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Texas Gardening: Gardening with Texas Native plants & Wildflowers. Part 4

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2005
9:22 PM

Post #1482171

This thread is a continuation of Gardening with Native plants and Wild flowers of Texas - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3

If you would like to visit Part 1 thread click on the following link http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/486105/

If you would like to visit Part 2 thread click on the following link http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/491824/

If you would like to visit Part 3 click on the following link http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/498342/
Hello Everyone,

The people on this thread are interested in discussion, seed and plant trading, and learning in general about native plants and wildflowers.

We are dedicated to plant conservation and love to demomstrate what can be done with the native plants that have been ignored by the nurseries in favor of the exotics. Many of the plants in our yards are native and we are always looking to improve. We are sure there are others out there doing the same thing and loving it as much as we do. Please let us talk about what you are doing and what you have accomplished.

We hope to hear from all you dedicated gardeners. Let us have some fun.

Sincerely, Josephine.
konkreteblond
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2005
10:51 PM

Post #1482399

I'll start this thread by asking a question...what do Mexican Hats do after they bloom? Will the plant die or just stop blooming?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2005
11:11 PM

Post #1482455

Mexican Hats are perennial, they will come back next year, but die to the ground in the fall.
They are supposed to bloom till fall if they are watered, although they usually get tall and fall over, you can cut them back in the summer and have fresh blooms till fall.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2005
1:00 AM

Post #1482756

Konkreteblond,

How did you know I was out taking photos today? It was windy so some of the photos end up blurred. Mexican Hat, Ratibida columnaris, are usually a dark reddish brown with a yellow edge. Many of the ones we have are solid yellow. The photo shows them growing side by side.
Veronica
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2005
1:17 AM

Post #1482802

We have this in our stock ponds. The 5 petaled Water Primrose, Ludwigia peploides, is also called Primrose-willow. The 4 petaled Water Primrose, Ludwigia octovalvis, doesn't seem to have any other common name. I think the photo trois posted is an example of the latter.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
1:47 AM

Post #1482860

That is correct. Each petal is heart shaped. I have been unable to get a closeup of one yet because as soon as they open the Bumble Bees mob them and knock off the petals. I haven't seen them do that before. Actually, they are wedging themselves in before the flower is completely open.
konkreteblond
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
2:10 AM

Post #1483449

These Mexican Hats get much bigger than I thought! Two big plants are smothering a Hollyhock and covering my Porterweed. I was hoping they would be small and bloom, then go away. lol I will definitely have to cut them back because they are so big. I had no idea they would bloom that long either! That's a good thing tho!
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2005
2:53 AM

Post #1483568

There were honeybees all over the Water Primrose.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2005
3:30 AM

Post #1483651

John, if Josephine can't get any Antelope Horn seeds for you, I are have several seed pods that are just turning brown.

Last year, I saw some small milkweed plants, but didn't pay much attention to them. They are out again. I found this Hierba de Zizotes (That's how it's listed.), Asclepias oenotheroides, in my greenhouse.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2005
3:39 AM

Post #1483673

A close-up of the flowers. In the shade, the petals remain green, but, out in the sunlight, the petals turn a creamy color. All the milkweed out in the sunlight had some damage to them.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
4:05 AM

Post #1483717

Single flower of Mexican willow Primrose.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
2:25 PM

Post #1484517

A Cypress vine near our stairs.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
4:33 PM

Post #1484750

That is one interesting Milkweed Veronica, it is amazing the great variety of them that we have.

Trois, that is a very nice picture of the Mexican willow Primrose.

Well, it seems I overlooked one of the Pictures from Pappy's. It is not a great picture becouse it was windy and it just wouldn't stay put, but I don't think this flower has been shown before, so here is Plains Fleabane, (Erigeron modestus) a sweet native little daisy with treadlike rays.
It is a perennial.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
4:36 PM

Post #1484757

A picture of the wildflower slope on May 17th, things have changed a lot.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
4:39 PM

Post #1484768

Slope detail with Coral Bean and Queen Anne's Lace.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
4:40 PM

Post #1484773

And an adorable Mexican Hat.
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 20, 2005
5:17 PM

Post #1484880

Trois, is that cypress vine from last year, or is it already blooming for you? Josephine, is cypress vine a TX native?

I have a backyard bed that is semi-wildflowers, but it seems like they take longer than anywhere else to actualy start blooming. It's pretty shady in the morning, but it gets solid sun from about noon (possibly a little earlier) to about 5:30. I've always heard that full afternoon TX sun is as good as full sun. These things do bloom, but... ?? I have purple coneflower coming up stronger than last year (at least the foliage looks great) but no hint of any flowers, yet Josephine's wildflower bed already has flowers. Some coral vine has a few little leaves, but doesn't really look like it's moving at all. I have some cypress vine coming back up, but it is just now sprouting (which is why I was wondering about yours, trois.)

Any suggestions?
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
5:32 PM

Post #1484918

It is blooming now and most of the early ones are white.

Morning sun? I have had Mexican Hat and others of this type for a month now.

Coneflowers for the last two weeks.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
5:39 PM

Post #1484931

Spiderwort from a couple of weeks ago.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
5:42 PM

Post #1484937

Delphinium from Wednesday.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
5:54 PM

Post #1484966

For those that attended the Texoma RU and were mystified about something,this picture should clear things up.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
6:03 PM

Post #1484981

Maggiemoo, I beleive that the Cypress vine is not a native. but an adapted species. It is very pretty and it attracts hummingbirds too.
My wildflower slope is in full sun facing south, so it gets the maximum, plus it is next to asphalt and it gets reflected heat, so there is a big difference.
Just be patient, when mine are roasting, yours will be fresh and green.
Don't forget too that you live in a wooded area, even if you have sun, trees do influence the environment.
How are your repairs coming along? I hope all is progressing well.
Josephine.
konkreteblond
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
7:05 PM

Post #1485135

I need an explanation with that picture!!!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
7:11 PM

Post #1485156

I don't know about the mystery that you are tlking about either.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2005
7:45 PM

Post #1485245

.trunnels can help.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2005
9:31 PM

Post #1485498

O.K. Trunnels, so what is the story?
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2005
7:11 AM

Post #1486510

Josephine,

Texas Star are still going strong despite our dry April and May. They are scattered all over the ranch, but I found this nice group.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2005
7:20 AM

Post #1486513

A close-up of the only Erthyrina bidwillii to survive winter. This far north, is there a chance I can turn this into a small tree?
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2005
7:38 AM

Post #1486519

I found another endemic, Sand Brazoria (Brazoria pulcherrima). It's blooming period is almost over, but still eye catching. It grows in large patches in sandy soil. These were the flowers I was after yesterday when I took off with my camera. I'm glad I found them. I had thought they had been shredded. The upper right hand corner shows some Herbertia seed pods.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2005
7:43 AM

Post #1486523

A close-up of one cluster of Sand Brazoria.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2005
8:40 AM

Post #1486555

The Herbertia seed pods are beginning to ripen. I collected some today. I want to plant them in my garden. They must be easy to grow. We had thousands blooming every day for close to 2 months. Blooms stay open only until mid-afternoon, but they are lovely. The bulb, when mature, is tear shaped and between 1/2 and 3/4 inches long. Would anyone like some seed? It's getting late and my brain is getting more andmore addled. I read about the possibility of the seed having a growth inhibitor that needs to be washed off. I'll find more information on this tomottow.
good night,

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
3:22 PM

Post #1487048

Veronica! that Sand Brazoria is adorable, I am so glad you showed it to us, I had only seen book pictures before, yours are much better.

