005
12:06 AM

Post #1262838

Hi, Starshine Are you looking for Gaultheria procumbens? I found it in our Plantfiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1101/ I also found some info on growing it on Googles: http://www.ehow.com/how_16316_grow-wintergreen-(gaultheria.html You might try requesting plants on the Plant Trading forum.
starshine2001
Franklin, NC

January 29, 2005
7:33 PM

Post #1264159

Yes, it is Gaultheria procumbens I am looking for. Thank you for the suggestions, I visited the sites and reviewed the helpful information. I will try
the plant trading forum. I had not done so because I expected to have to have something to trade, and as I am a new member I haven't saved anything worth trading yet. But I realize now that I could ask for the wintergreen for the cost of packing and postage and hope some good soul will connect.

starshine2001

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 29, 2005
7:47 PM

Post #1264174

Starshine, I'm just over Chunky Gal outside Haysville. I see lots of wintergreen here in the woods but not bearing berries.
ladyannne
Merced, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 14, 2005
5:35 PM

Post #1288572

Great thread, thanks Weez! We found this fungus on the ground, growing out of the niger thistle shells that drop from the bird sock feeders. It is neon orange and composed on tiny parts. Terminology is lacking here. Anyway, when we get near it, it puffs up dust. Scary. It is spreading despite efforts to remove it. That is a Forget Me Not plant and leaf for size comparison.

Any ID ideas? Any removeal ideas? Is this stuff really from outer space? Dangerous? Harmless? Should we move? (not!)

Thumbnail by ladyannne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ladyannne
Merced, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 14, 2005
5:39 PM

Post #1288578

A larger shot - thanks for any info!

Thumbnail by ladyannne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 14, 2005
7:06 PM

Post #1288671

To me it looks like Witches' Butter (Tremella mesenterica) but since you're in CA it could probably be Yellow Jelly Fungus (Guepiniopsis alpinus). At any rate, I'd say some sort of jelly fungi and the dust are probably spores. As far as I know it's harmless and I would allow it in my garden.
ladyannne
Merced, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 14, 2005
7:19 PM

Post #1288684

Di, I did run across that one in my search, and it is not the same thing at all, unfortunately. This is a vast collection of jointed orange saucers. It is spreading at an alarming rate. Thanks though!!!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 14, 2005
8:17 PM

Post #1288754

If it's in an inappropriate spot, I suppose you could change the conditions there to make it less appealing... drier, different pH?
Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 11, 2005
1:51 AM

Post #1809368

Hi guys ..

Jes droppin' in only long enuff to leave these with ya. (if ya haint already run across them, that is!)

I felt that if any one could appreciate these 'ticular websites - it would be you guys.

http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/calvatia.html

http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/

- Magpye
Equilibrium

October 11, 2005
5:21 AM

Post #1809709

The snowman was a riot!
BetsyBug
Memphis, TN
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2005
11:56 AM

Post #1818961

Good links...funny and infomative...as we always say "there's fungus among us"!
AudreyJo
Mountain Home, AR

October 19, 2005
3:12 PM

Post #1824772

In one of my usual hikes around our property, I spotted some huge mushrooms a couple of weeks ago. Here is one that is approximately 8½" across. I had not seen these before, so I thought they were pretty amazing. Timing is everything for these. I've spotted lots of other coral colored and other varieties in the woods, but these were in the open field.

Thumbnail by AudreyJo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AudreyJo
Mountain Home, AR

October 19, 2005
3:15 PM

Post #1824776

Here is another view of what looks to me like a "fairy ring".

Thumbnail by AudreyJo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 19, 2005
3:50 PM

Post #1824871

Howdy AudreyJo .. a big ol 'hearty' welcome to DG, to ya !!

- Magpye
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 20, 2005
6:24 PM

Post #1827371

Maybe you've discovered a true 'fairy subdivision' out in the meadow...a product of fungi urban sprawl.
AudreyJo
Mountain Home, AR

October 20, 2005
7:02 PM

Post #1827412

Oh, that's good, Weezingreens! That's indeed a possibility - 'fairy subdivision'. I'd like to think that you're absolutely right.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 21, 2005
5:02 AM

Post #1828493

Soon we'll see little street signs, tiny little ice cream truck...
AudreyJo
Mountain Home, AR

October 21, 2005
9:19 PM

Post #1829736

What a great imagination! I can just see it all now - well not now, but next year, when my fairy ring reappears.
DiOhio
Corning, OH
(Zone 6a)

