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Propagation: crepe myrtle

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venessa
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 20, 2001
8:18 PM

Post #6867

Can someone tell me when is a good time to take cuttings of these and can I root them in water?
Thank you.
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2001
10:46 AM

Post #85381

If you let yours go to seed, you'll have several hundred next spring. And they grow really fast.
dave

June 21, 2001
12:22 PM

Post #85404

Did somebody say Crepe Myrtle!! :) Those who know me are aware that I'm a crepe myrtle fanatic.

Forget trying to propagate the CM in water. I've never had any success and have never heard of anybody else succeeding that way either.

For cuttings, the best success I have had is with hardwood cuttings taken in mid-winter. Here's a little HOWTO I wrote last February about hardwood cuttings.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/6570/

Dave
Deanne
Franktown, CO
(Zone 5a)

June 21, 2001
12:50 PM

Post #85409

I've taken semi-soft wood in late summer and dipped in rooting hormone and placed in a moist potting mix covered in a plastic bag and they were rooted by winter.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

June 23, 2001
12:35 PM

Post #86140

Deanne,you live in zone 5? and you grow crepe myrtle? I've heard you can winter them over and they die back to the ground and come back the next year but more like a bush.Is this true? I love the bark on them almost as much as the blooms.Does anyone have a seedling I could trade for? I'd love to try it. crestedchic
Deanne
Franktown, CO
(Zone 5a)

June 25, 2001
2:52 AM

Post #86670

I put mine in the greenhouse over winter, but this past winter I lost the heat for a few days and all the leaves fell off. I thought I had lost them, but they sprouted and are growing great. Mine are like a bush. I'm moving to CO sometime in the next 2 years so I'll be giving up my crepe myrtles...they are too big to send to you. =o( Like tiG said, the seeds do well. I got some from Dave last year and they sprouted great!
dave

June 25, 2001
2:54 AM

Post #86671

Deanne, what method of germination did you use on the crepe myrtle cuttings I sent you last year? Did you stratify them? Did you cover them or surface sow them? What medium did you sow them in? How long did it take to germinate?

Thanks - I'm curious!

Dave
Deanne
Franktown, CO
(Zone 5a)

June 26, 2001
1:56 PM

Post #87122

Dave, I did surface sow them, kept them moist(not hard with all the rain we had) and I would guess they sprouted within a week or 3. Didn't write down the duration so thats a wag. Just took them from the pods you sent to the potting mix. My potting mix is spagnum peat and vermiculite mixed with some perlite. No cold temp or anything. I was surprised how easily they sprouted.
dave

June 26, 2001
2:39 PM

Post #87150

Thanks, Deanne. I'm going to be sowing a lot of crepe myrtle seeds this year. Did you have the seeds under a growlight or outside?

Dave
Deanne
Franktown, CO
(Zone 5a)

June 28, 2001
2:39 AM

Post #87795

I just started them outside in styro cups after it got warm.
louisa
Troy, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 7, 2001
8:18 PM

Post #91640

Crepe Myrtles send out many suckers so before I left the Tidewater area I managed to dig up three and now have some new trees about 3 feet tall. Does anyone have the pale pink or lavender coloured one?
D_Crownover
Oviedo, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 27, 2005
7:15 PM

Post #1723567

Louisa,

I have both the pale and hot pink, but can easily aquire a lavender.

My neighbor grafted a lavender and white together, You should see it! One side of the tree is white and the other a gorgeouse purple.

I've transplanted around 100 seedlings from the pale pink and they'll be ready fairly soon.

Deanna
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

August 28, 2005
4:36 AM

Post #1724588

Deanna, welcome to DG. This thread is several years old and louisa is no longer a suscriber. I love crepe myrtles too and got a candy stripe last saturday.
I would love some of your seedlings.
Have you considered our RU Oct. 8?
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/516592/
sidney
jester
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 6, 2007
9:05 AM

Post #4162826

does anyone have a copy of Dave's cutting article? I am still trying to make this work and will be doing so this winter. Sounds like the perfect article to read for me.

George in San Antonio

pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

November 26, 2007
4:49 AM

Post #4230021

Hey Jester, I don't have the article, but I have propagated crepes. I took cuttings about a month ago of semi hardwood. I scraped the top layer and put them in regular potting soil. As it has been warm, I just left them outside. I would probably cover them if they are inside for humidity. Since it was sooo dry here, I made sure they stayed moist, but not wet. They are rooted now and putting out fresh growth.