Yes, I would like some seed of the Herbertia, it sure is precious, are they bigger than
Blue-eyed Grass?

My Coral Bean dies to the ground each year, and still blooms, but with you being so much farther south you might get lucky and have at least a shrub, that would be really nice.

Bless your heart, I see you were up last night till close to four, posting pictures for us, thank you
and please get your rest, you need your health to take care of your husband, your animals
and plants. Josephine.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 21, 2005
4:00 PM

Post #1487126

Terrie needs to find this thread for the "rest of the story" and, Veronica, some seed would be much appreciated.

John

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
4:12 PM

Post #1487152

My Elderberry Shrub, ( Sambucus canadensis) is in bloom right now, and looking so lush.
The berries make great jam, but the birds always get to them before we do. This is a native hardy shrub that will tolerate some shade. It does like water.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
4:19 PM

Post #1487161

A close up of the flower cluster, every one should have one of these. Oh! I forgot, the flowers can be dipped in batter and served as fritters, I have never done it, but they say they are delecious. The plant itself is poisonous, but not the flowers or fruit when cooked.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
4:21 PM

Post #1487163

Lantana Camara on the wildflower slope.
eyesoftexas
Toadsuck, TX
(Zone 7a)

May 21, 2005
4:45 PM

Post #1487198

That's the gator from Trois's large pond that Barbara tackled by herself...OMG...not me!!!

"eyes"
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 21, 2005
5:04 PM

Post #1487244

It looks like she won too, doesn't it?
konkreteblond
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
5:19 PM

Post #1487280

TACKLED?!? ...so that Elderberry is poisonous? Hmmm...I have a small one planted that you gave me and it's growing. I'm not sure I have enough room for it to get big. I don't like to keep poisonous plants, but I do have several, and probably more that I'm not aware of. Oh well, my son barely eats food, let alone plants.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
5:51 PM

Post #1487323

Paige, you can prune it to tree shape and that way it won't take up room at the lower level.
Don't worry about the poisonous part, we have never had any problems with it.

Trois why didn't you want to tell us the story? Barbara is quite a brave woman to come close to such a beast, thank God she was not injured. Was she out by herself when she killed it?
And what do you do with such an animal after it is dead?
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 21, 2005
7:18 PM

Post #1487461

Well, the gator had to go. He ate 10 large Muscovy ducks in one night. The first night he ate all the turtles in the pond, about 15. The good he did was to eliminate most of the Raccoons in the area, but he was laying in wait, in the ambush position for anything to go on the pond edge. Our grandsons play in that area sometimes, and a couple of dogs disappeared. He would have killed any of us once he had declared this to be his pond.
I called the local game people and they said that if it was over 6 feet long, to shoot it. If it looked to be over 12 feet long call them back. Of course, You can not tell by just looking at one eyeball how big the rest of him is.

Small print: I did the deed. She helped me get it out of the pond, and posed for the picture. All the women in the neighborhood think she did it by herself because of another neighbor told them so in jest. Now they all believe. When we go to a local eatery, I see people pointing and whispering. Kind of funny what a rumor, complete with a picture, can do.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2005
7:24 PM

Post #1487481

Trois, that sheds some light on the matter, buy you still didn't say what you did with it.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 21, 2005
7:26 PM

Post #1487486

Betty says to leave the rumor be!
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 21, 2005
7:28 PM

Post #1487490

Josephine, I met with the contractor yesterday. Because I have a very difficult schedule next week, we're waiting until the week after Memorial Day to do the work. It should be completed within about three days that week. Thanks for asking.

Thanks also for the encouragement. I do have to be reminded from time to time that I am still in a wooded area.The trees on the outside of my fence really do make a difference in when and where the sun shines. When I had the pines removed it turned out to be a good thing that I couldn't afford to do anything else for almost a year. I was able to observe the sun patterns over the year to figure out which beds would get full sun, afternoon shade, etc.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 21, 2005
7:45 PM

Post #1487531

We have the skull and belly skin. We gave the meat about 60 pounds of the tail, to some people that like to eat it. We don't. The buzzards ate the rest.

We gave up on the rumor and just let it live on as a ledend.

This message was edited May 22, 2005 9:40 AM
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 22, 2005
5:21 AM

Post #1488531

trois, that is quite a story. Your grandsons are definitely safer with the alligator out of the way.

Konkreteblond, elderberries can get quite large between 8 and 12 feet tall. When we lived near Cincinnati, I had two bushes and each got at least 8 feet tall. Elderberries are only partly self-fruitful. To get the maximum number of elderberries, you should have at least two varieties. The canes produced the first year may produce a terminal cluster, but the canes' most productive period occurs the second year when they send out laterals. Any cane older than three years should be cut out to encourage the production of new canes.

You can grow plants nearby without any problems. I knew nothing about elderberries when I planted my first ones and planted them too close to my rose bushes. I had no idea they got so big, but with a regular fertilizer schedule, they all grew well together.

Veronica
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 22, 2005
5:27 AM

Post #1488540

I forgot to add that elderberries make an excellent jelly when combined with another fruit. I found a recipe that added staghorn sumac berry juice to the elderberries. The end result was a sweet-tart tasty jelly.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
2:46 PM

Post #1489006

These plants are not all blooming now. This is intended to show the ones that live on our place.
We have increased the numbers drastically by selective mowing, especially with the August blooming Purple Gerardia (agalinis purpurea)
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
2:50 PM

Post #1489013

The Yellow Puffs, (Neptunia Lutea) are blooming now, and for the next few months.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2005
2:53 PM

Post #1489021

I can understand why you would want to increase that one. Nice shot!
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
2:56 PM

Post #1489026

The relatively rare Salt Marsh MG, (Ipomoea sagittata) are also late bloomers, late July through August. These have the largest flowers of any MG I have seen, about 4 inches across. They also have the smallest leaves.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
2:59 PM

Post #1489032

Numerous in our ponds, the Delta Arrowhead.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
3:04 PM

Post #1489043

Thanks, John. I now have several thousand of these as young plants, scattered all over.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2005
3:15 PM

Post #1489060

Bet it's beautiful.
sidney

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 22, 2005
4:19 PM

Post #1489147

Trois, the Gerardia is so beautiful and delicate, I have seen them before in pink, but not in purple.
I love the the Marsh Morning glory, I saw some of these on Galveston Iland, I wish we could grow them here, although I have never tried, didn't have the seed.
Another problem for me is space, only a quarter acre, but I do the best I can.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
5:35 PM

Post #1489276

I observed many thousands of the young this morning. I instructed my son and DIL about them, hopefully preventing mowing. The first year we had a couple of plants. Last year where I didn't mow, several hundred. The colors vary from plant to plant, and as they age.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2005
8:38 PM

Post #1489591

Those are pretty.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2005
9:05 PM

Post #1489675

Thanks. I am hoping for a real bumper crop this year.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 23, 2005
3:48 AM

Post #1490552

Trois,

You'll have to post any new photos of Gerardia. They are lovely. We went to Matagorda Island last year and saw the Goat-foot Morning Glory, Ipomoea pes-caprae. Maybe it was my imagination, but the leaves and flowers seemed larger than those described in Wildflowers of Texas.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 23, 2005
3:50 AM

Post #1490559

In still have a few old pics left from last year that can tide me over till August.

