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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Yellow )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
9:16 PM

Post #1619268

Common Sunflower, ( Helianthus annus ) Native, annual. The most common Sunflower in Texas.
For more information go to the plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/223/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
9:18 PM

Post #1619271

Common Sunflower #2 opening up.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
9:20 PM

Post #1619275

Common Sunflower #3 close up of center flower.
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2005
9:38 PM

Post #1619305

Rudbeckia hirta, Black-eyed Susan. I'm not sure which one this is, so here's alink to a list of them in PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/search.php?search_text=rudbeckia+hirta
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2005
10:03 PM

Post #1619350

Sorry this is kind of a ratty close-up.
Rudbeckia hirta
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2005
11:04 PM

Post #1619456

Close-up of Lanceleaf Coreopsis, Tickseed Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata)
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/33/index.html
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2005
11:04 PM

Post #1619457

Lanceleaf/Tickseed Coreopsis, plant just beginning to bloom
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
4:35 PM

Post #1623417

Chocolate Daisy (Berlandiera lyrata), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring through summer, blooms smell like chocolate in the especially in the mornings
The flowers are yellow, about the size of a quarter and have red striped undersides, the petals drop off during the day. It has diiferent stages of blooms on the plant at the same time which makes it very interesting to observe: below is a bud and one with emerging petals. To see the full bloom, visit the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1605/index.html


htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
4:37 PM

Post #1623421

Chocolate Daisy (Berlandiera lyrata) seeds ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:20 PM

Post #1623532

Buffalo Bur (Solanum rostratum), Solanaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms late spring through late fall; although the burs and spines can really hurt, I find the bloom very beautiful

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32175/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:22 PM

Post #1623536

Buffalo Bur (Solanum rostratum) leaf ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:23 PM

Post #1623538

Buffalo Bur (Solanum rostratum) developing burs ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:25 PM

Post #1623542

Buffalo Bur (Solanum rostratum) seedpods (burs) and seeds ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:27 PM

Post #1623543

Buffalo Bur (Solanum rostratum) seedpods are five chambered as shown in the photo and contain many small seeds.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:25 PM

Post #1624060

Camphorweed, Golden Aster, Camphor Daisy (Heterotheca subaxillaris, previously named Heterotheca latifolia), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms in early spring through late falll; considered a weed by many, but admired by native plant enthusiasts.

Cut it to a low level in latesummer and it will continue to bloom until the first frost and sometimes even later. The rough and usually toothed leaves emit a strong camphor aroma when crushed or disturbed and are sticky due to the hairs being gland-tipped.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/80578/index.html

A view of the blooms at different stages of development ...

This message was edited Jul 15, 2005 6:12 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:31 PM

Post #1624086

Camphorweed, Golden Aster, Camphor Daisy (Heterotheca subaxillaris, previously named Heterotheca latifolia)

Fading blooms, seedheads forming and mature seedhead ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:34 PM

Post #1624092

Camphorweed, Golden Aster, Camphor Daisy (Heterotheca subaxillaris, previously named Heterotheca latifolia)

The stems can have a purple tone. A close view of the seedhead with a few seeds ready to be dispersed ...
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2005
6:04 PM

Post #1625874

Cowpen Daisy, Golden Crownbeard (Verbesina encelioides)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:47 PM

Post #1626203

( Native ) Mexican Hat, ( Ratibida columnaris ) A solid yellow specimen.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
11:18 PM

Post #1626477

Texas Yellow Star, Star Daisy (Lindheimera texana), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms in late winter to mid-spring

This plant is considered to be a winter annual. The bloom stalks shoot up in February.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55468/index.html

This message was edited Jul 15, 2005 6:22 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
11:21 PM

Post #1626483

Texas Yellow Star, Star Daisy (Lindheimera texana)

A view of the attractive infructescence ... the fruiting stage of the inflorescence ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
11:26 PM

Post #1626489

Texas Yellow Star, Star Daisy (Lindheimera texana)

Only the ray flowers produce seeds; 5 seeds are held in each star-shaped structure. Unfortunately, the one in this photo is damaged. When whole, it is very attractive.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
11:29 PM

Post #1626500

Texas Yellow Star, Star Daisy (Lindheimera texana)

The whole plant showing growth habit, blooms, developing fruit (green) and fruit (achenes) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
1:51 PM

Post #1627506

Carolina Desert Chicory, Leafy False Dandelion, Florida Dandelion (Pyrrhopappus carolinianus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial/biennial, blooms mid-spring through summer

I can't locate the photo of the full bloom, but am posting the photo of the center of the bloom which will help identify it. See other photos and more information in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1666/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
6:43 PM

Post #1628014

Texas Broomweed, Matchbush, Matchweed, Kindling Weed (Gutierrezia texana), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, blooms late summer through late fall, can be a subshrub or shrub.

Wiry stems and small, sparse leaves give this native plant an airy, delicate appearance.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77114/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
6:45 PM

Post #1628020

Texas Broomweed, Matchbush, Matchweed, Kindling Weed (Gutierrezia texana)

A closeup of the very small bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
6:49 PM

Post #1644415

Greenthread, Plains Greenthread, Threadleaf Thelesperma, Navajo Tea, False Golden Wave (Thelesperma filifolium), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual or short-lived perennial, blooms in March through June and often into the fall

It can be found growing along roadsides and on dry hills in the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau. The eight ray flowers are yellow and the numerous disk flowers are reddish to dark brown. The leaves are scattered along the whole stem and the blades are very thin. It does not appear to be ravaged by deer. It is also a good larval and nectar plant for butterflies and is a larval food for the dainty sulphur butterfly.

Being used to make a beverage tea which is sometimes used medicinally by several Native American tribes, especially those in the southwest the names Navajo Tea, Hopi Tea, or Indian tea reflect its use by these populations. But, its main use is in the Southwest. How to make the tea: (1) harvest the plant just as the flower buds open, cutting it to within 2-3 inches above the soil and then wash the plants. (2) Let it dry. Fold the dried plant into uniform 4 inch lengths. (3) Bundled with string into units of about 6 grams each for storage and use. (4) Boil a bundle of the herb in about 6 cups of water for about 5 minutes. A sweetener can be added. The taste is somewhat like that of standard green tea, but has a very slight aromatic taste. It may be enjoyed without any sweetener.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68433/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
11:57 AM

Post #1645820

Goldmane Tickseed, Dye Flower (Coreopsis basalis), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms April through August

It is found in the the eastern half of Texas growing on open ground in praires and meadows. The species thrives on disturbed land that is sandy and well drained. It is drought tolerant. It is bushy and has a compact growth habit. The dark pattern around the center helps distinguish this tickseed from other types.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55838/live_view/

A not very good photo of the bloom ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
8:45 PM

Post #1651762

( Native ) Golden Crownbeard, Cowpen Daisy, ( Verbesina enceliodes ) Sunflower family. Lovely abundant wildflower, annual, up to three feet high, blooms profusely March- November. See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/59964/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
10:43 AM

Post #1652820

Twin-leaf Senna, Two-leaf Senna, Twin-leaved Senna, Two-leaved Senna (Senna roemeriana), Caesalpiniaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in early spring through early fall

Its natural habitat is poor, dry, limestone soil. It will grow in a garden, as long as the soil is well-drained. Give it a little extra water, cut it back and it will bloom into the fall. it is a butterfly larvae food for tailed oranges, orange sulphurs and statira sulphurs. CAUTION: It is poisonous to cattle, goats and horses.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/66696/index.html

The leaves are divided into two leaflets and it has 3/4 to 1 inch blooms.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
10:47 AM

Post #1652828

Twin-leaf Senna, Two-leaf Senna, Twin-leaved Senna, Two-leaved Senna (Senna roemeriana)

A closeup of a bloom that is just openinig that shows the brown veins on the petals ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
10:49 AM

Post #1652830

Twin-leaf Senna, Two-leaf Senna, Twin-leaved Senna, Two-leaved Senna (Senna roemeriana

)A view of the seedpod ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
7:15 PM

Post #1653803

( Native ) Damianita, ( Chrysactinia mexicana ) A strongly scented leafy plant up to 2 feet tall. Perennial heavy bloomer.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/70908/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
8:21 AM

Post #1657672

Hinckley's Golden Columbine (Aquilegia hinckleyana), Ranunculaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, blooms in early spring through early summer and sometimes sporadically through the summer until fall

Hinckley's golden columbine is an endemic Texas native plant. It can be found in its natural habit in the Trans-Pecos mountains region of Texas. It is 2 feet tall and 2 feet wide and is one of four yellow blooming columbines that are indigenous to the state.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60182/index.html

The large blooms provide striking color contrast in a shady spot. Shown in April.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
8:24 AM

Post #1657673

Hinckley's Golden Columbine (Aquilegia hinckleyana)

The buds provide an interesting form in a shade garden. They resemble rocketships as they wave in the wind.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
8:20 PM

Post #1658782

( Native ) Engelmann Daisy, ( Engelmannia pinnatifida ) Sunflower family. Lovely perennial up to three feet tall, bloom period February-november.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55987/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
5:21 PM

Post #1660441

( Native) Prairie Parsley, ( Polytaenia nuttallii ) Parsley family,Biennial to three feet,
bloom period April to June. Sometimes called Wild Dill, host to butterflies.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/85824/index.html

This message was edited May 26, 2007 9:45 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
7:43 AM

Post #1668072

Thrift-leaf Perky Sue, Four-Nerve Daisy, Slender-stem Bitterweed, Plains Hymenoxys (Hymenoxys scaposa), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, everblooming in Central and South Texas

This is an evergreen native Texas perennial that has short tufts of grayish-green, grassy looking foliage that provides a burst of yellow bloom color. It is a low growing plant which bears the blooms on taller stalks. It will bloom about all year in warmer climates. It survived February and March freezes without any damage and kept on blooming. Make sure the soil it is planted in is well drained. The blooms themselves are long lasting. It is an excellent xeriscape plant. Use it as a border or as groupings in the border. Great plant for rock gardens.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53549/index.html

When the other summer plants are being removed (October), this little guy just keeps on producing small (1.5 inch), but highly noticeable blooms.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
7:45 AM

Post #1668074

Thrift-leaf Perky Sue, Four-Nerve Daisy, Slender-stem Bitterweed, Plains Hymenoxys (Hymenoxys scaposa)

1.5 inch bloom close up ... it is held above the foliage on a leafless stem.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
7:55 AM

Post #1668077

Thrift-leaf Perky Sue, Four-Nerve Daisy, Slender-stem Bitterweed, Plains Hymenoxys (Hymenoxys scaposa)


This plant self-seeds easily. The seedhead turns totally white when dry and and the empty seedhead persists on the plant. Notice how the dried petals turn inward. So, there are yellow blooms with white seedheads on the plant at the same time making the plant look as though it has yellow as well as white blooms on it from a distance. I cut the dried bloomstalks from the plant after the seedhead has dried. This can be accomplished easily with a weed whacker.