I also have them rooting in water. Once again, my neglect has paid off. I just add new water when it gets low. I haven't potted any with the roots yet, so don't know how well they will do. I'll pot one up and keep an eye on it to let ya know.

My DH got these off his parent's tree about 1 1/2 months ago.

Thumbnail by pupilpropogtr
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pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

November 26, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #4230027

Glad you got me looking at these. Notice it has started growing "limbs" in the water.

I didn't scrape these by the way. Just stuck them in.

Thumbnail by pupilpropogtr
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pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

November 26, 2007
4:51 AM

Post #4230036

Last one. Notice some of the cuttings are only about 3 inches long. This is a tall water bottle and the roots go to the bottom. I really need to do something with these. lol.

Thumbnail by pupilpropogtr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jester
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 26, 2007
5:48 AM

Post #4230169

thanks for the info. Gives me a place to start.
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 14, 2007
3:38 PM

Post #4294093

I know this thread is a little old but I have to add my two cents worth since CRAPEMYRTLES are what we do in our mom & pop propagation nursery. We do most of the "mini" cultivars with the LA names and also the 'Whit l-Vlll'. We are licensed to do the Whit's and a couple of weeping types ('rosey carpet' & 'orchid cascade') which are patented.

We propagate from very soft wood cuttings in early spring as soon as they have 4 to 6" of new growth, no hormone, under mist, and get roots in 3 to 4 weeks. The rooting medium must drain very well. We have even used pure sand with great results but went with a potting medium to make moving up eaiser.

Dave; we go to the Bryan area often, our son lives there, so if you want to talk crapemyrtle, dmail me. Gene

sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2007
1:53 PM

Post #4296798

Gene,
What great knowledge you have just given us. I know Dave's first entry or photo was crepemyrtles. Anyhow he really likes them and so do I.

I live in Zone 9A and have 4 'Tuscarora' CMs. I want to know when and how to prune them for the maximum amout of blooms? They have been untouched for 2 years.
Thanks so much,
Sidney
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 15, 2007
4:44 PM

Post #4297328

Sidney, you have touched a really tender spot with me! An all too common practice is to "pollard" the trees. That is, cut all growth off at some level determined by you. They bloom on new wood, so this practice results in lots of new growth. I call it Crape-Murder. (I did not coin that phrase) I much prefer to prune on an 'as needed' basis, crossing branches, keep the center a little open, etc. standard pruning methods, and remove suckers which are common and seed heads after bloom. I think the trees that have been pollarded look horrible, especially in winter with no leaves to cover the mutilation. Just my 2 cents worth.

As to time, it depends on your area. You don't want to prune, cause new growth, and then have the new tender growth subjected to frost kill. There are so many cultivars that it is much better to buy a crapemyrtle of the color and future full grown size you require. They are available in any 'mature' size from less than a foot to 30' or higher and several different colors.

I am in zone 8 and I DO NOT fertilize after July because of the above potential for frost damage to new wood. Crapemyrtle are notorious for their reluctance to go domant.

Check you local library for CRAPEMYRTLE, A GROWER'S THOUGHTS by David Byers. HTH Gene
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2007
4:50 PM

Post #4297350

Would it hurt if I removed the seed pods now?
;)
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 15, 2007
7:25 PM

Post #4297803

By all means, when the flowers are spent, remove the seed heads. Leaves more energy for the plant when it doesn't use it to produce seed. Gene

pbyrley

pbyrley
Port St Lucie (+ Wk , FL
(Zone 9b)

December 19, 2007
2:18 AM

Post #4308906

My experience with seedling crepe myrtles from Natchez and Muscogee,(planted close together) was that I got 6 seedlings up to flowering size after 2 or 3 years and none of the flowers were very interesting. I guess I was hoping for a great new cultivar :o) I moved during last summer and it was so hot and dry there were no blooms by the time I left. I moved from Chaarlotte, NC (zone 7a) to Wake Forest, NC (zone 7b)

I'd love to hear what Geneivy has to say about the chance of getting a decent plant from seedlings. I have 2 Whit crepe myrtles, Dynamite and Rasberry Sundae (I forgot what the Whit Roman numeral is).
Paul
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 19, 2007
2:56 AM

Post #4309036

Paul;
Yeah, been there done that. I don't mean to sound like a know-it-all but again I quote. This time from "CRAPEMYRTLE, A GROWERS THOUGHTS" by David Byers.
"Seed are an unacceptable way for nurserymen to increase Lagerstroemia. Although easy to germinate, seed lead to mongrelization of the population. We have fought that annoyance with our careful selection routines. A plant geneticist can control the breeding process, selecting each parent for desirable attributes, in which seed are the necessary element." He then goes on to tell how to propagate a few new plants from hardwood cuttings taken about this time of year.

