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Gardening with Texas Native plants & Wildflowers. Part 4

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

This thread is a continuation of Gardening with Native plants and Wild flowers of Texas - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3

If you would like to visit Part 1 thread click on the following link http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/486105/

If you would like to visit Part 2 thread click on the following link http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/491824/

If you would like to visit Part 3 click on the following link http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/498342/
Hello Everyone,

The people on this thread are interested in discussion, seed and plant trading, and learning in general about native plants and wildflowers.

We are dedicated to plant conservation and love to demomstrate what can be done with the native plants that have been ignored by the nurseries in favor of the exotics. Many of the plants in our yards are native and we are always looking to improve. We are sure there are others out there doing the same thing and loving it as much as we do. Please let us talk about what you are doing and what you have accomplished.

We hope to hear from all you dedicated gardeners. Let us have some fun.

Sincerely, Josephine.

Burleson, TX(Zone 8a)

I'll start this thread by asking a question...what do Mexican Hats do after they bloom? Will the plant die or just stop blooming?

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Mexican Hats are perennial, they will come back next year, but die to the ground in the fall.
They are supposed to bloom till fall if they are watered, although they usually get tall and fall over, you can cut them back in the summer and have fresh blooms till fall.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Konkreteblond,

How did you know I was out taking photos today? It was windy so some of the photos end up blurred. Mexican Hat, Ratibida columnaris, are usually a dark reddish brown with a yellow edge. Many of the ones we have are solid yellow. The photo shows them growing side by side.
Veronica

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

We have this in our stock ponds. The 5 petaled Water Primrose, Ludwigia peploides, is also called Primrose-willow. The 4 petaled Water Primrose, Ludwigia octovalvis, doesn't seem to have any other common name. I think the photo trois posted is an example of the latter.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

That is correct. Each petal is heart shaped. I have been unable to get a closeup of one yet because as soon as they open the Bumble Bees mob them and knock off the petals. I haven't seen them do that before. Actually, they are wedging themselves in before the flower is completely open.

Burleson, TX(Zone 8a)

These Mexican Hats get much bigger than I thought! Two big plants are smothering a Hollyhock and covering my Porterweed. I was hoping they would be small and bloom, then go away. lol I will definitely have to cut them back because they are so big. I had no idea they would bloom that long either! That's a good thing tho!

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

There were honeybees all over the Water Primrose.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

John, if Josephine can't get any Antelope Horn seeds for you, I are have several seed pods that are just turning brown.

Last year, I saw some small milkweed plants, but didn't pay much attention to them. They are out again. I found this Hierba de Zizotes (That's how it's listed.), Asclepias oenotheroides, in my greenhouse.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

A close-up of the flowers. In the shade, the petals remain green, but, out in the sunlight, the petals turn a creamy color. All the milkweed out in the sunlight had some damage to them.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

Single flower of Mexican willow Primrose.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

A Cypress vine near our stairs.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

That is one interesting Milkweed Veronica, it is amazing the great variety of them that we have.

Trois, that is a very nice picture of the Mexican willow Primrose.

Well, it seems I overlooked one of the Pictures from Pappy's. It is not a great picture becouse it was windy and it just wouldn't stay put, but I don't think this flower has been shown before, so here is Plains Fleabane, (Erigeron modestus) a sweet native little daisy with treadlike rays.
It is a perennial.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

A picture of the wildflower slope on May 17th, things have changed a lot.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Slope detail with Coral Bean and Queen Anne's Lace.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

And an adorable Mexican Hat.

Conroe, TX(Zone 9a)

Trois, is that cypress vine from last year, or is it already blooming for you? Josephine, is cypress vine a TX native?

I have a backyard bed that is semi-wildflowers, but it seems like they take longer than anywhere else to actualy start blooming. It's pretty shady in the morning, but it gets solid sun from about noon (possibly a little earlier) to about 5:30. I've always heard that full afternoon TX sun is as good as full sun. These things do bloom, but... ?? I have purple coneflower coming up stronger than last year (at least the foliage looks great) but no hint of any flowers, yet Josephine's wildflower bed already has flowers. Some coral vine has a few little leaves, but doesn't really look like it's moving at all. I have some cypress vine coming back up, but it is just now sprouting (which is why I was wondering about yours, trois.)

