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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( White )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
8:40 PM

Post #1619199

Jimsonweed, ( Datura wrightii ) * Meteloides * Native Texas plant, perennial, flowers open at night
have a beautiful scent.
For more information see the plant files click on this link: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/355/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
8:41 PM

Post #1619202

A close up of Jimsonweed.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:22 PM

Post #1623023

Giant Rain Lily, Prairie Lily, Hill Country Rain Lily (Zephyranthes drummondii), Texas (mainly Central Texas), Mexico and Louisiana native, Amaryllidaceae Family, perennial, blooms heavily in late winter through early summer - 2-3 inch blooms that last several days
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/65974/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:25 PM

Post #1623033

Giant Rain Lily, Prairie Lily, Hill Country Rain Lily (Zephyranthes drummondii)
Image of foliage and bloom bud ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:27 PM

Post #1623038

Giant Rain Lily, Prairie Lily, Hill Country Rain Lily (Zephyranthes drummondii)
Image of bloom bud ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
4:05 PM

Post #1623367

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca), Rosaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late Spring through mid-summer; I have to pick the strawberries before the birds and other critters beat me to them. The color of the bloom is a white - the photo was taken in early morning sunlight.
For more information see the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1013/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
2:57 PM

Post #1625540

Blackfoot daisy (Melampodium leucanthum), Asteraceae, Texas native, perennial, blooms in mid-spring through fall

View of a bloom blowing in the hot wind; the plant is next to a sidewalk and street and the temperature was 115 degrees in this area at time the photo was taken in a drought period; this is one tough plant.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/259/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
2:59 PM

Post #1625547

Blackfoot daisy (Melampodium leucanthum)

Seedheads are shaped like stars: top one has dispersed some seeds and the bottom one is empty.
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2005
5:34 PM

Post #1625815

Jimsonweed plant with several blooms...
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2005
5:51 PM

Post #1625845

Prickly Poppy (Argemone pleiacantha) - plant which is now 5' -6' tall...
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2005
5:52 PM

Post #1625850

Prickly Poppy (Argemone pleiacantha) - closeup of flower
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
1:39 PM

Post #1627490

Southern Swamp Lily, American Crinum (Crinum americanum), Amaryllidaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late spring through summer

Even though it looks like it might be a lily, it is not a true lily because the flower parts are attached above the ovary rather than below, as in a true lily. It spreads by underground stolons and self-seeds. It is found along streambanks and in marshes. It grows in full sun to shade, but blooms better in full sun. It makes a great bog plant.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1172/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
1:42 PM

Post #1627496

Southern Swamp Lily, American Crinum (Crinum americanum)

A closer view of the blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
5:44 AM

Post #1629180

Woolly-White, Woolly White, Old Plainsman, Wild Cauiliflower (Hymenopappus scabiosaeus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, biennial, blooms in early spring through mid-summer

It is considered an invasive weed by some. It is often found in dry, sandy soils, on rocky hillsides, prairies, roadsides and close to limestone outcrops. The flowerhead is composed of white to creamy white disk flowers and small white petal-like bracts and is about 1/2 inch in diameter. Many flowerheads form a cluster. There are many clusters on each plant. The leaves tend to form a basal rosette and some leaves alternate along the stem which is ribbed. The blooms attract butterflies and bees.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/75459/index.html

A view of young flowerheads ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2005
7:36 PM

Post #1636929

( Native ) False Ragweed, Parthenium hysterophorus. Sunflower family.
Annual up to 3 feet tall, blooms June- October. Beautiful leaves with tiny white flowers. This plant was given to me by one our members Mitch,75154, I like very much and I am not allergic to it. Small plant shows the leaves.
See the plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/image.php

This message was edited Jul 20, 2005 2:41 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2005
7:38 PM

Post #1636933

Medium size plant starting to bloom.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2005
7:40 PM

Post #1636937

False Ragweed. Full size plant in bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
4:28 AM

Post #1645517

False Ragweed (Parthenium hysterophorus)

The 3/16 inch across flowerheads have 5 ray flowers and numerous disk flowers.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
4:29 AM

Post #1645518

False Ragweed (Parthenium hysterophorus)

The flowerhead resembles a teensy cauliflower. The blooms produce a large amount of pollen.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
4:40 AM

Post #1645538

False Gromwell, Softhair Marbleseed, Bexar Marbleseed, Smooth Onosmodium (Onosmodium molle ssp. bejariense), Texas native, perennial


Some references to this plant state that it is endemic to Texas being found mostly in the Central and Edwards Plateau regions; however, other references state that it is endemic to Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. It is usually found on prairies in a sunny site. But, it inhabits woods also. It prefers rocky, sandy soil. Known also as Bexar marbleseed after being found in a riparian woodland along Acequia de It is Espada in Bexar County, Texas (of which San Antonio, Texas is located):hence its genus name "bejariense":Bexar = Bajer in Spanish).

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68305/index.html

When I found this plant growing outside of a fence along a roadside in Northwest Bexar county, I was enchanted by it. It took me a long time to find its ID.


This message was edited Jul 29, 2005 5:59 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
4:41 AM

Post #1645543

False Gromwell, Softhair Marbleseed, Bexar Marbleseed, Smooth Onosmodium (Onosmodium molle ssp. bejariense)

A closer view of the blooms ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
8:31 PM

Post #1651725

( Naturalized ) Yarrow, Milfoil, ( Achillea millefolium ) This lovely plant is native to Europe, but is now naturalized throughout North America. Perennial, it blooms
April- June. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/60178/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
8:32 PM

Post #1651729

A close up of Yarrow bloom cluster.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
7:04 PM

Post #1653770

( Native ) Bull Nettle, ( Cnidoscolus texanus ) Spurge family, bloom period
March- September, perennial plant covered with stinging hairs,which in contact with the sking can produce a very painful irritation. The flowers are beautiful and have a lovely scent. The seeds are edible.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/74905/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
7:05 PM

Post #1653774

A close up of Bull Nettle flowers.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
10:47 AM

Post #1657721

OOOOOPS ... See below

This message was edited Jul 29, 2005 5:51 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
10:49 AM

Post #1657723

White Buttercup, Pale Evening Primrose (Oenothera pallida ssp. runcinata), Onagraceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, blooms March through July

The Pale Evening Primrose has delicate blooms that are approximately 2 to 3 1/2 inches in diameter. As the blooms mature, they turn a rosy pink.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/64334/index.html

This message was edited Jul 29, 2005 5:54 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
10:55 AM

Post #1657727

White Buttercup, Pale Evening Primrose (Oenothera pallida ssp. runcinata)

Another view ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
8:33 PM

Post #1658791

( Naturalized ) Ox-eye Daisy, ( Chrysanthemum leucanthemum ) This daisy is rare in Texas and is found only in the northeast corner of the state. Perennial up to three feet tall, bloom period May-October.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1903/index.html

This message was edited Jul 29, 2005 10:19 PM
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2005
8:53 PM

Post #1658826

Oxeye daisy is not native to the US. ;-) http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/topics.cgi?earl=plant_profile.cgi&symbol=LEVU

Some states list it as a noxious weed.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
9:02 PM

Post #1658839

You told me that before John, and I thought we got that settled, blame it on
Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller, in Texas Wildflwers, I like their version.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2005
9:11 PM

Post #1658851

We only reference things we like? The USDA is an inferior reference some times but, not all the time?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
9:18 PM

Post #1658863

I guess we make choices John, I did not say any one is superior or inferior, I just said I like their version and I chose to go with it.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2005
9:30 PM

Post #1658880

The inference was that the National Plants Database is inferior to Cambell and Lynn Loughmiller's book, was it not?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
9:34 PM

Post #1658883

No, I simply posted someting, that is all.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
5:06 PM

Post #1660422

( Native ) Plains Fleabane, ( Erigeron modestus ) Sundlower family.
Perennial, bloom period March to November, very pretty little daisy.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55621/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
5:31 PM

Post #1660457

(Native ) Frostweed, ( Verbesina virginica) Sunflower family, perennial 3 to 7 feet tall.
Bloom period August to November. Lush lovely looking plant, that will tolerate shade.
After a hard freeze the stems will burst and form ice in very intersting patterns.
One tall plant on the wildflower slope in full sun.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/62556/

This message was edited Aug 4, 2005 9:25 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
5:31 PM

Post #1660460

Close up of the flowers.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
5:33 PM

Post #1660462

The split stem with ice formation around it.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 30, 2005
10:44 PM

Post #1660938

Frostweed, (Verbesina virginica)

The white to greenish white ray and disc flowers are found in 6 inch heads.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 30, 2005
10:48 PM

Post #1660943

Frostweed (Verbesina virginica)

Frostweed is also known as white crown-beard and ice plant. It is starting to bloom in September. Shown here starting to bloom in September in Bexar County.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
6:29 AM

Post #1668044

Lazy Daisy, Doze Daisy, Dozedaisy, Arkansas Lazy Daisy, Texas Lazy Daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual,

With a very high heat tolerance and very low water requirement, it is an excellent xeriscape plant - great for rock gardens. It starts out as a very small inconspicuos plant, then beomes very bushy, 6-18 inches tall and 1-2 feet in diameter (it makes a mound) depending upon the growing conditions. The 1 inch blooms which appear prolifically are white with yellow centers and resemble an aster. The foliage is a silver-green or a greyish-green. Because the blooms close at night and then take a while to open in the morning, its commomly called a "lazy daisy" and/or "doze daisy".