Thanks.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2005
7:08 PM

Post #1491799

Here is a picture of Partridge Pea, ( Cassia fasciculata ) This is a lovely native legume.
It is an annual that produces very pretty flowers and lots of seed for game and song birds.
The adult sulfur butterfly lays its eggs on the leaves, and the larvae use it as a food source.
The seedpods burst open when ripe and disperse the seeds.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2005
7:10 PM

Post #1491801

A close up of Partridge Pea.

This message was edited May 23, 2005 2:11 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2005
4:16 PM

Post #1493943

A lovely patch of Mexican Hats on the wildflower slope.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2005
4:18 PM

Post #1493950

And a patch of Coneflwers.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 24, 2005
5:09 PM

Post #1494084

I have been carefully examining the "sensitive" plants. We have 4 distinct types here. 2 kinds of pinks, one with stickery stems and one without, just soft things. We have the yellow puffs, and this morning I found a patch of undistinguished ones with buff colored flowers, and they are less sensitave. I will post more soon.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2005
7:12 PM

Post #1496710

This is a view of our backyard looking toward the vegetable garden.
There is Penstemon tenuis blooming, Frostweed, Ironweed, Turk's cap, Phlox carolina,
Flame Anisacanthus, Tall Goldenrod, Four O'clocks, and Texas Star hibiscus.
Elephant garlic in the vegetable garden, with some white Ginger.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2005
7:24 PM

Post #1496743

This is the opposite corner, with Cherry Laurel, Texas Mountain Laurel, Mexican Buckeye,
Turk's cap, Frostweed, Lantana, Texas Star, and my gigantic Elderberry which is about 35 feet tall. The compost area which measures about 10 x 15 feet is behind the shrubs, and that Elderberry is feeding off of it, that is why it is so large, normally the dont get taller then 15 feet. The top of the Elderberry can not be seen in the picture.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
1:44 PM

Post #1498408

We will soon have many of these in the wetter areas.
West Texas Mist.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
1:47 PM

Post #1498414

Another.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
1:50 PM

Post #1498424

And one more.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2005
1:51 PM

Post #1498425

How does it fare in less than wet conditions I wonder? I understand it also attracts butterflies.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
1:54 PM

Post #1498436

It does indeed attract many Butterflies. It grows wild every where its too wet to mow, except in the water. I will leave a small amount of dry area to see if any comes up there.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2005
1:55 PM

Post #1498437

Ohhhh ohhhh oohhhh, That is my blue mistflower! eupatorium something... I LOVE that stuff, although it takes over if not watched. I can say that it grows in my really crappy soil, no water, neglected!

The monarchs LOVE it! I have it in just s spots, but they are growing everywhere that there is bare dirt, and actually got aggressive with it and cut it back to the ground in february/march. hasn't phased it... it will be blooming in no time! I can't kill the stuff!

melanie
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2005
1:57 PM

Post #1498441

:-)
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2005
1:58 PM

Post #1498447

I'll put some in your package when I send the sedum! ; )
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2005
2:03 PM

Post #1498452

WOW!
sweezel
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2005
2:31 PM

Post #1498504

Mine did not come back. :( I bought it at the Heard Sale last year and it thrived all summer, but never came back this spring. I can say I rarely ever gave it any extra water and it was happy, but I guess not happy enough.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
2:37 PM

Post #1498513

It is still early. It may not return to the exact same place.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2005
3:33 PM

Post #1498608

How interesting! we all have different experiences. I also bought this plant some time ago but it didn't do anything, died shortly after planting, may be it was sick when I got it.
I probably should try it again.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
4:39 PM

Post #1498755

We had another interesting experience. We had a fig tree that was not doing well due to other large plants. It moved itself over about 4 feet during the winter leaving it's stake behind. It has several figs already. No trace of the old plant.. It's enough to creep you out.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
5:04 PM

Post #1498832

3 more.
1. Lyre Leafed Sage.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
5:06 PM

Post #1498837

2. Trailing Fuzzy bean.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
5:08 PM

Post #1498847

Bluet patch.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 26, 2005
5:20 PM

Post #1498874

There was a science fiction movie called Day of the Triffids. Alien plants, arriving in a meteor shower, move around on their own killing anything they can find. They were more active at night. Yours could be called Winter of the Figs. If the figs make a move toward you, RUN.

I have two dwarf figs I'm keeping in pots because I'm afraid to lose them during winter. Tuesday, my husband and I went to the Antique Rose Emporium in Brenham. There were two huge fig trees growing in the nursery. I think I'll put mine in the ground. I just need two holes dug.

I was out before it got so hot and took a photo of a pink wine cup. They have been increasing in numbera here. I recall seeinng only a few, 3 years ago. Earlier in the year, I saw a white one or two, but didn't have my camera with me. I love the viberant purple color of the normal purple wine cups, but they never photograph well.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
5:27 PM

Post #1498891

The fig that moved is a cutting from a very large fig tree we had in Houston. That is the direction it moved, so maybe it wants to go home.

I agree that Wine Cups are the most difficult of all flowers to photograph. They just never look right.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2005
6:02 PM

Post #1498967

Veronica, that is a lovely picture of a pink Winecup, I had never seen one.
Don't be afraid of planting your Fig trees in the ground, I have a Texas brown turkey, tha is about 30 years old. It has lived through very low temperatures, I beleive as low as five above 0.
It has died to the ground on those years when it went below 20, at least 3 times, but allways came back.
Here is a picture from two years ago, when we had a good snow fall, it didn't hurt it one bit.
It is about 20 feet tall with many trunks, we love the fruit, but the last two years the squirrels and the birds have eaten it before it ripens. We are considering trapping the squirrels and taking them to Veterans park, we shall see.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2005
10:05 PM

Post #1499541

Trois,
Is the West Texas Mist an annual? It's really pretty.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2005
10:12 PM

Post #1499559

It is listed as perennial. I don't know for what zones.

It just grows wild here and we never gave it a lot of thought or checked to see if the same plant comes back or it is just reseeding. We have much more every year.

This message was edited May 26, 2005 5:14 PM

This message was edited May 26, 2005 9:45 PM
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2005
2:48 AM

Post #1500102

Three blooming now. All wild.
1. Verbina
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2005
2:49 AM

Post #1500110

2. Scarlet Pimpernel.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2005
2:51 AM

Post #1500115

3. Frilly Passion.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 27, 2005
2:54 AM

Post #1500121

Trois,
This that the Passiflora incarnata?
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2005
3:11 AM

Post #1500165

If I remember correctly, the experts had a problem with this one. It seems to have elements of more than one kind. There are about a dozen different wild ones here during the summer.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 27, 2005
4:13 AM

Post #1500571

I have three large patches, but they are all P. incarnata.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
4:44 PM

Post #1501375

Here's a Mexican Hat that showed up by chance in my garden. I love serendipity!
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
4:47 PM

Post #1501383

Cowpen daisies, four o'clocks and a datura started from seeds that Josephine gave me.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
4:48 PM

Post #1501393

Closeup of the cowpen daisy.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
4:53 PM

Post #1501403

Here's a white prickly poppy - perhaps from seed given to me by Josephine - but they are almost 5' tall - would they grow that much in one year? Or do you think they were already there?
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
4:59 PM

Post #1501415

Tiny unidentified wildflowers that are growing at the back of my yard.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
5:02 PM