Seedhead that has not dried totally yet ...

This message was edited Aug 3, 2005 2:58 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
10:47 AM

Post #1668136

Klondike Cosmos, Sulphur Cosmos, Orange Cosmos (Cosmos sulphureus), Asteraceae Family, adapted Texas native, annual, blooms mid-summer through early fall, on invasive plant list in Tennessee


Beautiful blooms (may be yellow or orange) on drought tolerant plants which freely self-seed. AN excellent choice for a rock garden, xeriscape or wildscape.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/218/index.html

This message was edited Aug 4, 2005 3:25 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
10:49 AM

Post #1668138

Klondike Cosmos, Sulphur Cosmos, Orange Cosmos (Cosmos sulphureus)

A closer view of the bloom ...

This message was edited Aug 4, 2005 3:22 AM
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 3, 2005
5:19 PM

Post #1668787

Sure do appreciate the potential rock garden plants being pointed out!!!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 4, 2005
8:31 AM

Post #1670249

I have been tryng to remember to add that information, John, and am glad it is helpful to you. I forgot to add it to the cosmos above, but inserted it after sayimg, "Oops !". I added the thread that lists plants that are suitable for rock gardens and xeriscapes.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2005
9:46 PM

Post #1671522

( Native ) Black-eyed Susan, ( Rudbeckia hirta )
A lovely patch at Veterans Park.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/image.php

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2005
10:16 PM

Post #1671586

( Endemic Native ) Texas Squaw-Weed, ( Senecio ampullaceus )
Sunflower family, slender upright annual, to 3 feet high.
Bloom period February to April, this plant can cover entire fields in gold.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/98867/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2005
10:18 PM

Post #1671592

Close up of flower cluster.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 11, 2005
1:52 AM

Post #1684136

Showy Goldenrod (Solidago speciosa), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in late July through October

Showy goldenrod is a deer resistant, native rhizomatous plant that inhabits almost all of North America. Preferring sandy to loamy soil, it can grow in poor dry soils as well as medium wet soils as long as the soil is well drained. It can be found in fields, open woods, meadows, prairies, along roadsides and in thickets reaching a height of between 2 and 3 feet and between 2 and 3 feet wide. Thriving best in full sun, it can tolerate very light shade. Showy goldenrod provides late summer and fall color and is an excellent choice for naturalized areas (wildscapaes), xeriscapes, rock gardens and perennial beds.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/88279/index.html

Photo courtesy of Tom Clothier (tomclothier.hort.net):

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2005
9:15 PM

Post #1685852

( Native ) Canada Goldenrod, ( Solidago canadensis ) Beautiful perennial wildflower, very misunderstood, it does not cause hay fever, the pollen is sticky and does not blow in the wind. On the wildflower slope.
Seeplant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/57958/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2005
9:17 PM

Post #1685857

A close up of Goldenrod with Mexican Petunia, I love the color combination.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

August 14, 2005
10:33 PM

Post #1692229

Partridge pea.
mkjones
Aurora, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 9, 2005
1:18 PM

Post #1748844

Partridge Pea close-up (growing wild on Corps of Engineer's property at Lake Grapevine).
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
4:26 PM

Post #1749145

Straggler Daisy, Prostrate Lawnflower, Hierba del caballo, Horseherb (Calyptocarpus vialis), Asteraceae Family, natuarlized, perennial groundcover, blooms early spring through late fall, considered an invasive weed by many

This plant is very difficult to remove from lawns and is considered a pest; however, it is a great groundcover that can be useful in preventing soil erosion and as a groundcover where nothing else will grow.


For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31751/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
12:42 PM

Post #1750658

Toothed Spurge (Euphorbia dentata), Euphorbiaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms mid-summer through late summer (inconspicuous - pale yellow, pale green or near white), considered an invasive weed by many

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31835/index.html


This plant is common throughout Texas. It may have white or pinkish white tones near the base of the leaves.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
5:00 PM

Post #1751037

Dandelion, Lion's Tooth, Bitterwort, Chicoria, Fortune-Teller, Wild Endive, Puffball (Taraxacum officinale), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, thought of as an invasive weed by some

Its solitary flower head has numerous yellow ray flowers which appear on the tops of tops a hollow, leafless stalks. The stalks emerge from center of a rosettes of toothed leaves. The stem juice is milky. The new leaves can be used in salads as well as soups and wine is made from the heads.

For photos of the blooms and more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/885/index.html

I believe that the seedhead is a thing of beauty.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
5:24 PM

Post #1751065

Common Mullein, Aaron's Rod, Adam's Flannel, Fairy Tale Plant (Verbascum thapsus), Scrophulariaceae Family, naturalized, biennial, blooms mid-srping through late summer through early fall (sometimes through December), some consider it a weed

For more infoormation, see its entry in the PlantFles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/849/index.html

I think the blooms are quite beautiful.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
5:30 PM

Post #1751071

Common Mullein, Aaron's Rod, Adam's Flannel, Fairy Tale Plant (Verbascum thapsus)

The Verbascum thapsus bloom is very interesting viewed close up with its mix of colors and fuzzy petals. Shown here blooming in late December ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 11, 2005
2:00 AM

Post #1868977

Shrubby Water Primrose, Mexican Primrose Willow (Ludwigia octovalvis), Onagraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms July through November, bog plant

It grows in wet soils or the mud of ditches, fields and rice fields, as well as the edges of marshes, ponds and streams. The plants are often found in large colonies and may reseed prolifically. The 1 5/8 to 2 inch, bright yellow, 4-petaled, 4-sepaled, stalked blooms appear from July through November from the upper leaf axils. The fruit are long, slender, erect, cylindrical, 4-sided, several ribbed pods that are up to 2 inches long. They are quite lovely and are often used in flower arrangements. The shrubby water primerose is a host plant for the water-primrose hornworm moth and is a favorite of swamp dragonflies.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62774/index.html

A view of the base of a plant growing along a drainage ditch in Bexar County ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 11, 2005
2:02 AM

Post #1868981

Shrubby Water Primrose, Mexican Primrose Willow (Ludwigia octovalvis)

A beautiful bloom which is close to 2 inches wide ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 11, 2005
2:04 AM

Post #1868986

Shrubby Water Primrose, Mexican Primrose Willow (Ludwigia octovalvis)

A view of the sepals after the bloom has fallen which are just starting to turn to a maroon color ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 11, 2005
2:06 AM

Post #1868989

Shrubby Water Primrose, Mexican Primrose Willow (Ludwigia octovalvis)

A view of the sepals which have turned marron as seen from the back ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2006
9:35 PM

Post #2117218

Squarebud Primrose, Calylophus Drummondianus. This is the variety with the black throat and stigma, grows in the Texas Hill Country. Another variety is all yellow. BTW, the Enquist book, Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country is available in print again, yea! This is one of my favorite natives!

This message was edited Mar 16, 2006 5:36 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2006
8:14 PM

Post #2248765

Smallhead sneezeweed, small head sneezeweed (Helenium microcephalum), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual - sometimes biennial, blloms Late april through October, reseeds, refers moist areas

It is a larval host plant for several of Lepidoptera species including Phymatopus behrensii.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/79777/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2006
8:16 PM

Post #2248771

Smallhead sneezeweed, small head sneezeweed (Helenium microcephalum)

Bloom buds and blooms at different stages of development ...



htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2006
8:21 PM

Post #2248784

Smallhead sneezeweed, small head sneezeweed (Helenium microcephalum)

This plant has a winter basal rosette that usually forms one stem with the upper half branching into several stems.

Whole plant that is starting to branch ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2006
8:22 PM

Post #2248788

Smallhead sneezeweed, small head sneezeweed (Helenium microcephalum)

A view of its growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2006
5:04 PM

Post #2658382

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina), Asteraceae Family, native, perennial (sometimes biennial), blooms March through October

This plant forms mounds 2 feet high and 3 feet wide. The stems and leaves are somewhat hairy. The alternate and narrow leaves are decrease in size as they move upward on the plant. The lower leaves form a rosette at the plant base. It can be found growing in rocky, sandy, sandy loam, nedium loam, clay and clay loam soils on plains, grassland areas, open slopes and washes. Usually it is found growing in various soil types of the Edwards Plateau, South Texas Plains and West Texas. It loves dry, semi-arid conditions. It reseeds itself, but the new plants do not bloom until the second year. The 'petals' stay on the flower for a long time after they finish blooming, becoming papery and dry; hence, the common name 'Paper Flower'. Butterflies love it. It is a great plant to use in rock gardens, xeriscape gardens and native plant scapes.