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57959/index.html

Growing in a wedge between a sidewalk and a street curb where it is terrifically hot and dry.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
6:32 AM

Post #1668046

Lazy Daisy, Doze Daisy, Dozedaisy, Arkansas Lazy Daisy, Texas Lazy Daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis)

A closer view of the blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
6:36 AM

Post #1668053

Lazy Daisy, Doze Daisy, Dozedaisy, Arkansas Lazy Daisy, Texas Lazy Daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis)

The blooms close at night into a tight ball and then open as the morning progresses. The closed blooms themselves are attractive. I just love this plant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 4, 2005
12:25 PM

Post #1670453

Rain Lily, Fairy Lily, Zephyr Lily, Autumn Rain Lily (Zephyranthes candida), Amaryllidaceae Family, perennial, naturalized, blooms late summer to early fall

This rain lily has large blooms and forms nice large clumps.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2536/index.html
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 30, 2005
5:55 AM

Post #1728938

Snow-On-the-Mountain, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbiaceae Family, Texas native, annual

One to three feet high. Plant usually starts as a single tall stem dividing toward the top. Leaves are large, oval and a strong grayish-blue green with entire margins. Toward the inflorescence the leaves get narrower and have a white margin. The white margins get broader as they near the top. Snow-On-the-Mountains differ from Snow-On-the-Prairie in that the leaves of the latter are narrower.

At the top of the plant are what appear to be 5-petaled "flowers." These are not flowers, but involucral cups that contain the real flowers. The milky white sap that can irritate the skin in humans is also toxic to livestock. It is seldom fatal to them, but it causes mouth and gastrointestinal irritations that lead to severe weight loss and may take months to recover.

Note: Texas Wildflowers by Campbell and Miller, pg 97, describe Snow-On-the-Prairie, use the correct scientific name, but call it Snow-On-the-Mountain.
For more information, see the PlantFiles
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/8109/
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 30, 2005
6:00 AM

Post #1728942

Snow-On-the-Mountain, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbiaceae Family, annual Texas native.

Close-up of an inflorescence.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 30, 2005
6:08 AM

Post #1728947

Snow-On-the-Mountain, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbiaceae Family, annual Texas native.

Close-up of the stem and its leaves.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
2:18 PM

Post #1750788

White Flowered Bush Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, subshrub/shrub, evergreen, blloms late spring to early fall

Cross-referenced in the Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs ) thread

The white flowered bush zinnia is also known as desert zinnia, spinyleaf zinnia, dwarf zinnia, wild zinnia and white zinnia. It is deer resistant. In Texas, it can be found in the Trans-Pecos, Southwest Rio Grand Plains and into the Valley regions. Soil pH should be acidic with a pH above 6.8. It has slender woolly stems and needle-like, 1/2" long, narrow, stiff, grayish-green leaves that have sharp tips. The number of bloom petals varies.

It grows 10 to 12 inches tall and to 2 feet in diameter which makes it a great groundcover. Requiring minimum care, the desert zinnia is useful in harsh arid environments. It is very drought tolerant and will survive with no supplemental water, but wll look a bit ragged and has fewer blooms. It will need a little water to grow to its optimum beauty and produce blooms prolifically. An occasional watering with a hose will suffice if it hasn't rained in a while. Soils must be well-drained soils. Itt makes a great xeriscape, rock garden or wildscape plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53451/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
5:10 PM

Post #1751045

Hedge Parsley, Hedgeparsley, Spreading Hedgeparsley, Beggar's Ticks (Torilis arvensis), Apiaceae Family, naturalized, annual, considered an invasive weed by many

Hedge Parsley's (Beggar's Ticks') light pinkish to white blooms are in the form of compound umbrels with 3 to 8 unequal rays. The plant has pinnately divided leaves.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32053/index.html

Shown here blooming in late February ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 14, 2005
3:43 PM

Post #1874842

Mexican Devil-Weed, Spiny Aster (Chloracantha spinosa; previously Aster spinosus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms from April through November (more so in late summer and fall), evergreen stems, may be invasive

Mexican devil-weed (Aster spinosus) is a native much branched perennial that is almost leafless. It is occassionally spiny along its stems. It can form hedge-like thickets along the banks of irrigation ditches, bottomlands, in alkaline valley soils and in moist saline soil along river bottoms, pastures, and low places, It also is found growing with cultivated crops, including soybean, cotton, alfalfa and small grain. It blooms from April to October, but primarily in late summer and fall. Propaqgation is by seeds and by widespreading creeping rhizomes. Although it is found in moist soil areas, it also can be found in dry areas. However, it is not as prolific.

For more information, see its entry in the Plant-Files:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113078/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2006
9:19 PM

Post #2107923

Pasture heliotrope (Heliotropium tenellum), Boraginaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms spring through early fall

Pasture heliotrope (Heliotropium tenellum) also is commonly known as slender heliotrope and is a native plant. It inhabits dry areas both wooded and open, limestone glades and rocky prairiies. It can reach 40cm (16inches) in height, but it is usually smaller and has many branched narrow stems. It has a taproot as well as some spreading roots. Because the 5-6mm wide blooms are so tiny, it often goes unnoticed.

For more information, see its entry in the Plant-Files:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/80382/index.html

The bloom as photographed in Blanco County ...


This message was edited Mar 12, 2006 4:22 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2006
9:21 PM

Post #2107933

Pasture heliotrope (Heliotropium tenellum)

A view of the plant a bit farther back ...
davesgarden5
Tomball, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2006
4:07 PM

Post #2109686

Frostweed, have you or anyone else done the Datura Metel "Belle Blanche"? I have some seedlings started but not sure if I want to plant them. Think they are worth the space? Package says 3 feet tall. jackie

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 13, 2006
4:24 PM

Post #2109730

Hello, I have only done the plain datura or Jimsonweed. Last year someone gave me the double white, and I bought a litttle plat of the double purple, which turned out to be beautiful.
You could try some od the Belle and see whow you like them, I think all plants deserve a chance, so go ahead and try them.
Josephine.
davesgarden5
Tomball, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2006
6:36 PM

Post #2110090

will do, thanks! jackie
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 28, 2006
1:02 AM

Post #2143662

Wild Strawberry, Virginia Strawberry, Scarlet Strawberry (Fragaria virginiana), Rosaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late Spring through mid-summer.

Virginia strawberry or wild strawberry is a groundcover that emerges from a fibrous, perennial root system. The leaf petioles, which can be up to 6 inches long, each bear a single trifoliate deep green serrated leaf. The leaflets are roundish to oblong. The flower stalk has a loose cluster of small, five-petaled flowers which are followed by very sweet wild strawberries. The wild strawberries are much smaller than "store bought" ones, 90 per cent of which are hybrids developed from this native species and a South American strawberry. The other 10 percent of cultivated starwberries have Coastal Strawberry (Fragaria chiloensis) as the source parent. Virginia strawberry can be distinguished from the Woodland Strawberry (F. vesca) whose sepals point backwards away from the fruit and whose leaves are a lighter green.. The Virginia strawberry (F. virginiana) reproduces itself by seeds and by runners. The Woodland Strawberry (F. vesca) does not produce runners. It is found in fields open slopes and woodland edges. It can grow in a variety of soils, but likes sandy soils best (very acidic to slightly alkaline). If you want more fruit, pinch off the runners. The leaves may be steeped in boiling water to make tea. Like the fruits, the leaves are high in vitamin C. The plants need watered every 2 weeks if experiencing a drought. Virginia Strawberry can withstand frosts and is evergreen in my Zone 8b. It does well as a cultivated groundcover given dappled sun, full sun or morniing sun. Fruit production is best when the plants are given full sun. It may be container grown.

For more information see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31464/index.html

The bloom is similar to the F. vesca bloom shown above. Here is a ripening fruit that shows the sepals encasing the fruit rather than flaring back away from it.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2006
3:15 AM

Post #2277088

Barbara's Buttons, Marshallia caespitosa, is a perennial wildflower of Texas and some other states. Marshallia caespitosa is the botanical name of this cold-hardy plant, which forms a rosette over the winter. It has round white flower heads and blooms every Spring, growing to heights up to 18 inches at that time.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2006
3:29 AM

Post #2277123

Butterflies and insects just love them! Another view of Barbara's Buttons.
CSinTexas
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 4, 2006
4:48 PM

Post #2466235

Capeweed, Creeping Lip Plant, Frog-Fruit, Frog's Bit, Licorice Verbena, Turkey Tangle Fogfruit
(Phyla nodiflora)

A tiny flower found along ditches in my area.