Post #1501425

This shot shows the newly rebuilt retaining wall between my house and my neighbors. The understory trees are Eve's Necklace. The white flower is similar to Queen Anne's Lace and I'm told that swallowtail butterflies lay eggs on it. True?
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
5:12 PM

Post #1501441

I saw this at Green Mama's - think it was identified as inland sea oats. It grows wild on the banks of the Brazos behind our house. It's leaves remind me of some types of bamboo - think it's quite pretty. Have lots if anyone wants a start.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2005
5:15 PM

Post #1501444

These vines are growing almost rampantly on the vacant lot next to me. Anybody recognize this? Gourd, squash?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2005
5:48 PM

Post #1501502

Wow, Shugarfoot, you sure are doing great. I am so proud of you! Thank you for posting your pictures, they look great, especially the Cowpen Daisy and the White Prickly Poppy.
I don't think the poppy would get that big in one season from seed, so it probably was there all along, waiting to spring up.
Of the unidentified wildflowers the yellow one is Common Yellow Primrose, but the pink one I don't know, may be someone else can identifie it.
The sea ooats is very pretty. I am sure someone has a need fot it.
The flower that looks like Queen Anne's lace is Mock Bishop's- Weed it is an annual but self seeds heavily and it is a larval food source for swallowtail butterflies.
Keep up the good work.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2005
6:17 PM

Post #1501556

The big one is a native gourd that has big yellow flowers and baseball sized striped gourds. We used them for balls when I was a kid.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 27, 2005
10:13 PM

Post #1501997

The gourd is called Buffalo Gourd, Cucurbita foetidissima, is a perennial vine whose branches can get over 18' long and very invasive. Supposedly, the natives boiled the gourd and ate it. and the roots were used as soap. It stinks if crushed. Could you isolate the pink flower and take a close-up?
Veronica
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2005
11:05 PM

Post #1502072

I also have thousands of the unidentified Pink flowers. They look like minature Texas stars. People have tried to convince me it is a pink variety of Blue Eyed grass. I don't think so.
In the foreground, under the Marsh Pinks, are the tiny pinks. They are about 1/4 the size of a Scarlet Pimpernel.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 28, 2005
3:03 AM

Post #1502814

Your little stars are very pretty, Trois, but I think they have different leaves than the ones in my yard. Mine remind me of a geranium that I had in Colorado, only this is a much smaller scale. Here's a closer pic.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2005
3:17 AM

Post #1502859

Yes, the leaves are different. I may never get an ID, but at least they are nice to look at.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 28, 2005
3:37 AM

Post #1502900

Looking at the seed pods, I do think mine is in the crane's bill family. It looks similar to Erodium Cicutarium on the wildflower.org site.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2005
4:10 PM

Post #1503641

You are on the right track Linda, it is definately of the Geranium family, there is one in Wildflowers of Texas book that is very similar called Texas Storks-bill ( Erodium texanum )

Keep up the good work, Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2005
4:35 PM

Post #1503690

And Trois, you are doing great job too, giving us a glimpse of all the wonderful plants you have at your place. Thank you very much, Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2005
6:20 PM

Post #1503877

I found one this morning I have never seen before. Can anyone ID it for me?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2005
6:49 PM

Post #1503960

Wow! that is a neat flower. The closest one I have found is Gaillardia aestivalis, variety winkleri
at lady bird Johnson. It is not exactly the same but very close, let me know what you think.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2005
7:10 PM

Post #1503990

I think it is a relative. The leaves are also a bit different.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2005
7:12 PM

Post #1504000

May be Veronica will know.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2005
8:38 PM

Post #1504183

I hope so.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 29, 2005
7:36 AM

Post #1505295

It looked more like sneezeweed or bitterweed, Helenium, so I went on a hunt. Found it on this link. Taken from a different angle it's the same plant. The stem shape provided the clue. Purpleheaded Sneezeweed, Helenium flexuosum.

http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/b/hdw030599es.jpg

Only problem is TAMU's website is the only one to provide a photo of H. flexuosum with red petals. A google turned up only yellow-petaled H. flexuosum. It's possible that there are color variations of this wildflower.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2005
11:34 AM

Post #1505393

Thanks. That is most likely it. I wish they had showed leaves and so forth. I will keep an eye on this one and see if there are more of them than one plant.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 29, 2005
3:36 PM

Post #1505748

Hooray for Veronica! I knew we could count on you and your excellent research skills.
Trois' flower was prettier than their picture, I think because it was fresher and had all the pollen on it. Thank you very much.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2005
3:50 PM

Post #1505763

I went back this morning to have another look and took a few more pictures since more blooms were open.This seems to be a solitary plant. I searched the area and could find no others.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2005
3:53 PM

Post #1505767

Another. This shows most of the plant.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 29, 2005
3:54 PM

Post #1505770

Trois,
Could this be one of your unidentified flowers from above? Was looking for purslane and came across this - Calandrinia breweri or Brewers Redmaids.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2005
3:56 PM

Post #1505772

Last one. This shows leaves and stems.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2005
4:04 PM

Post #1505781

Sugerfoot, I don't think so. The tiny pink flowers we have have a yellow center.
Could you post a larger picture?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 30, 2005
4:51 PM

Post #1508083

Wow! you guys are putting me to shame. Keep it up, Please.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 30, 2005
9:56 PM

Post #1508729

Does anyone know what this is? I had been watching it thinking that I had planted seeds, but it appears to be a "weed" maybe a native, here...

Melanie
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 30, 2005
9:58 PM

Post #1508734

Here is a closeup of the pretty flower...

TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 30, 2005
10:05 PM

Post #1508746

Trois, Here is my Eupatorium Greggs Mist Flower... Looks like yours, too, maybe...
barb_tx
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 30, 2005
10:15 PM

Post #1508764

A late post of photos from my spring garden. The bluebonnets are gone now and the Hinckley Columbine has gone to seed.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 30, 2005
10:52 PM

Post #1508844

TXMel, that does look like the Mist Flower that I have, but mine is not blooming yet.

That yellow flower is new to me, but it is an attractive plant.

Great looking yard, barb_tx. I wish we could grow Columbine.

This message was edited Jun 4, 2005 7:10 AM
barb_tx
Corpus Christi, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2005
2:42 AM

Post #1509392

Trois, The Hinckley Columbine is the only one I can get to grow here. It stays on the the shady side of the birdbath and gets lots of water (and fertilizer from the birds). You might be able to grow it in a similiar situation. It will only grow for me in this one spot in the yard.

I have been lurking and looking at all the beautiful photos of the plants we can grow in our state. This is a great thread (s).

