Photo by Melody
It's time now to VOTE in our 14th annual photo contest! Voting ends November 7, so be sure to cast your votes for your favorites in each category here. Good luck to all contestants!

Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Blue )

Communities > Forums > Texas Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Texas GardeningReplies: 111, Views: 2,021
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2005
6:46 PM

Post #1616035

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis ) Legume family, ( Fabaceae )
Annual, native plant endemic to Texas, bloom period, March---May.
The state flower of Texas.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/754/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2005
6:59 PM

Post #1616082

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis )

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2005
7:00 PM

Post #1616087

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis )
konkreteblond
Burleson, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
4:55 AM

Post #1617811

:)

This message was edited Jul 17, 2005 5:41 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
8:43 PM

Post #1619208

Texas Bluebonnet, A field in Spring.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 13, 2005
8:48 AM

Post #1620393

False Dayflower, (Commelinantia anomala - formerly Tinantia anomala), Commelinaceae Family, annual, endemic Texas native, is prevalent in the moist soils of the Edwards Plateau, surrounding counties and Goliad County (I found this one in Northwestern Bexar County), blooms from April to July.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55644/index.html

This message was edited Jul 13, 2005 6:00 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 13, 2005
10:53 AM

Post #1620463

Drummond's Skullcap, (Scutellaria drummondii), Lamiaceae Family, annual, Texas native, blooms early spring through mid-summer (depends upon the zone in which it is growing), blooms may be lavender, blue violet or a darker blue as shown below.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62458/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 13, 2005
11:33 AM

Post #1620494

Mealy Cup Sage, Duelberg Sage, 'Henry Duelberg' Salvia (Salvia farinacea, 'Henry Duelberg'), Lamiaceae Family, NOT A NATIVE PLANT - IS A CULTIVAR OF A NATIVE PLANT WHICH IS POSTED FURTHE ON DOWN THIS THREAD, perennial, deer resistant, blooms vigorously from spring until frost; is taller, has darker blooms and deeper green leaves than other Salvia farinacea.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/101057/index.html

This message was edited Jul 17, 2005 11:17 AM
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:21 PM

Post #1621141

1. Texas Bluebonnet.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:23 PM

Post #1621147

Old fence row Bluebonnets.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:25 PM

Post #1621148

Another.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:27 PM

Post #1621152

Pale Bluets.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:28 PM

Post #1621156

Deep Bluets.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:31 PM

Post #1621161

A patch of Bluets.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:54 PM

Post #1621225

West Texas Mist Flower.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:56 PM

Post #1621228

Another West Texas Mist flower.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
5:58 PM

Post #1621237

A third West Texas Mist.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2005
6:00 PM

Post #1621241

Milkweed.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:00 PM

Post #1622988

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis ) Legume family, ( Fabaceae )
Annual, native plant endemic to Texas, bloom period, March---May.

Seed pod
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
4:22 PM

Post #1623394

Mealy Cup Sage (Salvia farinacea), Lamiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring to the first freeze
For more information see in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/127/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:05 PM

Post #1623500

West Texas Mist Flower (Eupatorium greggii), Family Eupatorium, Texas native, blooms late spring to early fall depending upon in which zone it is growing, attracts butterflies, I found it grows best with morning sun and afternoon filtered shade.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53449/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:08 PM

Post #1623503

West Texas Mist Flower (Eupatorium greggii)
A view of the bloom clusters just starting to open ... When the blooms are all open, one can not see that each cluster is composed of tiny star-shaped blooms.

This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 12:10 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:12 PM

Post #1623510

West Texas Mist Flower (Eupatorium greggii)
A maturing bloom cluster with most of the blooms open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:14 PM

Post #1623512

West Texas Mist Flower (Eupatorium greggii)

Seeds ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
9:20 PM

Post #1651828

( Native ) Erect Dayflower, ( Commelina erecta ) Bloom period May-October.
Perennial very abundant, blooms last only a few hours, very pretty wildflower.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57022/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
6:16 PM

Post #1653638

( Native ) A beautiful specimen of Drummond's Skullcap, at the wildflower center.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/71007/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 10, 2005
12:58 PM

Post #1682888

Blue Bottle, Starch Hyacinth, Southern Grape Hyacinth (Muscari neglectum), Hyacinthaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, blooms in midspring

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/704/index.html

I planted about 30 of the bulbs this year and they did very well. I am hoping that they spread. The ones in part sun performed the best. Some were planted under a crepe myrtle tree; these performed well also.

