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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Purple )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
10:51 PM

Post #1619438

Western Ironweed, ( Vernonia baldwinii ) Native Texas plant, prennial, drought tolerant, lovely purple flowers.
For more information see the plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1429/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2005
10:55 PM

Post #1619441

Western Ironweed, a stem cluster,
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
4:44 PM

Post #1623432

Prairie Spiderwort, Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis), Commelinaceae Family, Texas native, blooms appear in clusters in late spring to early summer, can have blue or white blooms also, blooms remain open several days
For more information visit its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2079/index.html


This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 11:48 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
4:46 PM

Post #1623447

Prairie Spiderwort, Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis)
A view of the buds which have hairy calyxes ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:35 PM

Post #1623566

Blazing Star, Narrow Leaf Gayfeather, Narrow-Leaf Gayfeather, Cusp Gayfeather (Liatris mucronata), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late summer through early fall
For more information see:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/83324/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:36 PM

Post #1623573

Blazing Star, Narrow Leaf Gayfeather, Narrow-Leaf Gayfeather, Cusp Gayfeather (Liatris mucronata)
Closeup of the blooms ...

This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 12:39 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
5:38 PM

Post #1623577

Blazing Star, Narrow Leaf Gayfeather, Narrow-Leaf Gayfeather, Cusp Gayfeather (Liatris mucronata) leaves and stalk ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
8:54 PM

Post #1623982

Annual Aster, Baby’s Breath Aster, Hierba del Marrano, Saltmarsh Aster (Aster subulatus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms from late summer to early winter depending upon the zone in which it grows, blooms may be white or off-white also.

For more information: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/82318/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:00 PM

Post #1623998

Annual Aster, Baby’s Breath Aster, Hierba del Marrano, Saltmarsh Aster (Aster subulatus)

A view of its growth habit with numerous blooms just starting to open in September; blooms are .5 inches in diameter when fully open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:46 PM

Post #1624128

Purple Wood Sorrel, Drummond's Wood-Sorrel, Drummond's Wood Sorrel, Drummond's Oxalis (Oxalis drummondii - Synonyms: Acetosella drummondii, Ionoxalis drummondii, Oxalis leonis), Oxalidaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, bulb or tuber, blooms late summer through late fall

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/81479/index.html

Note that the spent bloom icolor is a royal blue ...

This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 5:04 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:48 PM

Post #1624131

Purple Wood Sorrel, Drummond's Wood-Sorrel, Drummond's Wood Sorrel, Drummond's Oxalis (Oxalis drummondii - Synonyms: Acetosella drummondii, Ionoxalis drummondii, Oxalis leonis)

A closer view of the delicate bloom backlit by morning sun ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
9:51 PM

Post #1624144

Purple Wood Sorrel, Drummond's Wood-Sorrel, Drummond's Wood Sorrel, Drummond's Oxalis (Oxalis drummondii - Synonyms: Acetosella drummondii, Ionoxalis drummondii, Oxalis leonis)

The V- or wedge-shaped leaflets (1/2 to 2 1/2 inches wide) are usually marked with purple splotches as shown in this photo.The white on the leaves are morning dew.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
10:02 PM

Post #1624173

Hollow Joe-Pye Weed, Queen-of-the-Meadow, Trumpet Weed (Eupatorium fistulosum - Synonym: Eupatoriadelphus fistulosus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in mid-summer through early fall, blooms may also be pinkish or rosey mauve

For more information see entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1430/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
10:06 PM

Post #1624186

Hollow Joe-Pye Weed, Queen-of-the-Meadow, Trumpet Weed (Eupatorium fistulosum - Synonym: Eupatoriadelphus fistulosus)

Another photo ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
10:08 PM

Post #1624190

Hollow Joe-Pye Weed, Queen-of-the-Meadow, Trumpet Weed (Eupatorium fistulosum - Synonym: Eupatoriadelphus fistulosus)

A better view of the leaves and stems ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
2:05 PM

Post #1627525

Hairy Tubetongue, False Honeysuckle, False-Honeysuckle (Siphonoglossa pilosella), Acanthaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring through fall

This is listed as a subshrub in the USDA Plants Database, but it is more of a sprawling almost vine-like plant. It can be found growing up fences, over other vegetation and as a groundcover. The .5 to 1 inch bloom may be small, but it is showy. It may be other colors as well.