For more information. see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62460/index.html

A view of a flower from the side which shows fine hairs encasing the lower part of the bloom and a "woolly" flower bud ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2006
5:06 PM

Post #2658386

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina)

The hairy leaves and stems ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2006
5:08 PM

Post #2658392

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina)

A view of the Woolly Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina) bloom which has faded and dried, a drying bloom and a bud ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 25, 2006
5:08 PM

Post #2658393

Hazel, it is good to have you posting again, you write such wonderful descriptions.
Thank you very much.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
1:03 AM

Post #2737324

Verbesina encelioides, aka yellow-top or cow-pen daisy

I didn't actually know the proper name for this flower until I was reading an entry in the B&HB forum:

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/650348/

I see a few entries of this one already, but may as well include the lovely Butterflies that choose this plant it's host.

The wasp in the picture is a braconid wasp which lays it's eggs on the hornworm:
http://davesgarden.com/terms/showimage.php?did=3667&tid=1565
http://davesgarden.com/forums/fp.php?pid=2705731

and even lays eggs on one during metomorphosis, This one was on my Moonvine:
http://davesgarden.com/forums/fp.php?pid=2730682

>>Verbesina encelioides Cowpen Daisy
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
1:34 PM

Post #2738627

Texas Green-Eyes, Berlandiera texana. Perennial, moderately xeriscape, needs well-drained soil, can grow in sand, loam, clay or caliche (yes!). Tolerates full sun or partly sunny. Blooms anytime from April to November. This is one tough plant! It can get a bit tall, so plant in the right location, but you can prune it back also. Propagates easily from seed. A bit too easily perhaps...best in a "natural" area. Small plants are not so easily dug up, deep tap root develops after a while. May or may not become dormant in winter, depending on temperatures in your area. Named for the green composite head. Closely related to B. Lyrata, or Chocolate Daisy.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2006
4:35 AM

Post #2781093

Damianita Daisy (Chrysactinia mexicana) - bright yellow blooming type, Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mainly in spring and on and off through fall, evergreen

Damianita daisy is also known by theses names:Calanca, False Damiana, Garanona, Hierba de San Nicolas, Mariola, Romerillo, San Nicolas and Yeyepaxtle. It is a small evergreen shrub (actually a subsrub) that has dark green, highly aromatic needle-like leaves and is extremely heat and drought tolerant. It typically can be found growing natively on rocky limestone soils in the Trans-Pecos and Edwards Plateau. However, it is not picky about the types of soil in which it thrives being found found growing in igneous, sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, clay loam, clay and caliche soils. Poor soils (not amended with organic matter) with excellent drainage are recommended if being grown as a landscape plant. It is well suited for rock gardens, wildscapes, xeriscapes, flowerbed borders and/or as a ground cover for hillsides or hot exposed areas. It is cold hardy to about 10 degrees F.

I have had 2 of these planted in a hot, dry part of my landscape since the spring. They have been somewhat slow growers and I have provided supplemental water as they were becoming established due to the severe drought conditions in my naighborhood. Because the soil in which I planted them is very well draining, they have done very well and are now putting on a show of bright yelllow blooms (some types have golden yellow blooms as shown above in this thread). The stems have flopped some and they have a compact, mounded growth habit.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68511/index.html

A view of the small bloom ...


This message was edited Oct 12, 2006 11:13 AM
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 3, 2006
2:49 PM

Post #2781877

I'm beginning to grow very fond of yellow!

:oD
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

October 6, 2006
1:20 AM

Post #2789609

Oh my gosh, are you a professional photographer! Those photos are national geographic AWESOME!!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 6, 2006
6:06 AM

Post #2790148

debnes_dfw_tx, I really love the btight yellow blooms on this cute little plant.
Tir_Na_Nog, thank you for your kind remarks. My father was a spot news photographer for the San Antonio Express and News. I wish I had learned about photography from him. He could take a perfect shot with one click. Me? ,,, I have to take quite s few before I have one that I like and that is actually in focus. :o) I often think that he is laughing at me from heaven.
Thank you both for your comments.

Here is the photo of its growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 6, 2006
6:13 AM

Post #2790153

Damianita Daisy (Chrysactinia mexicana)

Another view showing the portulaca growing beside it to give a size perspective ... I planted 2 of these that were in 6 inch pots in the spring
.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2006
9:03 PM

Post #2791954

Thank God for digital.. I know what you mean I take tons to get a few good ones myself. We have what counts now, a good camera, and good taste..and then you have it in your blood it seems. I'm sure your Dad is thrilled with pride over what he was able to pass on to you.

WOW again H

:oDeb
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:01 PM

Post #2810341

Redbud , Low Menodora (Menodora heterophylla), Oleaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, blooms March through June (I found it blooming in October after a rain a few weeks earlier, guess it thought it was spring)

Growing to be between 2 and 10 inches in height, redbud is a small erect perennial that can be found in clay, gravel, sandy-loam or caliche soils of the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau. It forms a thick mat suitable for a flowering groundcover. The deeply lobed, 1 inch long leaves are crowded on the stem and can be entire or deeply cut. The flower bud is a bright scarlet red giving the plant one of it's common names. The flowers are 1" wide with a 1 1/2" long tube and can have 5 or 6 petals. The petals are pale yellow to a medium yellow when first open and fade to a paler color as time passes. The outer side of some petals are streaked with red giving them a bronzish tone. The flowersclose in the hottest part of the day. The seed pods look like round peas. The top half opens to release the seeds.If cultivated, plant in well drained soil. The plant is drought tolerant but will take some summer water. Redbud leaves are eaten by white-tailed deer and quail and it is a butterfly nectar source

The flower bud ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:04 PM

Post #2810353

Redbud , Low Menodora (Menodora heterophylla)

The flowers are streaked with red on the outside of some petals which can be more easily observed as the flower begins to open.. The yellow of the bloom when not backlit by sunlght is much paler than in this photo.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:06 PM

Post #2810358

Redbud , Low Menodora (Menodora heterophylla)

A fully opened flower ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:08 PM

Post #2810372

Redbud , Low Menodora (Menodora heterophylla)

Flowers with some bronze tones on the petals ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:10 PM

Post #2810376

Redbud , Low Menodora (Menodora heterophylla)

The leaves are deeply lobed, crowded on the stem and are approximately an inch long.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
4:11 PM

Post #2810384

Redbud , Low Menodora (Menodora heterophylla)

It has a groundcover growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
11:21 AM

Post #2966901

Puncturevine, Caltrop, Goat's Head, Bullhead (Tribulus terrestris), Zygophyllaceae Family, naturalized, annual, blooms mid-summer through early fall, invasive

This is a low-growing, trailing up to 5 feet long plant that is considered a weed. It is often found growing in sandy and disturbed areas The 4 to 6 cm long, short-stalked leaves are opposite, pinnately compound and have 5 to 10 pairs of leaflets. The 4 to 5 cm across, five-petaled flowers are borne on 2.5 to 5 cm stalks in the leaf axils. The goat head-shaped seeds have sharp thorns that can be very painful to step upon. The flowers have been used in the past in the treatment of leprosy and the stems are used in the treatment of skin diseases and psoriasis. It is used in various herbal formulas to treat eye problems such as itching, conjunctivitis and weak vision, headaches, pain relief, improved mood and sense of well-being, enhancement of the immune system, cholesterol reduction, relief of premenstrual (PMS), and nervousness. After learning its herbal uses, I guess I will not be so mad when I step on the stickers. It is extremely toxic to sheep. Puncture vine seeds have been used to kill people in weapons in southern Africa. The poisonous juice of Acokanthera venenata is smeared on the seeds and the seeds are put where victims are likely to step.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31936/index.html

The flower ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
11:23 AM

Post #2966908

Puncturevine, Caltrop, Goat's Head, Bullhead (Tribulus terrestris),

The leaves (note the flower originating in the leaf axil) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 11, 2006
9:15 PM

Post #2990787

Spinyfruit Buttercup, Spiny-Fruit Buttercup, Spiny Buttercup, Stick-Seed Buttercup, Sharp Buttercup, Scilly Buttercup (Ranunculus muricatus), Ranunculaceae Family, naturalized, annual, perennial, biennial, blooms March through June, invasive and considered a weed by many; plant dies back in the heat of summer, all parts of this plant are poisonous when raw and can cause skin irritation in the form of blisters

Spinyfruit buttercup can be found growing natively in open fields, ditches and lawns as well as along roadsides. In addition, it can be found growing in sandy marshes, around ponds and streams and often in shallow water. Spinyfruit buttercup generally cannot be successfully grown in areas where the soil quality is of a poor quality which lack lack sufficient nutrients. The leaves are a beautiful shape and dark green color, but the blooms are small (up to 15 mm in diameter). The pistils develop into achenes with short spines; however, they have a spine-free edge. The prickly achemes distinguish this species from all other buttercups other than corn buttercup which has deeply divided leaves and a spiny-edged seed. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by flies. Considered a medicinal herb, it is used in the treatment of intermittent fevers, gout and asthma.