This one has a Martian Face ;
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 15, 2006
3:31 PM

Post #2508598

Rain Lily, Fairy Lily, Zephyr Lily (Zephyranthes candida)

Finally decided to grace me with a few blooms. I figure this is a good shot of the foliage. I need to move this back into a clay pot--for some reason I planted it on the east side of the house. Many bulbs just do better in clay pots for me if I don't have the perfect conditions for them..
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 15, 2006
3:36 PM

Post #2508606

Here's frostweed; Verbesina virginica about three feet tall in full sun. I posted this to let people know it seems to like the soil on the Katy Prairie too.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2006
3:54 PM

Post #2658175

Yerba Mansa, Swamproot, Lizard Tail (Anemopsis californica), Saururaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms March through September, bog or wetlands plant

Cross-referenced at Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Aquatic & Bog )

This perennial herb's blooms start out white and then develop reddish pink spots as it matures. The leaves are large, waxy, dull gray-green that lay flat and form mats. They have great veining. It is commonly called "lizard tail" because of the long runners that it produces in the spring. It can be found in marshes, creeksides, and other highly moist areas.

An infusion made from the aromatic roots is used by native Americans of the southwest as a general pain reliever and a treatment for colds, stomach ulcers, and chest congestion.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/59447/index.html

A view of the bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2006
3:55 PM

Post #2658178

Yerba Mansa, Swamproot, Lizard Tail (Anemopsis californica)

A view of a leaf ...
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
12:23 AM

Post #2737204

Josephine~
I know I'm chimin(g) in late here but I just recently became a subscribing member. It's getting close to the meet in Arlington too, and Sheila just told me about it last week.. so not much time for me to prepare, but I still hope to come.
I am so glad someone initiated a Texas Native Plants Catagory, as i have a few years of pics I have gathered from all over, and of course in my own garden. A few I still haven't identified, but learning about them is important before you plant in your own yard, so i love to learn this way. Such as, does it have a fruit? Can ya eat it? Does it have a fragrance? Will it attract a welcome or unwelcome guest? ..and so on.
After perusing each section I will see if any of the ones I have are already listed and has an available photo. If it is/does. I may or may not post what I have.
Great job y'all! This should make an excellent & fun reference point for us Texas Gardeners..! Native plants are amazing ! A big TexasThankU to everyone contributing here so far!! Nice work!!

~Debnes
This one is > Sweet Alyssum Lobularia maritima (Brassicaceae)
I planted some seeds in Spring that have made an awesome border around a candleush, and they do smell sweet, and definatly have staying power.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
3:02 AM

Post #2737719

Debnes, thank you for joyning us in this fun endeavor, we certainly can use all the information we can get. Looking forward to meeting you at the Dallas swap.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 30, 2006
10:11 PM

Post #2773504

Metz's Wild Petunia, Wild White Petunia (Ruellia metziae), Acanthaceae Family, native, endemic to Texas, perennial, blooms early summer through fall

Metz's Wild Petunia can be found in growing in gravel, limestone outcrops, thickets, fields, prairies and open woods from the Lampasas Plain south and southwest to central Texas and the Edwards Plateau. It loves the heat and can withstand droughts. The fragrant blooms are about 1 to 1.5 inches across and are smaller than the purple or lavendar wild petunias; however, they really show up well due to their pure white color. The plant serves as a butterfly nectar source as well as butterfly larval host It is also highly deer resistant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/38218/index.html

Flowers in morning sun ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 30, 2006
10:19 PM

Post #2773522

Metz's Wild Petunia, Wild White Petunia (Ruellia metziae)

Another view of a flower ...
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2006
4:30 AM

Post #2774632

Thx Josephine!
I love these posts! This is such excellent information.
I'm trying to decide what to bring for covered dish, and also working to care for the plants I'm bringing. I might call you tomorrow to scope out some possibilities on the dish if that's alright..

Deb
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:30 AM

Post #2809244

American Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, White Nightshade (Solanum americanum: now is known as Solanum ptychanthum) Solanaceae Family, native, annual or short-lived perennial, blooms early summer through fall (warm areas with no freezes - all year), flower color white or light purple (lavender), some consider it a noxious weed, poisonous

The leaves are alternate and may reach 10cm (4inches) in length and 5 cm (2inches) in width. They areovate or somewhat triangular and entire or irregularly toothed with wavy margins. The stem may be smooth or most of the stem may have have small hairs which are visable under magnification. The 5-petaled, 3/8 inch in diameter flowers have a yellow beak of stamens which droop downward. Sometimes the petals are reflexed.. It has round black fruit ( 5 -10 mm in diameter) that look like black cherry tomatoes and they contain numerous small seeds. All parts of this plant are poisonous. It is thought that the berries lose their toxicity when fully ripe and that wildlife eat them; but, other sources state that when mature they should be considered poisonous as they may contain high levels of solanine. I don't think that I will be eating any. :o)

It occurs natively in woodland edges and openings, beaches, sand dunes, stream and river flood plains, fence rows, chaparrals. Growing in various soil types, it usually can be found in disturbed, abandoned or cultivated areas.
Can be found in 6 counties in the Texas Panhandle region as well as many other counties spread across the state as shown here:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SOPT7

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54503

The small bloom (note rain drop on petal - finally had a wonderful rain) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:32 AM

Post #2809251

American Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, White Nightshade (Solanum americanum: now is known as Solanum ptychanthum)

Blloms as one views it from above with the flowers hanging downward ...
CSinTexas
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
3:00 PM

Post #2897490

Here is what I assume is a native plant growing next to frostweed and turks cap. It is about 2ft tall
CSinTexas
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
3:02 PM

Post #2897498

...and another pic of the same plant. Can anyone ID it?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
3:05 PM

Post #2897511

CS, that looks very interesting, are the larger white parts petals? or are they seedpods.
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
3:12 PM

Post #2897531

It looks like it might be Boneset, but I am not sure, is it this one?
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1118/index.html
Josephine.
CSinTexas
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
3:16 PM

Post #2897546

Hi Frostweed
no I don't think so -here is a close-up

I think they are petals 3 per flower and about 1/8" long

By the way I looked at your TexasStar site it is very nice. I would like to use mostly natives on my site also.

Chris

This message was edited Nov 9, 2006 10:18 AM
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2006
4:51 PM

Post #2897855

Those flowers or whatever they are look to me like a sheep's head w/ the tongue sticking out. Really, especially the one to the left of center with all that green line. Really cute!

Ann

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2006
5:02 PM

Post #2897876

That sure looks different, I will have to do some investigating, maybe Hazel or Linda know what it is.
I think it is really neat.
Josephine.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2006
12:16 AM

Post #2902696

Whoa, that's an intriguing plant! I'm not familiar with it and couldn't find anything in the wildflower book that has wildflowers by color. Unless maybe it's a wild buckwheat?...and I don't know what they look like real close-up. Anybody seen those?
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
7:16 PM

Post #2968063

CSinTexas, I don't know what your plant is but I will research it.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
7:52 PM

Post #2968157

Heath Aster, White Aster, Squarrose White Aster, White Wreath Aster, White Prairie Aster, Tufted White Prairie Aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides), Asteraceae Family, native, perennial, flowers late August through November

County distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SYER

It is a common somewhat sprawling white aster of dry prairies and other open places. This grayish bushy plant growis 1 to 2 feet tall, and can often be found growing in patches. The leaves are narrow, alternate, small and pointed. They are leaves are less than 3 inches long and ¼ inch wide. The heath aster appears insignificant until it blooms. The daisy-like flowerheads are about ½ inch wide and appear in dense, frequently one-sided (that is on one side of the stem) clusters. The flowers can have up to 20 white (sometimes pale pink), petal-like rays which surround a small yellow disk which turns to reddish brown to purple with age.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1277/index.html

The flower ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
7:55 PM

Post #2968163

Heath Aster, White Aster, Squarrose White Aster, White Wreath Aster, White Prairie Aster, Tufted White Prairie Aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides)

A view of a flowering branch that provides a size perspective ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2006
5:53 PM

Post #3028454

Texas Milkweed or White Milkweed, Asclepias texana.
Native, endemic to Texas, it is a perennial milkweed. An attractive plant with clusters of white flowers, mainly found in the Edwards Plateau and in some areas of West Texas. About 6 to 18 inches tall, it grows in caliche outcrops, hillsides and grassy fields among live oaks or near creeks. It normally blooms from late spring to mid-fall. Today one still has a few blooms even after we've had some nighttime lows down into the 20's. A very rare occurrence and quite amazing! This plant deserves to be preserved and propagated.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2006
6:38 PM

Post #3028557

Linda, that is really neat, and amazing that it is still in bloom. I have never seen the white milkweed. Maybe next year I can get a start from you.
Josephine.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2007
7:04 AM

Post #3040992

Oh, okay, I can get you a plant! There's still a few that need to be rescued, Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2007
1:38 PM

Post #3041319

Thank you Linda, I see you were up late, we went to bed about 1.30. Happy New Year 2007.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 11, 2007
4:32 AM

Post #3177024

CSinTexas, your unidentified plant is probably in the Polypogonaceae Femily due to its bloom characteristics and may be a type of buckwheat. The one that closely resembles it is Heartsepal Buckwheat, Heartsepal Wild Buckwheat, Many Flowered Wild Buckwheat (Eriogonum multiflorum) which is an annual or biennial which blooms in the summer and fall. I have been unable to find a good photo of its foliage.

http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/a/hdw23109982s.jpg
http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/a/hdw23109983s.jpg
http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/a/hdw23109984s.jpg
http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/a/hdw23109985s.jpg
http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/mi13/mi13076.jpg
http://botany.cs.tamu.edu/FLORA/dcs420/mi13/mi13077.jpg
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

February 11, 2007
4:47 PM

Post #3178189

Way to go Hazel! I think you've got it! I have some cultivated buckwheat seed and am going to try to grow some this year. Interesting plants!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 11, 2007
5:43 PM

Post #3178408

Yes Hazel, super job again, I wonder if he knows you found it.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 13, 2007
6:11 AM

Post #3183873

LindaTX8, the buckwheat plants do look interesting ... I don't think I have seen one in person (if I did, I probably didn't know what it was at the time). I hope yours do well for you.