Photo courtesy of Tom Clothier: http://tomclothier.hort.net
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 10, 2005
1:00 PM

Post #1682891

Blue Bottle, Starch Hyacinth, Southern Grape Hyacinth (Muscari neglectum)

The seed pods ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 7, 2006
10:33 PM

Post #2094075

Blue Bottle, Starch Hyacinth, Southern Grape Hyacinth (Muscari neglectum)

Update: These have naturalized really well and I have lots more plants than I had originally planted. They have lots of blooms now.

Blooms on one of my plants ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 7, 2006
11:41 PM

Post #2094219

Blue Bottle, Starch Hyacinth, Southern Grape Hyacinth (Muscari neglectum)

A close look at the tiny blooms and a cute visitor ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

March 8, 2006
3:04 AM

Post #2094782

These are just gorgeous. Texas Bluebells, Eustoma grandiflora. Or have they changed the botanical name?
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 18, 2006
12:56 AM

Post #2733693

Delphinium larkspur (very blue), and they don't mind a little drought.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 18, 2006
1:09 AM

Post #2733726

Strange thing, the pic didn't post.. sorry.
Trying Again, (above)
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 18, 2006
1:37 AM

Post #2733817

Great pics. Thanks!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 18, 2006
4:39 AM

Post #2734326

The same thing happened to me earlier on another forum. Very pretty!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2006
11:22 PM

Post #3037406

Shrubby Blue Sage, Mejorana, Salvia ballotaeflora, in the Labiatae family (Mint Family)
Found growing wild from the southern Edwards Plateau to the Rio Grande Plains. It has aromatic leaves and flowers, light blue to pale purple flowers from Spring to Fall. Nothing is sweeter than to encounter lots of these shrubby plants filled with blooms and inhale the fragrance while bees and other insects feast on the nectar!
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2006
11:27 PM

Post #3037416

Supurb entry Linda,
I can smell it from your description...Nice shot & beautifully done!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 17, 2007
4:43 PM

Post #3292174

(See its entry above.)
Mealy Cup Sage, Duelberg Sage, 'Henry Duelberg' Salvia (Salvia farinacea, 'Henry Duelberg')

I planted this Mealy Cup Sage (Salvia farinacea) 'Henry Duelberg' last summer and it was a bit straggly looking because it never sent up many shoots. The roots were established this winter and the plant is sprouting many stems in the middle of March. So if you plant new 'Henry Duelberg' transplants do not despair that first year if they are not very full. After the roots are established, they obviously become fuller.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2007
10:24 PM

Post #3341565

Blue Gilia, Gilia rigidula var. rigidula
You're most likely to see this one in late afternoon or evening. Out of what looks like a fairly difficult habitat can come great beauty! So lovely. Blooms March to July, according to one book.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

March 31, 2007
10:31 PM

Post #3341589

Blue Pimpernel. Anagallis monellii

This message was edited Mar 31, 2007 9:35 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
1:54 AM

Post #3353254

Blue Gilia, Prickleleaf Gilia, Stiffleaf Gilia, Bluebowls (Gilia rigidula), Polemoniaceae Family, perennial/annual, native, subshrub, blooms from February or March through July or August (depending upon its habitat) - it frequently reblooms in the fall

Blue gilia can be found natively growing in dry sandy, rocky limestone or chalky soils of plains, prairies, brushlands, slopes or evergreen wooded environs. The blooms are about 3/4 of an inch wide. However , they standout well because of their color. The plant forms a basal rosette of leaves; however, it has a stout, woody base. The stems are very small and slender. It has a taproot, so it is difficult to dig up and replant without it being injured. I have tried to save 2 of them from construction bulldozers and both have died. It is considered to be rare. It is a very low growing groundcover and makes an excellent plant to use in a rock garden, wildscape or xeriscape. It also can be used in an area trhat needs erosion control.