October 21, 2005
10:19 PM

Post #1829864

This is so cool AJ !! I've never seen a Fairy Ring. Those are some pretty hefty shrooms too. Now that we finally got some rain here in SE Ohio I'll have to go out fungus hunting soon.
Breezymeadow
Culpeper, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 21, 2005
10:21 PM

Post #1829872

We get "fairy ring" mushrooms here all the time, & they are cool to see popping up. It's truly amazing how they manage to come up in a complete circle like that.
AnaM149
Casselberry, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 22, 2005
7:47 PM

Post #1831571

I came accross this forum as I change one of mine every few weeks or so, for variety and sometimes, I dont really have much to do with what I was watching anymore. Well this one caught my eye, as I am trying to put some natives in my garden for all sorts of reasons: help out the environment, but mostly because if they thrive in the wild, then there is not much that I can do to kill them with neglect... Stop laughing, I know many of you wish you had some plants you could litterally plant and forget. ANYWAY, I came accross this thread about fungi and such and it caught my curiosity (which will kill this cat, one day).

What a great thread!!! I really hope Dave will decide to move this into it's own forum. This is great! I finally discovered what was growing on my mulch - those Bird's Nest thingies. I thought that they were just nasty and avoided touching them for fear that, well, I dont know what I was afraid of... So, here is a picture. Sorry that it is not totally crisp, I have a hard time with holding the shutter down steady enough.

Either way, thanks for this thread. I have a few other beasties growing in the back yard and when they appear I will post here for some ID. Thanks, Ana

Thumbnail by AnaM149
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AnaM149
Casselberry, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 22, 2005
7:52 PM

Post #1831586

OH, I forgot! I also have a Viburnum covered in lichens and stuff... DH wants me to cut it down, but I love the look and the tree is still growing, so nope, not gonna cut it! See if you can spot someone posing, too...

Thumbnail by AnaM149
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Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 22, 2005
9:37 PM

Post #1831822

Yes! I noticed the little fellow right away! I, too, am fascinated with these fungi and other spores that pop up here and there. A couple years ago, I read up on broomrape that grows in proximity to our alders.

Ana, if you are using a point and shoot digital camera, try moving back a bit to take the picture. Use a higher resolution so that you can crop the picture after you download. That will zoom you in closer without the distortion.
AnaM149
Casselberry, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 26, 2005
4:22 PM

Post #1839795

I happened to come accross this - Dave will not let us have our own forum... http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/553422/
Breezymeadow
Culpeper, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 26, 2005
4:43 PM

Post #1839825

That's a shame, as I love mushrooms & would love to have a forum to help with I.D.'s. Not I.D.'ing for edibility, just for fun & information. I get a really wide & colorful variety of them here on my VA farm. Not to mention there are so many companies out there now selling indoor kits & mushroom spawn for outdoor growing etc., etc.

It's a shame we couldn't get a forum started with an explicit no-no against discussing or mentioning them for drug purposes - same as all the forums have about discussing sales.

Do you think there'd be at least 20 of us interested enough to petition for this?



This message was edited Oct 26, 2005 2:11 PM
AudreyJo
Mountain Home, AR

October 27, 2005
7:24 PM

Post #1842163

Well, I have another interesting picture of mushroom activity - and I say activity, because this is a whole bloomin' bunch! My husband discovered this (it's about 7" across) growing in our gravel driveway. It's very dry now, so there's no telling what got this mess started.

Thumbnail by AudreyJo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AnaM149
Casselberry, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 27, 2005
7:57 PM

Post #1842197

Well, you can count me in! I know that the Datura forum and I think the Brugmansia forum also has a warning about content. I dont recall ever seeing any posts about other insidious uses for those plants. It is kind of a bummer.
Breezymeadow
Culpeper, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 27, 2005
8:03 PM

Post #1842205

We've got another thread going about this at the same time as this one - check in over there as well.

And I agree. What's the difference between inappropriate use of funghi & inappropriate use of herbs & other plants with hallucinogenic properties?
AnaM149
Casselberry, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 27, 2005
8:07 PM

Post #1842210

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/553422/

If we get enough interest... MAYBE
MAYBE
MAYBE
A new forum would be born!
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

October 31, 2005
2:06 AM

Post #1848395

This thread is very interesting! Yesterday, we went for one of our family walks up in Awenda Provincial Park here in Ontario and our children spotted a broken tree with some type of fungus living on it. They were very intrigued and it soon became a hunt for more. They had many questions that I couldn't even come close to answering and my oldest said "well, you're always on Dave's so there's probably "stuff" on there about it", lol. I said I'd look, so here I am on this thread. Here are some pics of what we spotted for sharing. I don't have clue as to the names but me and the kids are going to have a family project of naming them.