Barb

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2005
3:02 AM

Post #1509444

Barb, welcome to the tread, and thank you for sharing your pictures, aren't Texas native plants great? So much to learn, and so much fun in the process.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2005
3:19 AM

Post #1509482

I think I just found another I haven't seen before. I think it's a bland looking Horse Mint. Rubbing the leaves smells like a freshly sharpened pencil with a dab of toothpaste on it. I have a picture somewhere.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 31, 2005
3:22 AM

Post #1509492

Josephine - I just finished ready 1,2,3, and now 4 - wow I went on a check in the field I told you about and found a few - I will bring some photos on the 8th to show ya (my camera is on the out again, one day works three does not). If I can get it going again I will get them on here - wow some great plants! Mitch
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2005
4:41 AM

Post #1509767

trois, have you ever dabbed toothpaste on a freshly sharpened pencil? (Not that there's anything wrong with that, just thought I'd ask.) :-)
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 31, 2005
7:48 AM

Post #1509930

TexMel,
Did you plant any safflower seeds? The photo of t he yellow flower surrounded by prickly bracts looks like Safflower, Carthamus thinctorius.
Veronica


http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_browseimgs_plant_sci&enlarge=0000+0000+0802+0102
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2005
11:59 AM

Post #1510044

No, I never did that. If you come across one of these plants, try and see about that smell. They don't both happen at once, first the sharpened pencil smell, then a faint toothpaste smell is added.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2005
1:44 PM

Post #1510208

No, veronica, I don't think that i did plant them. Now I'm really upset. My hubby pulled them up yesterday. hates weeds, and imagined that we'd have zillions of them if they went to seed. NOW I see that those seeds were worth a fortune! Have you SEEN the price of safflower...? $$$

Mel
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2005
2:49 PM

Post #1510335

TexMel,
I have some of these plante that came up under my birdfeeder. Will post a pic later but I'm pretty sure it's the same plant.
Linda

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2005
6:05 PM

Post #1510739

I had never seen the Saflower, and I was going to do some research, but I am glad Veronica found out what it is. They are really neat, I guess they came from the bird food.

Mel, if you feel bad about having lost them, just find the seed in the bird mix and plant yourself some, it shouln't be hard. Josephine.
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2005
6:18 PM

Post #1510766

It really shouldn't be hard, considering the great germination rate of spilled birdseed!

(Hmmm... maybe that's how I should try to start ALL my seeds. Place them in the birdfeeder, they spill, they grow! Much better success than when I try to start things myself!)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2005
6:56 PM

Post #1510843

I was doing some work on the slope Sunday and look what I found.
A little Partridge Pea seedling growing out of the asphalt, they are willing, aren't they?
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 31, 2005
6:57 PM

Post #1510847

I have those Frostweed!!!! They are going in the side bed - so I want to keep'um right? LOL What does the flower look like?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2005
7:15 PM

Post #1510896

Hello Mitch, that is great, I posted some pictures of the flowers on this thread about 50 posts back, or you can see it on the plants files. It is an annual and it has a lovely yellow flower.

I am glad you went exploring on the field close to your house, it is amazing what we can find if we look closely.

I am still looking about the trees, will look through my books today. Josephine.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 31, 2005
7:29 PM

Post #1510940

Thanks Josephine - I will hunt it up - so many plant sin this thread it is hard to keep them all strait! I will start looking for the seeds then for in the yard next year - Mitch

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2005
9:32 PM

Post #1511195

Hello Mitch, since you are looking for some good shade trees that are native, I thought I would post the list here. I hope it helps you, and whoever needs trees. I will start with the large, deciduous shade trees.

Bur Oak, ( Quercus macrocarpa ) Fast growing, deciduous, 50 to 75 feet shade tree.

Bald Cypress, ( Taxodium distichum ) Fast growing, deciduous, 50 to 100 feet shade tree.

White Ash, ( Fraxinus americana ) Fast growing, 30 to 80 feet, deciduous shade tree.

Green Ash, ( Fraxinus pensylvanica ) Fast growing, 30 to 80 feet, decduous shade tree.

Cedar Elm ( Ulmus crassifolia ) Medium fast, deciduous, 30 to 60 feet shade tree.

Sweetgum, ( Liquidumbar styraciflua ) Medium fast, beautiful color, 30 to 90 feet, deciduous.

Texas or Spanish Oak, ( Quercus Texana ) Slow growth, beautiful color, 15 to 50 feet.

Pecan, ( Carya illinoiensis ) Slow but worth it, 50 to 90 feet, deciduous nut bearing shade tree.

Red Maple, ( Acer rubrum ) Slow, beautiful color, 30 to 90 feet, deciduous tree.

Southern Sugar Maple, ( Acer barbatum ) Slow, great color 30 to 90 feet.

If you have questions let me know. Tomorrow I will post a list of medium decidous trees.

Josephine.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 31, 2005
10:23 PM

Post #1511269

Oh thank you thank you thank you!!!! waiting for the rest fo the list!
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2005
2:07 AM

Post #1511912

Josephine, I must have missed that Partridge Pea post. I have that stuff - or at least something that looks just like that seedling - coming up all over the place! I've been pulling it, guess I'll let a few grow. I was looking around in the back yard, and noticed this seed pod, apparently from one of the cross vines. It's the first time I've ever seen one, and I have LOTS of cross vines, have I just been blind before? Maybe I was always pulling the vines down before they got a chance to form the pods. Should I just wait until it turns brown or something, to harvest the seed?
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
2:41 AM

Post #1512029

You know... it makes sense now! I bought Safflower seeds for my Cardinals a few months back! I enjoyed watching them feed on it alot. It never dawned on me to see what the flowers or plants looked like! That has to be it!

I wish I had not let him pull them up, but BOY the points were very sharp on them!

I learn so much here! %>)

Mel

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2005
3:13 AM

Post #1512122

Yes Maggiemoo, the pod should be brown and dry before you pick it.
Actually the reason you haven't seen seed pods before is because they hardly make any.
I hardly ever see pods on mine, and I have never tried to grow them from seed, although I suppose it is possible. May be you can try it and see if you have any luck, you never know.
Josephine.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
3:19 AM

Post #1512694

Remember how lush my Tangerine Crossvine was in early spring...? Well, she gets LOTS of pods on her! I pull them off, cause they are not attractive. I would be glad to save pods for anyone that wants to give them a try!

Mel
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
3:33 AM

Post #1512737

I'd love to try the crossvine if you'd save a few pods!!
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
4:00 AM

Post #1512791

I will do that!

Mel
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 1, 2005
5:22 AM

Post #1512886

Mel, I would love to try the crossvine also. Please save some for me.
Veronica
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
2:04 PM

Post #1513367

If you would email me at melharris@dot11net.net I will make a list and mail them when they are ready. If it gets out of control, I may ask for postage... ; )

mel

Email is correct now... sorry, try again!

m-

This message was edited Jun 1, 2005 4:41 PM
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
3:22 PM

Post #1513556

Last fall we thought it was so "cute" that the squirrel was gathering the native pecans in our back yard and burying them. Never did we dream that the germination rate would be so high. Counted 24 in my flowerbeds yesterday. I'll try to pot them up if anyone is interested.

Linda
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2005
3:43 PM

Post #1513605

Anyone want oaks? Each year the squirells here are so generous as to plant them all over the place - walkways, lawn, flowerbeds, containers - about two or three inches apart, so there are plenty more even after all the pulling I've been doing.

Want ash trees? The trees themselves are very generous to drop thousands of seeds every Spring, they must have about a 99.9% germination rate!

;->
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 1, 2005
4:17 PM

Post #1513681

Maggiemoo - what type of Ash are they?
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2005
4:58 PM

Post #1513768

I think someone told me once they are white ash? (I'm just barely getting perrenials down, I don't know nuthin' 'bout trees.)
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2005
5:40 PM

Post #1513863

That is likely correct. We have a lot of those here. Along the Bayou some are up to about 70 feet tall. Most are 35 to 45 feet tall. They like a lot of water and do not require a "well drained soil"

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2005
6:03 PM

Post #1513923

Wow! more and more learning and sharing. This is superb! What a team!
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 1, 2005
6:19 PM

Post #1513966

Mel,
I tried to send you an e-mail regarding the crossvine seeds, but my e-mail was returned undeliverable. Please put me on your list.
Veronica
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 1, 2005
8:13 PM

Post #1514252

lots of water - well not for me then :-) looked them up stunning trees . . . everything pointed to water. I bet ya if you posted a few on the trading area you could get rid of a bunch (got rid of a few of nextdoors baby elms that way)
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2005
8:22 PM

Post #1514270

Oh, but that means I would have to go around digging holes everywhere! I already have squirrels doing that, I don't want to add to it. (Hey, maybe I could train the squirrels to pot them up for me...)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2005
8:32 PM

Post #1514287

This is the list of small to medium deciduous native trees, including flowering trees.
Of course this is by no means a comprehensive list, just the ones I think will do well, are very attractive and easy to grow.