The 'Whit' cultivars you refer to are, 'Whit I' raspberry sundae, and 'Whit II' dynamite. All the 'Whit' cultivars, I thru VIII, are really outstanding. Are you familiar with his (Dr. Carl Whitcomb) 'Whit V' tightwad red? I just posted some pics on 'Rosey Carpet' and 'Orchid Cascade', take a look and let me know what you think. Gene
peony01
Prattville, AL
(Zone 8a)

December 19, 2007
6:29 PM

Post #4310775

As a rule of thumb for pruning crape myrtle - Prune up, not down. Prune to see through, not over.
IMO, topping the crape myrtle at some standard height produces arthritic knuckle looking plants. The commercial lawn care folk started that silliness. It is mighty ugly. Don't wish to offend, but I've been doing this awhile. Good pruning. By the way, crape myrtle propagate easily from stem cuttings. I use softwood cuttings in early summer.
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 19, 2007
7:59 PM

Post #4310998

peony01 AMEN, your "see through, not over" says it better than I did. Gene
shadowpaige64507
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

December 19, 2007
8:45 PM

Post #4311108

I'm glad to of read that. I have two in my back yard that are getting very tall. I didn't know if I should do "as the landscapers" in order to get a bigger bloom. Meaning there would be more branches to have blooms on. I think I will just leave it alone, unless anyone has any good ideas.

pbyrley

pbyrley
Port St Lucie (+ Wk , FL
(Zone 9b)

December 31, 2007
3:45 PM

Post #4343791

Gene, I will look at the Whit V Tightwad red. I had considered a pure red I saw on the Nat. Arboretum site 2 yrs ago- I thought it was Apache, but can no longer find it there so I assume they discovered some disease intolerance and removed it. (I'm 70 so my memory of the name may be wrong).

I am surprised at all the talk about rooting CM as I have always found them easy to root- almost as easy as fig or hydrangea. I can just say to folks- get a sutable rooting medium from Lowes, HD or many mail order houses. I have used Vermiculite since about 1953. It's found about $4 a bag, next to bags of Perlite. Dirr suggests mixing sand and peat but that's too much trouble for a lazy hobbyist. I don't really care if I get 30% or 90% sucess so I just stick my cuttings, dipped in rooting hormone (usually), into a pot of vermiculite on the shady side of the house and try to remember to water once or twice a week and LEAVE THEM ALONE until I see some new growth. I use the hose to thoroughly wet the vermiculite and, if rooted, the cuttings will come out with roots intact. If no roots yet - stick the cutting back in for a while.

Use the web to research a little- if you live in Zone 8 or 9, you will want to stick with named cultivars that are resistant to mildew. It is well worth it to spend a few bucks to get good cultivars (like Gene is propagating) instead of watching your no-name plant grow up for several years, bloom and then look really ugly because it's not disease resistant.

Paul
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 31, 2007
10:18 PM

Post #4345102

pbyrley The 'whit V' gets to about 24 to 30 inches only. There is another true red that may be more to your liking. Look at Red Rocket, another 'whit' cultivar, they get 15 to 20 feet. I do very soft wood cuttings under mist, 5 seconds every 10 minutes on a timer, in perlite, sand, & some peat, I never use hormone on these. I can usually get near 100% There is a National Arboretum release called Chickasaw that may impress you. It is also very small. I know what you are saying about 70. Those of us in our 8th decade are very suseptible to 'senior moments'. I love talking crapemyrtles so it is really nice talking to you. Gene
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 1, 2008
2:54 PM

Post #4347243

OK Gentlemen,
Back in Oct. I was ordered to plant someting along the side of my Garage pictured below. I love Crepe Myrtles and would like to have variety of color about 10 -12 feet tall.
As CM experts which ones would you suggest?
Thanks,
Sidney
TARogers5
Kingston, OK
(Zone 7a)

January 1, 2008
3:12 PM

Post #4347296

Gene what is your take one the crape myrtle Alamo. I have not been able to get it up here.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 1, 2008
3:13 PM

Post #4347300

I forgot to post picture.
;)

Thumbnail by sugarweed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 1, 2008
9:45 PM

Post #4348865

Sidney, look at the site www.petitjeanfoothillsnursery.com for ideas. However, given the two massive trees I think you will be dissapointed with crapemyrtles. They need as much full sun and heat as possible to bloom (at least 8 to 10 hours). I can't tell how the garage is oriented but it looks to me like you have way too much shade for success. Just my opinion though. If you still want them, I will be glad to recomend some.