For more information see entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/75169/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
2:07 PM

Post #1627534

Hairy Tubetongue, False Honeysuckle, False-Honeysuckle (Siphonoglossa pilosella)

Shown from above as one usually sees it. Notice the plant branching outward along the ground.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
2:10 PM

Post #1627537

Hairy Tubetongue, False Honeysuckle, False-Honeysuckle (Siphonoglossa pilosella)

The 3/8 to 1 5/8 inch long to 3/4 inch wide deep green leaves are almost stalkless and have fine hairs.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
2:12 PM

Post #1627541

Hairy Tubetongue, False Honeysuckle, False-Honeysuckle (Siphonoglossa pilosella)

The bloom appears from the leaf axis. The leaves are especially hairy on their undersides.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
6:57 PM

Post #1628037

Prairie Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum), Ranunculaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms early spring through mid-summer

Blue, blue-violet and white blooming prairie larkspurs are now classified together. Some are much deeper blue-violet.It may be considered by some to be a noxious weed or invasive. It has very high moisture needs and is suitable for bogs and water gardens.
It sellf-sows freely so you neeed to deadhead it if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season.


For photos of the other colors of blooms and more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62755/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
8:26 PM

Post #1628188

Prairie Brazoria, Prairie Brazosmint (Brazoria scutellarioides), Lamiaceae Family, found as a native in only Texas and Oklahoma, annual, blooms mid-spring through early summer

This plant took me quite sometime to identify because the blooms resemble scullcap blooms. The leaves are long and thin.

For more information see entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/76403/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 18, 2005
2:56 AM

Post #1630923

Prairie Bluets, Fine-leaf Bluets, Baby’s Breath, Diamondflowers, Diamond Flowers, Diamond-flowers, Star-violet (Hedyotis nigricans; synomyns: Hedyotis nigricans var. nigricans, Houstonia nigricans), Rubiaceae, Texas native, perennial, classified as a subshrub in the USDA Plants Database, blooms late spring (usually April) to mid-fall (November), is adaptable to most soil conditions

This plant can be found in Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains. It grows from 2 to 20 inches tall and can have an upright or sprawling growth habit. It has thread-like leaves with rolled margins are 3/8 to 1 5/8 inches in length. The species name, "nigricans", refers to the black color that the leaves turn as they dry. The stems form clumps and it is well branched in the upper portions of the plant. The wiry stems together with the tiny blooms create a "baby's breath" appearance. The usually four-lobed and trumpet-shaped blooms may be pale pink, pale lavender or white in color (more rare). The corolla may be white, pink or pale bluish-purple. The blooms are 3/8 of to 1/4 of an inch in length and appear in clusters. Although the plant is adaptable to many soil types and acidity levels, it requires excellent drainage. This plant makes a great rock garden or wildscape plant.

For more information see entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62754/index.html

I love to find small plants with small blooms. I call them "the little ones" ... the ones which so often are not noticed by the casual observer. I must be a little (or maybe even greatly) freaky because I enjoy stooping over and telling these plants that I see them and that they are beautiful.

I cry when I see the photo I am posting below which shows the blooms on a very, very small specimen. The plant was dead the day after I took the photo.This plant and many, many others were destroyed as one of my favorite fields full of beautiful plants that I visited often was cleared to make a Hobby Lobby near my home. (See the member comments posted for this photo if you are interested in a sad tale).