Redbud, ( Cersis canadensis ) Fast growing, deciduous flowering tree, 15 to 30 feet.

Prairie Flameleaf Sumac, ( Rhus lanceolata ) Fast grwoing deciduous, 15 to 30 feet, Beautiful fall color.

Goldenball Leadtree, ( Luceana retusa ) Fast growing deciduous tree, 15 to 25 feet. Lovely golden, scented, fuzzy balls.

Deser Willow, ( Chilopsis linearis ) Fast growing deciduous tree, 10 to 25 feet. Lovely orchid like flowers all summer, delicate honey like scent.

Mexican Plum, ( Prunus mexicana ) Fast growing deciduous tree, 15 to 25 feet. Lovely white flowers in early Spring, followed by fruits much loved by birds.

Red Buckeye, ( Aesculus pavia ) Slow growing understory tree, deciduous, 10 to 25 feet.
Beautiful clusters of red flwers in Spring, unusual foliage.

Flowering Dogwood, ( Cornus florida ) Slow growing understory tree, 15 to 25 feet. Beautiful flowers in Spring red fruits in the Fall.

Possom Haw, ( Ilex decidua ) Medium fast, deciduous tree, 15 to 25 feet, red berries in the Fall that remain on the tree through the Winter, good for the birds.

Desert Bird of Paradise, ( Caesalpinia gillesii ) Adapted native, 5 to 10 feet tall. Beautiful exotic looking flowers Spring and Summer.

Eve's Necklace, ( Sophora affinis ) deciduous tree 10 to 20 feet. Lovely cascade of flowers in Spring, followed by interesting seed pods.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2005
8:41 PM

Post #1514301

I have some seeds of the Mexican Bird of Paradise, AKA Pride of Barbados. They get about 6 to 8 feet tall, bloom with red and orange flowers.
Last summer a truck driver delivered something to us and he said" those are the prettiest flowers I have ever seen. Do you have some seeds I could give to my wife" So I gave him a bunch. Never heard from him again.

This message was edited Jun 1, 2005 3:43 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2005
8:52 PM

Post #1514318

Well I sure would like to have someTrois, and I promise, You will hear from me again, even more than once. I know what you mean though, I have gone out of my way to send seeds to people who asked out of the blue, and the same thing happened, but you never know, you may have given a lot of joy to someone, good deeds are never wasted.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2005
9:43 PM

Post #1514404

I was not upset with the man. I hope they did bring joy to someone. I never expected any feedback.
I will be happe to send you some. They should be root hardy where you live, especially if you do about 6 or 8 inches of mulch around the base for winter.
Is your mailing address listed?
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2005
9:43 PM

Post #1514405

Sorry, veronica... I updated my email... just take out the 5... forgot my own address! : (

try again, ya'll.

Mel

melharris@dot11net.net

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2005
9:49 PM

Post #1514422

Thank you Trois, yes, my address is listed. Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2005
9:53 PM

Post #1514432

Got it.
I just a few minutes ago spotted the first Salt Marsh MG blooming. This one is only a couple of inches high, but the flower is still 4 inches plus.

This message was edited Jun 1, 2005 6:45 PM
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 1, 2005
11:39 PM

Post #1514690

Lots of flowers on the trees - now I have like a mile long list to get down to the 5 or 6 best. . . Mitch
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2005
11:50 PM

Post #1514710

For those of you that thought I was giving you an Evergreen Wisteria, one of the plants I kept has bloomed. Yesterday it was pink, today this is how it looks.
I hope this helps.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2005
12:00 AM

Post #1514735

WWWWWOOOOOOWWWWWW !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
12:34 AM

Post #1514815

While I was down in the swamp earlier today, I found a patch of these. Any ideas?
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2005
1:32 AM

Post #1514981

Hmmm, some sort of gall?
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2005
1:42 AM

Post #1515021

John, as in gallstone? :-)
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
1:51 AM

Post #1515051

And a whole patch just alike?
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2005
2:12 AM

Post #1515123

They're caused by an insect.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2005
2:30 AM

Post #1515152

Cut one open and see if there is a critter in there.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
3:14 AM

Post #1515242

I guess I will have to try that.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2005
4:04 AM

Post #1515424

they are from a wasp right? at least that is what we were told long ago to keep up from playing with them...
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 2, 2005
4:33 AM

Post #1515471

Wasps lay an egg in the tissue so if you see anythings it would be the larvae. If there's a hole in the gall the larvae became a wasp and flew the coop gall.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
11:40 AM

Post #1515745

Thanks for the information. They just look so perfect, like inline tomatos.

This message was edited Jun 2, 2005 2:38 PM
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2005
12:10 PM

Post #1515782

Trois, that was my thought too, inline tomatos that hadn't ripened yet.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
12:49 PM

Post #1515873

Since rhere are several, I guess I will open one today and see what's in there.

They still look like tomatos.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2005
1:22 PM

Post #1515930

So is that vine that bloomed, a snail vine? Ohhh one on my want list! So it grew fast, huh?
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
1:55 PM

Post #1515988

I'm not sure if that is a snail vine or not. My daughter that professes to know nothing about plants took one look and said "
Snail Vine" I hope for a verdict soon.
If you drop by to of from your cruise at Galveston, you can dig one up for your self.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
2:17 PM

Post #1516044

Google "Goldenrod Gall Flies" There is a very interesting article about the Gall Fly, and the Wasps that eat them, as well as the Downey Woodpeckers also eat them. They stay in the plant for a year, and the adults never eat.
trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2005
2:43 PM

Post #1516101

Trois, which plants are the galls on, is it one kind? or different kinds of plants.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2005
2:46 PM

Post #1516113

OOOohhhh. I just might do that! We come down there on the 26th, and ship leaves 27th. I will see what the timing is like. We are meeting another family at the port, so my kids will be anxious to get there. If you could email me an address and phone, I will return my phone # too.

thanks! Can I bring YOU something?

mel
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2005
3:21 PM

Post #1516192

Very cool, Trois!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2005
7:32 PM

Post #1516798

Here is a list of evergreen native trees, starting with the largest.

Coastal Live Oak, ( Quercus virginiana ) Slow growing tree, dense shade, 30 to 60 feet.

American Holly, ( Ilex opaca ) Slow growing beautiful tree, red berries for the birds, 20 to 50 feet.

Laurel Cherry, ( Prunus caroliniana ) Fast growing,lovely flowers, black berries for the birds,20 to 40 feet.

Yaupon Holly, ( Ilex vomitoria) Fast growing small tree, with red berries loved by the birds, 15 to 20 feet.

Wax Myrtle, ( Myrica cerifera) Fast growing small tree, nutlets in the fall for the birds, 6 to 15 feet.

Texas Mountain Laurel, ( Sophora secundiflora) Slow growing small tree, beautiful flowers,10 to 15 feet

I hope this will be useful in your selection. Remember to have an evergreen area for your winter bird shelter. Josephine.