Whether or not there would be a forum dedicated to these types of living matter, it is important to try to understand their roles in the eco system and what exactly we have growing in our yards and in the places we visit.

Cheers

Thumbnail by Erynne
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Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

October 31, 2005
2:06 AM

Post #1848396

another,

Thumbnail by Erynne
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Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

October 31, 2005
2:07 AM

Post #1848398

on a tree stump

Thumbnail by Erynne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

October 31, 2005
2:08 AM

Post #1848401

along the path

Thumbnail by Erynne
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Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

October 31, 2005
2:09 AM

Post #1848403

last one..

Thumbnail by Erynne
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moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

December 2, 2005
10:14 PM

Post #1905149

So glad to find his forum, been reading back and looking at your great pictures. I have some photos taken in the spring that I'll show you. This picture is Gyromitra Esculenta aka False Morel. note the redish, cinnamon brown color.

This one is in my woods, down near the river.

You'll see were this schroom has killed 160 people since '64 !!

Bill

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_morel

Thumbnail by moko
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 3, 2005
1:48 AM

Post #1905510

I was raised in Northern Indiana, so it is possible I've eaten one! My father used to go out hunting for morels, but they were the small pale colored ones, so I think not. They certainly were delicious. I don't think I'd want to take a chance with this fellow!
Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2006
10:41 PM

Post #1974402

This certainly is an interesting thread. I just found it.
I don't see any harm having a forum for this subject, Anything can be used for the wrong reasons. If Dave can keep the Jokes & Chat forum clean, Fungus should be a snap. Just my 2 cents worth.
Here are pics of fungus on my firewood.
Andy P

Thumbnail by Sarahskeeper
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Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2006
10:44 PM

Post #1974411

Another, both were taken in early January. They are still growing, in Winter!
Andy P

Thumbnail by Sarahskeeper
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2006
11:15 PM

Post #1974462

Wellllll now ... Andy P .. What could you have possibly, 'really' expected!?!
It's winter here, and jes look at moi'!! This ol fungus is still growin' and wartin' the dickens out of everybody.
(Sorry .. jes HAD to .. twas far too big a bait danglin' to refuse a lil nibble-bump!!)
I'm thru with my giggler, for now .. LOL ..

I wonder if Dave has even been able to take a read of the many of us, that have requested (still another thread), such a forum?
Keepin' my 'fingers crossed' that he'll come thru for us eventually. I, for one, could sure benefit greatly.

A big batch of excellent shots of some mitey interesting growths, you guys!

- Magpye
moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2006
8:06 PM

Post #1976457

These little guys grow along my driveway , their 'British soldiers' (C. Cristatella) only about 3/4 In. This Lichen comes out in late June and and start disappearing in Aug. I only wish they would stay longer. The light Lichen is (C. Evansii ) or powder puff aka Deer moss. Their are a few sulpher caps in the picture but their name escapes me.




Edited to correct typo

This message was edited Jan 14, 2006 4:20 PM

Thumbnail by moko
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moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2006
8:13 PM

Post #1976467

A closer picture of the 'Soldiers'.


Bill

Thumbnail by moko
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 15, 2006
3:17 AM

Post #1977508

Lichen, moss and fungi are so amazing. The 'Soldiers' are quite beautiful, and the light lichen offers a beautiful contrast.
Equilibrium

January 15, 2006
4:55 AM

Post #1977671

Those look like some form of ocean life. I love the color.
moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2006
6:40 PM

Post #1978724

Yes Equilibrium, they do look like something you would find under Sea, you have a keen imagination !

I would like to put this photo in the Plant Files, could someone steer me in the right direction, Thanks
moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2006
6:50 PM

Post #1978745

Repeated the first post twice.

This message was edited Jan 20, 2006 7:03 PM
moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2006
6:54 PM

Post #1978754

Repeated the first post twice.

This message was edited Jan 20, 2006 6:58 PM
ceeadsalaskazone3
Seward, AK

January 25, 2006
2:44 AM

Post #1998385

If numbers count let me help, I vote for a forum.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


January 26, 2006
9:04 PM

Post #2002300

Yes, I'd like to see lichen, mosses and fungi in a database here on DG.
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2006
2:04 PM

Post #2026182

Hi, all. Just joining in. I haven't had time to read through all your posts, but it looks like a very interesting thread. I checked out this thread because I'm trying to get an I.D. for this red fungus that appears in several spots in my yard in the Springtime. It is about 3 - 4 inches tall and forms a cathedral like arched dome. It's unpleasant smell of rotting rats can scent the air for a good distance away from the plant. It often has a white round globe pop up near the base of the plant that just barely breaks the surface of the soil.