Note that one bloom has 5 petals instead of 4.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 18, 2005
6:03 AM

Post #1631256

Stiff Aster, Bristly Aster, Flaxleaf Whitetop, Flax Leaf Ankle Aster, Savoryleaf Aster, Pine Starwort (Ionactis linariifolius, Synonym: Aster lateriflorus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late summer through October

This aster inhabits dry clearings, sandy woods, rocky slopes, rocky stream beds and prairies. A durable plant, it prefers only full sun and it thrives in acidic, sandy soils. It withstands drought as well as seasonal flooding. It usually attains a height between 12 and 24 inches and a width of 6 to 12 inches. It forms stiff, rounded clumps. The dark, shiny leaves resemble small yew leaves or linaria leaves. This explains its species name "linariifolius" which means "leaves like Linaria". The leaves are in whorls that are at right angles to the stem. The pale blue-purple flowerheads are 3/4 to 1 inch across with a disk that starts out yellow and then turns red-orange as the bloom matures. They are produced at the ends of ascending stems and are great cut flowers. To encourage bushiness and more blooms, shear off the top half of the plant in early June.

Because it is a long-blooming, showy, compact aster, it is an excellent choice for the rock garden and native garden. Plus, it attracts butterflies. It looks great massed in groups or used as a border plant. Be sure that the soil in which it is planted is well drained.

For more information see entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2419/index.html

This is a photo of the lone bloom on the plant; although, it had many bloom buds. Sadly, as with the plant above, it was killed during the construction of a Hobby Lobby right after the photo was taken. I wish that I could have saved it and the other plants; but, at least I saved it in a photo.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
4:51 PM

Post #1644212

Texas Vervain (Verbena halei), Verbenaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March through August and then starts tapering off

Also known as slender verbena and Texas verbena, Texas vervain blooms from May to June. It is listed as a subshrub in the USDA Plant Database, but I am including it here. Texas vervain is a tall, spindly plant that usually 1.5 to 2 feet tall, but can grow to 3 feet tall. It has small, about 1/4" wide, light purple flowers that start forming along the stem gradually move up the lengthening stem as the plant grows.

For more information see entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62793/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
4:53 PM

Post #1644217

Texas Vervain (Verbena halei)

A closer view of the blooms ...

This message was edited Mar 27, 2007 6:08 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 23, 2005
5:16 PM

Post #1644257

(Native) Texas Thistle ( Cirsium texanum ) Annual or biennial plant blooms May-July.
Very attractive to butterflies and moths, also the goldfinches eat the seed and use the fluff to line their nests. Very lovely flowers.
See plant files; http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62786/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 23, 2005
5:17 PM

Post #1644261

A view of the whole plant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:09 AM

Post #1645300

Texas Thistle (Cirsium texanum)

Another view of the bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:10 AM

Post #1645301

Texas Thistle (Cirsium texanum)

A bud with the first petal starting to emerge. Shown in May ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:12 AM

Post #1645303

Texas Thistle (Cirsium texanum)

A spent bloom which I think is attractive ...


htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
6:22 PM

Post #1646570

Winecup, Annual Winecup, Tall Winecup, Poppy Mallow, Tall Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe leiocarpa), Malvaceae Family, Texas native, annual

It grows several stems from a thin, small taproot with many fibrous roots attached. This makes it difficult totransplant. It can be found in fields, prairies and woods. It is a native wildflower that is found in Texas as well as other states and blooms in the spring and throughout the summer.

For more information, see its entry in the plantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/67513/


This message was edited Jul 26, 2005 7:10 AM
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 25, 2005
1:37 AM

Post #1647352

Hazel, my winecup is perennial. Also, its my understanding that the tuber can be dug up in the winter. Supposedly it makes a decent hanging basket plant. I must mark my volunteer plant and give that a try!

