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Xeriscape Gardening: Favorite TOUGH Xeriscape plants

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michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

June 29, 2001
1:34 PM

Post #7421

Please tell me your favorite Xeriscape Plants and Trees.
Im talking tough, very low water plants. I have to say this time of year my favorites are My Palo Verde Trees, Mexican and Blue. My Chilean Mesquite is in its 3rd year and it is really taking off. It is already providing shade for my parking area. The Native Datura is blooming. Wild Coyote melon, and Morning glory will soon put on a show. I cant wait for. The Desert Willow is blooming as well , I have varying shades of lighter pink and a wild tree, that is more a dark pink.
tashak2
Silver Springs, NV
(Zone 6b)

June 30, 2001
5:03 AM

Post #88545

What is Wild Coyote Melon?
lantana

(Zone 7a)

June 30, 2001
5:34 AM

Post #88547

Desert willow, yes. And we have Maximilian sunflowers here that don't blink at heat and drought. Also my blue sage. Yarrow and asters. Yucca and hesperaloe.
dpmichael
Rethymno, Crete
Greece
(Zone 10b)

July 2, 2001
8:25 PM

Post #89511

Michele, I found Crete is THE xeriscaping area, and I can make a very long list, but here are two favorites:

Bougainvilleas provide a color that is out of this world

Carob trees are splendid to watch grow in the drought as if nothing happening.

And the surprise of surprises, solanum rantonetti, which is full of delicate small flowers, it just ignores the most blazing sunshine, grows like mad when watered well and keeps flowering till lae October!!

Dimitri

http://nature.jardin.free.fr/cadre2.html
Chooch
Chatham-Kent, ON
(Zone 6a)

July 5, 2001
12:57 AM

Post #90435

Aspholedine Lutea is my favorite so far ...blooms for a long period and looks very interesting ...and of course there are so many Yuccas to try IF a person can locate the source .
Sis

July 9, 2001
11:47 PM

Post #92461



This message was edited Friday, Aug 17th 1:12 AM
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2001
2:09 AM

Post #92530

Heloboress!!! Sis can we do a trade in the fall?! Wow< You sound
ad busy as me! 100+ is typical here all summer.
Sis

July 10, 2001
4:13 AM

Post #92577



This message was edited Friday, Aug 17th 1:14 AM
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2001
7:02 AM

Post #92623

Sis I have been here scince 1987, Didnt quite make it that far back .I still hear about that snow back in 74. I moved from Huntington Beach. To the Desert. I came out to visit I fell in love with the Joshua Trees. And they are so pretty when they get yearly snow on them. And tonight when there is a good moon. I do not have Ocotillo at the moment I am working on it.Would you be interested if I can get some? I should be able to get one this next year. I have heard they are extremely easy to propagate. Just cut like a cactus and heal over, and plant. Have you done this yet? You should plant some Joshua Trees! You can. Chooch does it in Canada. I have his germination instructions. Maybe to remember your dear Mom by.
Sis

July 10, 2001
3:43 PM

Post #92724



This message was edited Friday, Aug 17th 1:13 AM
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2001
8:53 PM

Post #92860

Oh no, I would not take off protected land. There are plenty of folks that have them, I can ask for. I would never do that. I ll bet I could get you a method of getting those JT's going. Maybe as a house plant? What do you think? I have seen a way of handling cactus , with strips of newspaper, folded into strips. I have used my canvas gloves and tongs. The gloves were ruined by then. Live and learn. You see this was the first year I have tried all this! I really am a baby to this all. But I am like a sponge , I am taking in new information all the time. You seem to know quite a bit! Hope you'll stick around and please feel free to e-mail me anytime!
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2001
9:05 PM

Post #92864

Ok , Tashak please accept my apology , I had to locate the latin on the Coyote Melon. Cucubita Palmata, the guord family. A desert vine Triangular leaves Large showy flowers, looks like squash blossoms, (I think prettier and last longer). turn into green striped w/white fruits , like tennis ball size.Ripen turn yellow then tan, seeds rattle in side. The taste is said to be bitter, large quantities of cucurbitacins can be toxic. Pueblo indians reportedly used the juice as an insect repellent.I wouldnt , because anything can be absorbed through your skin. To your organs. Tashak I will post a picture for you! Go to the photos gallery. Sis, I am sure you remember these. Any memories to share with us? Does anyone else have a simular plant like this growing wild in your area?
Sis