Distribution
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,6,7,8,9,10&name=%3Ci%3EGilia+rigidula%3C/i%3E+Benth.+ssp.+%3Ci%3Erigidula%3C/i%3E

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62385/index.html

The bloom closeup ... note the bloom bud that is a unique color


This message was edited Apr 4, 2007 1:21 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
5:10 AM

Post #3353379

Baby Blue Eyes, Baby Blue-Eyes, Large-Flowered Nemophila (Nemophila phacelioides), Hydrophyllaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms March or April through May (if we don't have hot, hot May)

Baby blue eyes is an annual that likes cool weather. It is found natively in moist sandy or sometimes clay soils of plains, woodlands, partially shaded thicket edges, meadows, river bottoms, prairies and coastal brushlands. It can form large colonies with enough moisture. The alternate, stalked leaves are bluish-green and can vary in shape. They are lobed or divided into segments as well as sometimes irregularly toothed. The stems and leaves have fine hairs. The blue to blue-violet blooms are about 1 inch wide (may be up to 1.25 inches) and have a white center. They may appear solitarily from the leaf axils or in clusters at the tip of stems. As soon as the weather starts heating up, they disappear. The blooms are lovely, especially in early morning and in late afternoon sunlight or when backlit. Here's one plant that does well in partial or light shade.

Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=1,2,3,4,6,7&name=%3Ci%3ENemophila+phacelioides%3C/i%3E+Nutt.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/156344/index.html

Bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
5:12 AM

Post #3353380

Baby Blue Eyes, Baby Blue-Eyes, Large-Flowered Nemophila (Nemophila phacelioides)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
5:15 AM

Post #3353382

Baby Blue Eyes, Baby Blue-Eyes, Large-Flowered Nemophila (Nemophila phacelioides)

Seed capsule starting to form ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
8:23 AM

Post #3353642

Phacelia, Blue Curls, Caterpillar, Fiddleneck, Spider Flower, Wild Heliotrope (Phacelia congesta), Hydrophyllaceae Family, Texas native, annual/biennial, blooms from February or March through May or June

Blue curls is found natively in gravelly, rocky or sandy soils on woodland edges, river and stream banks, and around ponds. It typically is found in large colonies which make a dramatic display in late winter/early spring. The alternate, soft, 4 inch long, 1 5/8 inch wide hairy leaves have deeply cut lobes which are irregularly toothed. The .25 inch purple, blue or white blooms appear in raceme-like, coiled clusters. The coils unfurl as the blooms open. The blooms have 5 petals that are united and form an open bell shape. The stamens conspicuously protrude past the petals. The plant grows easily from seed.

Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,4,5,6,7,8,9,10&name=%3Ci%3EPhacelia+congesta%3C/i%3E+Hook.

For more informationand more photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55642/index.html

The coils with blooms about to open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
8:28 AM

Post #3353657

Phacelia, Blue Curls, Caterpillar, Fiddleneck, Spider Flower, Wild Heliotrope (Phacelia congesta)

An opened bloom and coil up close ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
8:31 AM

Post #3353667

Phacelia, Blue Curls, Caterpillar, Fiddleneck, Spider Flower, Wild Heliotrope (Phacelia congesta)

Backlit by morning sunlight ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 4, 2007
8:33 AM

Post #3353673

Phacelia, Blue Curls, Caterpillar, Fiddleneck, Spider Flower, Wild Heliotrope (Phacelia congesta)

Branching stems which each end with a bloom cluster ...
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 18, 2007
1:38 AM

Post #3403696

RE: Phacelia, Blue Curls, Caterpillar, Fiddleneck, Spider Flower, Wild Heliotrope (Phacelia congesta)

I have so many of these guys growing everywhere here. Anyone want seeds???
They are very pretty indeed.