County distribution: (Does not show it in Bexar County; however, I found plants near downtown San Antonio)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=RAMU2

Foir more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/141486/index.html

The flower ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 11, 2006
9:18 PM

Post #2990798

Spinyfruit Buttercup, Spiny-Fruit Buttercup, Spiny Buttercup, Stick-Seed Buttercup, Sharp Buttercup, Scilly Buttercup (Ranunculus muricatus)

The achenes forming which will have a "beak" on the outside end ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 11, 2006
9:19 PM

Post #2990801

Spinyfruit Buttercup, Spiny-Fruit Buttercup, Spiny Buttercup, Stick-Seed Buttercup, Sharp Buttercup, Scilly Buttercup (Ranunculus muricatus)

The basal leaves which are simple, broadly cordate to reniform or semicircular, undivided to 3-lobed, 2 to 5 cm long and 2 to 6.5 cm wide ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 11, 2006
9:21 PM

Post #2990804

Spinyfruit Buttercup, Spiny-Fruit Buttercup, Spiny Buttercup, Stick-Seed Buttercup, Sharp Buttercup, Scilly Buttercup (Ranunculus muricatus)

Growth habit showing some cauline leaves - lower ones are alternate and similar to basal ones; upper ones reduced in size, narrower and more deeply lobed ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 11, 2006
9:24 PM

Post #2990816

Spinyfruit Buttercup, Spiny-Fruit Buttercup, Spiny Buttercup, Stick-Seed Buttercup, Sharp Buttercup, Scilly Buttercup (Ranunculus muricatus)

Growth habit ... the stems may be reclining or erect. It forms colonies, emerges in November and blooms in very early spring.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 10, 2007
3:47 PM

Post #3175049

Beach Ground-Cherry, Smallflower Ground-Cherry, Smallflower Ground Cherry, Yellow Ground Cherry (Physalis cinerascens var. cinerascens), Solanaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms spring until the first frost

This perennial is found throughout most of the state growing natively in disturbed areas along roadsides, gravel pits, fields, cemeteries, etc. It grows from a sturdy deep rhizome and attains a height of about 20 inches and a width of 4 feet. The leaves are fuzzy especially when they are small. The 1/2" to 3/4" wide, yellowish-green flower has a burgundy center star and it grows face down. The fruit is a green to purplish berry.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/153077/index.html
I had to pull the bloom over so that it could be seen head-on ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 10, 2007
3:48 PM

Post #3175053

Beach Ground-Cherry, Smallflower Ground-Cherry, Smallflower Ground Cherry, Yellow Ground Cherry (Physalis cinerascens var. cinerascens)

A closer view of the bloom ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 10, 2007
4:12 PM

Post #3175113

Very pretty Hazel, thank you for adding it to the plant files too.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 11, 2007
1:10 AM

Post #3176458

Canada Lettuce, Tall Lettuce, Tall Wild Lettuce (Lactuca canadensis), Asteraceae Family, native, annual, biennial, blooms July through September, considered a weed by many

Canada lettuce inhabits degraded prairies, roadsides, thickets and disturbed habitats; but, it also may be found in cultivated habitats. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or full sun preferring moist sandy soil. Wild Lettuce can be distinguished from other native Lactuca spp. by the color of its flowers, its achenes which have attached tufts of hairs and its non-hairy stems and leaves (although it does have scattered non-prickly hairs along the central vein on the underneath side of the leaves). The 1/4 inch across flowerheads are yellow and often tinted with red. They are hermaphrodite having both male and female parts and are pollinated by Insects attracting bees mostly. Goldfinches eat the seeds. Mammalian herbivores occasionally eat the stems and leaves. White-tailed deer and horses eat the tops off of mature plants; whereas, the cottontail rabbit eats the tender leaves of first-year plants.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53158/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 11, 2007
1:12 AM

Post #3176471

Canada Lettuce, Tall Lettuce, Tall Wild Lettuce (Lactuca canadensis)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 11, 2007
1:13 AM

Post #3176478

Thanks, Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 11, 2007
2:12 AM

Post #3176692

Tiny Tim Bristle-Leaf Dyssodia, Bristleleaf, Pricklyleaf, Dogweed, Fetid Marigold (Thymophylla tenuiloba var. tenuiloba), Asteraceae Family, native, annual, perennial, blooms late spring to first frost

Tiny Tim dogweed is one of the smaller wildflower versions of the Dalberg Daisy cultivars. It grows between 2" and 4" tall and 9" to 12" wide and has a somewhat woody base. Normally, Tiny Tim is treated as an annual, but sometimes survives for a second or third season in frost free areas (USDA zones 9B-11). It may be found growing in limestone, gravel, sand and gravelly red clay mix soils; however, it prefers a well drained, sandy soil with a pH of 6.8 or higher (alkaline). It is very tolerant of dry conditions and does not perform well during periods of high rainfall and humidity. The leaves are alternate and dissected into 7-15 linear lobes which are very thin and needle-shaped. The leaves have a lemony or carroty odor when crushed or bruised. It produces masses of bright 1/4"-3/8" wide flowers which may have bright golden, orange or yellow rays and yellow disks. The peduncle (flower stem) is bare, very thin and 1" to 3" long. It flowers best in late summer when temperatures begin to cool. It can be planted in fall for winter or spring blooming and is good where a low edging is needed. Being well adapted to calcareous or limey soils, it will usually self-sow under such conditions and is a great rock garden plant. It is well suited for growing in containers or a hanging baskets.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/153237/index.html

The small bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 11, 2007
2:18 AM

Post #3176704

Tiny Tim Bristle-Leaf Dyssodia, Bristleleaf, Pricklyleaf, Dogweed, Fetid Marigold (Thymophylla tenuiloba var. tenuiloba)

It is a tough little plant shown here during a severe 2 year drought in South Central Texas when many native plants were not to be seen due too lack of rainfall (note the cracks in the ground). It usually looks more robust.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
10:19 PM

Post #3300069

Huisache Daisy, Butterfly Daisy, Honey Daisy (Amblyolepis setigera), Asteraceae Family, endemic, annual, usually blooms profusely for about two months sometime between February and June, depending upon how far north its habitat is

Huisache Daisy grows in the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau (Central and South Texas) regions. It thrives in sandy loam, limestone and chalky soils growing in clumps that provide a bright cheery color from early spring until June. It has a fragrance that is similar to new mown hay, sweet clover or vanilla extract. It can be found growing under huisache and other chaparral shrubs. The blooms are between 1.5 and 2 inches and rise above the basal mound of soft leaves on long, leafless stems. The center disk flowers form a dome in the center of the flower. The 8-12 ray flowers have 3 or 4 teeth on the edge. The toothed portion very often is lighter than the rest, but not always. The stems are covered in hair especially nearer the base of the petiole. The leaves are covered in very fine hair that may not be visible to the naked eye. The leaf margins have longer hairs. The leaves are occasionally eaten by white-tailed deer and cattle. Huisache dasy will grow in varying moisture conditions from dry to wet-mesic. Because the bloomstems are long, it makes a lovely cut flower. The bloom lasts a long time after being cut. Ii is an appropriate plant to use in wildflower borders or planting in masses in the landscape.

Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,4,5,6,7,8,9,10&name=%3Ci%3EAmblyolepis+setigera%3C/i%3E+DC.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/64298/index.html

The bloom ... note the slightly lighter color on the tips of the petals.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
10:40 PM

Post #3300149

Huisache Daisy, Butterfly Daisy, Honey Daisy (Amblyolepis setigera)

A view of a bloom showing the disk flowers from the side which form a dome in the center of the bloom. The dome enlarges in height as the bloom . (The color in this digital camera photo is not true. The bloom is a little more golden yellow.)

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
10:44 PM

Post #3300162

Huisache Daisy, Butterfly Daisy, Honey Daisy (Amblyolepis setigera)

A view of the Huisache Daisy, Butterfly Daisy, Honey Daisy (Amblyolepis setigera) leaves and stem which shows the longer hairs that are present. Very, very small hairs cover the surface of the leaves which have trapped debri on them.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
10:46 PM

Post #3300176

Huisache Daisy, Butterfly Daisy, Honey Daisy (Amblyolepis setigera)

A view of the center of a Huisache Daisy, Butterfly Daisy, Honey Daisy (Amblyolepis setigera) as seen in late afternoon sunlight which shows the leaf venetion ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
11:36 PM

Post #3300366

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba), Onagraceae Family, native, winter annual or biennial, blooms February through April or February through July depending upon how far north its habitat is

Texas distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,4,5,6,7,8&name=%3Ci%3EOenothera+triloba%3C/i%3E+Nutt.

Stemless Evening Primrose can be found in clay or dry limestone soils of the Blackland Praire, Rolling Plains and Edwards Plateau Regions in dry open areas with drained soil such as barrens, prairies, floodplains, slopes, hillsides, rock outcrops in fields and grassy areas. It is a frequent lawn invader. The plant forms a rosette shape like a dandelion with broadly lobed leaves low to the ground. Because it is very low growing (usually 8 inches tall or less), it withstands mowing very well. The up to 4.5cm (1.75 ") wide flowers are bright yellow when they open about half an hour before sunset. When they close about noon the following day, their color has faded to a pale yellow. If you observe them opening, you will be surprised. They go from buds that resemble little okra pods to flowers in about a minute. This is so fast that you actually can see them move. The seedpods form at the base of the flower stem and are hidden in the foliage at ground level. They resemble tiny pinecones. Deer resistant is high. This hardy perennial is a good plant for rock gardens.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55461/index.html

The rosette bearing blooms shown in mid-March:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
11:39 PM

Post #3300380

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba)

Lobed leaf with old bloom which is salmomy pink in color...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2007
11:42 PM

Post #3300387

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba)

More leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 21, 2007
4:13 PM

Post #3305929

Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs (Corydalis curvisiliqua), Fumariaceae Family, native, winter annual or biennial, blooms February through April


Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs (Corydalis curvisiliqua) In its native habitat, it can be found on hillsides, prairies, meadows, pastures, plains, savannahs, slopes and woodlands' edges, It prefers growing in clay, loam, medium loam, sandy loam and gravelly soil and in the bright light of part shade to light shade. It grows best in open, thin woods or with the sheltered protection of such shrubs as sagebrush. It requires medium moisture.