July 10, 2001
10:05 PM

Post #92879



This message was edited Friday, Aug 17th 1:13 AM
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2001
10:12 PM

Post #92883

Ahhhh yes Cholla, Teddy bear! Looks furry, and is like a double barb when pulling this cactus needle out! I had one in my foot for ages wouldnt come out! It finally did. You NEVER go bare foot out side here. How bout them goat head weeds! If you dont hula hoe like you should here . YOU PAY , they come in on the shoes , you step on them in the house.
Sis

July 10, 2001
11:51 PM

Post #92921



This message was edited Friday, Aug 17th 1:11 AM
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 11, 2001
2:17 AM

Post #92986

Yes, I was at a local tourist trap,and they were selling what I call cactus skeketons for a pretty penny. Well I never thought of that! It is kind of pretty. So when I am out I do collect some. I have it on my front porch as some decoration. Like an everlasting of sorts. Even I took that for granted until late. So nice to relate to someone who knows this area so intimately.
Now some non native plants that take heat and low water. Are, Hollyhock, Zinnia, Morning Glory, Mexican Sage, Lavendar, Lantana, Sunflower, Lambs ears, Verbena, and Iris, herbs. All need to be well watered the first season. Once root systems are established , it can take a beating sort of speak.My have more of a list later.
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 12, 2001
2:03 PM

Post #93513

Tashak I posted a picture of Coyote Melon. It took me awhile to get up when the sun came up. To catch the blooms at the right light. I hope you enjoy the pic.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

October 21, 2001
4:57 AM

Post #150334

I LOVE the red/orange Bird of Paradise! They have an abundace of it growing in Tucson, but since we are 10 degrees colder here in winter ( and Summer!) I'm told that it might freeze back. Have planted 3 small ones and hope they survive until spring. They tell me that the yellow is more winter hardy. Any thoughts on this? Jo
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

October 21, 2001
6:26 AM

Post #150347

Roadrunner, I am zone 8- 8 1/2. The typical temps here are 25-30's in the winter. For a few months of the year. I have the red/orange bird of paradise, the yellow, and JT native. (I will have seed to trade later as well) I have the 3 all together in a bed between 2 olive trees, and mulched heavily. My suggestion is to make a microclimate. If it is already in the ground you could put a hay bale or 2 around it where the wind blows on it, and the afternoon sun is partially blocked. Once the plant is of good size it will have a better chance of survival.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

October 28, 2001
5:35 AM

Post #154363

Thanks Michele...sorry I didn't get back to you sooner. I have now obtained (snitched them from the VA in Tucson..hehe) some seed pods of the Bird of Paradise! I will get more as we are there about once a week. How do I store them and when do I plant them? Some one told me that you need to soak the seed before planting, and another told me to cut the outer shell of the seed...???I would love to see some of them just growing amidst all this Mesquite we have...not near the house, but away, where I can look out at them. Dumb Jo
michele5000
Joshua Tree, CA
(Zone 8b)

October 28, 2001
8:29 PM

Post #154620

Roadrunner, It is in the Caesalpinia species, my native is Caesalpinia gilliesii, there are several kinds you can view info at
http://www.desert-tropicals.com Then type in Caesalpinia and it will take you to the pages of the different kinds.
click on previous species or next species to view the different kinds of Caesalpinia, These are really cool.
I have a little of 3 kinds, and will have a lot more next year.
I have heard with that seed, to sand it lightly all over , and soak overnight, it takes in the water better that way. These like kind of seeds seem to have a glossy coat , on them, so it roughs it up a bit.
Let me know how its going! I havent had a chance to germinate them yet. But wild natives pop up easily here , so it cant be that hard. Good Luck!

This message was edited Sunday, Oct 28th 4:35 PM

This message was edited Sunday, Oct 28th 4:36 PM
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

October 28, 2001
9:06 PM

Post #154643

Thanks Michele...going there now. Jo
Kelli
L.A. (Canoga Park), CA
(Zone 10a)

March 3, 2004
8:30 PM

Post #797991

I've tried growing ocotillo from cuttings a dozen times and never had success. If I hadn't seen that it actually has been done, I'd think that was just a legend. You can see that some of the ocotillo in this fence have sprouted.