Josephine, I guess I had better send a D-Mail.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
3:19 AM

Post #3357233

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri), Ranunculaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms February through April

Texas distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10&name=Anemone berlandieri Pritz.

Ten-petal nemone can be found growing natively on open grasslands, pastures, prairies, hillsides, openings and edges of woodlands and granite outcrops. It grows in well-drained sandy, calcareous or limestone soils of the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau Regions. It is an is an upright perennial that attains a height of between 4 and 16 inches when flowering. The usually white (may be pink, blue or violet), 1 3/4 " in diameter flower head has no petals. The 10-20 sepals are petal-like. The leaves are divided into three shallowly toothed leaflets. The leaves are occasionally eaten by white-tailed deer. Ten-petal anemone is often confused with Carolina anemone (Anemone caroliniana). Some facts that may assist with distinguishing between the two follow:

Ten-petal anemone has a stem that is hairy along its entire lenght unlike Carolina anemone that is hairy to the leaves but not below them.

Ten-petal anemone has a whorl of leaves halfway up stem unlike Carolina anemone that has a whorl of leaves right below the bloom but not half way up the stem.

Ten-petal anemone has a tuber with no stolons unlike Carolina anemone that has a bulb-like tuber and has stolons or rhizomes present.

Caution: All parts of this plant are toxic when fresh (only if eaten in large amounts). Contact with fresh sap may cause inflammation and blistering.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/63683/index.html

A bloom at the first of April; photo shows leaves half the way up the stem ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
3:24 AM

Post #3357237

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri),

A view of the leaves that are halfway up the stem ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
3:26 AM

Post #3357240

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri)

The singular stem is covered with hairs along its entire length
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
3:28 AM

Post #3357242

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri)

This cone-like structure elongates after pollination (sometimes before the sepals have fallen). The seeds are produced here and then dispersed usually by winds after they have dried (hence, the common name, "windflower".

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
9:37 AM

Post #3357747

Hazel, you have been putting in some very lovely pictures and detailed information.
Thank you very much for your care and your patience.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
11:56 AM

Post #3358244

Josephine, thank you for your comments. Some of the plants I have found are not easily identified. Some have taken me a year or more and many, many hours of research to determine their exact identity. I hope that the information I post is useful to others so that they save time when attempting to identify a plant. I was thinking last night that maybe people would rather just see the photos and I could add them more quickly if I didn't include the details.

By the way, many of the first photos that I added to the PlantFiles were taken with a not so good camera. I lost many of them when my computer crashed. To add them here, I had to copy them from the PlantFiles to my computer. When I did this, they came out distorted for some reason. I gave up trying to figure out why. None of the photos that have reds and some colors of yellow upload accurately which I haven't determined why either. If anyone can help me determine what the problem is, please let me know.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
12:09 PM

Post #3358276

Hazel, the details are very important because they expand on what you see in the picture and give you information that you wouldn't have otherwise.
I am sorry that the pictures are not copying right for you, I will ask my husband and see if he has any ideas.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
12:53 PM

Post #3358419

Thanks, Josephine. One day I am going to buy a better Texas wildflower reference book which will help me make identifications. The ones I have are small field guides which only include the most frequently found wildflowers.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
1:46 PM

Post #3358557

Well, I don't know if there is such a thing, there is such an amazing variety, it is near impossible to document it all.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 5, 2007
3:29 PM

Post #3358855

Josephine has documented so much on a database or something of the sort. Her husband, Frank, is doing that and he carries his laptop around w/him like teenagers carry their cell phones. LOL They have so much info. Wish Josephine would write a book.

Ann

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
3:49 PM

Post #3358904

Thank you Ann, you are so sweet to say that, but I really am not a writer, what we did is gather a lot of the information already out there and put it together, but if you go to the search by name box and type in Htop, you will see a lot of Hazel's pictures that she has graciously let us use to adorn the site.
This is the link in case you want to check it out; http://www.npot.org/
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 5, 2007
5:44 PM

Post #3359254

Ann, Josephine's database has been invaluable to me as I try to identify plants. I use it all of the time to narrow down my searches. She and her husband have done a fabulous job.

Josephine, I really like that I am able to search for my photos on the database. Sometimes I forget the names of some of the plants I have photographed and this feature will assist me with finding some of them.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
5:48 PM

Post #3359270

Excellent, it makes us feel so good that we can be of help, your pictures are all beautiful and a great asset to the site.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 6, 2007
8:01 AM

Post #3360966

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri)

Another bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 6, 2007
8:05 AM

Post #3360980

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri)

Very tiny, flat seeds being dispersed from the "thimble" ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 6, 2007
8:41 AM

Post #3361089

Ten-Petal Anemone, Tenpetal Thimbleweed, Texas Anemone, Southern Anemone, Glade Flower, Windflower (Anemone berlandieri)

A very, very close view of achenes bursting forth from their chambers - They are held in the "thimble" by the green structures as well as a clear, shiny membrane (but my eyes could be deceiving me). The elliptical, flat, curve-beaked , 2.7-3.5 × 2.2-2.5 mm seeds themselves are not shiny (being covered in fine hairs).

For identification purposes:

Note: Anemone edwardsiana var. petraea is endemic and found on the Edwards Plateau. Its 0.5-1 mm flat achenes are varnished, glabrous (no hairs) and have a straight beak..

Note: Anemone edwardsiana var. edwardsiana 0.5-1 mm achenes are woolly with a tuft of hair at the base (do not have a plume of hairs) and have a straight beak.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 10, 2007
1:18 AM

Post #3374266

Texas Prickly Poppy, Texas Pricklypoppy, Hill Prickly Poppy (Argemone aurantiaca), endemic Texas native, Papaveraceae Family, annual/biennial, blooms spring through summer, considered a weed by many

Texas prickly poppy is found natively growing in fields, pastures, on hills and other disturbed sites as well as in transition zones between lowlands and plateau areas in various parts of central Texas. In particilar, it is frequently found in these counties: Bandera, Bell, Bexar, Blanco, Brown, Comal, Gillespie, Hays, Kerr, Maverick, McLennan, Menard, Mitchell, Schleicher, Taylor, Travis and Uvalde. I could not find very much information about this plant. It is similar in appearance to Argemone albiflora ssp. texana. They differ in the amount of thorns that are present on the plant. The main diffrence is the shape of their seed capsules and their bloom buds. Argemone aurantiaca's bloom buds are oblong. Argemone albiflora ssp. texana bloom buds are subglobose (not quite having the shape of a sphere or ball or nearly orbicular in shape) to broadly ellipsoid (the shape of a compressed or somewhat flattened sphere). In other words, Argemone albiflora ssp. texana's are somewhat "squatter" than Argemone aurantiaca's. The seeds are held in capsules which, when dried, have holes in the top from which the seeds pour out like salt shaker (as do other poppy family species).

Distribution Map 1: (this map does not include Bexar County - this plant has been documented in Bexar County by several sources)
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/endemics_map_page2?code=K4280400

Distribution Map 2: http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=ARAU2

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/114901/index.html

A bloom blowing in a brisk April wind which assists with pollen dispersal:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 10, 2007
1:21 AM

Post #3374269

Texas Prickly Poppy, Texas Pricklypoppy, Hill Prickly Poppy (Argemone aurantiaca)

A closer view of the pollen laden bloom center ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 11, 2007
5:13 AM

Post #3378123

Rock Lettuce, White Dandelion, White Rock-lettuce, Pink Dandelion (Pinaropappus roseus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March through August

Rock lettuce is an upright plant that attains a height of between six and eighteen inches. It natively grows in dry gravelly or calcareous soils on hillsides, rock ledges, gravel deposits and rock outcrops and the edges of thickets, gravelly creekbeds and woodlands. The alternate 2 to 4 inch long leaves are very narrow and lobed. They are crowded at the base and farther up, are very narrow and shallowly lobed or entire. The stem may have no upper leaves. The beautiful blooms are between 1 and 2 inches across and have no disk flowers. The upper side of blooms are yellowish to white and the underside may be pink to dark rose-lavendar. Interestingly, the bloom starts out rolled lengthwise and forms a narrow tube which slowly expands and flattens as the bloom opens.