Judy
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2007
7:45 AM

Post #3403941

Very nice Hazel!! I really like this Phacelia.


Judy would it be alright to send you a SASBE for some of the seeds?


Deb

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2007
7:53 AM

Post #3403962

Me too Judy, I don't have those and they are adorable. I would love some seeds.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 19, 2007
12:12 AM

Post #3407137

Sure. I just mowed most of them down in the yard area today. (I just moved into this area in Dec. and it was knee to waist high in weeds then - 2 1/3 acres worth). Was waiting for the bluebonnets to go to seed. I pulled quite a few of the flower heads off before mowing and put them in a nice size paper bag. Hope the seeds will fall out into it. There are no real visible seed pods that I can identify, so wish me luck. There are still lots more all around here ( I live in the country, but you know, I driven in other parts not far from here and didn't see them. I live on the east side of I-35 just south of SA and my soil is sand -like beach sand. The west side of I-35 has black dirt, so they are not native there). As soon as I know for sure I have some seeds, I'll send soem out and post a message to your D-Mail.
My addy is in the database.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 19, 2007
2:54 AM

Post #3407323

Ok, here is a photo of a patch of bluebonnets in the backyard. We had them everywhere here. I was surprised to see a few stragglers come up and bloom uder the oak trees. Guess they got enough light.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 19, 2007
8:06 AM

Post #3407601

Whenever you are ready just let us know and thank you for checking.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 21, 2007
11:52 PM

Post #3416932

Thanks, Deb. I am fascinated by the blooms on this plant. There were a lot of them in bloom this year probably due to the rain for a change,
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 22, 2007
12:00 AM

Post #3416997

Drummond's Skullcap, (Scutellaria drummondii var. edwardsiana), Lamiaceae Family, annual, Texas native, blooms early spring through mid-summer (depends upon the zone in which it is growing), blooms may be lavender or blue-violet

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SCDRE

For more information (couldn't find much on this plant), see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/142404/index.html

Bloom and calyces with skullcap-like (or shield-like) protrusions which are called scutellums. They are reddish-purple in color here.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 22, 2007
12:03 AM

Post #3417006

Drummond's Skullcap, (Scutellaria drummondii var. edwardsiana)

Blooms are paired in the axils of the leaves. This photo provides a view of opened blooms, a bloom just starting to open and unopened blooms.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 22, 2007
12:06 AM

Post #3417014

Drummond's Skullcap, (Scutellaria drummondii var. edwardsiana)

As seen in bright afternoon sunlight ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 22, 2007
12:09 AM

Post #3417020

Drummond's Skullcap, (Scutellaria drummondii var. edwardsiana)

The beautiful little plant in its native habitat which is being savaged by land development. This sidewalk leads to a recently built school in the fastest growing school district in the nation due to the huge number of new homes that have been completed. Too bad that building codes in my area do not contain a provision for wildscape areas being set aside to conserve flora and fauna.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 24, 2007
2:31 AM

Post #3424332

Texas Sage, Blue Sage (Salvia texana), Lamiaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms March through May or April through June depending upon in what region it is growing

Texas sage is called blue sage in most wildflower books. It can be found growing natively in dry, limestone soils in the Edwards Plateau, the South Texas Plains, Central and West Texas on hillsides, slopes, ledges and disturbed areas. It is an erect plant that grows from six to fifteen inches high and is often overlooked. The narrow, 2 inch long leaves are opposite or whorled below the the blooms. They may be slightly toothed on the upper two thirds of the leaf margins. The purple to dark blue flower is 3/4 to 1 inch long with a white throat and 2 stamen. Its stem has retrorse (directed back or downwards) long and short hairs on all 4 sides (need a hand lens to see) and the throat of the bloom calyx is very hairy. It has a taproot and forms a winter rosette. Texas sage resembles Engelmann's sage, but it has smaller, darker colored flowers and it also has a longer bloom period.