Thumbnail by Kelli
Click the image for an enlarged view.

etexbill
Lindale, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2004
11:51 PM

Post #798173

That's amazing, Kelli. Tough plant, apparently.
saya
Heerlen
Netherlands
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2004
12:14 PM

Post #799512

What was very surprisingly for me was the Rudbeckia nitida...amazing how fresh it looked during the hot periods last summer. I have a very sheltered garden and the heat was close to 40 C for several weeks. No pests did harm this 200 cm Rudbeckia either.
dbarron
Hindsville, AR
(Zone 6b)

May 19, 2004
8:09 AM

Post #875814

Caesalpina gillesii is hardy to zone 6 (Yellow Bird of Paradise).
buythenumbers
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 11)

March 3, 2005
6:53 PM

Post #1318312


Is it possible to container plant Bougainvilleas in the HEAT of Las Vegas, Nevada?

Thank you!
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 4, 2005
1:04 AM

Post #1319095

Hunnemania. A beautiful little ever-bloomer that croaks if it gets any summer water at all.

Tagetes: fantastic when backlit.

Erysimums: short-lived, but fast growing and dependable, pest-free.
Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

March 4, 2005
5:28 PM

Post #1320099

buythenumbers, I saw some huge Bougianvilleas at the Zoo in Albuquerque, NM, in huge pots, they looked great. It was in the middle of summer, so It makes me wonder how they over winter them there. It may have to be a plant that is already established for it to survive the heat.
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 5, 2005
12:30 AM

Post #1320695

Bougies can take all the heat you can give them. It's frost that kills them.
buythenumbers
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 11)

March 11, 2005
7:52 AM

Post #1331564

What would grow well in huge pots and urns in Las Vegas?
redbelly
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2005
12:42 PM

Post #1358994

Just to add my 2c here, we have several Scotch Broom that are 8' x 5' and are covered in gorgeous yellow flowers in the spring. These guys never get watered and just keep on trucking even through the several drought years we just had.

Unfortunately they are also considered invasive, noxious weeds and are a serious problem in the PNW and parts of california.
sharvis
Klamath Falls, OR
(Zone 6a)

March 24, 2005
8:03 PM

Post #1360197

I LOVE them! So far, I haven't planted any out of guilt, but every once in a while, I am so tempted that I have to grit my teeth. I keep thinking that if I just keep them controlled and don't let them get out of hand, but deep down inside, I know that birds etc. can/will carry the seed and I really should pay attention to those warnings. Sigh.
Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

March 25, 2005
2:09 AM

Post #1360907

Oh, I planted two of those about 5 years ago, then moved them about 3 years ago.. This is the first year that they bloom and grow some. I am in a desert area though. Very dry and hot.. I did not even think about our feathered friends carrying off the seeds. Here's a picture of it blooming today.

Thumbnail by Gourd
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

March 25, 2005
2:10 AM

Post #1360908

My aloes finally bloomed and multiplied...yippee.. I started off with just two of these in containers 9 years ago.. look at them now... The other broom bush is next to them.

Thumbnail by Gourd
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Judy81350
Queen Creek, AZ
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2005
5:03 AM

Post #1488507

My yard is in the making but I do have a few things that I just love. My Chilean Mesquite for one. They were so small the first year I planted them. They've grown about 3 feet in one year. I can't wait until their big. I have a soft spot for my Wolfberry and I love the Globemallow. The 'mallow all have since gone to seed. I want a Desert Willow, but I can't seem to find any at my local nurseries. They are beautiful trees and are drought resistant.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 22, 2005
1:01 PM

Post #1488838

Judy..you can start a Desert Willow from seeds...I called the Extension Office and they said to just put it in sand. Jo
Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

May 24, 2005
2:22 AM

Post #1492795

Judy,

I have lots of desert willow seeds... they do germinate by laying them right on top of the soil too. (mine didn't make it because I had to take a trip)... But, my daughter sent me more seeds from Albuquerque, NM. You are welcome to some if you'd like. I also want to get some going.