Texas distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=COCU2

Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs leaves are compound with blades that have 2-3 orders of leaflets and lobes. The ultimate lobes are obovate, oblong or elliptic with the margins frequently being apex obtuse, rounded or incised. The interesting small 1/2 to 1 inch long goldish yellow recurved blooms appear in racemes which have between 6 to18 blooms that stand above the foliage. The bloom pedicel measures 1-3 mm. Some upper petals may have a crest. The blooms have 4 petals with the outer 2 petals enclosing the inner 2 petals. One petal of each bloom has a straight, short, sac-like spur at the base which holds nectar. The lower petal acts as a landing pad for insects seeking nectar. The 2-lobed stigma is rectangular and has 8 papillae.

The 1.75–2.75 " long seed pods (seedpods) are erect and slender. They are usually strongly incurved; however, some may be staight. The 2 mm in diameter seeds appear distinctly roughened or faintly reticulate under when observed under magnification. The seeds do not germinate on dispersal, because an after-ripening period is necessary
This plant has is highly resistant to deer.

Note: Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs plants contain 8 alkaloids. They are reportedly toxic to livestock. The pants were used in treating arthritis in the past.

Differientiating between the yellow blooming Corydalis species is diificult and is usually based upon the size of the blooms, whether the blooms stand above the foliage, the height of the plants, and the size of the seed pods (seedpods). Corydalis curvisiliqua ssp. curvisiliqua is an endemic Texas plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/76061/index.html

It makes a beautiful showing in very early spring.

This message was edited Mar 21, 2007 3:37 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 21, 2007
4:18 PM

Post #3305946

Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs (Corydalis curvisiliqua)

The numerous 1/2 to 1 inch long goldish yellow flowers are quitye showy.. A bloom stalk shown in the middle of March ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 21, 2007
4:21 PM

Post #3305959

Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs (Corydalis curvisiliqua)

The leaves are compound and have a blade with 2 to 3 orders of leaflets and lobes. The ultimate lobes may be obovate, oblong, or elliptic.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 21, 2007
4:27 PM

Post #3305978

Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs (Corydalis curvisiliqua)

Some of the petals have a crest as shown on the top left petal. Note the curve on the petal on the top right bloom. The lower left bloom is fully open.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 21, 2007
4:29 PM

Post #3305986

Thank you Hazel those are really pretty.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 21, 2007
4:31 PM

Post #3305996

Curvepod fumewort, scrambled eggs (Corydalis curvisiliqua)

This is an opening bloom showng the inner petals and reproductive parts. The lower petal, when fully open, becomes a landing pad for insects seeking nectar that is stored in the back end of the bloom in the nectar sac.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 21, 2007
4:34 PM

Post #3306007

Your welcome, Josephine. I am going to try to save a few of them before the bulldozers massacre them. The seed pods are not ripe yet. With the wet weather, they may transplant okay. Wish me luck. :o)
gessiegail
Taft, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 22, 2007
7:14 PM

Post #3309811

htop, you are a wealth of information!!! The first time I saw the chocolate daisy was in the botanical gardens at NM State University back in '89. I had no idea we could grow it here...
Would the Canyon Daisy be a native...or has it been mentioned elsewhere in this thread by another name...It grows great everywhere in texas...little bitty yellow flowers but on great big bushes if you don't cut hard early in the spring...
thanks,
gail
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 23, 2007
8:54 AM

Post #3311224

Gail, I really love finding and doing research native Texas plants. The above plant was very difficult to identify. I did research on it for 6 days. I dug some up before the construction workers plowed over them and I hope they survive transplanting. With the cool, moist weather, they may. I will have to cut all of the seedpods off because rhere are a few cows living in the fields behind my house. I would be very sad if the plants started growing there and the cows ate them causing their calves to be aborted. I planted the plants as far away from my neighbor's property as possible.

I always thought that Copper Canyon Daisy, Lemmon’s Daisy, Mountain Lemmon Marigold, Tangerine Scented Marigold (Tagetes lemmonii) is a native Texas plant too until I researched the plant. It is listed as a native Arizona plant. You are riight, it is sure does well in Texas. I love mine and always anxiously await its bloom. I love its aromatic foliage that smells like mint with a hint of camphor that you can smell if you brush by it. It produces a chemical that repels non-beneficial insects . I only wish it bloomed all year round. For anyone interested in the plant, here is the PlantFiles entry:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54284/index.html

There is a compact cultivar which I wish I could find in a nursury here. Here is its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/82279/index.html
gessiegail
Taft, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 23, 2007
10:03 AM

Post #3311444

I have given it to all my adult children living all over the state of Texas and it still blooms its head off. We all love the plant. Thanks for the information on a compact cultivar...going to track it down (tee hee)...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 25, 2007
7:06 AM

Post #3317691

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba) see above information about this plant.

A closeup of a bloom just beginning to open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 25, 2007
7:10 AM

Post #3317695

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba)

A closeup of a bloom that has just fully opened ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 25, 2007
7:13 AM

Post #3317698

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba)

Pollen being dispersed by a strong wind ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 25, 2007
7:14 AM

Post #3317699

Stemless Evening Primrose (Oenothera triloba)

A spent bloom ...
QueenB
Shepherd, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 30, 2007
8:40 PM

Post #3338080

Texas Paintbrush, Indian Paintbrush, ( Castilleja indivisa ), Yellow form.
Found growing on a roadside curve in a patch of Bluebonnets and orange Indian Paintbrush near Stephen's Creek, San Jacinto County.
QueenB
Shepherd, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 30, 2007
8:45 PM

Post #3338098

Texas Paintbrush, Indian Paintbrush, ( Castilleja indivisa ), Gold form.
It appears to be a cross between the yellow and the orange, and has a pink tint to the flowers. Found in same area.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 30, 2007
10:09 PM

Post #3338323

Thank you very much QuennB, very pretty.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2007
9:43 AM

Post #3339355

I'll say!!
QueenB
Shepherd, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 31, 2007
1:42 PM

Post #3339961

Texas Paintbrush, Indian Paintbrush, ( Castilleja indivisa ), Yellow form.
Solitary clump, same area.


(I was using two different cameras, so I got different resolutions, and only one can be used at home.)


Thanks, ya'll! :-)

QueenB
Shepherd, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 31, 2007
3:43 PM

Post #3340302

Wood Betony, or Canadian Lousewort (Pedicularis canadensis).
Grows in damp woodlands, spreading by runners.
Found growing in patches on a stretch of road in the Sam Houston National Forest, near Coldspring, San Jacinto County, Texas.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 13, 2007
10:26 PM

Post #3388605

Tocalote, Malta Thistle, Maltese Star-thistle, Cockspur Thistle, Yellow Star-thistle, Napa Thistle (Centaurea melitensis), Asteraceae Family, naturalized, annual/biennial, invasive

Malta thistle, Maltese star-thistle, cockspur thistle, yellow star-thistle, Napa thistle (Centaurea melitensis) is an introduced invasive winter annual plant. It is difficult to distinguish between Malta star-thistle and yellow star-thistle (Centaurea solstitialis) until they flower. Both have bright yellow thistle-like flowers with prominent spines emanating from the flower base in a star-like arrangement at the base of the flower head. The spines on yellow star-thistle flowers are ¾ to1 inch long, yellow, very stiff and pointed like a cactus spine. Malta star-thistle has tan spines that are not as stiff and shorter (3/8 inch). Malta star-thistle bracts below the heads have short often reddish or brownish spines; whereas, yellow star-thistle bracts have yellow spines. Yellow-star thistle blooms have discoid heads that are about one inch in diameter. Malta star-thistle blooms stand 1/2 to 5/8 inch tall. Malta-star thistle blooms May-December with yellow star-thistle blooming April-September.

For more characteristis that differientiate these 2 plants, see its entry in the PlantFiles (link below).

Distribution:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=CEME2

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/127519/index.html

The bloom is a thistle-like flower about 3/8" to 1/2" wide. Its bracts have spines. Shown in April (blooms in background are on a different plant) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 13, 2007
10:28 PM

Post #3388614

Tocalote, Malta Thistle, Maltese Star-thistle, Cockspur Thistle, Yellow Star-thistle, Napa Thistle (Centaurea melitensis)

A view of the bloom showing its attachment to the stem (Its leaves are hairy.) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 13, 2007
10:31 PM

Post #3388617

Tocalote, Malta Thistle, Maltese Star-thistle, Cockspur Thistle, Yellow Star-thistle, Napa Thistle (Centaurea melitensis)

This shows the cobweb-like material on the bracts which is an identifying characteristic. Note that the leaves extend down the stem giving it a winged appearance. The upper leaves are quite thin.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 14, 2007
3:41 PM

Post #3390911

Nice pics! But I hate that stuff! It's taking over so many of our natural areas and roadsides.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 14, 2007
7:04 PM

Post #3391593

Thanks, Linda. I had never really noticed it before this year. I saw it covering largwe areas. It sure can be a menace.

This message was edited Apr 14, 2007 6:15 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 22, 2007
3:07 AM

Post #3417222

Damianita Daisy (Chrysactinia mexicana)

(I have already entered a post for this plant above)
http://davesgarden.com/forums/p.php?pid=2781093

I just had to post another photo of this plant. It is blooming up a storm and the colors of the blooms are magnificent. It is one of the best plants that I have ever purchased. No fuss, no muss, no water. I am pleased that it blooms more than once a year. The only complaint that I have is that a heavy rainstorm bent the stems downward.