Distribution according to USDA:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SATE3

Distribution according to TAMU:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,4,5,6,7,8,9,10&name=%3Ci%3ESalvia+texana%3C/i%3E+(Scheele)+Torr.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113584/index.html

A bloom showing its densely hairy calyx ... blooms may be dark blue, blue-violet or purple and may become somewhat lighter in color with age. This bloom is much darker than as captured by my camera.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 24, 2007
2:34 AM

Post #3424335

Texas Sage, Blue Sage (Salvia texana)

A close view of the upper portion of a bloom (illuminated with the flash function on) ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 24, 2007
8:03 AM

Post #3424684

Gorgeous Hazel!!!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 24, 2007
11:29 AM

Post #3425294

Thanks, Josephine. This is another of the "little ones" that I am so fond of.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2007
2:32 AM

Post #3431911

Swordleaf Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium chilense), Iridaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms in March through May

Swordleaf blue-eyed grass forms a dense, turf-like clump given time. Although its name implies that it is a grass, it is not and is related to the iris. The derivation of the genus name "Sisyrinchium" comes from the Greek words "sys" (pig) and "rhynchos" (nose). This refers to the habit of pigs or wild hogs "grubbing" the roots. It can be found growing along roadsides, in meadows, oak uplands, open woodlands, pastures, prairies, plains and savannahs. It grows in a variety of soils, but prefers sandy, sandy loam and medium loam. It has been found in clay loam, clay and limestone-based soils. It will remain evergreen if kept watered through the summer and it needs water when in bloom. This wet spring has blessed Texans with a wonderful showing of these beautiful little plants.

The leaves are narrow and long and emerge from the base. The gray-green flower stem is short and winged. Each inflorescence has two leaf-like bracts underneath it where it meets the main stem. These are called the spathe. There are two of these leaf-like structures where the flowers emerge as well which are both about the same length. The blue to blue-violet "petals" of the yellow-based small bloom are actually tepals. Three of the six are narrower than the other three. The yellow base appears as a yellow "eye" in the center of the bloom. It is usually outlined in dark bluish purple. The filaments (stalks of the anthers) are connate (grown together). The flowers close at night or in cloudy weather. The round, 1/4 inch seed capsules are light to dark brown. Each seed has a small indentation on one side. Seed may be collected in May when the seeds are black.

Any of the blue-eyed grass species are excellent choices to use as border plants and/or iin wildscapes. They also can be used as container plants.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SICH2

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/142795/index.html

A fully opened bloom, unripe seed capsule and spent bloom shown in the late afternoon. The tepals are recurved backward which is not always the case. (For other photos of blooms and seed capsules, see later date posts: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=8683141
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=8683143)


This message was edited Jul 10, 2011 1:17 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2007
2:37 AM

Post #3431916

Swordleaf Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium chilense)

A bloom highlighted by late afternoon sunlight ... the blooms appear to be different colors depending upon the lighting situation. Also, the color intensity varies somehat by population. Note that 3 of the tepals are a bit narrower than the other 3.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 10, 2007
2:29 AM

Post #3481936

Colorado Venus' Looking-Glass, Western Venus Looking Glass (Triodanis coloradoensis), Campanulaceae Family, endemic, annual, blooms from April through June

Colorado Venus' Looking-Glass derives its common name from its very shiny tiny seed that resembles a mirror. It is an erect endemic plant that s found natively growing in dry rocky soils on ledges, rocky hills, open woodlands, edges of floodplains and gravel bars in the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau regions. It typically is about 2 feet tall, but can reach 30 inches under very favorable conditions. Normally, it has a solitary stem that has a few branches in the upper portion. The stem and branches are thin and delicate.and it has elliptic (twice as long as wide) leaves that are about 2 to 2 7/8 inches long and 1/2 inch wide. They are alternate with the lower ones being short-stalked and the upper ones stalkless.