TARogers5, There are new crapemyrtle cultivars coming on so fast it is hard to keep up with them!! The Alamo I had not heard of but believe me I will find it. It looks outstanding! Red is by far the most popular color and a weeper to boot. If you find out who produces it, I would love to know. I'm sure it is patented. Mike Dirr just released a line of dwarfs of various colors which will be patented for 20 years, but there are lots of mini's available. Gene



sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 2, 2008
12:07 AM

Post #4349270

Gene I have Live Oaks and dappled sun all day. That side of the garage faces the Southwest. I had been advised by a MG locally that my dappled shade received enough sun to be called 'full'. Also the Live Oaks all lean towards the street and that area isn't under their canopy.
As I stated earlier I have 4 Tuscarora CMs planted along the SE end of my yard with a whispy FL wildflower, burgandy ajuga, several colors of pink impatients and a variety of pink leafed sun coleus. All bordered with Monkey Grass.
This last summer I planted 5#s of mixed Caladiums. It was beautiful and in bloom for over 2 & 1/2 months.
Sidney
TARogers5
Kingston, OK
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2008
12:54 AM

Post #4349501

Gene here is a link that gives some information.
http://www.growise.com/fanickcrapemyrtle2.pdf
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 2, 2008
3:50 AM

Post #4350194

Sidney, OK. Here is what I would put in

Dynamite 'Whit II' is red, 10 to 15 feet, good mildew resistance.

Raspberry Sundae 'Whit I' is pinkish-red with each flower trimed in white, again good mildew resistance.

Yuma is a lavender with outstanding bloom.

These selections will keep you out of the classic "watermelon" colors and make an outstanding display against the garage. I jwould like to hear what your final selection is when you make it. All should be available locally.


TARogers5, Thank you so much! I looked at that site but didn't scroll down far enough. The Fanicks nursery is in San Antonio about 50 miles from me. I will shoot them an email first thing tomorrow. The site says they are in still in a test phase so maybe I can sweet talk them out of a liner or two.

Gene
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 2, 2008
5:00 PM

Post #4351642

Thanks so much. Now to find a reasonable source. I have several I'm sure.
When I purchased the 4 matched Tuscarora CMs I found the prices ran from $25 to $100.
All of the locals get great plants in March. I'll be ready to plant then.
Sidney
TARogers5
Kingston, OK
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2008
5:04 PM

Post #4351655

Gene you are welcome. Tell them I need to test one in Oklahoma clay. LOL
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 2, 2008
5:34 PM

Post #4351739

Sidney, if you would be OK with rooted cuttings, I could supply them in the spring cheap. If pushed, they will put on 2 to 3 feet of new growth every year. We don't do the Yuma now but would be happy to add it to our stock. I have sources for whatever cultivar you decide to plant. Dmail me when you are ready and give me time to locate your choices. We have all the 'Whit's in stock all the time. Gene
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 2, 2008
5:37 PM

Post #4351751

TARogers5, I have emailed the folks in San Antonio and am waiting for a reply. Sure hope it comes soon, I don't think I can hold my breath much longer. LOL Will let you know. By the way, according to the web site, they have an upright form and a weeping form of the 'Alamo Fire'. From talking to a plant developer I know, (he developed 'Rosey Carpet"), it may take 2 or 3 years to obtain a patent even if the patent is approved. In the meantime, they could say "Plant Patent Applied For" or PPAF.
Thanks again for the link, Gene

This message was edited Jan 2, 2008 11:51 AM
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 2, 2008
7:00 PM

Post #4351976

Gene,
Well, I won this AD from the Zoneing Dept here in Jax that is conditional on my planting and maintaining vegitation to soften the street side of it.
It was a "Oh Brier Rabbit, Not the Brier Patch!" punishment.
I however am going to get some of your cuttings come spring for other sunny growing areas.
Being this wonderful Red/Purple age I am going to alternate Yumas and Dynamite. I am sure I can get some 6' for reasonable price locally.
Sidney
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 3, 2008
2:10 AM

Post #4353659


TARogers5, I have a meeting tomorrow AM 1/3/08 in San Antonio, with Dr. Jerry M. Parsons, the developer of 'Alamo Fire' cultivars. He seems interested in having me help with the testing of these new cultivars and has promised me rooted cuttings. They are at this time trying to determine the suseptability to powdery mildew as compared to dynamite to see if they are worth patenting. I will keep you posted. Wish me luck. I owe you one friend. Gene
pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 3, 2008
11:24 AM