Is it a native plant or an alien the Martians that visit my garden on a frequent basis are leaving behind?

Jeremy
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2006
2:07 PM

Post #2026184

OOPs, forgot to include the photo. Here it is:

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
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Equilibrium

February 6, 2006
2:12 PM

Post #2026193

Say moko, I don't think they can be added to the database. I tried to add some common shrooms and couldn't. They really are a separate category unto themselves.

In keeping with the "sealife" theme, you guys gotta get a load of this. The creativity is unparalleled and I can assure you some of what you will see is directly attributable to a person who has an imagination that blows mine out of the water.

It will take a little bit of time to load but it is worth the wait and you will want to share it with your children because it is just that cool. If you don't have quick time, you may have to download their free software to view this which isn't that difficult-
http://www.1st-ave-machine.com/video/anime.htm
moko
Northern, AR
(Zone 6b)

February 6, 2006
2:35 PM

Post #2026236

Jax

It is most commonly called 'Stink Horn', judging only by It's color, I would say (Mutinus Caninus), I got those in a load of sawdust once, they do stink!

Equil

I'll check that this evening, I have dial up, yuck!

Bill

JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2006
2:45 PM

Post #2026255

Thanks, Mako. In the DG Plant ID Forum, Floridian also said it was "Stinkhorn" and provided the following link for more info:

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.floridata.com/wallpaper/jpg/Clathrus_columnatus800a.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.floridata.com/tracks/GardenersJournal04/Journal_11_04.htm&h=600&w=800&sz=193&tbnid=vdnip4Y5XCOGZM:&tbnh=106&tbnw=142&hl=en&start=11&prev=/images?q=stinkhorns&svnum=10&hl=en&lr=&sa=N

It seems to most closely resemble Clathrus columnatus. And the above article confirms that the fungi smells enough like rotting flesh that is able to attract vultures! but it apparently emits the smell to attract tiny flies that eat its stinking goo which contains its spores. The flies then "deposit" the spores on new locations and assist in spreading the Clathrus.

One smart fungi, I'd say.

Jeremy
Equilibrium

February 6, 2006
3:24 PM

Post #2026345

Oh Jeremy, your escapades with the "piano art" just came up. I tell you I laughed all over again reading that thread and the photo of the piano parts just puts the icing on the cake. Thanks for making my day every time I run into that thread and re-read it. What a hoot.
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2006
6:03 PM

Post #2026648

Thanks, Equil! Glad the story can give you a snicker still. I sent a copy of the story to our local Steinway Piano dealer with whom I had dinner with friends a few weeks ago. I'm not sure he saw the humor of it.

Jeremy
Equilibrium

February 6, 2006
10:51 PM

Post #2027112

Hmmm, I'm thinking a change in dinner partners is in order. I don't know anyone who has read about your piano escapades who didn't all but split a gut to include my girlfriend Shirley... who is a piano teacher who has a Steinway in her conservatory.
Equilibrium

February 7, 2006
12:47 AM

Post #2027355

Isn't anyone going to look at my video clip that left me spell bound?
The music to it is practically perfect. Here's the link again-
http://www.1st-ave-machine.com/video/anime.htm
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 7, 2006
1:00 AM

Post #2027383

Equil - I think the Steinway dealer here may have felt too much grief and angst knowing that pianos can be destroyed in transit to enjoy the story LOL -- but I haven't had a chance to talk with him yet about it. Glad to know Shirley got a chuckle from it. The link you provided above comes up a blank page on my computer, but my comp is old and tired and often doesn't want to cooperate much of the time (it and I have a lot in common!)
Jeremy
Equilibrium

February 7, 2006
2:48 AM

Post #2027638

Boo hoo! Some creative genius with a computer out there went a created a video in which he/she made some plants come to life. Literally, the plants come to life. It was one of the most interesting video clips I have ever seen. Your computer screen is blank because you must not have the application to be able to view it. The only mistake the person made in my opinion was to create the videoe in Quick Time which most people don't have loaded. I had to go and download the software from their site to be able to view it. Sorry dear, I wish you could see it. Maybe if you are visiting someone's home you could pop on line for a bit and see if you can view it. It is only a few minutes long.
Floridian
Lutz, FL
(Zone 9b)


February 7, 2006
1:44 PM

Post #2028378

I finally was able to access the video from (my new) home computer last night...you're right, it is amazing. I watched it several times!
Equilibrium

February 7, 2006
2:00 PM

Post #2028407

We all watched it a few times too. Entrancingly beautiful.
joepyeweed
Peoria, IL

February 7, 2006
4:39 PM

Post #2028753

Have you fungus freaks read the book "Reflections on Fungaloids" by Betty Williamson?