The 1/2 to 3/4 inch, 5-petalled (fused into a short stem) blooms are blue-violet with white inside the tube. The petals may have whitish streaks. Each bloom has 5 sepals which are united into a tube and appears solitarily from the upper leaf axils. Actually, it has two types of blooms: the showy upper flowers which appear later in the plant's growth are open at pollination and the lower flowers which appear first are small, closed and self-pollinating. The seed are in a capsule. When mature, a part of the capsule rolls upward which exposes a slit in the capsule. The seed then escape.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=TRCO5

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/144268/index.html

The bloom has a 3-lobed stigma. It may be darker or lighter in color than this bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 10, 2007
2:31 AM

Post #3481939

Colorado Venus' Looking-Glass, Western Venus Looking Glass (Triodanis coloradoensis)

Another bloom ..
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
6:16 AM

Post #3485534

Colorado Venus' Looking-Glass, Western Venus Looking Glass (Triodanis coloradoensis)

A leaf ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:17 AM

Post #3485595

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata), Campanulaceae Family, annual, blooms from March through July

Note: Although the blooms on the plants I observed were more of a purplish color than blue-violet, I am posting this plant ih the blue thread because the blooms may be either color and one can compare this species to the one that is posted above.

Round-leaved Venus' looking-glass can be found growing in old fields, prairies and pastures, on cliffs, at the edges of woodlands and along roadsides. It pops up in soil that has been disturbed and prefers sandy soils. However, the ones I observed are growing in limestoney soil. It grows natively in all regions of Texas. It is an erect, up to 30 inches tall plant that is usually unbranched. The ones I observed had one soliatry stem; however, it may branch from the base (multiple stems).

The fused 5-petalled,1/3" to 1/2" wide blooms open widely and have a white center with a protruding, white style. Each is subtended by small, cupped leaf. Like Triodanis coloradoensis, it has two types of blooms: the showy upper flowers which appear later in the plant's growth are open at pollination and the lower flowers which appear first are small, closed and self-pollinating.The alternate, up to 1" leaves are rounded, clasp the stem and are palmately veined. They are deeply notched at the base and have shallowly toothed (rounded) edges. The fruit is an oblong capsule. When mature, a part of the capsule rolls upward which exposes a slit (pore) in the capsule which facilitates the release of the seed. The pore is broadly elliptical to rounded which distinguishes it from T. holzinger which has capsules that have linear pores.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=TRTE4

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55426/index.html

Blooms may be blue-violet to purple - these were purplish and the spent blooms were blue to blue-violet.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:20 AM

Post #3485599

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata)

A not as widely open bloom (just opened) that still has wrinkles and some spent blooms
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:23 AM

Post #3485604

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata)

Bloom buds, opening bloom from the side and spent blooms
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:25 AM

Post #3485610

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata)

Stem structure and the elongated hypanthium with the cupped leaves below them
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:27 AM

Post #3485615

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata)

Seed capsule just starting to form which looks like a tiny pickle right in the center
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:29 AM

Post #3485618

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata)

Tiny seed capsules in the axils of the leaves
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 11, 2007
7:31 AM

Post #3485620

Venus' Looking-glass, Clasping Venus' Looking-glass, Round-leaved Venus' Looking-glass (Triodanis perfoliata)

About 5mm long seed capsules ... the pores have opened. Most of the very tiny seeds have been dispersed and a few teensy seeds can be seen on the leaf and stem. It has broadly elliptical to rounded capsule openings which distinguish it from T. holzingeri which has linear pores.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 2, 2007
6:42 AM

Post #3564744

Deb (debnes_dfw_tx) and Josephine (frostweed), I have the seeds ready for the Blue Curls -Phacelia> If you still want them, please send a small SASE. They are tiny seeds (the size of petunia seeds), so a small one will do fine.


Thanks,

Judy Johnson
285 Rhonda Drive
Lytle, TX 78052

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
2:00 PM

Post #3565381

Judy, you are so sweet to do this.
I will send an SASE soon.
Thank you very much, is there anything I can offer you?
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
2:10 PM

Post #3565419

Me too Judy!! Thank you so much for remembering :-)))))


:-Deb
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2007
1:16 PM

Post #3697829

I thought maybe Hazel or Josephine would know what this plant it popping up here in the garden. I am hoping it is something I planted.