Bloom colors are intense, difficult to describe and difficult to capture accurately with my digital camera. The blooms persist for quite some time without fading.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 23, 2007
5:47 AM

Post #3420497

Greenthread, Plains Greenthread, Threadleaf Thelesperma, Navajo Tea, False Golden Wave (Thelesperma filifolium)

(I have already entered a post for this plant above)
http://davesgarden.com/forums/p.php?pid=1644415

The bloom stems hang over with the bloom buds facing downwards.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 23, 2007
5:56 AM

Post #3420504

Greenthread, Plains Greenthread, Threadleaf Thelesperma, Navajo Tea, False Golden Wave (Thelesperma filifolium)

The inner whorl of phyllaries of the Greenthread, Plains Greenthread, Navajo Tea (Thelesperma filifolium) flower bud is translucent which allows the colors of the developing flower to show through.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 23, 2007
5:59 AM

Post #3420508

Greenthread, Plains Greenthread, Threadleaf Thelesperma, Navajo Tea, False Golden Wave (Thelesperma filifolium)

A field aglow with blooms and very robust plants after our very rainy spring ...
KayeTX
San Antonio, TX

April 26, 2007
11:03 AM

Post #3432817

Yellow Stonecrop
Sedum nuttallianum Crassulaceae

Native throughout Texas, Stonecrop can be seen flowering across the rocky hillsides turning them a chartreuse shade of green to a golden yellow. They grow right out of the porous limestone rock. Stonecrop is very adaptable to soil, just requires that it is well draining.

Stonecrop grows no more than 4 inches high as it is a sprawling succulent that spreads and forms a mat to cover bare ground. It thrives in dry hot locations, complementing small cacti, or dangling out of rock crevices in a rock or alpine garden. The stems break easily so you do not want to put stonecrop in a walkway.

Very cold hardy, drought tolerant, shade tolerant, and easily roots by stem cuttings makes stonecrop a great groundcover in xeric garden. Usually you see stonecrop flower in the spring and early summer, but can flower into the fall when it receives supplementary water.

http://wildflower.utexas.edu/plants/result.php?id_plant=SENU
KayeTX
San Antonio, TX

April 26, 2007
2:25 PM

Post #3433557

Should I move the stonecrop to cacti and desert? I may have put this in the wrong categorie.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2007
2:44 PM

Post #3433609

I think this is O.K. here. It is a succulent that could be at home in many different places, and we are not trying to be technical about it.
Josephine.
sweezel
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2007
12:09 PM

Post #3436923

A field of Tetraneuris scaposa Four Nerve Daisy http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53549/index.html in Garland at Spring Creek Forest Preserve. This is in a native tall grass prairie on fairly thin, almost caliche like, soil.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2007
2:27 PM

Post #3437329

That is a beautiful picture Stacey, doesn't it make your heart sing when you see something like that?
We are going to see two different prairies this Sunday, I hope I get good pictures.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

April 27, 2007
2:56 PM

Post #3437394

Opuntia macrorhiza. This one is in my yard, transplanted from Oklahoma. It is also native to Texas.
sweezel
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2007
3:18 PM

Post #3437447

Are you doing the New York Avenue Blackland Prairie Tour with Jim Varnum on Sunday? I attended two nature walks with Jim last week. Parkhill Prairie in Collin County on Saturday & Spring Creek in Garland on Wednesday. Going on these walks has encouraged me to go ahead and take the Master Naturalist Classes next spring (the Collin County chapter does not have classes in the fall). Have you finished your classes and hours and been officially named a Master Naturalist?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2007
3:38 PM

Post #3437515

Yes I have Stacey, and it has given me a new appreciation of out beautiful land and country.
I am now a Master Naturalist, but as they told us, this means that I can now notice things in Nature that I didn't know or see before.
No one is ever a master in the study of Nature, they said they had to call the course something, and that is what they came up with.
But we can become students, observers and lovers of Nature, which will lead us on a journey to last a lifetime.
I hope you will take the course, I loved it and I made a few new friends in the process.
Yes we are going to the New York avenue prairie and the Tandy Hills prairie, so it is going to be a busy but joyful day.
Love;
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2007
3:46 PM

Post #3437546

Trois, that is the most gorgeous cactus blossom, was it after a rain?
Ah, the wonders of nature, if we only stop to look!!!
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

April 27, 2007
3:51 PM

Post #3437561

Thanks, Josephine. It was after early morning fog.

trois
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 29, 2007
5:34 PM

Post #3444769

Berlandier's sundrops, Square-Bud primrose, Sundrops, Halfshrub Sundrops (Calylophus berlandieri - Synonyms: Calylophus berlandieri ssp. berlandieri, Calylophus drummondianus ssp. berlandieri), Onagraceae Family. native, perennial, blooms March through September

This is a bushy, usually 4 - 20 inch tall, plant (but it can grow up to 32 inches tall) that sometimes becomes woody near the base which grows in sun or part sun. Sundrops can be found in old fields and on hillsides of the Edwards Plateau and the South Texas Plains in sandy or rocky soil. There is an erect type and a more spread out groundcover form. Its leaves are narrow and spiny-toothed. The showy, crinkled, bright yellow blooms are up to 2 inches across with four, broad petals. The center of the bloom and stigma either black or yellow. The stigma is shaped like a club which is typical in Calylophus while in Oenothera the stigma is cross-shaped. The filaments of the stamens are fused to the petals and the bloom buds have prominent ribs on 4 sides giving it a square appearance. Seed is most successful if done in fall. It can also be propagated by take cuttings of new growth in early spring and sometimes even in January.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=CABEB2

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/128674/index.html

Note that the filaments of the stamens are fused to the petals.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 29, 2007
5:38 PM

Post #3444782

Berlandier's sundrops, Square-Bud primrose, Sundrops, Halfshrub Sundrops (Calylophus berlandieri - Synonyms: Calylophus berlandieri ssp. berlandieri, Calylophus drummondianus ssp. berlandieri)

Blooms in different stages of maturity ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 29, 2007
5:42 PM

Post #3444801

Berlandier's sundrops, Square-Bud primrose, Sundrops, Halfshrub Sundrops (Calylophus berlandieri - Synonyms: Calylophus berlandieri ssp. berlandieri, Calylophus drummondianus ssp. berlandieri)

Bloom as seen from the side and bloom buds. The buds have prominent ribs on 4 sides giving it a square appearance.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 29, 2007
5:45 PM

Post #3444812

Berlandier's sundrops, Square-Bud primrose, Sundrops, Halfshrub Sundrops (Calylophus berlandieri - Synonyms: Calylophus berlandieri ssp. berlandieri, Calylophus drummondianus ssp. berlandieri)

Leaves and a spent bloom that is turning peachy in color ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 29, 2007
5:48 PM

Post #3444821

Berlandier's sundrops, Square-Bud primrose, Sundrops, Halfshrub Sundrops (Calylophus berlandieri - Synonyms: Calylophus berlandieri ssp. berlandieri, Calylophus drummondianus ssp. berlandieri)

Woody stems at the base ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:14 AM

Post #3454162

Annual b... (expletive) cabbage, mustard-weed, turnip-weed, giant mustard, ball mustard, wild turnip ((Rapistrum rugosom), Brassicaceae Family, naturalized, annual, blooms early spring (sometimes in January and February) until it becomes really hot. on Texas Noxious Weed List

I spent quite sometime researching and then describing this plant. When I attempted to upload the information and a photo, my post was blocked due to the name of the plant that contained an expletive. All of my posting disappeared and I was disconnected form my DSL server. If you wish to know more about this plant, go here:

http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/raru1.htm

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/152452/index.html

Bloom cluster with one seed capsule forming
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:17 AM

Post #3454175

Annual b... (expletive) cabbage, mustard-weed, turnip-weed, giant mustard, ball mustard, wild turnip ((Rapistrum rugosom)

Plants in early spring before they became huge
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:19 AM

Post #3454183

Annual b... (expletive) cabbage, mustard-weed, turnip-weed, giant mustard, ball mustard, wild turnip ((Rapistrum rugosom)

Stem with many unripe 2-segmented seed capsules (silique) which both contain seeds when ripe

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2007
8:21 AM

Post #3454193

That is just too funny Hazel, ah the wonders of censorship!!!
I am glad you included the links.
Thank you very much.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:21 AM

Post #3454194

Annual b... (expletive) cabbage, mustard-weed, turnip-weed, giant mustard, ball mustard, wild turnip ((Rapistrum rugosom)

The seed capsule has a cylindrical base containing 0 to 2 seeds and a turban-shaped upper segment with 1 seed.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:24 AM

Post #3454205

Annual b... (expletive) cabbage, mustard-weed, turnip-weed, giant mustard, ball mustard, wild turnip ((Rapistrum rugosom)

Plants that were mostly dead and falling over; however, they were loaded with seed capsules most of which had already fallen off.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
8:30 AM

Post #3454226

Josephine, I was given a warning to "clean up" my post. When I tried to do so, everything disappeared and I was knocked off line. I really don't think that Dave's knocked me offline. I was just too tired to go back through all my research, and recompose the info. I do not know how to type, so it takes me a long time to type my posts. I had tried to do a search for this plant in the plantFiles using its scientific name. It won't come up. :o) Have a great day.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2007
3:03 PM

Post #3462793

Opuntia macrorhiza. Finally a fully opened bloom. Cloudy days inhibit opening.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2007
3:29 PM

Post #3462875

Beautiful again Trois, I wish I had taken the time to see your picture album, I was too rushed, but I will next time, I promise.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2007
6:59 PM

Post #3463452

Trois, great photo. :o) I haven't been taking many photos due to the poor light conditions. This afternoon, we finally had some sun, but I didn't have time to photograph things.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2007
7:31 PM

Post #3463530

htop, I've been seeing lots of your photos! You take more than any one I know, all great. Thanks, and by the way, I take most when it's cloudy. I have trouble with washed out colors in sunlight.