I gave my sister this book as a gift for christmas. We sat down and read skimmed through it together. The illustrations are beautiful and the stories are just as interesting.

I do reccomend it for anyone who appreciates a beautiful fungus or nice artwork.
Equilibrium

February 7, 2006
5:54 PM

Post #2028905

"fungus freaks" ;) ;) ;) Who meeeeeeeeeee?

I'll ask for the book. I never had heard of it before you mentioned it and I've got a birthday coming up here this summer! Sounds like a great book to curl up and read on a rainy day and a little bit of subject matter one can sink their teeth into is always an added bonus.
Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2006
7:35 PM

Post #2029020

.. (clearing throat) Joepyeweed ..

I jes want ya to know that I absolutely resemble that remark!! .. LOL ..
(rather reluctanty extending arm up & into the air) ..

However, it's more of a fungus 'fondness' .. for my part. (hee)

- Magpye
joepyeweed
Peoria, IL

February 8, 2006
2:08 AM

Post #2029809

I consider myself a fungus freak too, the term was meant to be self-deprecating ... one of my photos to share...


This message was edited Feb 7, 2006 9:20 PM

Thumbnail by joepyeweed
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joepyeweed
Peoria, IL

February 8, 2006
2:20 AM

Post #2029829

another pic to share:
(can we put more than one picture in a post? - relative newbie to this site)

Thumbnail by joepyeweed
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Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2006
2:44 AM

Post #2029874

Howdy again, joepye ..

.. 'fraid ya can't post multiple pics. One pic per post ...

But, there is an alternative; one can create a 'collage' of several images to appear in one pic. Do believe ya hafta use a photo program to create the collage. However, I find that the multiple images are so much smaller, and cause a bit of difficulty for 'good' viewing. (But, this is merely my humble opinion). Myself .. I can truly appreciate the larger 'single' photos.

In case I've missed the opportunity ... I'd like to offer a big ol 'hearty' welcome to DG, to ya joepyeweed!!

- Magpye
joepyeweed
Peoria, IL

February 8, 2006
2:54 AM

Post #2029890

thank you magpye :-)
Equilibrium

February 8, 2006
4:09 AM

Post #2030158

Please don't create a collage, I don't see well enough as it is and I'd end up saving every one of your collages to my desktop to be able to enlarge the photos to look at them. I am afraid I don't see all that well. Your second pic looks absolutely edible! Actually, it looks like a hollow stem Morrel to me. Yum yum. What's the first photo?
joepyeweed
Peoria, IL

February 8, 2006
12:23 PM

Post #2030425

I believe the first pic is a beefsteak morel, Gyromitra esculenta. Its a false morel, and not edible.

The second pic was very yummy :-)
Equilibrium

February 8, 2006
1:27 PM

Post #2030521

We have a little site up in the UP where Morrels grow. We don't tell anyone where our site is because we call it a family secret. WE take the kids and let them pick the mushrooms then we scramble them up with eggs. A nice family "secret' and tasty too. People are very protective of their Morrel sites.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 9, 2006
5:44 PM

Post #2033035

Yes, I've noticed that nobody up here in Alaska tells anybody where they have a mining claim or a morrel patch!
Equilibrium

February 9, 2006
7:10 PM

Post #2033165

Hey Weeze, long time no hear. How be you! Got Moose? nyuk nyuk nyuk!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 11, 2006
4:18 PM

Post #2037602

Just saw a moosey across the street in a stand of willow trees last week. It's been pretty snowless around here until lately, so they haven't been showing up in my driveway much. They like the plowed areas where they don't have to wade through three or four feet of snow. With those big ol' hooves of theirs, you'd think they'd serve as snow shoes!
dawndelie
Carlsbad, CA

June 12, 2007
7:08 PM

Post #3607012

These inkcap mushrooms are destroying my bromeliad garden. They decompose within two hours of growth, and release a black tar-like substance all over anything they touch. How do I get rid of them? They are everywhere! I can't keep up with them. I have been trying to pull them out before they decompose, but with their short life cycle, it is overwhelming. Please advise.

Thumbnail by dawndelie
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bonitin
Gent
Belgium
(Zone 8a)

June 12, 2007
7:52 PM

Post #3607146



inkcap mushrooms (Coprinus) are entirely harmless to your or any other plants! They grow on rich soils.

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