John
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
5:15 AM

Post #1647744

John, yours may be Callirhoe involucrata, winecup, buffalo rose, purple poppymallow It is a native perennial, is low growing (trailing) to about a foot in height and has a large taproot. It has about 4 feet long sprawling stems that trail among nearby plants. When digging it up, go deep enough so that you don't hurt the taproot. All of its green parts are hairy. See its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/695/index.html

Another trailing one is Callirhoe papaver (woodland poppymallow, woodland winecup), native perennial, it is a sprawling, prostrate plant with stems that are 5-10 feet long and has a large taproot. The deep-magenta blooms are 2 to 3 inches across. The leaves can be various shapes, but are usually divided into 3-5 linear to elliptic segments.

Shown in my photo above, Callirhoe leiocarpa (synonym:Callirhoe pedata) tall poppy mallow, annual winecup, standing winecup is erect to about 3 feet tall and not hairy. It has a thin taproot.

Callirhoe scabriuscula (Texas poppymallow), native annual, has sandpapery leaves and is endangered in 3 Texas counties: Coke, Mitchell and Runnels

Callirhoe involucrata var. lineariloba (variegated winecup, pale winecup, white winecup) is perennial that has blooms that are almost pure white to white with wide light lavender striping.

This information has been added to assist with Callirhoe identification.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 25, 2005
2:17 PM

Post #1648229

Much obliged for the clarification, Hazel! I must find that tuber this winter.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
4:01 PM

Post #1648441

Crameria, Trailing Krameria, Trailing Ratany, Prairie Sandbur, Three Fans (Krameria lanceolata), Krameriaceae Family, perennial, blooms mid-spring to early fall

This ground-hugging, trailing wildflower is uncommon (Lone Star Field Guide - Wildflowers, Trees and Shrubs of Texas; Tull and Miller; Taylor Trade Publishing: Revised 1999, p. 139) and ranges from Kansas to Arizona, Texas and Mexico. In Texas, it is not found in the far north eastern nor the far central eastern portion of the state. It can be found from just north of Beaumont along the coastal region to Brownsville as well as all other areas. (Wildflowers of Texas, Ajilvsgi; Shearer Publishing: Revised 2002, p. 323).

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/66698/index.html

Blooms: .5 to .75 inches;leaves: fine pubescence catching sunlight in photo (spots on foliage are sunlight) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
4:03 PM

Post #1648448

Crameria, Trailing Krameria, Trailing Ratany, Prairie Sandbur, Three Fans (Krameria lanceolata)

There are 5 maroon sepals that look like petals. The small bloom is in the center.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
4:05 PM

Post #1648451

Crameria, Trailing Krameria, Trailing Ratany, Prairie Sandbur, Three Fans (Krameria lanceolata)

The fruit contain 1 seed. The hairy leaves are only an inch in length so you can see these are very small.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
5:31 PM

Post #1648613

June Centaury, Serpentine Centaury, Muhlenberg's centaury (Centaurium floribundum), Gentianaceae Family, Texas native, annual/biennial, blooms May through August

This is a native wildflower growing on fields, valley floors, riverbeds, floodplains, moist areas by streams, grasslands, open grassy slopes, rocky areas and exposed roadcuts. It blooms from May to August and has white or pink to light magenta blooms. It is listed as ocurring frequently in the Big Bend region. I have been unable to locate any more information about this plant as of now.
I found this plant growing in a grassy field near a drainage area in northwestern Bexar County that was bulldozed a few days later.

PlantFiles entry: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62735/index.html

Beautiful small blooms that standout because of their color (blooms also may be pink or white) ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 25, 2005
8:26 PM

Post #1648998

( Native ) Lemon Mint, Purple Horse Mint, ( Monarda citriodora )
Bloom April- October, lovely lemon scented annual makes a delightful tea.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/90401/index.html
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 26, 2005
5:31 AM

Post #1650163

Callirhoe alcaeoides, Plains Poppy-Mallow, Light Poppy-Mallow, Pink Poppy-Mallow, Pink Wine Cup, Malvaceae Family, Texas native, perennial.