Texas distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=PIRO

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58252/index.html

A bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 11, 2007
5:14 AM

Post #3378124

Rock Lettuce, White Dandelion, White Rock-lettuce, Pink Dandelion (Pinaropappus roseus)

A bloom bud ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 11, 2007
5:17 AM

Post #3378126

Rock Lettuce, White Dandelion, White Rock-lettuce, Pink Dandelion (Pinaropappus roseus)

Leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 19, 2007
6:49 PM

Post #3409391

Southern pepperwort, southern pepperweed, southern peppergrass (Lepidium austrinum), Brassicaceae Family, native, annual.biennial, blooms from February through May

The southern pepperwort (Lepidium austrinum) is also known as southern pepperweed and southern peppergrass. An erect plant which attains a mature height of about twenty inches, it grows in loamy or sandy soils of the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau Regions. The stem is hairy and the leaves are toothed. They vary in size as they go up the stem. The basal leaves reach a length of 3 1/2 inches and upper leaves reach about 3/4 of an inch. It produces small white flowers from February to May and is considered a cool weather plant.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=LEAU3

Distribution by vegetative regions:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,4,5,6,7,8&name=Lepidium austrinum Small

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/82931/index.html

Just starting to bloom as seen as the sun is setting behind it:..One can clearly see the rays of sunlight illuminating it as well as other plants in the background.
KayeTX
San Antonio, TX

April 24, 2007
9:59 AM

Post #3425041

Peppergrass, pennycress (Lepidium montanum) Brassica (cabbage) family, (formerly Cruciferae)
It has many spreading branches with round clusters of white flowers at the end of the stems. With the long narrow leaves swaying in the breeze give a delicate lacy effect. The pods are flat.
Central and West Texas. March-June. Annual.

This message was edited Apr 24, 2007 10:21 AM
KayeTX
San Antonio, TX

April 24, 2007
10:07 AM

Post #3425072

The flower clusters of peppergrass appear at the end of the stem, with many individual flowers, which are 1/4 inch across.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2007
4:30 AM

Post #3431975

Texas Bluebonnet, (Lupinus texensis), Legume family, (Fabaceae) annual, native plant endemic to Texas, bloom period, March---May

An uncommon white bloomer ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 27, 2007
4:58 PM

Post #3437731

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens), Papilionaceae Family, introduced, perennial, blooms April through September

This plant roots at the nodes and can form large mats up to 2m in diameter. It is found in the Pineywoods, Gulf Prairies and Marshes, Post Oak Savannahs, Blackland Prairies, Cross Timbers and Prairies, South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau Regions. White clover grows in crops, turfgrass and landscapes in a wide range of environments. White clover can tolerate close mowing. It can grow on many different types and pHs of soil. Its foliage appears in 3 leaflet groups. The leaflets are ovate to orbicular with striate veins and have inverted splotches. The corolla is whitish and fades to tan or pink. It is purposefully planted together with grasses to enrich pastures for cattle, horses, sheep, or goats as well as cultivated in poor soil during crop rotations. Clovers assist with setting nitrogen; therefore a season of clover dominance will improve commerical crops for years into the future.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54471/index.html

Bloom clusters
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 27, 2007
4:59 PM

Post #3437736

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens)

Bloom clusters that have a touch of pink
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 27, 2007
5:01 PM

Post #3437744

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens)

Spent blooms add interest
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 27, 2007
5:03 PM

Post #3437749

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens)

Leaves with their nice markings
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 27, 2007
5:04 PM

Post #3437753

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens)

A mat of vegetation
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 27, 2007
5:06 PM

Post #3437764

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens)

It is quite showy when in a large mass. These are in a field that will be mowed in about 30 minutes, but it will grow back.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 1, 2007
7:31 PM

Post #3452460

Allium canadense var. fraseri
This Texas native allium has a clear white bloom starting in April. It prefers a drier, well drained location in my garden and can be easily tucked around other perennials or annuals. Bloom height is 18" and this is really a "no-care" plant! This one is definitely not invasive either.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 1, 2007
10:02 PM

Post #3453133

Sure is pretty ... thanks for sharing it.
lily13
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 2, 2007
12:23 PM

Post #3454993

This morning, while walking the dogs, I noticed this in the empty field next door. does anyone know what it is? So far, it is the only one that I have seen bloom.
lily13
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 2, 2007
12:24 PM

Post #3454999

Here is a close-up of the foliage close to the ground.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
3:08 PM

Post #3455599

Is there just one flower spike on the plant?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2007
3:25 PM

Post #3455666

It looks like some kind of lily, but the bottom part looks like a succulent.
It is very pretty.
Josephine.
lily13
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 2, 2007
7:18 PM

Post #3456497

htop, yes, there is only the one spike of tiny flowers on the plant.

And yes, Josephine, the stem and leaves do look like that of a tiny asiatic lily. A few minutes ago, I went outside and there are a couple of new ones in bloom this afternoon. They are only about 10 inches high.

Does it look familiar to anyone?
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:11 PM

Post #3456660

I have been researching your plant for quite sometime. I keep staring at it thinking that I know what it is and it'll just jump out of my mind. I too had been thinking that the leaf arrangement sort of looks like my asiatic lillies. I'll keep digging around to see if I can find it. Do you live in a hilly area of Austin?
lily13
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 2, 2007
9:34 PM

Post #3456909

htop,

We live in Lakeway, just west of Austin, overlooking Lake Travis. This plant is growing in a vacant lot that has been a dumping ground for rocks, concrete and gravel from the other houses built in this area. On top of the limestone is caliche and very little else. Last year, in an attempt to make it look a little better, I spread about a pound and a half of wild flower seeds on it from the Wild Seed Farm in Fredricksburg. However, I only purchased red poppies, bluebonnets, and larkspur. The rest, I am assuming, are natives.

Does this help?
lily13
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 2, 2007
10:01 PM

Post #3457109

Could it be white milkwort (Polygala alba)?
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
10:24 PM

Post #3457209

I had thought that the bloom looks like a milk wort, but I couldn't tell by the photos I had found. I tink that I had dismissed it being Polygala alba because I think that the leaves are different. Still loolking ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 3, 2007
12:33 AM

Post #3457569

Well, that was what I was thinking also. It looked kind of like Polygala alba, except for the leaves in the other picture. Is it possible that those leaves weren't on that plant, maybe it just looked like it was? Anyway, I have those blooming now, but the leaves are so linear and wispy-looking, you know.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 17, 2007
9:40 PM

Post #3508451

Heller's Plantain (Plantago helleri), Plantaginaceae Family, native. annual. blooms April through June

Heller's plantain (Plantago helleri) is a plant that is native to central and southwestern Texas and is typically found growing in sandy, limestoney or gravelly soil. The ones I observed ae growing in almost pure limestone. I think it grows from a winter rossette; however, I am not sure about this. It reaches a height of about 8 to10 inches. The fuzzy leaves are more linear and thinner than some other species of plantain. It blooms from April through June. The flower spike is about 3 to 4 inches long and is on a thick fuzzy spathe. There are many bloom spikes arising from the base of the plant that has a taproot. The bloom petals are whitish and translucent. They turn a brownish-tan color as the blooms age. The blooms are followed by capsules which usually contain 2 seeds. It is a host plant for the common buckeye (Junonia coenia). I could find little information about it on the internet or in my native plant books.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=PLHE

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/140909/index.html

Aging flower spike - "petals" when fresh are whitish and translucent.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 17, 2007
9:41 PM

Post #3508459

Heller's Plantain (Plantago helleri)

A view of the plant taken from a low angle ... most of this plant's flower spikes are aging to a brownish-tan. The spikes to the left and at the base of the plant are fresher and show the whitish translucent "petals".
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 19, 2007
11:06 AM

Post #3513414

Redseed Plantain (Plantago rhodosperma), Plantaginaceae Family, native, annual, blooms April through July

Redseed plantain is between 3 and 12 inches tall and has a taproot. Its leaves are arranged basally in a rosette. The hairy, 4 to 27 cm long, 1 to 4.7 cm wide leaves are elliptic to oblanceolate with entire or remotely dentate (have a few widely spaced teeth). They have parallel venation. Long, thin, hairy, hollow flower spathes circle the leaves. Long bloom spikes appear at the end of the spathes. The bloom corolla is lobed with each lobe being 2 to 4 mm long. They are usually erect and cleistogamous (folded together); however, they are sometimes chasmogamous (spreading). The blooms are followed by seed capsules that contain two reddish, 1.5 to 3 mm long seeds. This is another plant that I could not find much information about.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=PLRH

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/140913/index.html

Part of a bloom spike ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 19, 2007
11:12 AM

Post #3513420

Redseed Plantain (Plantago rhodosperma)

Growth habit - notice how the spathes grow horozontally from the base of the plant and then curve upwards. The spathes eventually are in a circle around the plant's base. This is one of its distinguishing characteristics.
flowerette
Alvin, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2007
4:28 PM

Post #3538275

Hi, maybe I should post this in the id forum but know you guys here are the authorities on native plants. Found this flower on the roadside next to the San Bernard River which is near Brazoria, TX. It is a beautiful little flower! There were only about 15 flowers in the cluster and each flower seems to me to be very unusual. It has a tier of three seed heads absolutely vertical, and the top seed head has a tiny spot of pink on it. I did check the white native plants and don't think it's there but don't know for sure. I imagine Frostweed would be particularly interested. Please let me know if you have any ideas and whether or not it should be posted in the id forum.
Thanks,
Carol
flowerette
Alvin, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2007
4:35 PM

Post #3538292

This pic shows the three tiers and white & sulphur butterflies were very attracted to it.
flowerette
Alvin, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2007
4:42 PM

Post #3538309

Sorry, the first pic was blurry. Here's another.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
4:46 PM

Post #3538324

Looks like Monarda to me...