Any suggestions?

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

It is blooming now and most of the early ones are white.

Morning sun? I have had Mexican Hat and others of this type for a month now.

Coneflowers for the last two weeks.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

Spiderwort from a couple of weeks ago.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

Delphinium from Wednesday.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

For those that attended the Texoma RU and were mystified about something,this picture should clear things up.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Maggiemoo, I beleive that the Cypress vine is not a native. but an adapted species. It is very pretty and it attracts hummingbirds too.
My wildflower slope is in full sun facing south, so it gets the maximum, plus it is next to asphalt and it gets reflected heat, so there is a big difference.
Just be patient, when mine are roasting, yours will be fresh and green.
Don't forget too that you live in a wooded area, even if you have sun, trees do influence the environment.
How are your repairs coming along? I hope all is progressing well.
Josephine.

Burleson, TX(Zone 8a)

I need an explanation with that picture!!!

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

I don't know about the mystery that you are tlking about either.

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

.trunnels can help.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

O.K. Trunnels, so what is the story?

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Josephine,

Texas Star are still going strong despite our dry April and May. They are scattered all over the ranch, but I found this nice group.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

A close-up of the only Erthyrina bidwillii to survive winter. This far north, is there a chance I can turn this into a small tree?

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

I found another endemic, Sand Brazoria (Brazoria pulcherrima). It's blooming period is almost over, but still eye catching. It grows in large patches in sandy soil. These were the flowers I was after yesterday when I took off with my camera. I'm glad I found them. I had thought they had been shredded. The upper right hand corner shows some Herbertia seed pods.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

A close-up of one cluster of Sand Brazoria.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

The Herbertia seed pods are beginning to ripen. I collected some today. I want to plant them in my garden. They must be easy to grow. We had thousands blooming every day for close to 2 months. Blooms stay open only until mid-afternoon, but they are lovely. The bulb, when mature, is tear shaped and between 1/2 and 3/4 inches long. Would anyone like some seed? It's getting late and my brain is getting more andmore addled. I read about the possibility of the seed having a growth inhibitor that needs to be washed off. I'll find more information on this tomottow.
good night,

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Veronica! that Sand Brazoria is adorable, I am so glad you showed it to us, I had only seen book pictures before, yours are much better.

Yes, I would like some seed of the Herbertia, it sure is precious, are they bigger than
Blue-eyed Grass?

My Coral Bean dies to the ground each year, and still blooms, but with you being so much farther south you might get lucky and have at least a shrub, that would be really nice.

Bless your heart, I see you were up last night till close to four, posting pictures for us, thank you
and please get your rest, you need your health to take care of your husband, your animals
and plants. Josephine.

Gordonville, TX(Zone 7b)

Terrie needs to find this thread for the "rest of the story" and, Veronica, some seed would be much appreciated.

John

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

My Elderberry Shrub, ( Sambucus canadensis) is in bloom right now, and looking so lush.
The berries make great jam, but the birds always get to them before we do. This is a native hardy shrub that will tolerate some shade. It does like water.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

A close up of the flower cluster, every one should have one of these. Oh! I forgot, the flowers can be dipped in batter and served as fritters, I have never done it, but they say they are delecious. The plant itself is poisonous, but not the flowers or fruit when cooked.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Lantana Camara on the wildflower slope.

Toadsuck, TX(Zone 7a)

That's the gator from Trois's large pond that Barbara tackled by herself....OMG......not me!!!

"eyes"

Santa Fe, TX(Zone 9b)

It looks like she won too, doesn't it?

Burleson, TX(Zone 8a)

TACKLED?!? ...so that Elderberry is poisonous? Hmmm...I have a small one planted that you gave me and it's growing. I'm not sure I have enough room for it to get big. I don't like to keep poisonous plants, but I do have several, and probably more that I'm not aware of. Oh well, my son barely eats food, let alone plants.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Paige, you can prune it to tree shape and that way it won't take up room at the lower level.
Don't worry about the poisonous part, we have never had any problems with it.

Trois why didn't you want to tell us the story? Barbara is quite a brave woman to come close to such a beast, thank God she was not injured. Was she out by herself when she killed it?
And what do you do with such an animal after it is dead?
Josephine.

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