An herbaceous plant up to 20" tall, from a taproot, branching from base. Leaves are deeply subdivided into 5 to 7 lobes. The 5 petaled pink to whitish flowers are slightly more than an inch wide. The white filaments appear after the anthers have lost their stamen and pollen. Found in prairies, grassy fields, open woods and roadsides. Prefers full sun.



This message was edited Jul 26, 2005 6:56 PM
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 26, 2005
6:37 AM

Post #1650236

Callirhoe involucrata, Purple Wine Cup, Purple Poppy-Mallow, Malvaceae Family, Texas native, perennial.

A low sprawling herbaceous plant to 6 - 12 inches tall with trailing stems 18 inches long . The stems are hairy. The palmately divided 5 to 7 lobed leaves are 1 - 2 inches long and 1 - 2-3/8 inches wide. The goblet shaped flowers have 5 reddish-purple petals 1" long and white at the base. The stamen column is whitish or yellowish. Below the petals are 5 bracts, and below the bracts are 3 bract-like structures collectively called the involucel. There are 2 varieties of C. involucrata: C. involucrata var. involucrata (Purple Wine Cup) and C. involucrata var. lineariloba (Pure white or white with reddish-purple streak down the center of each petal) C. involucrata is the only wine cup with involucels in Texas.

The photo shows a Purple Wine Cup flower on the left side of the photo. A Wine Cup bud to the left of the flower shows the 5 bracts that enclose the petals. Below the bracts, the involucel can be seen. A Drummond Phlox flower is shown on the right.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 26, 2005
6:55 AM

Post #1650247

Callirhoe involucrata var, lineariloba, Wine Cup, Purple Poppy-mallow, Variegated Wine Cup, White Wine Cup, Malvaceae Family, Texas native, perennial.

A low, sprawling herbaceaous plant 6 - 12 inches tall with trailing stems 18 inches long. Hairy stems. The palmately divided 5 - 7 lobed leaves are 1 - 2 inches long and 1 - 2-3/8 inches wide. The glblet shaped flowers have 5 white with a reddish-purple stripe down the center of each petal. The petals are 1" long. The stamen column is whitish or yellowish. Below the petals are 5 bracts, and below the bracts are 3 bract-like structures called the involucel.

The involucel differentiate C. involucrata from other wine cup species.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
9:03 PM

Post #1651794

( Native ) Wine-cup, ( Callirhoe involucrata ) Perennial blooms March-July.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/695/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 26, 2005
10:43 PM

Post #1651973

Skeleton Plant, Purple Dandelion, Milk pink and Flowering Straw (Lygodesmia texana), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late spring to early fall

It grows in the western 2/3 of Texas. It does not grow in north east Texas, but does grow from Beaumont southward along the coastal region. It is interesting because by the time the buds form, the basal leaves wither and die and the upper leaves are just scales. The plant looks as though something has eaten all of the leaves. Bees love it and butterflies use it as a source of nectar.

For further information, see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/59966/index.html

The 1.5 to 2 inch bloom has erect dark lavender or purple striped styles.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 26, 2005
10:45 PM

Post #1651979

Skeleton Plant, Purple Dandelion, Milk pink and Flowering Straw (Lygodesmia texana)

The seedhead ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
1:07 PM

Post #1653006

Horse Nettle, Silverleaf Nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium), Solanaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in mid-spring through early fall

For further information, see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31750/index.html

The pollen is released through pores at the tips of the banana-shaped anthers.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
1:09 PM

Post #1653007

Horse Nettle, Silverleaf Nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium)

A view from the side in morning light ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
8:40 PM

Post #1658804

( Native ) Brazos or Gulfcoast Penstemon, ( Penstemon tenuis )
Lovely perennial plant up to three feet tall, bees love the flowers. Bloom period
March-May. See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55963/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2005
8:42 PM

Post #1658806

Close up of flowers.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
4:52 PM

Post #1660388

( Native ) Mealy Sage, ( Salvia farinacea ) Mint family. Lovely perennial, bloom period March to November, up to three feet high, drought tolerant, very popular plant.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/127

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
4:52 PM

Post #1660391

Close up of bloom cluster.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
9:50 PM

Post #1679803

Obedient Plant, False Dragonhead (Physostegia virginiana), Lamiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late summer through late fall, can be invasive (but great if you want to cover an area over time), requires moist soil

Mine receives some morning sun and afternoon shade and started blooming about a week ago. A view of the blooms backlit by morning sun ...