:-Deb
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
4:51 PM

Post #3538333

flowerette!
I sure hope this link shows up... I love this plant, I see them on the roadside here too, very pretty!
http://images.ask.com/fr?q=pictures of white monarda&desturi=http://www.wildflowers-and-weeds.com/Plant_Families/Lamiaceae.htm&fm=i&ac=17&ftURI=http://images.ask.com/fr?q=pictures+of+white+monarda&desturi=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wildflowers-and-weeds.com%2FPlant_Families%2FLamiaceae.htm&imagesrc=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wildflowers-and-weeds.com%2FPlant_Families%2FLamiaceae_pics%2FMonarda_spp.1.Chatfield.jpg&thumbsrc=http%3A%2F%2F65.214.37.88%2Fts%3Ft%3D17393997615728067748&thumbuselocalisedstatic=false&fn=Monarda_spp.1.Chatfield.jpg&imagewidth=225&imageheight=300&fs=29&ft=jpg&f=2&fm=i&ftbURI=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ask.com%2Fweb%3Fq%3Dpictures%2Bof%2Bwhite%2Bmonarda%26page%3D1&qt=0

Deb :-)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
5:38 PM

Post #3538458

Flowerette!! this is so exciting!! I believe what you have is
Monarda punctuta ssp. inmaculata, a Texas endemic plant that is shown to grow in only two counties, so you do have a very unusual plant indeed.
I could not find picture of it, but click on this link for the counties where it has been reported to grow. http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MOPUI2
Please try to preserve it where it grows.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
8:51 PM

Post #3538952

Josephine~
Here is a pic of Monarda punctuta I happened to come across, hehe...

http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/monardapunc.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
9:36 PM

Post #3539064

Yes, it is the ssp. immaculata that I have not been able to find a picture of.
Of course I don't really know that is what her plant is, but I think so, we shall see if we can find out.
flowerette
Alvin, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2007
10:34 PM

Post #3539196

debnes_dfw_tx, Thanks for the link. It may be in the same mint family, but if you can see the saw-toothed edges of the leaf in my second picture whereas your picture indicates a smooth edge to its leaf. Maybe we are getting very close. Very interesting!

Frostweed, I am studying your link as well. Geez, wish I had some control over this plant, but it was growing on the opposite side of the street from where my son just finished building his house. There are no buildings where the plant was growing, so hopefully it will survive and return next year. That was a few days ago when I spotted it, so it may be bloomed out by the time I get back down there, but I'll definitely take another look. Who knows -- maybe more will be blooming. Oh, don't hit me -- I did pinch off that tiny flowerhead, and I still have it! I know that's a no-no, but I had never-ever seen anything like it. They were approx. 10 inches, maybe less in height.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
11:23 PM

Post #3539354

flowerette~ If that is a crime, I am just as guilty. I really don't know what the rules are on picking wildflowers...or that it would be against them to pick something from a place that might soon be treated with herbacides and covered with turf instead.. Doesn't seem wrong to me. When I get a specimin, I usually like to take the whole root with it. So many of the wildflowers do not take well to transplanting. I am really most interrested in preserving and conserving in my heart of hearts.

Monarda is a paticular favorite of mine. I am not deeply familiar with all the different species of it, just an ardent admirer. The bloom clusters resemble elaborate crowns to me, such an elegant flower. I believe it is attractive to many winged creatures also, which is my main passion. I study them for food value for native benificial insect life, mainly butterflies. Of course what follows that is many species of native birds.. and so on, lol!

If they haul you in, they will have to come get me too, haha!

:-Deb
flowerette
Alvin, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 27, 2007
12:32 AM

Post #3539553

:-Deb:
I am a winged creature hugger as well -- any and all of them -- birds, butterflies, moths, and other insects have a place in my heart, and I mean all of them, well, with the exception of fire ants. As I tell DH, all animals have a right-to-life. Trying to get that over to a hunter doesn't carry much weight :) and, of course, not to forget my very long love of plants. Wouldn't it be neat if this flowerhead actually dried and produced seed! We shall see.
Carol
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2007
1:01 AM

Post #3539654

flowerette~
It would be more than neat...it would be a miracle. The best way is to keep watch of the patch you found those in, and when they turn brown you may be able collect the dried seeds from it. According to the specs on propagation that is the way to collect fertile seeds. Maybe the reason for laws about wildflowers, cutting them before they are dead and brown, directly causes displacement from their natural habitat and extinction.

:-D
flowerette
Alvin, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 27, 2007
3:45 AM

Post #3540247

I agree. We only mow our wildflowers after they have turned brown.
Carol
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 28, 2007
9:46 PM

Post #3546020

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus), Apiaceae Family, native, annual/biennial, blooms March or April through June/July, considered a noxious weed by many (very hard to get up due to long roots)

American wild carrot, rattlesnake weed, southwestern carrot can be found growing in the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau regions on barrens, meadows, plains, dry hills, roadsides, streambanks and waste areas. It is not picky about soil types. Simple to few-branched and erect, it grows 2 to 3 feet tall and its roots have a characteristic carrot odor. The fern-like and lacy leaves are alternate, pinnate and compound. The stems are retrorsely-hispid (covered in rigid or bristly hairs that are directed back or downwards). The leaves are eaten by white-tailed deer.

The flat to cupped, 1 1/4 to 2 inch wide flowerhead is composed of several tiny, white, 5-petalled, 5-staminated flowers gathered in a compound umbel. They do not have a red or purplish central flower that is characteristic of Queen Ann's lace (Daucus carota). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and is self-fertile; however, they are pollinated by beetles and flies as well. The flowers are subtended by sturdy, lacy bracts (modified leaves) which support them (and later the fruit). The bracts may be longer than the flower cluster is wide. The flowers are not long lasting and begin turning into fruit quite quickly. The oblong fruit (seed pods) each have two rows of stiff bristles.

The root is edible either raw or cooked (see caution below). The plant is thought to be an antipruritic and blood purifier. It has been used to treat colds, itches and fevers. It obtained the commomn name "rattle snake weed" because a poultice of the chewed plant has been used to treat to snakebites. Recent studies have indicated that it may be a cancer preventative

Cautions:
If the sap contacts the skin of some people, dermatitis and/or photo-sensitivity can occur. The taproot and the leaves are easily confused with poison hemlock (conium maculatum which is one of the most deadly poisonous wild flowering plants. I would be very careful about eating wild carrot as food.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=DAPU3

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/74985/index.html

The flower cluster is composed of several tiny white flowers gathered in a small, compact, 1.25 inch, compound umbel. There is no red or purple central flower as is present in Queen Ann's lace (Daucus carota).
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 28, 2007
9:48 PM

Post #3546027

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

The unripe fruit are oblong with two rows of stiff bristles and are interesting looking as well as attractive.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 28, 2007
9:50 PM

Post #3546037

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

The unripe fruit which are subtended by bracts (modified leaves) which support the umbel
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 28, 2007
9:56 PM

Post #3546049

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

A view of the flower stem showing the hairs that are present and the sturdy bracts that support the umbel
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 28, 2007
10:05 PM

Post #3546076

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

Leaves and retrorsely-hispid stems (Poison hemlock stems do not have hairs. Water hemlock, which is also deadly poisonous, and poison hemlock are often purple spotted or purple streaked.)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:17 PM

Post #3565788

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum), Ranunculaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms in April and May

This 1 to 3 foot tall larkspur is an upright, hairy plant that has deep roots. It can be found growing in sandy or clay soils, on coastal prairies and grassy plains, and in pine woods and open woods. The very slender stem is usually unbranched. The leaf blade is distinctly 3-parted and repeatedly divided into narrow segments. They are along the stem or clustered at the base of the plant. It forms a winter rosette. The flowers are borne on a slender raceme that is held a considerable distance above the foliage. The blooms are various shades of blue (sometimes very light bluish-lavender) to white. Its name is derived from the fact that the bloom spur resembles that of a lark. Its Spanish common name, espuela del caballero, is derived from its spur resembling that of a horseman's spur. The Kiowa called larkspur "ton a" which means "gourd seed". This refers to the plants small seeds being used in ceremonial gourd rattles.

Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum hybridizes with D . madrense especially on southern edge of Edwards Plateau in Texas.

Distribution:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=6043&flora_id=1

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/138752/index.html

A mostly white bloom that has pale hints of blue especially on the tips
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:19 PM

Post #3565794

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

A white bloom showing the darker greenish splotches
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:22 PM

Post #3565802

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

A white bloom as seen from the back showing how it is attached
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #3565871

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

White bloom as seen from the side showing the spur
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:38 PM

Post #3565878

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

A plant that has darker blooms. The anthers are olive-greenish brown and stand out against the pale colors of the bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:41 PM

Post #3565887

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

Inflorescence which is a slender raceme - each flower has a pair of opposite bracts at the base.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
4:43 PM

Post #3565898

Terrific pictures Hazel, you are building a wonderful library of Native Texas Plants.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:48 PM

Post #3565919

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

Leaf blades which are 3-parted and repeatedly divided into narrow segments. They can be at the base and/or along the stem becoming narrower in the upper portions.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


June 2, 2007
4:51 PM

Post #3565936

Thanks, Josephine. I have a lot of plants to add that I have been unable to identify as of yet. Sometimes I feel like I am doing research work for a thesis. :o) I am learning a lot and enjoying it.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2007
8:00 PM

Post #3611155

Hello girls, since you love Monarda, here is a lovely group of Monarda punctata art Pappy Elkins Park, don't you just love it?
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 3, 2007
1:34 PM

Post #3689757

Very beautiful Josephine! I so love Monarda..


Deb
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2007
8:09 PM

Post #3782754

This is Daucosma, Daucosma laciniatum, a native plant in the parsley family. It grows in locations in the southern areas of the Texas Hill Country. It can be seen blooming now along soggy roadsides and flooding creeks in those areas. It's a host plant for the Black Swallowtail butterfly.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2007
8:37 PM

Post #3782840

Wow Linda, that is really pretty, I have never seen it growing around here, but the book Flora of North Central Texas says that it grows around this area, it is an annual and it is Endemic to Texas, so it is a very special plant indeed.
Thank you for showing it to us.
Josephine.

Loonie1

Loonie1
Rowlett, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2007
8:46 PM

Post #3782868

Josephine, I've been meaning to say "Thanks" for sharing the photo of the Monarda punctata. Because of that photo, I rescued a smallish plant from a soon-to-be developed plot of land near my local Starbucks. I planted it in my flowerbed and it's growing very nicely. If I hadn't spotted your picture, I would have thought the plant was a clover and would have left it where it was. It's nice to know I have a native (and free!) Bee Balm for the bees and butterflies to enjoy. All because of your picture. :-)

Carla

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2007
10:00 PM

Post #3783159

Thank you Carla, that is what it is all about, sharing and having a wonderful time doing it.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2007
1:05 PM

Post #3792039

Way to go Carla!! I agree, this is a super library for us.

Hazel~ I applaude your finds and explainations!

:-Deb
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 15, 2007
11:42 PM

Post #4086922

Carla, I am so happy that you found the photos here and they have been of use to you and equally happy that you have saved a plant. :o)

Deb, thanks.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:02 PM

Post #4222025

On our recent trip to the land in Big Thicket I spotted a few fall bloomers, and I could use an extra set of native plant eyes to figure out exactly what they are.

The blooms have a maroon cast, and are about 3/4 inch across, erected on woody stems about 2-3' tall. The leaves are dark green, slim and pointed at the apex.

debnes

#1
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:04 PM

Post #4222029

The bloom cluster on this one is about 1" across..


#2

This message was edited Nov 23, 2007 9:05 AM
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:12 PM

Post #4222040

These bushy plants were growing everywhere. The blooms are about 3/4 inch and look like little paint brushes.. Next a close up of the blooms.

#3
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:15 PM

Post #4222046

Close up of #3 (with above)

debnes

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:46 PM

Post #4222129

Deb, #1 could be this one Willowleaf Aster, but not sure;
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/139160

#2 Camphor Weed;
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54337

#3 One of the Baccharis, possibly this one;
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/60395/

Josephine.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:21 PM

Post #4650984

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum), Malvaceae, native, perennial, evergreen, considered a subshrub, blooms throught the year (but, principally Oct-Nov), considered a weed by many

I find it listed as a native Texas plant ; however, the USDA Plants Database does not list it as such. It can be found in dry, rocky open woodlands and prairies from the Edwards Plateau to West Texas.

Shrubby Indian Mallow grows to be up to 40 inches (1 m) tall (rarely taller). The 5-petalled, up to 3/4 inch (1.9 cm) wide flowers (petals may be pink, white, or yellow) each have a dark red basal spot with reddish veins extending from it. The heart-shaped, grayish appearing, velvety leaves are petioled, and somewhat elongated. The velvety foliage (covered in fine stellate hairs) provides interesting texture in a xeric garden. They have sharp or rounded toothed margins. The brown seed capsules have 5 mericarps which helps distinguish it from other species. Each mericarp has 3 seeds which are about 1.8 to 2 mm long To encourage bushy new spring growth, cut it back in the spring. Indian mallow is a larval host plant and a nectar source for several butterfly species including the Texas Powdered Skipper and Common Streaky-Skipper.

There are 2 subspecies:
Abutilon incanum ssp. incanum ( pelotazo)
Abutilon incanum ssp. pringlei (Pringle abutilon, Pringle's abutilon)

Images of Abutilon incanum yellowish blooms can be seen here:
http://wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=1282

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/166681/

White blooms ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:24 PM

Post #4650988

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Seed capsules ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:26 PM

Post #4650993

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Flower buds and seed capsules ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:28 PM

Post #4650999

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Growth habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:30 PM

Post #4651006

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Growth habit and a good view of the velvety leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 14, 2008
12:03 PM

Post #4662134

What a neat little mallow Hazel! Thanks!

And Thank you for IDing the Thicket plants for me Josephine. :-)

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 14, 2008
3:27 PM

Post #4662833

debnes_dfw_tx, you're welcome.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

April 25, 2008
1:15 AM

Post #4860026

I was hoping that I would spot the white flower here that I took it's picture last week while at the Iris convention. I bought two different books on wildflowers native to Texas and for the live of me can not find it...

It is clustered with some stickers on the cluster and the stem. I thought it might be a nettles family member but can not find it anywhere.

The largest picture is blurred but the blooms are not.

I will continue to look.

D

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2008
1:55 AM

Post #4860241

Could it be Texas Bull Nettle, Cnidoscolus texanus?
http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=3336
Josephine.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

April 25, 2008
1:59 AM

Post #4860271

No, not that one but will try to post a picture of it as it is driving me nuts.

D

Thank you

LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2008
1:48 PM

Post #4861898

White Prickly Poppy?
http://www.lostsprings.com/plants.aspx?cat=Flowers&photo=P4123501
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

April 25, 2008
5:26 PM

Post #4862840

No that one was super easy but going to try to get the pictures from the laptop tonight and post it, as it is driving me crazy when I can not pick a family, still think it might be of same family as any nettles.

Thanks for all the help

D
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 25, 2008
7:47 PM

Post #4863392

How about Carolina horse nettle (Solanum carolinense)?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_horsenettle
http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/PHPPS/ipc/weedinfo/solanum-carolinense2.htm

White horse nettle (Solanum carolinense var. albiflorum) which is often misidentified as bull nettle and may be a synonym for the above plant.
a photo would help in identifying it.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

April 25, 2008
9:31 PM

Post #4863810

htop might be that but will work hard on getting a picture posted this weekend

D
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 27, 2008
3:21 PM

Post #4871252

Allium canadense var fraseri

This is a native Texas bulb--Allium canadense var fraseri which I think holds a lot of actual garden potential for all of Texas and all of the southern US as well. This one is definitely not the very common, weedy, bulbil-spitting, invasive seed-spitting, common form of this species which can be seen here:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/35774/

What's nice about it is its delicate, does not form bulbils or spit seeds and when it melts down, it disappears all at once. I think it would look good nestled in around short scutellaria's such as the native S resinosa or other pink or blue small flowered, short, spring annuals or perennials. My kid used to be into what I loosely call "yard art" when she was younger--now I just use them to mark some bulbs I don't want to accidentally disturb later in the year. Height of the foliage stays about 5", bloom scapes at about 10-12". They are not at their peak yet, but you can see a good close-up shot here and above on this thread:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/149155/

Another, more impressive native TX allium is sending up buds now too--but I'll show you that one when its actually blooming. Both of them should work anywhere in the state of Texas--wet or dry--north or south--and in my opinion, should be used everywhere in the southern US. I'm proud of our native Texas bulbs!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2008
3:53 PM