Post #4355207

Hey Gene,
This Alabama soil can be alot different from TX and OK soil. Just in case ;^)
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 3, 2008
12:57 PM

Post #4355344

TARogers5 JOY JOY JOY, an email from Dr. Parsons last PM said "Bring your truck so you can haul some plants."

pupil, so very good to hear from you. I have first hand knowledge of the kinds of problems you were facing so didn't want to impose. Really hope your life is regaining some semblense of normal. I have you on my list. Will dmail you later with data on my progress. Gene
TARogers5
Kingston, OK
(Zone 7a)

January 3, 2008
4:43 PM

Post #4356241

Gene that is great news. A big plus for you. Glad a little push was in the right direction.
Load up and have some fun. LOL

Another link for getting some personnel trees in your area. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/798640/

Traci you show up everywhere. Love Ya and the best of luck. Ted

Area in front of fence that I am going to plant in Mini or Dwarf Crape Myrtle.



This message was edited Jan 3, 2008 11:18 AM

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pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 4, 2008
12:59 AM

Post #4357942

It's amazing Dr. TA, isn't it. If you look way up on the thread, I beat you here. lol.

If you see me everywhere, then doesn't that make you everywhere too?

Love ya too and GeneIvy who may have some news later. Oh, psychic too. Glad I have ya'll around ;^)

I love the mini weeping ones. Darling!! That area will be perfect for whatever you decide. When will you have it done, tomorrow? You kill me with all you do. Do you SLEEP?
jester
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 5, 2008
12:17 AM

Post #4361303

I have a 25 to 30 foot pink flowered Crepe Myrtle on the corner of my garage. This is the plant I will be taking the cuttings off of. How do I find out the variety name of this particular tree?

Bear
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 5, 2008
12:31 AM

Post #4361362

Do you know the origin of the plant? If it was grown from seed originally, then it wouldn't have a cultivar name. Assuming it is a cultivar, about all you can do now is look through Plant Files or other sources for crapes that get 20+ feet tall and have pink flowers--there are probably quite a few, although the height of it should narrow it down a bit. Then if that doesn't narrow it down enough, I'd post a pic of it in bloom on the ID forum (if you have one...otherwise you'll have to wait until summer when it blooms again)
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 5, 2008
4:07 AM

Post #4362303


Jester, as ecrane3 says, if grown from seed, you will never have a cultivar name. They do not come true from seed. However, if it is a cultivar, acording to 'Crapemyrtle, A Growers Thoughts' by David Byers, 'Biloxi' is the only pink that gets over 30 feet. There are a few more that go over 20 feet. They are Choctaw, Miami, Potomac, and Tuscarora. Good photos of flower heads, bark, (both new and when it exfoliates), and seed heads may give you a positive ID. If you would like, I can send you the 3 paragraphs in which he describes 'Biloxi' but briefly it runs "planted one in 1987, it is over 30' high 12' wide, even with some shade which is not good for crapemyrtles, fastest growing of all in his book, bark exfoliation in July reveals beautiful mottled dark brown colors, produced in 1972, excellent powdery mildew resistance & good winter hardiness. HTH Gene
LorraineR
Gilmer, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 18, 2008
2:56 AM

Post #4418144

Can I winter sow the cm. I have lots of seeds so I put some in containers and put them outside. What do you think will happen to them.
geneivy
Kyle, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 18, 2008
3:49 AM

Post #4418500

LorraineR
It depends on the mother plant they came from. On some of the newer cultivars, the seed are steril. In any event, they will not produce a "good" crapemyrtle. They simply do not come true from seed. It is much better to take cuttings from the mother plant in spring and root the cuttings. They are easy to root from softwood cuttings. Gene
TARogers5
Kingston, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2008
2:20 AM

Post #4838563

Bump

Gene how is the trial going?
I will test some. LOL
jester
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 21, 2008
11:50 AM

Post #4840029

Gene I guess now is the time to get my cuttings?

Bear in San Antonio

pbyrley

pbyrley
Port St Lucie (+ Wk , FL
(Zone 9b)

July 1, 2008
4:11 AM

Post #5185984

I asked GeneIvy for recommendations and one he gave me was Rhapsody in Pink (Whit VIII). I got two of them in March from Homewood nursery in Raleigh and planted them almost immediately. I am now greatly enjoying the blooms and have attached a photo, taken June 23rd.
Thanks again Gene!

Paul

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