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/23/index.html

This message was edited Aug 8, 2005 6:33 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
9:51 PM

Post #1679808

Obedient Plant, False Dragonhead (Physostegia virginiana)

A closer view of the bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
11:25 PM

Post #1679994

Desert Petunia, Florida Bluebells, Mexican Petunia, Mexican Blue Bells, Blue Shade (Ruellia brittoniana), Acanthaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, blooms from early spring until the first freeze, dies down and comes back from the roots

Blue shade is a wonderful groundcover that blooms nonstop and takes no care unless it spreads where you don't want it (easily removed). It is a fast grower that will cover an area quickly. It can also be grown in hanging baskets and containers. Not picky about soil, not needing a lot of water, appearing to be insect pest free, fast growing, nice foliage and beautiful flowers make this an excellent ground cover. It makaes a great xeriscape, rock garedn (under a large shrub) or wildscape plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/38180/index.html

Desert petunia's, (blue shade's) growth habit and new leaves. The leaves may appear a grayish green due to the fine hairs on the leaves.

This message was edited Aug 8, 2005 6:39 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
11:28 PM

Post #1680001

Desert Petunia, Florida Bluebells, Mexican Petunia, Mexican Blue Bells, Blue Shade (Ruellia brittoniana)

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
11:31 PM

Post #1680011

Desert Petunia, Florida Bluebells, Mexican Petunia, Mexican Blue Bells, Blue Shade (Ruellia brittoniana)

A view of the bloom from a different angle; note the fine hairs on the leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
5:09 PM

Post #1752673

Globe Amaranth, Gomphrena (Gomphrena globosa), Amaranthaceae Family, naturalized, annual, blooms late summer through fall

Globe amaranth, native to Panama and Guatemala, has attained naturalized status in Texas. Bloom colors may be white, pink, red, lavender or purple. They are composed of stiff, colorful and papery bracts which are very flashy. The inconspicuous individual flowers within the flowerheads are extremely small, but there are many of them.I found that these perform better in poor soil, no fertilizer and regular supplemental water in hot weather. Mulching in hot climates helps also. Until I discovered this, the plants just withered, turned white and died.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/222/index.html

A view of globe amaranth and a butterfly with sunlight providing backlighting taken with my old camera. The plants have reached their peak and are starting to decline when I took the photo 2 years ago. The colored part of the heads are bracts. The blooms are tiny and white. I saw 8 different kinds of butterflies having a block party here. The color of the blooms was impossible for me to capture accurately with my digital camera and they seem to be one of the most difficult blooms for me to capture accurately.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 14, 2005
3:56 PM

Post #1758881

Sharp Pod Morning Glories. Another that I have trouble deciding the color. Very early morning they are basically pink, an hour after sunup, decidedly purple. This picture was taken about a half hour after sunup.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 22, 2005
11:17 PM

Post #1831957

Dwarf Cleome, Clammy Weed, Clammyweed, Redwhisker Clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra), Capparaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms in April or May and continues to bloom through October, self-seeds freely

Dwarf Cleome, Clammy Weed, Clammyweed, Redwhisker Clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra) is a wide spread annual native of Texas as well as most other states. It is commonly found in various soils of the Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains. It may be found in deserts, on plains, in open areas, as well as along sandy stream banks, roadsides and disturbed areas. Clammy weed enjoys dry feet and prefers gravely, sandy soil which of course is well drained. If it hasn't received rain in a long period of time, give it a good soaking. The petals may be white or in a color range from pinkish to rose to purple. These plants make great cultivated plants in dry areas.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/785/index.html