This message was edited Jun 2, 2005 2:35 PM
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2005
8:00 PM

Post #1516894

Right - everygreen for the birds, does it need to be a tree (they are going to be small to start) or are some larges bushes ok? I just saw a Wax Myrtle today and wondered if it was a native. Fosters I20 and Hamoton clained to have Texas Sage 6 for 15 but nada once I got over there so I will keep looking. Do you have a fav place to get trees at Josephine in the area? You just thought it was one easy question right? Mitch

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2005
8:05 PM

Post #1516904

I checked the Goldenrod Gall Fly articles and they are very interesting, you learn something everyday. I have lots of Goldenrod, but have never seen the galls on it, however I do get a lot of what they call spittle bugs. These bugs put a foamy substance on the goldenrod stems, which slows it down but doesn't kill it.
Do you get those too?
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
8:13 PM

Post #1516919

I saw a some whitish looking foam on a couple.

We have tons of Bayberry (Wax Myrtle). I sent out thousands of seeds last fall. Ours are evergreen here, and get 10 to 15 feet tall. Nice dense bushes.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2005
8:15 PM

Post #1516924

Hello Mitch, you can get the Wax Myrtle when it is small and let it develop into a tree.
I have some Laurel Cherry that I can give you, so you don't have to get that one.
I normally get my native trees at Redentas Garden, but they are on the pricey side, however sometimes it is worth it. You shoudn't have trouble finding Yaupon Holly either, but be sure it is not the dwarf kind, also if you start with a small plant it is a lot more reasonable.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2005
9:13 PM

Post #1517030

Thanks Josephine - Redentas Garden will check it out. I found a few at HD but have not gotten them yet. My F.I.L. bought me two silk trees? Are these something I want in Texas or is this one of those gifts you say thanks and then pass on? I wish Texas gave native trees away - back in the day my grandfather got 100 or so trees from OK for his farm to reforest part of it for free just had to ask... guess they dont do that here.

I just got back from the Glenn Heights Wetlands area - really a joke. I am kinda upset seeing the cost they spent and there is just a man made pond and mixed up plants sitting between tons of tall hay grass. Not a wetland and I got chiggers from the trip to boot! LOL I thought about asking about helping them out but there is way to much to do so I will just stay away for now.

Mitch

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2005
10:09 PM

Post #1517171

I suppose you are talking about a Mimosa, those are pretty trees when they are healthy, but they are short lived and fast growing.
It is up to you if you want to plant one, since it is a gift.
It also depends on the ammount of space you have and how much of it you want to dedicate to that tree.
I have never heard of the state giving trees away, but may be there is such a program.
May be Trois or Veronica know something about that.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2005
11:15 PM

Post #1517307

Check with the County Agent. They gave away trees here a couple of years ago. We got our Fuyu Persimmon that way about 4 years ago. Great tree, but small.
In Southwest Oklahoma Mimosas live a long time, some more than 60 years. It depends on the area. In houston, we planted on that is still going strong after 25 years. It is about 25 feet tall and 35 feet wide. We brought offspring here and Twig Girdlers killed one and the other is not growing. It just depends on conditions and so forth.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
12:36 AM

Post #1517516

County Agent - I will check out and let you all know. I think a Silk Tree is a Mimosas - I am still not sure. So I might plant them in that side field I told ya about. never hurts to ask for free trees - right? Let Yall Know Mitch
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 3, 2005
1:02 AM

Post #1517591

Had to take my cat to A & M today for a check-up. Mimosas were blooming everywhere. It's a tree that really stands out. Believe me, I wish I had them on the ranch instead of yaupon. Beats me why anyone would deliberately plant that stuff.

I haven't heard of any tree giveaways by the state, but Austin does. Maybe other large cities do too. Check with the Texas Forestry Service. You can buy trees from them at a very reasonable price. The selection is not very extensive and the trees have to be ordered late summer/early fall. I believe there are some application for ms that have to be filled out.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 3, 2005
1:46 AM

Post #1517676

Free trees are given away every Arbor Day. Do a google for info. Easy to get on their mailing list.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
3:00 AM

Post #1517886

Emailed both C.A. and TFS and will let you know what they say. TFS on line said you have to order 50 of any one tree - 50! So I asked about only one or two of a couple will let you know if not I may share the wealth they are cheap - two years old but low cost. All right I have to ask what is ms??? bettydee - need an app for ms?

Thanks Mitch
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 3, 2005
3:11 AM

Post #1517907

Ooops! Put a space where there shouldn't be one. The word is forms.
Veronica
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
3:40 AM

Post #1517965

Ah now that I understand - sorry dumb teacher here who cannot type! LOL
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
3:45 AM

Post #1517982

I liked the mystery better.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 3, 2005
5:50 AM

Post #1518152

Yaupon hollies are taking over the land where my cousin lives east of Seguin. Every few feet you will see a yaupon holly. You can't walk through them. I was amazed when I saw this. They must like the sandyish soil there and a lot of the seeds must sprout. He is having to dig them up with a backhoe. I told him that he ought to give them to a nursery or have a nursery come dig them up. They are pretty expensive here.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
11:40 AM

Post #1518383

We have a lot of them here. Some get up to about 15 feet high. They are one of the more common wild plants.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
2:22 PM

Post #1518705

So trois do you have a few babies for postage? hint hint - they cost a lot here to! I am sure we could get rid of the weeds . . . :->
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
2:48 PM

Post #1518768

I have never noticed babies. Bring a truck and dig up all you want. Sell the rest.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 3, 2005
3:14 PM

Post #1518842

$10 membership tree deals can be found here. Ten trees for 10 bucks!

http://www.arborday.org/Shopping/Memberships/Memberships.cfm?CFID=2571318&CFTOKEN=33002901
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
4:25 PM

Post #1519014

I have tried those 10 for 10 deal - only one made the winter and did not last the summer. They are really really small. However I did find some good plum trees for family on there.

All right Trois - LOL might take you up on that is nothing else happens.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
4:45 PM

Post #1519060

Not a problem. Come on down.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 3, 2005
5:42 PM

Post #1519186

Yaupon become small trees here. They spread by sending lateral underground roots in all directions and form thickets. If you ever pass by, drop by and take all you want. Sexes are on different plants. Until they get to blooming size you can't tell them apart. Males don't produce berries, but you need at least one male to provide the pollen. You need to find an isolated clump of each. Chances are the small plants around the larger one are connected to it. If you know the sex of the large yaupon, you'll know what you take home.