:-Deb

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2007
8:57 PM

Post #3699558

Deb, the leaf reminds me of carnation, but I know that is not it since the flower is very different, however I can't really see the flower just the general shape, it seems to be some kind of bell, but I cannot tell. Sorry.
maybe a clearer picture of the flower will help.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2007
12:12 AM

Post #3712510

Thanks Josephine! I was hoping it was some sort of Agalinis. My computer has been playing up on me lately. (In case you wondered why I haven't been online much.) I thought I had it fixed, but it wasn't.

Do you happen to have a pic of Slender Agalinis? I wasn't able to get any of the seeds I had for either Agalinis to grow for me this year. :-.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2007
3:46 AM

Post #3713463

Deb, here is my picture from the plant files, now that you mention it, the leaves look similar, but are your flowers blue? or is it just the light.
As a matter of fact, I don't have any growing either, maybe I still have some seeds from last year, I will look.
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/131074/
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2007
3:51 AM

Post #3713473

I have thousands of those growing wild all over our place. Real beauties.

trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2007
12:00 PM

Post #3714069

You are a lucky guy Trois!!!!
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2007
12:46 PM

Post #3714189

Yep, but I have helped by selective mowing for several years. 9 years ago there were only few plants.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 11, 2007
8:00 PM

Post #3724527

Troi,
That's nice to have thousands of those! I do a bit of selective mowing myself! Tried sowing some in spring, but none of them came up, :- Do you get Buckeye butterflies?
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 11, 2007
10:05 PM

Post #3725050

I get a lot of butterflies that move too fast for pictures. I will try to find out.
There is another large patch up now, hopefully blooming soon.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 11, 2007
10:11 PM

Post #3725074

debnes_dfw_tx, we have a lot of those later in the year. I hadto look them up.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 11, 2007
10:18 PM

Post #3725105

debnes_dfw_tx, we have a lot of those later in the year. I had to look them up.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2007
1:42 AM

Post #3725887

I have seen quite a few of the Buckeyes this year, so I know there must be a larval host somewhere nearby. I'm surprised you have any trouble getting pics of them.. The males will just sit and bask when they find a comfortable spot. One of these years maybe get some Agalinis to grow and a chance to host them.
Keep an eye out for chewed plants in your patch.

:-D
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 12, 2007
1:48 AM

Post #3725916

Few butterflies stay put here, except in winter.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2007
2:31 AM

Post #3726072

Deb, all these plants are larval hosts for the Buckeye, I bet you have some of them.

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia):
ACANTHACEAE: Snake-herb (Dyschoriste linearis), Violet Ruellia (Ruellia nudiflora), PLANTAGINACEAE: English Plantain (Plantago lanceolata), Pale-Seed Plantain (P. virginica), Buck-Horn Plantain (P. coronopus), Dooryard Plantain (P. major), Common Plantain (P. rugelii), Cedar Plantain (P. helleri), Tallow-Weed (P. hookeriana); SCROPHULARIACEAE: Beach Gerardia (Agalinis fasciculata), Flat-Flower Gerardia (Agalinis homalantha), Slender Gerardia (Agalinis tenuifolia), False Foxglove (Aureolaria grandifloria), American Bluehearts (Buchnera americana), Texas Paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa), Prairie Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja purpurea), Butter and Eggs (Linaria vulgaris); Snapdragon Vine (Maurandya antirrhiniflora), Toad-Flax (Nuttallanthus canadensis), VERBENACEAE: Common Frogfruit (Lippia nodiflora), Lance-Leaf Frogfruit (Lippia lanceolata), Brazilian Verbena (Verbena bonariensis).
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #3726138

Yes I have a couple of those Josephine, but I have never seen any cats on them. Maybe they will sneak upand surprise me soon.
Thanks for the list!
:-D
charlenesplants
Buffalo, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 24, 2008
2:30 AM

Post #4579798

I discovered this along the fence-line this morning. I don't know what the name is, but it is a native that just "showed up".