One plant all by itself blooming in a field in northwest Bexar County ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 22, 2005
11:20 PM

Post #1831963

Dwarf Cleome, Clammy Weed, Clammyweed, Redwhisker Clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra)

A closer view of the fruit (photo not well focused due to camera having to be set to telephoto) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 23, 2006
2:53 PM

Post #1994857

Henbit, Deadnettle (Lamium amplexicaule), Lamiaceae Family, naturalized, winter/cool season annual, invasive

Henbit usually emerges in January or so and provides pink or lavender flowers when very few plants are blooming. It reseeds prolifically and is very invasive. I find the small blooms very pretty, but pull most of the plants from my flowerbeds. I leave a few because I like the blooms and the foliage as well. This ensures that I will havw a lot to pullup the following year, however.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53157/index.html

Flower buds and foliage ,,,
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 23, 2006
2:55 PM

Post #1994864

Henbit, Deadnettle (Lamium amplexicaule)

Pinkish bloom ...


htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 23, 2006
2:57 PM

Post #1994866

Henbit, Deadnettle (Lamium amplexicaule)

Lavender bloom with upper petals folded ..
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

January 25, 2006
11:38 PM

Post #2000291

Kinda like this this "weed." ;-)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 26, 2006
2:40 AM

Post #2000963

I do too!

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2006
4:00 AM

Post #2012143

But a little goes a long way!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2006
6:46 PM

Post #2123343

Woolly Stemodia, Wooly Stemodia, Gray Woolly Twintip, Silverleaf Stemodia, Creeping Silver Cenizo (Stemodia tomentosa), Scrophulariaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, blooms March through October or so.

Woolly stemoda is a low spreading evergreen groundcover that grows to be about 4 - 6”inches in height high and spreads to 2 feet - 4’ feet wide. The up to 3/4 of an inch by 1/2 of an inch wide leaves are covered in small fine white hairs which give them a pale gray or silver appearance. The tiny 1/2 inch wide and 3/8 inch long tubular blooms are violet to bluish purple. It tolerates heat, drought and salt and is deer resistant. It prefers full sun and does well in poor soils. It is a great groundcover, border, rock garden, xeriscape or container plant. It may be used for erosion control. It serves as catepillar plant food for the mangrove buckeye butterfly.

Map of Nntive range:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,6,10&name=Stemodia%20tomentosa%20(Mill.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/128614/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2006
6:49 PM

Post #2123350

Woolly Stemodia, Wooly Stemodia, Gray Woolly Twintip, Silverleaf Stemodia, Creeping Silver Cenizo (Stemodia tomentosa)

A view of it in March with no blooms yet and the new growth appearing ... the stems root at the nodes.

This message was edited Mar 19, 2006 1:50 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2006
6:52 PM

Post #2123357

Woolly Stemodia, Wooly Stemodia, Gray Woolly Twintip, Silverleaf Stemodia, Creeping Silver Cenizo (Stemodia tomentosa)

A view of its dense mat ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 19, 2006
6:53 PM

Post #2123361

Woolly Stemodia, Wooly Stemodia, Gray Woolly Twintip, Silverleaf Stemodia, Creeping Silver Cenizo (Stemodia tomentosa)

New growth in March ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2006
12:31 AM

Post #2273733

Lindheimer's Morning Glory, Ipomoea lindheimeri
Endemic to Edwards Plateau to West Texas, it is a perennial hardy vine blooming spring to fall. Flowers are usually pale lavender, occasionally blue. Leaves are lobed, In this photo, the vine is growing up through some Cedar Sage.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2006
4:55 PM

Post #2275601

Linda, thank you for posting this picture, I can't wait to see mine bloom.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
1:29 AM

Post #2737404

Lemon Mint, Lemon Balm, Purple Horsemint, Lemon Bee Balm, Beebalm
Monarda citriodora
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
1:43 AM

Post #2737450

I see H posted one of these already, and mentioned the focus. Well, I happened to have a fairly good pic here. The original of this is 2048x1536

Would it be purple, red, or white group? Or all 3?
NE way, in this close-up I took at Dallas Discovery Garden last June, you can really see the little clams and the little whiskers...I liked the beanie (legumous) pods too.