During fall of 2003, the berries on several of our yaupons were an TAMU maroon instead of the usual red. I thought I had mutants (sports) and began to envision $$$. This past winter, they were all red. Must have had something to do with the weather.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
5:47 PM

Post #1519194

So how far away are you guys? Guess I should ask for gas sake before i get in here over my head.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2005
6:07 PM

Post #1519234

Hello Everyone, this is what the Texas Parks and Wildlife plants database has to say about
Yaupon Holly.
I must say that mine is about 25 feet tall, has made no runners, and does fruit without a companion for polination, although I think that the other shrubs in the neighborhood do the job for me. I have nothing but good things to say about it. Here is the link.

http://tpid.tpwd.state.tx.us/species_report.asp?species=50

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2005
7:37 PM

Post #1519466

Trois, is this the other creamy fluffy flower that you talked about a while back?
This is a native called Illinois Bundleflower, ( Desmanthus illinoensis ) also known as Twistpod, because of the shape of the seed pods, not much of a flower but the pods are very interesting and the foliage is very pretty. It is much sought after by birds.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2005
7:38 PM

Post #1519468

And a picture of foliage and buds.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
7:50 PM

Post #1519492

That looks like it. Is this a sensitive? Ours is, but not as fast as some of the others.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2005
7:52 PM

Post #1519496

Yes, it is sentive to touch and light, the leaves fold up at night.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
7:56 PM

Post #1519510

Thanks for the information.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 3, 2005
8:01 PM

Post #1519522

Mitch,

I'm 65 miles southeast of Austin.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2005
9:07 PM

Post #1519651

I am 16 miles NW of Galveston, in Galveston county.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2005
9:25 PM

Post #1519694

LOL - well IF I can get a trip to head that far I will take up your offers - I love that part of the state just mgiht have to do it... Mitch
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2005
11:46 PM

Post #1519945

We all need to discover more of this large "back yard" (TX) anyway. I envision some day (if gas money allows) just travelling around the state visiting DG'ers and their gardens. It would be a lot of fun!
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 4, 2005
1:49 AM

Post #1520222

I agree.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2005
2:18 AM

Post #1520276

I remember trying to calm my father down when gas went to 35 cents/gal.
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 4, 2005
2:24 AM

Post #1520286

(sigh!) Them wuz the days. Times wuz simpler then... ;-)
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2005
2:30 AM

Post #1520296

Interestingly that was often said then, too! LOL
60bugs
Tucson, AZ

June 4, 2005
2:49 PM

Post #1521294

Bettydee:


I love the mexican hat flowers. Are they originally from Texas? I see them growing here in Tucson late winter and early spring. What is the best time to plant them?

In the back yard we had blue dicks, mexican evening prim rose, globe mallow, little yellow and little white daisies 1/2" in diameter. The blue dicks were a real surprise.

This September I'll be plants more wild flowers. I have some seed, but always looking for more.

Regards:

60bugs

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2005
4:03 PM

Post #1521471

Hello 60bugs, and welcome to the thread, we hope you will be a regular. Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2005
4:15 PM

Post #1521494

Here is a lovely little blue native flower, Erect Dayflower or Widows Tears, ( Comelina erecta )
This is a very prevalent plant, some might call it a pest, but can be very pretty early in the morning, usually closes by early afternoon. I once saw a field covered with these flowers and it was beautiful. The name, widows tears, refers to the fact that they last a short time.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2005
8:09 PM

Post #1521953

Oh, I love that! Of course I collect every blue flower I can get my hands on! Save me some if you have any, please!

Mel

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2005
8:19 PM

Post #1521972

I certainly will Mel, I will pot up some for you. Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 4, 2005
8:20 PM

Post #1521978

This is the only Salt Marsh MG to bloom so far. Usually it is August, but this is a dry year.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2005
8:38 PM

Post #1522003

That is really pretty Trois, do you think it would grow here?
I have a feeling that it will need special conditions, my book says it grows along river and creek banks, beaches, dunes, and along edges of coastal marshes, so it doen't look like it.
Oh well, I guess we can't have everything.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 4, 2005
8:50 PM

Post #1522017

This one is growing on the edge of a driveway, high and dry. I have never been able to find seeds for this plant. When the flower goes, the whole plant seems to go. This one was at the same place last year, but it was wet and 2 feet tall.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2005
12:26 AM

Post #1522235

Hi 60bugs,

Mexican Hat, Ratibida columnaris, is not endemic to Texas although they are found almost everywhere. They are best planted in the fall in zones 7 - 11. Just barely cover the seed. I looked up blue dick. I can see why you were surprised. They are beautiful.

Trois, how high is your water table? If Salt Marsh Morning Glory is like all the other morning glories, the roots can go down to 6 feet and spread out even more. It could have its feet in water. It is a pretty flower.

I love blue flowers, too. The Erect Dayflower here are usually growing up through other plants under tree canopies. I love the way the royal blue petals contrast with the gold stamen.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 5, 2005
1:34 AM

Post #1522323

During the rainy season it is about 6 inches. Usually it is about 12 to 15 inches. Now, it is down several feet.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2005
5:57 AM

Post #1522721

Wow! Does the water contain a lot of sodium?

Have been spend much of this past week watching one of our old cows and her newborn calf. I wanted to make sure the calf was getting enough milk. I did make time to take photos of some McCartney Roses growing nearby. The McCartney Rose, Rosa bracteata, is a plant I like to admire, but in someone else's backyard. It can grow 12 X 12. I multiplies rapidly and becomes a pest. Its beautiful white flowers are identical to those of the Cherokee Rose. The only difference is the number of leaflets on the flowering stems 7 to 9 for the McCartney Rose and 3 to 5 for the Cherokee Rose.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2005
6:24 AM

Post #1522742

I found this in my yard this afternoon. This is the only Purple Horsemint, Monarda citriodora, on the ranch with purple flowers in addtion to the purple bracts. All the others have pink flowers and the purple bracts. I flagged it to make sure my husband doesn't mow it down. He's been pulling up Brown-Eyed Susans left and right.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 6, 2005
9:59 PM

Post #1526486

Those are both lovely flowers Veronica, the rose is really neat, I had never heard of it.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 6, 2005
10:03 PM

Post #1526496

Maas nursery in Houston has a very large Cherokee Rose growing in their yard. At least 20 feet tall and wide.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2005
11:18 PM

Post #1526736

I had assumed they were the same rose going by different names. In the extension classes I have to take to keep my Applicator's License, the McCartney Rose is the pest that is difficult to control. One neighbor has huge clumps all over one of his pastures.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 6, 2005
11:20 PM

Post #1526743

We have none of the above growing here.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2005
11:23 PM

Post #1526760

I saw a home and field slated for development, got permission and went looking. All I found was Iris (had to get some), native daylily (once agian) and red yucca. My question is the red yucca is this a native? it is out in the field so I wondered before I spent hours to dig it out if this is something I want here in the yard... such a sharp plant not something I want if it is not from here . . . LOL Mitch
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2005
12:10 AM

Post #1526872

Mitch,
Red Yucca is a Texas native. Here's a lint to a TAMU webpage. It apprears to have many good qualities. If you have a site where the sharp leaves won't be a problem, go for it.

Veronica

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/aransas/redyucca.htm
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2005
12:15 AM

Post #1526889

Alright out I go in the morning and get it up... thanks hard to know were to find all this at... Thanks Mitch
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2005
12:18 AM

Post #1526895

This thread and especially Josephine are a good place to start Mitch.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2005
12:29 AM

Post #1526922

I have already been out to her place and wow ... my head was swimming... I will have to go back I am sure I missed half trying to see everything!
konkreteblond
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 7, 2005
4:47 AM

Post #1527638

almost time for thread 4...here is an updated picture of my Frogfruit. It's gone crazy this year. It is so healthy and happy, but I've had to give it a hair cut.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 7, 2005
6:15 PM

Post #1528770

Hello Paige, that is some tall Frogfruit you have there, the cuttings you gave me took just great
and now they are ready to be set out.

I will try and start the thread over today if I can, it is getting long again, isn't it great?

Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 7, 2005
11:12 PM

Post #1529537

Hello Everyone, the new thread #5 has been started, to go to the new thread click on this link

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/518448/

Let us continue learning, sharing, and having lots of fun.

Sincerely, Josephine.

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