Sorry, I think this one is purple and I put it in the wrong place.

Charlene

This message was edited Feb 23, 2008 8:33 PM

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #4580084

Charlene...
It is under the purple section. Here is a link. She has two other pics on there also.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=1994857

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2008
3:49 AM

Post #4580087

Charlene, that plant is adorable but it is not native, it is called Henbit, and it is an introduced plant;
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LAAM
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53157
Thank you for checking it out.
Josephine.
jessaree
Anderson, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 20, 2008
3:31 AM

Post #5131124

There is nothing like Texas Bluebonnets in the spring!

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 20, 2008
3:39 AM

Post #5131165

Sweet!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 20, 2008
4:50 AM

Post #5131381

Very pretty Jessareel
WillisTxGarden
Willis, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2009
6:38 PM

Post #6591546

Prairie Larkspur ( Delphinium carolinianum ) Dee & I found these growing between Jacksonville & Palestine
the afternoon of the ETRU '09. Brilliant blue flowers stood out even as we passed by at 60mph
bellzeybubba
Bastrop, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 25, 2009
3:30 AM

Post #7101895

Oh dear I just realized I should have posted this on the purple thread! I'm sorry, I'll repost it there :(

This lovely liatris is growing wild across from my house and up a good length of the street where there are no houses. I'm going to collect some seed heads when they're ready and scatter them everywhere, I want more!



This message was edited Sep 24, 2009 9:31 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 9, 2011
11:30 PM

Post #8683141

Swordleaf Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium chilense), Iridaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms in March through May

I dug a clu,p up in the wild and planted it in a flower bed that receives the most sun and heat. It comes back each year and the clump is spreading. It bloomed thrpogh June. Due to the heat, it has now died back.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 9, 2011
11:35 PM

Post #8683143

Swordleaf Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium chilense), Iridaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms in March through May

Blooms and very small seed capsules which turn a dark tan color when ripe ...
(For closeup of bloom and more information, see previous posting)


This message was edited Jul 10, 2011 10:12 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2011
5:17 AM

Post #8683313

Thank you Hazel, they are beautiful.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 10, 2011
9:14 AM

Post #8683819

You're welcome. I ws pl;eased that these survived in my yard after saving them from destruction. They are carefree plants and so cute.

postoaksavannah

postoaksavannah
Teague, TX

August 17, 2014
7:41 AM

Post #9920011

Here is Eryngium hookeri, or Hookers eryngo. growing on my land in Freestone County, Texas. I will have lots of seed.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2014
12:56 PM

Post #9920163

Excellent! thank you for posting, we could use some of that here too.
Jamper
Sugarland, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2014
3:51 PM

Post #9952469

All native plants to Texas - all in blues and violets. Any one can add what grows well in the fall to winter months. Please...

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2014
10:52 AM

Post #9955853

Just plants that are native to Texas and have the blue color.
The Eryngium hookeri is a great prairie plant postoak. I wanted to post my photo of it also.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 11, 2014
3:49 PM

Post #9956983

Slender agalinas? Is that what this is? Too tiny to pic properly without better ewuipment, blue, yes

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 11, 2014
5:30 PM

Post #9957033

I am sorry, but I can't tell what it is.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 11, 2014
5:46 PM

Post #9957042

They were hard to see with the naked eye, doesnt surprise me. Strange curled blooms

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Texas Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
who grows peonies in houston area? vossner 20 Jun 18, 2012 7:58 PM
Texas Invasives List PvillePlanter 18 Mar 14, 2014 5:34 PM
Anyone Up For A Chat? dstartz 29 Jun 30, 2007 5:44 PM
DGrs in SW houston vossner 5 Dec 29, 2013 2:55 PM
Mock Orange in a big pot? mkjones 21 Aug 15, 2011 1:29 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America