The ones I have started and are about 12 inches tall now are the Palo Verde tree seeds. Hoping that I can keep them alive till next year. I also started 6 seeds of mesquite seeds (one germinated and is only about 1 inche tall).

Antoinette
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2005
3:17 AM

Post #1492971

Gourd...I had the same problem...started my Desert Willow then "went 'a travlin"...but it had grown about 3 inches when I left it in a friends care. Jo
Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

May 24, 2005
4:16 AM

Post #1493098

Jo,
Let me know if you want some seeds to try agian, I got lots of them.. will send them off to you. Antoinette
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2005
9:21 AM

Post #1493290

Thanks! I still have some...now where did I put them? Anyhow...there are plenty of the trees around here I can get seeds from...my favorite place to get them? The Division of Motor Vehicles...LOL Jo
MississippiSkie
Collins (90 min. dr, MS
(Zone 8b)

May 28, 2005
6:02 AM

Post #1503051

I have yucca if anyone's interested in a trade. Mine looks like this type:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/2229/
Judy81350
Queen Creek, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 7, 2005
9:52 PM

Post #1529338

roadrunner, thank you for the info.

Gourd, I would love some seeds. I promised roadrunner cottonwoods. If you would like a couple, I would be more then happy to trade you for your seeds. That is all I have to trade for the moment. But the cottowoods won't be ready until around Jan. I cut small branches then root them after the last leaves fall from the parent tree. It usually takes a couple months to get a good root system on them. Let me know and I can give you my address. Oh, and they are the cottonless cottonwoods.
Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

June 17, 2005
5:09 AM

Post #1553578

Hi Judy,

sorry I took so long to answer... just send me your address and I'll get some seeds out to you. I don't think I can use the cottonwoods, I would love some, but the heat here would kill them, we don't have enough water during the summer months and I struggle to keep things alive. How do they do there for you, do you need to water them alot?...

Antoinette
Judy81350
Queen Creek, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2005
7:25 PM

Post #1554886

Mine are doing beautifully. I do have to water them alot, but not everyday. I deep water them about twice a week. They were sticks when I stuck them in the ground. Heres a picture of the ones going down one side of our driveway. They've been in the ground for about 4 mos now.

Thumbnail by Judy81350
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Judy81350
Queen Creek, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2005
7:26 PM

Post #1554893

And here's the mother ship, where I got all my cuttings from.

Thumbnail by Judy81350
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Judy81350
Queen Creek, AZ
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2005
7:28 PM

Post #1554901

So I shouldn't start the Desert Willow in jiffy mix?
rweiler
Albuquerque, NM

June 20, 2005
7:18 PM

Post #1562739

Hello from Albuquerque! If you love Desert Willows, you have to find a Chitalpa. It is the new "it" tree around here. It is a Desert Willow bred with a Catalpa. It has all the exact qualities of a Desert Willow- size, can be multi-trucked or can be trimmed as a single trunk, drought dolerant, etc. It has fantastic Catalpa flowers, which are much like Desert Willow but white with purple tongues and 3 times the size and flowers just as profuse as the Desert Willow. The leaves are about 3 times the size as well. Super trees!

And I have yet to see a bougainvillea overwinter here! It makes me quite sad actually.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

June 20, 2005
10:01 PM

Post #1563131

Welcome to the Garden, rweiler...how do you "cross-breed" these trees? Jo
anacua
San Antonio, TX

August 24, 2005
7:03 PM

Post #1716876

A few of my favorite xeriscape plants for full sun are:
1) Esperanza or Yellow Bells (Tecoma stans)- blooms all summer in this heat with no watering. Freezes back cold winters but root is hardy here. I usually cut it back in February (even if it hasn't frozen back) and it shoots up to 6-8 feet and blooms all summer.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/61000/index.html

2) Wooly Butterflybush (Buddleja marrubifolia) - very drough-hardy gray shrub with small globose orange flowers. Evergreen most winters here. As a bonus it attracts small butterflies.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54351/index.html

4) Copper canyon daisy - late fall-blooming perenniaI. I often cut mine back twice/year - once in winter and once mid-summer to keep it in check. It has a strong lemony-smell and deer won't eat it.
5) Black-foot daisy

Just a few to add to your discussion..
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