Post #4871384

Me too, I know that you are doing a lot of work with them and that is great.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

April 28, 2008
2:22 PM

Post #4876412

OK finally am getting this sticky white flower posted and hope someone knows what it is for sure, or for the presentation it will be a white sticky wild flower found near Natural Bridge Cave.:) hee hee

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2008
6:43 PM

Post #4877673

Well the picture is not very clear, but I think this may be it,
Macoun's cudweed, Pseudognaphalium macounii
one of the Cudweeds also called Everlastings;
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PSMA11
Josephine.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 14, 2008
2:33 AM

Post #4948172

Allium texanum

‘Texas False Garlic’ or ‘White King’ or ‘Texas Wild Onion’

A robust upland species native to seepy, wet situations such as swales and bottomlands, in alkaline clay soil from the hills of Central Texas to Oklahoma. Many flowered dome-shaped umbels (60-100) of chalk white starry flowers with green ovaries appear in late spring (usually during the first months of May) on scapes nearly 2’ tall. The robust foliage is distinctive, being flat, about ½" wide, glaucous, blue, and spiraling. It needs to be well watered while flowering or the buds will abort. This is one of the two largest flowering native Texas wild alliums and was differentiated from Allium canadense var fraseri in 1990 by Thad Howard. Prior to this it was considered Allium canadense var fraseri (yet another strain) but if you grow both of these alliums, like I do, they are as different as night and day with a distinctively different set of physical and ecological characteristics.

Easy to grow, undemanding, drought tolerant (but will appreciate late summer moisture while dormant); an excellent candidate for mixing in the border with daylilies or other late-spring blooming natives and perennials. Good for growing from zones 5-9.

This one shows a group in various stages of opening up and still in bud.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 14, 2008
2:35 AM

Post #4948187

Allium texanum

‘Texas False Garlic’ or ‘White King’ or ‘Texas Wild Onion’

This is a close-up of the bloom.

PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/78505/

edited to change the fact I used a different picture for the PlantFiles which changed this caption.



This message was edited May 13, 2008 9:37 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2008
3:31 AM

Post #4948430

Very nice Debbie.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 14, 2008
3:44 AM

Post #4948493

thank you Josephine
=)
hummerlou
Bedias, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2008
9:15 PM

Post #5213714

Can anyone identify this plant? You can see it alot along our highways.
hummerlou
Bedias, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2008
9:16 PM

Post #5213718

Here's another picture.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2008
11:02 PM

Post #5214270

It is one of the Yuccas, probably Yucca pallida,
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/151873/
Josephine.
hummerlou
Bedias, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2008
11:30 PM

Post #5214416

Thank you for your help!!!!!
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2009
10:49 PM

Post #6379337

Josephine and Hazel~
I dug this up from our property in Village Mills, TX... Big Thicket

It grows all over the open fields there. I just can't tell which Blackberry it is, but I know that much.

There were no pics in the Dave's database yet. Would it be Sawtooth, or Field?

Sawtooth Blackberry Rubus argutus
or
Field Blackberry Rubus arvensis


Debnes


This message was edited Apr 7, 2009 5:56 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2009
12:35 PM

Post #6381428

Rubus argutus has a more widespread area of habitation and is found in Hardin County.
http://txflora.org/Species.aspx?Species=Rubus argutus

Rubus arvensis is reported as being growing in Walker County with no other counties being noted. It could be growing elsewhere. It is mentioned as a Big Thicket plant. I couldn't find enough information about it on the web (which I find a bit strange) to be able to fill in any of the details on its PlantFile entry..

Without being able to compare the 2, I am unable to assist with the ID. I am sorr that I couldn't be of more help.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2009
1:07 PM

Post #6381536

Deb I couldn't help either, Sorry.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2009
1:14 PM

Post #6381562

Thank you for looking into it Hazel & Josephine!

I took home a couple vines and planted it almost 2 years ago. It is finally starting to grow pretty well. The first blooms came a few weeks ago, and in the picture you can see where they've fallen off. Not sure if they got proper pollination to become berries yet, but we shall see.


I am satisfied with it being Sawtooth Blackberry for now. Since it is classified as a Sub-shrub, I wonder... Oo Where does it go in the Native Plant Files?..oO (I only knew it had white flowers.)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2009
5:24 PM

Post #6382512

I would say under white is fine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 14, 2009
12:13 PM

Post #6407762

You could also post it under shrubs also. I have double posted some plants.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2009
10:47 AM

Post #6417619

Thanks Hazel!
I will work on the entry and put it there too.
:-)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 16, 2009
8:16 PM

Post #6419793

You're welcome. :o)
CarloInTX
Denton, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2009
11:59 AM

Post #6569192

Since this is a branch of a sticky thread here's my entry...

Asclepias asperula
Antelope horns or spider milkweed

http://wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ASAS

They call them pale greenish yellow, but they look white to me and my wife.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2009
12:02 PM

Post #6569199

Thank you Carlo, I love the antelope horns milkweed.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 24, 2009
3:20 PM

Post #6590948

Thanks for the photo. I have only seen antelope horns milkweed plants once and the plants were destroyed by a bulldozer before I could take a photo and/or save them from destruction. The blooms are wonderful.
glamourpaw
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

September 8, 2009
2:56 AM

Post #7038891

Snow on the Prairie. Native Texas wildflower. Annual. You'll see this all over N. Texas in late summer.
glamourpaw
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

September 8, 2009
2:57 AM

Post #7038897

Snow on the Prairie.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 8, 2009
3:33 AM

Post #7039045

Thank you, those are very pretty.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 8, 2009
11:34 PM

Post #7041855

glamourpaw, thanks for the photos. I haven't seen any in my area this year. I think it is due to the prolonged drought. We finally had 2 good rains ... the best in 2 years! Yippee!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 10, 2009
5:25 PM

Post #7047898

I finally got one blooming...it's not very big, but looks great! Every single flower counts!
yardqueen1948
Emory, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 11, 2009
4:49 PM

Post #7051580

Linda,

Did you mean you have one and it is blooming? I have been wondering about trying to collect some seeds. Is that what you did?

Carol
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 12, 2009
1:30 AM

Post #7053499

I'm sorry, I thought it was Snow-on-the-Mountain, which I have. Didn't look very closely at that post...so thought it was the same one. This is the one I have. I should pay more attention.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/221/


This message was edited Sep 11, 2009 8:40 PM

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2009
11:40 PM

Post #7097400

I got an ID on this plant today and looked it up, to find it is a native! My Late-flowering Boneset (Eupatorium serotinum) is over 6 foot and full of blooms.


This message was edited Sep 23, 2009 6:41 PM

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2009
11:42 PM

Post #7097406

Says it is great for butterflies, sure hope so.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 24, 2009
12:14 AM

Post #7097510

Congratulations Sheila, I don't have that one, maybe i can get a cutting from you.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 24, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #7097659

You bet, not sure how I came to have it other than the birds or from a plant at trade time. I can save seeds for you also when they dry. I will try some cuttings now, but bring you more to RU.
AJNTEXAS
Beaumont, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 12, 2009
2:47 AM

Post #7159754

Late-flowering boneset, Eupatorium serotinum.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=EUSE2
AJNTEXAS
Beaumont, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 12, 2009
2:48 AM

Post #7159761

Side view
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2013
10:37 AM

Post #9543255

I thought these were elderberry but the leaves are different. Any ideas? I'm 30 miles west of Houston and lots of these are growing along the road sides.
Sorry, the photo was taken while driving!
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2013
10:39 AM

Post #9543259

I take that back. On further research, I see that the leaves do look like elderberry.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2013
11:54 AM

Post #9543332

Yes, Elderberry a very useful plant, I have lots of those and they are great for butterflies and birds, besides being beautiful.
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2013
10:46 AM

Post #9544614

Thank you, Josephine, for sharing your wonderful knowledge!!
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

October 16, 2013
11:08 AM

Post #9687272

debnes_dfw_tx wrote:Close up of #3 (with above)

debnes


I have this on my property and can't figure out what it is. The pollinators & Love bugs swarm it. Josephine- It's not either of those you posted. I'll add my photos, hoping they will help.

sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

October 16, 2013
12:12 PM

Post #9687300

Oops, I messed up on that quote above, sorry. Here is my whateverthisis. It's growing along the roadsides around here, too, so I'm guessing that many call it a weed.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2013
12:42 PM

Post #9687322

It is False Willow, Baccharis neglecta. Some people call it a weed but we love it it is great for all butterflies and pollinators.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=BANE2

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 16, 2013
2:25 PM

Post #9687397

Borrowed pictures, erigonium multiflorum, heartsepal buckwheat

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2013
2:35 PM

Post #9687406

Very nice Kitt, I don't get to see much of that but it sure is pretty.
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

October 16, 2013
8:14 PM

Post #9687701

That's it, Josephine. Thank you!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2013
8:35 PM

Post #9687710

You are welcome.

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