Where does all the time go?

trois.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 5, 2007
4:01 AM

Post #3464715

Thanks, trois. I too have trouble with washed out colors in bright sunlight sometimes. I like partly cloudy days best so the lighting is bright and you can wait for a cloud to pass over to keep the glare off the plant. I started having lots of problems the past weeks with the dark cloudy days. The colors were off a lot. I found that when I retired, the less time I have. :o)
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 5, 2007
8:46 AM

Post #3464971

Yep, I know what you mean. I used to get weekends off until I retired.

trois
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 10, 2007
9:07 AM

Post #3482415

Me too Hazel such a different cast on cloudy days.. About the mustard, B Cabbage... Oh my! That word is used a lot in names of plants and some animals. I guess another substitution would be 'misfit' Cabbage. Too bad words have been so abused that we can't use them for what they are really for, without offending anyone.
Anyway, lol...I suspect the 'pests' the url is referring to could be larvae of Whites or Sulphur butterflies which use the Brassicaceae or Mustard family of plants as a larval host. People would love to be surrounded by the pretty butterflies, but really quick to erradicate their food. This has taught me to look more deeply at everything in creation. (A main reason I have chosen butterfly conservation as a major field of hard study...or did i choose me?)
I saw the flower you posted peeking out of the clover and was going to post it to see exactly what it is.
Thanks to you, now I know.

:-D

:-D
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 10, 2007
12:48 PM

Post #3483113

Deb, I have found that almost all of the "weeds" have been used for medicinal purposes. I have that maybe they grow prolifically and in many areas so that mankind would always have a supply of them to "cure" what ails him. Every part of the elderberry was (is) used by native Americans and was considered so special that they always left the mother plant so that there would be a continuing supply. I am pleased to know that you are studying butterfly conservation. Most of the time I now let my plants be eaten by larvae; whereas, in years past I was quick to remove any nawing "pest". 3 of my gaura plants' leaves have been munched to pieces, but instead of being upset, I am happy that I will see more White Lined Sphinx moths. :o)
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2007
12:04 AM

Post #3491086

You know it Hazel! Rather have the Hummingbird Moths.. :-)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 14, 2007
1:37 AM

Post #3494544

Silver Bladderpod (Lesquerella argyraea), Brassicaceae Family, native (only Texas and Mexico, biennial/perennial, blooms from March to May

Silver bladderpod can be found growing natively only in the Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains Regions of Texas and the northern region of Mexico. It prefers calcareous limestone and sandy soils. It grows to a height of between 6 and 28 inches and its stems(can have several from the base) and alternate, simple leaves are finely pubescent being covered with stellate hairs. The entire, toothed or wavy upper stem leaves are 1/2 to 1 1/2 inches long and are narrowly linear to broad: whereas, the entire to deeply pinnately lobed basal leaves are approximately 3 inches long. The foliage is covered with minute stellate hairs.

The 4-petalled yellow flowers are from 1/4 to 3/4 inches in diameter with four long and two short stamen. The 1/8 to 3/8 wide fruit (silicles) are usually round or elliptical. They are smooth, appear on pedicels that usually have an S-shaped curve. and are glabrous (hairless). The seeds are eaten by scaled quail and have been used as a peppery seasoning (not by the quail, but by man). The leaves are eaten by white-tailed deer.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=LEAR3

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/137410/index.html

This plant was in an area where trash was being dumped illegally. I went back to take more and better photos - it was under a pile of debri.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 15, 2007
2:45 PM

Post #3499757

Radishroot wood sorrel (woodsorrel), hairy wood sorrel (woodsorrel), wild oxalis and white oxalis (Oxalis albicans), Oxalidaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms March through early summer

Radishroot woodsorrel (Oxalis albicans) is also commonly known as hairy wood sorrel, wild oxalis and white oxalis. It is found growing natively in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas as well as northern Mexico. The species name "albicans" refers to the white sheen on the leaflets that occurs due to the presence of fine hairs not due to it having white blooms (has yellow blooms). It grows on brushy and stony slopes, ravines, chaparrals, coastal grasslands, sage scrub areas, canyons and canyon bottoms, mountains, rock faces, cave openings, washes, streambeds, creeks, mesquite bosques and riparian woodlands and in moist soils. It prefers part shade.

It is classified as a small subshrub because its rootstock and taproot are thick and more or less woody unlike many wood sorrels. Its stems are prostrate or trailing and do not root at the nodes. They are hairy or glabrous and up to 40cm long. Each leaflet is up to 1.5 cm. Radishroot woodsorrel flowers from Maerch through early summer. The inflorescence has 1 to 3 flowers with pedicels up to 2 cm long. The lanceolate sepals are up to 6 mm long. The 8 to12 mm petals are yellow. Cylindrically-shaped, the fruit capsules are 6 to18 mm in length. It is sometimes mistaken for creeping wood sorrel (woodsorrel) which is Oxalis corniculata. Creeping wood sorrel's roots at the stem nodes (has aboveground stolons); whereas, radishroot wood sorrel does not. Creeping wood sorrel will have hairs along its leaf margins, as do most wood sorrels, but not on the leaf surfaces (may have a few); whereas, radishroot wood sorrel leaf margins and surfaces have numerous small hairs.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=OXAL

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/140256/index.html

It is difficult to see that the leaflets are covered in fine hairs in this photo. I went back to take closer photos of the leaflets; however, a big pile of refuse had been thrown on it. It was growing close to the plant that is described above.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 16, 2007
2:05 AM

Post #3501872

Bighead pygmy cudweed, big-head evax, rabbit tobacco (Evax prolifera), Asteraceae Family, native, Winter/spring annual, blooms late March or April through July

Bighead pygmy cudweed, big-head evax, rabbit tobacco (Evax prolifera) is a winter/spring annual that is native to Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and a few other states. It can be found in pastures, prairies, and stream valleys preferring dry, clayey or rocky limestone soils.

It is between 1 and 6 inches tall. The ones I have been observing are about 2 to 3 inches tall (in April). The erect, simple or branching from base, woolly stems are very leafy and densely white to gray. New growth may be greener in appearance until the dense hairs appear. The 1/8 to 1/4 inch long rosette leaves are spatulate and disappear as the stem leaves emerge. The spatulate to narrowly oblanceolate, alternate stem leaves are 1/8 to 3/5 inch long, and less than 1/6 inch wide. Their margins are entire and their tips are blunt.tips.

Rabbit tobacco blooms from late March or April through July. The cluster of flower are heads subtended by leaves that are .25 to .5 inch long with the receptacle slightly raised to somewhat conical. There is chaff which appears as appearing as bracts. This chaff usually exceeds the heads in length and protrudes. The blooms have no ray flowers. The blooms are followed by tiny yellowish-brown achenes which are oblong-elliptic in shape.

Even though this plant is quite small, it is very noticeabledue to its grayish, fuzzy appearance. I always just have to get low to the ground to view it closely. It would make a nice addition to a rock garden. (However, I do not know how invasive it is).

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=EVPR

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77759/index.html

It is a very small plant that is woolly all over. It is greener after rains. Looking closely, you can see a few teensy yellow blooms which have no ray flowers and a few disk flowers.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 16, 2007
2:09 AM

Post #3501889

Bighead pygmy cudweed, big-head evax, rabbit tobacco (Evax prolifera)

Leaves on the stem in the back are drying as it needs water.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 16, 2007
2:14 AM

Post #3501909

Bighead pygmy cudweed, big-head evax, rabbit tobacco (Evax prolifera)

It grows between 1 and 6 inches tall. Here it is growing amongst small native grass in very rocky limestone soil.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2007
7:20 PM

Post #3611031

Black- eyed Susan, Rudbeckia hirta. A field full of them at Pappy Elkins park.
Aren't they glorious?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2007
7:22 PM

Post #3611038

Another view of the same field, that place is so neat.
organic1
DFW Metroplex, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 29, 2007
12:02 AM

Post #3671511

Carolina Jessamine
Gelsemium sempervirens

Evergreen – Sun
Spacing 4’ – 8’

Habitat: Climbing vine needs support from the start. Many yellow flowers in early spring, sometimes in the fall and during warm spells in the winter! It needs well prepared soil, good drainage, moderate water. It will grow in the shade, but without the blooms. This beautiful vine can take the afternoon sun!

This is not a jasmine. All parts of this plant are poisonous, but not to the touch. Native to East Texas, Florida, and Virginia.

It grows quite well in my 100% organic yard here in North Central Texas (black clay soil which has been amended with rock powders and compost).
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 30, 2007
1:46 PM

Post #4033113

This is the River Primrose, also called the Trumpet Evening Primrose, Oenothera jamesii
It's a biennial, 3 to 6 foot tall. Native to Texas, Oklahoma and Mexico, it is found in the wild along streams and other wet areas...riparian habitats. It cannot tolerate complete dryness of the soil. Blooms appear from July to October and open late afternoon to evening. The info I found indicates it needs sunshine. Propagation is by seeds or root division.
In a normal year, it might not be a good choice for my place, which is kept more on the dry side and has little topsoil other than what I've added. But I bought two plants last May when a local chapter of NPSOT participated in an event in San Antonio. Lucky for me, rainfall was really pretty much constant during the summer, so nature provided what I couldn't. Because I had no appropriate place to plant them at the time, I kept them in pots until last month. Then I went into an overgrown jungle-like part of the yard and cleared out two spots for them to be planted. I must say, those blooms are just amazing! I just wish I had something remotely akin to a riparian area to grow these every year. The dry creek area would probably not work, I'm thinking.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 30, 2007
2:55 PM

Post #4033329

Really neat Linda, I have small plants of the Oenothera biennis you sent me the seed for last year, I am hoping they will bloom this coming spring.
Thank you.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 2, 2008
10:05 AM

Post #4611768

Prickly Lettuce, Opium Lettuce, China Lettuce, Wild Lettuce, Compass Plant, Horse Thistle, Milk Thistle (Lactuca serriola), Asteraceae Family, naturalized, annual/biennial, blooms late June through September, invasive, bloom colors: yellow, creamy yellow; blooms often fade to blue or lavender as they dry,

Distribution in Texas:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,4,5,7,8,9,10&name=%3Ci%3ELactuca+serriola%3C/i%3E+L.