August 25, 2005
12:23 AM

Post #1717501

I love the yellow bells! Jo
faeden
SF Bay Area, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 25, 2005
1:29 AM

Post #1717649

Favorites:

Mexican Palo Verde - Parkinsonia aculaeta
Desert Willow - Chilopsis linearis
Chilean Mesquite - Prosopis chilensis
Yucca - Yucca brevifolia
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

August 25, 2005
1:36 AM

Post #1717667

How hard is Desert Willow to transplant? I have to do some stuff at our National Park this fall...and want to grow one at the visitors center...Jo
faeden
SF Bay Area, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 25, 2005
1:49 AM

Post #1717691

I don't think they're difficult to transplant, but it might be better to do so when they're dormant.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

August 25, 2005
4:23 AM

Post #1718080

Perskay...that was my thought also...we thought we would wait until fall to work on this project...to get the soft, winter rains, instead of these gully washing monsoon storms! Thanks. Jo
faeden
SF Bay Area, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 25, 2005
6:19 AM

Post #1718202

You're welcome. Down your way you might even have to wait until around December, depending on how soon it gets cold there. If I remember right, some deciduous trees use cold to trigger leaf drop and dormancy.
augenjj
Melrose, NM

August 30, 2005
3:44 AM

Post #1728822

We're new to this area, but fell in "like" with the ocotillo and plan to plant some here. Anybody out there think it will do O.K.???We're at 4500 ft on the Caprock near the NM/TX border W. of Clovis. Any ideas/hints/opinions??
faeden
SF Bay Area, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 30, 2005
3:52 AM

Post #1728830

Fouquieria splendens (Ocotillo) should do well for you as long as it gets full sun and plenty of heat. Take a look at http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Fouquieriaceae/Fouquieria_splendens.html for its requirements.
Gibbler
La Luz, NM

September 12, 2005
1:54 PM

Post #1754190


Hi,

I am new to this forum and xeriscaping, so will have lots of questions for all of you. I'm very excited to start my new hobby.
I am just in the midst of closing on a home in La Luz New Mexcio. I'm coming from the midwest, so planting will be a whole new experience for me. I'd like to get some ideas on what to plant in my area, as I will be moving in shortly.
My home is in the foothills of the Sacremento mountains. The soil there is mostly clay. The only problem with this home is no landscaping in the backyard. I have a contractor coming out to give me a price on a retaining wall; or something else I can do as I am getting all kinds of washout from the mountain where they dug into it for the foundation of the house, which is only 6 years old. I was told after solving this problem, I should put some plants in which will help the soil integrity, not to mention it really needs some color! Nothing has been done back there, and I look forward to making it look beautiful as well as helping my problem of erosion.
Any advice for a beginner would be much appreciated. Thanks!
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2005
12:28 AM

Post #1755319

If I am remembering correctly...you can search the Plant Files by zipcode...that should show you some plants that do well in your area...although we don't have that many active subscribers in NM...I see that you are near Alamogorda...you might have the same zone as me...we have clay, sand, and cilichie. )Sp)

OH! Welcome to Dave;s Garden...this is a wonderful place. Jo
jessmerritt

(Zone 7b)

September 18, 2005
3:14 PM

Post #1766910

Glad i found this forum. I, too, had looked and noticed that there were not too many DGer's that are from new mexico. But it's nice to know I've found a few others to trade gardening advice, etc. with. I've lived out here for about a decade now, here and there in the state. Albuquerque, Clovis, now Roswell. I'm glad to meet every!
DanaDW
Pahrump, NV
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2006
8:52 PM

Post #2015834

Seems no one ever mentions globemallow. It popped up on it's own here and I just left it be, planting around it. It blooms all year here if I give it just a little occasional watering in summer. It's done so well I bought seeds of every type of globemallow I could find and going to plant this spring and see what happens.

