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Chocolate Daisies

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

A friend here in the panhandle wants to share some seeds of chocolate daisies with me. Earlier this year, she found some coming up volunteer in my garden, but I forgot to mark it to save the seed. They really do smell like chocolate!

Problem is, I have noticed this friend likes to grow other wild things and tends to let them take over, like echinacea. So I wanted to know what the real name is (don't have photos, but seems they were low to ground and small flowers), and if they are in-vasve or not, and what experience others have had with it in Texas.

I don't want to make an ax-eye mistake!

Tamara

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Do they look like this? If so, the botanical name is Berlandiera lyrata.

http://davesgarden.com/pdb/go/1605/index.html

I have never grown them, but the description states that they freely self sow and if you do not want volunteers, you will need to deadhead them. Thanks for the post. I had never heard of chocolate daisies before. They sound "delicious".

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

Fitch, They look "native" to me. Like only people put a boundry between Texas and Mexico. It might be too cold for them to take over, and they won't tumble when they are dry.lol

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

thanks guys. I will keep some for myself and send some for a gift. guess I need to learn to use the PDB huh? It always looks so intimidating when I try. The volunteer ones in my garden didn't get that big, maybe that is why I lost them among those tumbleweeds LOL

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

I have them and love them.
They've never gotten out of control, and you can ALWAYS find people who want the seeds and volunteer seedlings! lol...
-T

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

Thank you picker!
I kept a few for myself,and will be sure to save seed next year, just ask. As for volunteer seedlings, if I get any, I will hollar atcha, and you cin comngetm!!!
Can't wait to have the smell of chocolate in my garden :)

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

They are a bit on the short side, so plant them in the front of the border, not middle, or back.
They love full hot baking sun. They put out a tap root, so best direct sown, or planted out soon after germination, if germinating indoors.

Watch the seedheads, as they will mature and drop somethimes in the same day. There was a point in the midsummer where I'd have to go out twice a day to pick the seeds, or they'd be scattered by the wind...

good luck!
You'll LOVE the smell!! Really like a hershey bar, but even sweeter, if you can imagine! It is like a candy bar, with extra sugar...
Bees love them, as do butterflies.
-T

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

Great info, THANKS!

Will keep you "posted"...

near Dallas, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi Tamara. I would be interested in some of those too. I'm origionally from Amarillo but never saw anthing like them before. They sound like they would be perfect for a place I have on the ally side of the back fence. I have yellow cannas there and need something low to grow under them.

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

Luck pup~
According to seed picker, I will have to watch real close in order to collect seeds. But i will certainly share when I get some from my flowers. I will also post links here if I find some online...
Maybe if I start some early indoors, I can bring seed to the roundup in April...
Tamara

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Tamara- If you start them now, I recommend you use very deep containers, as they put out a tap root straight down, like a carrot. My rookie first attempt at sowing them in 4" pots was a big waste of time, as I had to repot them all just weeks after they sprouted. Not because the roots filled the pot, but because the single root was spinning around the bottom of the container and spilling out the drain holes! lol...

I used tall styrofoam cups with the bottom poked out, with great success. They are about the size of a 4" pot, only twice as tall.

The bottom being completely poked out, helps to "air prune" the tap root. In other words, when the tap root hits the air at the bottom of the cup, it stops growing and the daisy then channels it's energy to make additional and horizontal roots. You'll get a much healthier and larger, better rooted plant this way.

Trust me, I've learned the hard way! lol...

-T

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

Seedpkr, Thanks for the great long tap root lesson. Sidney

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

You are welcome
-T

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

A big thanks...

I have some 6" deep peat pots. Maybe I shold start them in there? Do I poke the entire bottom ou, or just part of it???

I am so excited, I got my table grow lights in today, hope to get something started this weekend.