The alternately arranged leaves alternately range from 2 to 14 inches long and become progressively smaller up the flowering stem. Most of the leaves are lobed and their bases clasp the stem. They have prickles that occur along the leaf margins and along the midvein on the lower leaf surfaces. The leaves have a distinct white midvein and emit a milky sap when cut.

The small blooms of the prickly lettuce appear on branches which emerge from the main stem. There can be 10 to 12 blooms per head. They are very delicate looking. This plant has been used medicinally for centuries. It was given to ease the sypmtoms of whooping cough, other respiratory illnesses and as a relaxant because the sap has the same chemicals that are found in opium. Don't get any ideas ... the ingestion of large quantities can cause poisoning.

Lepidoptera (butterfly) larvae feed on this plant. Several edible lettuces were derived from this plant. It has been used in soap making.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53160/

Blooms ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 2, 2008
10:07 AM

Post #4611770

Prickly Lettuce, Opium Lettuce, China Lettuce, Wild Lettuce, Compass Plant, Horse Thistle, Milk Thistle (Lactuca serriola)

Leaves and stems ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 2, 2008
10:41 AM

Post #4611783

Texas Dandelion, Carolina Desert Chicory, Leafy False Dandelion, Florida Dandelion (Pyrrhopappus carolinianus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial/biennial, blooms March through May

A closeup of the center of the bloom is shown in a previous post here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=1627506

The whole bloom ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2008
10:41 PM

Post #4618213

Hello Hazel, it is great to have you back, we have missed you.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 4, 2008
6:25 AM

Post #4620295

hi, Josephine. Thanks.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 6, 2008
6:08 PM

Post #4629985

Smooth Sow Thistle, Smooth Sowthistle, Milk Thistle, Swine Thistle (Sonchus oleraceus), Asteraceae Family, naturalized, annual/biennial, blooms June to August, known as a weed by some

Texas county distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SOOL

Smooth sow thistle, milk thistle, swine thistle is an introduced plant from Europe. It can grow in just about any type of soil; however, it prefers nutrient rich soils. Smooth sow thistle has a considerable variation in leaf form and flower color.

This annual/biennial sow thistle forms a winter rosette, grows from a long taproot and is from 8 inches to 5 feet high. The stout stems are hollow, usually 5-angled, hairless and exude latex when broken. The spined leaves are grayish rather than dark glossy green like prickly sow thistle. However, both species can have some plants that fall in the intermediate range in this regard. In the shade, the leaves may have a have purple blotching. The upper leaves are not divided and have a broad-based triangular shape; whereas, the lower leaves are divided to the midrib into lobes with the end lobe being the largest. The lobes clasping the stem have arrow-shaped, pointed tips (Sonchus asper are ear-shaped).

Smooth sow thistle flowers usually from June to August. However, it can flower in April and continue until the first frost. The pale yellow flowerhead is about 1 inch in diameter when fully open and the flowers appear in loose clusters. Dry, stored seed remains viable for around 10 years.

The smooth sow thistle is used in Greece as a winter salad. The leaves also can be boiled like spinach, mixed with other pot-herbs or added to soups.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/77129/

Blloms and buds:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:34 AM

Post #4866066

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina) - see above post dated August 25, 2006 for more information

This has been a wonderful cultivated plant. Sow seeds in the fall. Updated photos of plants growing in my yard follow.

Winter rosette ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:38 AM

Post #4866067

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina)

Blooms and leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:42 AM

Post #4866070

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:43 AM

Post #4866074

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:44 AM

Post #4866075

Woolly Paperflower, Hairy Paperflower (Psilostrophe tagetina)

Plants that emerged from mother plant that self-seeded

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2008
12:06 PM

Post #4866293

That is so neat Hazel, I knew about this plant, but had never seen pictures of it except in books. Glad to see it is doing well for you.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2008
3:24 AM

Post #4971858

Missouri Primrose, Oenothera missouriensis: perennial, up to a foot tall, but larger plants often sprawl out to as much as a foot and a half wide. It blooms from April to July. The yellow blooms can be four inches across. Can be found in exposed limestone and caliche or in some prairie areas. It tolerates well-drained sand, limestone or caliche soils and prefers full sun. Not the best photo, because the flowers were beginning to close.

This message was edited May 18, 2008 10:45 PM
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2008
3:41 AM

Post #4971928

It forms large winged pods to contain the seeds. Later the pods will be a tan color after they ripen.
decklife
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9b)

March 28, 2009
9:24 PM

Post #6332585

Beach evening-primrose, Oenothera drummondii.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2009
1:05 AM

Post #6333359

Decklife, thank you for posting, your Primrose is very pretty.
Josephine.
decklife
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9b)

March 29, 2009
1:53 AM

Post #6333562

Thanks - I'll try for a good picture of a fresh bloom next.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 29, 2009
3:49 AM

Post #6333915

decklife, I was going to ask you if you would post your photos in these Texas Native Plants & Wildflowers Picture Directory. I am happy to see you have. They will assist others when they are attempting to identify native plants. Thanks so much. :o)
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2009
11:18 PM

Post #6420566

Nerva-Ray or Squarebud Daisy, Tetragonotheca texana. Perennial native wildflower, 1 to 2 feet tall, which seems to like rocky soil in the southern part of the Hill Country. Both the buds and the phyllaries are shaped as squares. They are drought-tolerant, seeming to survive and bloom in the present drought. Blooms April to September.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2009
1:13 AM

Post #6421152

What an interesting flower, I had never seen it before Linda.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2009
1:47 AM

Post #6421334

That plant won't stay in my yard long, but on the dry slope at the front of the property, with poor soil, it has now started to establish itself.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2009
8:20 AM

Post #6422577

I have never seen one of those either. Thanks for sharing it.

This message was edited Apr 17, 2009 11:15 AM
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2009
12:11 PM

Post #6422932

Good eye Linda!

Loonie1

Loonie1
Rowlett, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2009
3:48 PM

Post #6658712

This is a little guy (less than 3 feet tall) with an enormous head. He sure brings sunshine into the flowerbed.

Carla
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2010
10:42 PM

Post #7688467

Fringed Puccoon Lithospermum incisum
Borage Family (Boraginaceae)

Has small, unopened, self-pollinating flowers, in addition to the showier fringed petaled flowers shown here. Small clusters of sterile frilly blooms appear within the first 2 weeks of spring. Then self-pollinating buds are formed later in spring or early summer. The leaves are slender toward the bloom, and more compact at the base sometimes withered by bloom time.
Here they are growing in rocky caliche soil between a traintrack and Highway 377 and nestled next to patches of Prairie Verbena.

This message was edited Apr 8, 2010 12:43 AM

This message was edited Apr 9, 2010 9:46 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2010
5:15 AM

Post #7688676

Those are beautiful Deb.
Allwild
North, TX

April 10, 2010
6:14 PM

Post #7695430

I've been trying to identify some wildflowers... and this one isn't listed here so thought I would add it.

Dwarf cinquefoil, Potentilla canadensis are starting to bloom now.

I have a few other yellows that aren't on this list, will add them later.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 10, 2010
8:26 PM

Post #7695781

Very pretty!!!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 13, 2010
12:50 AM

Post #7701553

Thanks Deb and Allwild for the lovely photos.
Allwild
North, TX

April 13, 2010
6:27 AM

Post #7701975

Htop, I am so glad to assist! I often come to this directory when I'm trying to ID a native wildflower. And btw, your photos are always so fantastic ~ so Thank You!! ^_^

Here is Golden ragwort, Golden Groundsel, Squaw Weed, senecio aureus Hardy to zones 4-9.

Turns out senecio is a huge genus and this particular plant is one of those that took some time to ID!! I love the golden daisies blooming in spring. They are already in full bloom now. They are in mostly shade here, right under a big oak but I think they are full sun bloomers! The leaves are toothed, irregular in shape... I'll have to get some pics and add them too.

This message was edited Apr 13, 2010 8:36 AM
Allwild
North, TX

April 13, 2010
6:32 AM

Post #7701992

Well here's one showing the leaves from a distance, if you can see the leaves are round and toothed at the bottom and slim down to a smaller more serrated leaf as they come up closer to the flower head.
Allwild
North, TX

April 13, 2010
6:45 AM

Post #7702030

One more. I guess I took a few of this one... teehee! But that's because I remember how pretty it was last year and have been waiting for it to bloom!

My dh, the lawnmower maniac, knows not to mow this area! hahaha
sharondippity
Gainesville, TX

June 6, 2011
9:24 AM

Post #8612696

Four pointed Evening primrose, Oenothera rhombipetala

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 6, 2011
12:00 PM

Post #8613030

Good job Sharon, thank you for adding it to this thread.
sharondippity
Gainesville, TX

June 6, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8613436

could not have without your help..thanks

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