Considering this area is so dry it makes the CA desert look like a rainforest I'm thinking maybe it's invasive in wetter climates????
ansonfan
Polkton, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 15, 2006
12:57 PM

Post #2046047

Hi All- I haven't been here before either, but I really need some advice on drought tolerant plants. Not that we get a lot of droughts here in 7b North Carolina, but I have a place on the property where it is impossible to water other than a bucket full at a time and its very dry. Compacted clay soil and even after a good rain, its dry in a few days. I have had exceptionally good fortune with the Blue Flax I planted there. It wasn't anything to look at when I planted it, but its second year it has taken off and looks really great. I also have Crepe Myrtle and Irises that seem to be happy, but I really need a lot more plants that can not only take hot, dry conditions, but also an occasional soaking, especially in the winter. I was really glad to see some of the plants above that can take all of the abuse; the Rudbeckia (I should have known), zinnias and asters, but I really need some plants with year round interest as this is right at the main road here. Anything with berries would be especially nice since I have a lot of birds to feed lol.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

August 4, 2006
7:11 AM

Post #2585370

Ansonfan I just wrote about my favorite xeriscape plants, which lucky for you they both are drought tollerant plants that thrive in clay soil and alkaline soil too and du dudu da They can handle quite a bit of wet feet, I know because I live in the desert but in a flood zone designated for flooding once every 500 years. Well we had our flood two years ago and these plants were submerged for 2 months in the cold winter 32 to13 degree night temps. Baccaris all varieties and atriplex chenopodiacia (salt bush=pretty eversilver),not to be mistaken for the salt cedar tree=ugly messy. Baccaris also is imune to fungus and molds from wet soil, it is a small hedge, bush or typically a groungcover used here for errosion control. There is a variety that can grow to 7 ft tall and is pretty lime green. It can be shaped too and both plants I love are real fast growing. Can you tell I love these plants? Dawn (#26 fan)
renatelynne
Boerne new zone 30, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 4, 2006
2:43 PM

Post #2586044

Maximillian sunflowers
chocolate flower
rosemary
butterfly bush
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

March 16, 2007
3:26 AM

Post #3286598

Catmint - wonderful
asters
shasta daisies
bishop's weed
yarrow
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2008
5:53 AM

Post #4374457

Mexican Firebush doesn't need watering once established. I've had two plants just outside my fence on the southwest side for years. I never watered them after they were well established. Of course, I've heard they can die if the temps get too low. Here it can get into the teens in the winter and they always come back in the spring. Kidneywood, Eysenhardtia texana, does well also once established. I have Desert Willow also, which does well here. Then there's Cenizo, which is an excellent plant to have. And Red Yucca...I really love it! I grew all mine from seed. Flame Acanthus can be drought-tolerant, although my plants do get watered. I also love the Yellow Bells. In the San Antonio area they have them in some places along the highways. Some of the things I have on my property that don't need to get watered are Damianita, Blackfoot Daisy, Fendler's Bladderpod, 4-Nerve Daisy, Skeleton Plant and Flor de San Juan. But I'm not exactly in a desert, so some of those might not be happy in areas of much lower rainfall.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 9, 2008
5:39 PM

Post #4379916

I am in the desert and some of those do well in my zone but some I never heard of like yellow bells, 4nerve daisy, flor de San Juan. I will look them up though. thanks. I, really on the prowl for stuff I can grow from seed for my xeriscape side because I am not as actively working on that part this growing season. I need to concentrate on my lasagna bed for roses and vines, the rest is much larger an area so I will eek along on that in the next year.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 9, 2008
9:14 PM

Post #4380778

Yellow bells is Tecoma stans, can't help you on the others!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

January 9, 2008
11:19 PM

Post #4381314

Four-Nerve Daisy is Hymenoxys scaposa. Another name for Flor de San Juan is Rock Trumpet. I'm hoping I'll find a way to propagate it sometime. It found its way to my land years ago when a neighbor put in a fence on the property line...evidently the tools or equipment they used brought it there.
http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=9989
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 12, 2008
5:30 AM

Post #4390531

No better way to get something for free. thanks.
dparsons01
Albuquerque, NM
(Zone 7b)

December 23, 2008
10:29 PM

Post #5922944

augenjj,

May be a little late but you are a bit colder than the indicated climate zones for Ocatillo. That doesn't mean it won't work for you. If you do try it very good drainage will be critical and some Winter protection will help. Perhaps near a South wall on your house would do well to keep it warm enough.