Tamara

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

I take out the entire bottom.
You can read more about the "Whitcomb bottomless continaers" method on this site:
http://agebb.missouri.edu/mac/agopp/arc/agopp027.txt

the author has been using this method on pecan seedlings, which have a tap root. It will expain how and why, better than I probably could.
-T

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

seedpkr, you've done it again, just have such good info. Thanks again.
I'm bound and determined to grow some Butterfly weed this year. They too have a very persnickedy tap root. They dont like being dug up at all. That's where I'm using this info.
My garden heart was opened 12 miles out of Plainview, Texas about 55 years ago.
I don't think my GM knew of this Choc. Daisy or we might have had them.

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Dierama, lavatera, and hollyhocks are some others that either resent being transplanted, and/or have a tap root.
I've grown these from seed in tall bottomless containers, and had much greater transplanting success rates, than compared to 4" pots.
I'm sure I can think of others, but those are off the top of my head...lol...

Frankly, the bottomless containers(some call them "band pots") are a better choice, for just about ANY plant.

Here is another tip. Those tall stryrofoam containers are easy to find, reusuable, lightweight(great for reducing shipping costs!), and cheap! Their shape helps keep the dirt from falling out of the bottom of the container, and the bottoms are easy to pop out. They are also EXACTLY the same size as those "Hound dog bulb planters" that they sell each Spring at Home Depot. Here is a link: http://www.hound-dog.com/bulb_hound.htm

Growing in those cups, and having a tool that digs the same sized hole, makes transplanting so quick and easy! I can plant many more plants in much less time using this "set up"! lol...
-T

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

that is great, thanks...

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

I never got the room under the lights to start any of thes, but, hey, it looks like I have got a bunch of volunteer chocolate daisies! So I will have plenty of seeds, if I can just catch em! Mowed over a few this morning, they were spent, and I was hoping to scatter some seeds.

Send an SASE. Don't think I will get enough to put these on the seed trading forum...

TamaraFaye

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

Well, apparently, what I thought was a seed head, is actually a bud, check out this photo of seeds by htop:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/69368/

So I will be watching for them. Currently, I have mostly buds. Actually, this mkaes me feel less dumb, as when I found them I couldn't believe that I hadn't noticed them previously, DUH, they haven't bloomed yet!

Here is what I am seeing now (again by htop):

http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/69367/

Tamara

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Tamara,

The mature flower look like a lot of other yellow daisies. The buds, however, are unusual. How large are they? Don't feel bad about not being able to see the seed pods. They look awfully small. I've been trying to get some Texas Star seed. The wildflower has been blooming for more than 2 months so there should be some ripe seed. I can find green seed pods, but then they disappear.

Veronica

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

Yeah, makes me want to tranplant some to a pot and move to a non windy place. At least then maybe most would fall into the pot. Then Icould just spread the dirt around next year... hmmmm.

Some of the plants are calf high and more than a foot around! I don't mow often...LOL

I wonder if something is eating your seed pods?

Tamara

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

It's possible, what with all the grasshoppers around, but all the ripe ones? I was thinking that maybe the pods don't produce many seeds so dry to almost nothing.
Veronica

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

I wish I could help, I don't know much about Texas Star (except that I would like some!)

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

I picked some seeds the other day to give to a friend and to a neighbor. Hope to get some for me and extras for DGers. Pretty cool how they are on the edge of the petal...

seed-picker_TX, funny how you had mentioned hollyhocks resenting tranplanting. I forgot all about it, and dug some up at a friends this week before they got buried in concrete! One so far may have made it, it has a bloom opening!

Luckpup, are you still wanting some seeds? Make sure you follow instructions above!

Tamara

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

I have seeds! Currently badly mixed with chaff and petals :-) Send SASE if you want some...

Baytown, TX(Zone 9b)

I would love some chocolate daisy seeds.

Sandy

Fritch, TX(Zone 6b)

Great, I am in the addy exchange, just send a SASbubbleE. I have plenty, and will gather more this week before I mow! Please insert a little note, reminding me of what to send you :-)

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