Some more plants that are quite hardy:
Both of these are nice medium shrubs that do very well in much of NM and grow native over a large part of the Western US.
Chamaebatiaria millefolium (Fernbush)
Fallugia paradoxa (Apache Plume)
Smaller shrub
Lavandula stoechas (Spanish Lavender)
Groundcovers
Sedum (Stonecrop) - many species: acre, album, reflexum(rupestre), spurium, and others

Note this list of plants do well at altitude (5000+ ft) but may not all like low desert areas. Many of the cacti that cover Southern Arizona don't grow here either.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

December 27, 2008
2:03 AM

Post #5931342

We can grow that stuff here in the high desert but we are only like 2500- 2800 feet above sea level. Drainage seems to be the biggest issue here and alkaline for some of the plants.
Gourd
Mesilla Park, NM

February 12, 2009
5:26 PM

Post #6128829

I've got to tell you all that the Mexican Hats (four varieties coneflowers) of all colors that I sowed indoors last year did very well transplanted in 2008, then, they have reseeded on their own and there are tiny plants all over and much to my surprise the plants are still green even though we have had weather in the 20's and a couple of days in the teens only a few hours in the teens, I just trimmed them some, but still... that is what I was hoping for.

Also, the CA poppies are up already and have been for about 2 months, they also reseeded and I don't have anymore going yet. Hopefully I'll find more as the years go by for our area.

How is everyone else doing?

I wintersowed some lupines this year, I didn't have many seeds so don't know if they will come up. Now I really miss CA, they used to sell lupines in bulk at HD.

hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 21, 2009
3:35 AM

Post #6167978

They still do. Not in NM?

I have had so much rain and cold in the last month, that I am almost a month behind on winter sowing, compared to last year. I am going to try to get some going tomorrow, since it is warm for a few days. I am so mad. I use water and soda bottles since they let light through and cut the bottles in half like a pez dispenser and drill holes for drainage and put a few in the cap to let heat escape until it warms up. I have a lot of work ahead.

Congrats on the successes, with your M. H. and poppies.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

February 21, 2009
10:53 PM

Post #6170901

Drought is getting so bad here, we've been in exceptional stage drought since last year. The spring wildflower time will be pretty sad. But there are bluebonnets that came up on the front of my property. The little plants just haven't gotten bigger and bushy like they normally would.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2009
3:52 AM

Post #6223332

We know what you mean. They are talking mandatory water rationing here in a lot of Ca.
We had some rain this year and it still falls short of the average rain fall totals. More than last year though.

We will have a great poppy season next month here with the cold and the timing of what rain we had. I hate drought, I long for rain and get panicked over it. Like end of the world type fear of no rain. I don't know why, it is just such a necessity.
crazymary
Lodi, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #6369569

Oh, if I only had room for a carob tree. Some of my favorites are Salvia leucophylla 'Figueroa', Winifred Gilman sage, Trichostema lanatum, Grevillea rosemarinifolia, Leonotus leonurus and my favorite new tree to my garden - Chilopsis linearis 'Monhews'. My front yard is an original on the block.

crazymary
Lodi, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2009
12:52 AM

Post #6369575

I wanted a Palo Verde, but I don't know how they do in high wind areas. Anybody know?
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2009
5:17 AM

Post #6370639

They do great here in Arizona...and we have some mighty hard winds. (are they the AZ State tree?) Jo
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 27, 2009
1:37 AM

Post #6467893

I have a question? I have a lot of Datura seeds and they are native to our area, the white ones anyway, but I got seed to germinate and then I was afraid to let them get watered since they don't take water once established. So I just put them in the ground and water it every few days a little. What do I do? they obviously don't like that, since there is no sign of them now. I have a lot more seeds. I would like to have them as a type of edging to a walkway, in lieu of like hosta, since I think they are a similar type plant for purpose, but they don't live here. I don't think they bloom long either, but I don't know. In the desert they come up in Sept. and stay a month or so.

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Other Xeriscape Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
How do you all start your seeds (Blanket flower, etc.) Gourd 12 Feb 26, 2008 12:54 AM
Perennials for Xeriscaping, Zone 7 (and zones 2-11) cherishlife 107 Jul 24, 2008 9:51 PM
Where do you get them at? MitchF 25 Aug 4, 2008 5:09 PM
Agastache seeds MQN 13 Dec 16, 2007 7:36 PM
Albuquerque project naturepatch 27 Oct 26, 2007 4:39 PM


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