Dwarf Cleome, Clammy Weed, Clammyweed, Redwhisker Clammyweed (Polanisia dodecandra)

This message was edited Sep 18, 2006 7:46 PM
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 26, 2006
2:56 AM

Post #2759193

Oxalis drummondii
Wood Sorrel
First identified by A. Gray and Native to Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. A fall flowering, winter-growing stoloniferous bulb with three leaflets and and violet flowers in four to eight flowering umbels. Makes a great potted specimen with it's delicate flowers. Shade or part sun, likes a little more moisture than a lot of the native bulbs. Recommended for growing in zones 8-9.

LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 26, 2006
5:20 AM

Post #2759530

Skeleton Plant, Lygodesmia texana. This Texas plant can look like it has no leaves, and often it doesn't. So when they bloom, it's almost like they're appearing out of nowhere. They are perennial, drought-tolerant and tolerates poor soil. It blooms in the summer and occasionally during the summer. Sometimes even in early fall. The plant is 10 to 24 inches tall. A patch of blooming Skeleton Plant is a beautiful sight to behold!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 26, 2006
5:33 AM

Post #2759539

A photo of Skeleton Plant:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:09 AM

Post #2809324

Wild Four O'Clock, Heartleaf Four O'Clock, Nightblooming Four O'Clock (Mirabilis nyctaginea), Nyctaginaceae Family, native, perennial. blooms April through November


Wild Four O'Clock stems are smooth and can be distinguished by their swollen joints and forked branches. The opposite salked leaves are between 2 and 4.75 inches long with the upper leaves being stalkless. It has clusters of between 3-5 flowers that are 1/2 - 5/8 across which are surrounded by green bracts which become papery, enlarged and colored as its fruit matures.

Texas native distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=MINY

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31793/index.html

Flower which is actually more pinkish than the photo shows. The flower is trumpet-shaped and is about ½" across or slightly less ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:11 AM

Post #2809327

Wild Four O'Clock, Heartleaf Four O'Clock, Nightblooming Four O'Clock (Mirabilis nyctaginea)

Flowers closing in late morning. Note the pollen faling from the flowers ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:13 AM

Post #2809330

Wild Four O'Clock, Heartleaf Four O'Clock, Nightblooming Four O'Clock (Mirabilis nyctaginea)

Flower which is not fully open which shows the green bract that has 5 lobes ..

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 12, 2006
2:51 PM

Post #2810119

Hazel, your pictures are amazing lately, thank you and Congratulations.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2006
12:51 AM

Post #2820486

Woolly Violet
Viola sororia
Note the fiberous root system..
This plant is considered a winter weed. It is a Texas Native, and also the State Flower of New Jersey

This message was edited Oct 16, 2006 9:51 AM

This message was edited Oct 22, 2006 8:32 AM

This message was edited Oct 22, 2006 8:36 AM
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2006
12:52 AM

Post #2820490

Woolly Violet
Viola sororia
This message was edited Oct 16, 2006 9:52 AM

This message was edited Oct 22, 2006 8:32 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 16, 2006
10:52 PM

Post #2823119

Thanks, Josephine. I ahven't had the time to take many photos lately.
turbosbabe96
Ingleside, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 17, 2006
2:11 AM

Post #2823713

Deb..What is that in the last 2 pics you posted?
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 23, 2006
4:37 PM

Post #2842998

Sorry I left it hanging turbos, I had some questions about this plant. I wanted to be sure about it.


:o)
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2006
8:08 PM

Post #3028754

Passiflora incarnata L.
Common Name(s): May-pop, Passionflower, Apricot vine, Purple passion-flower
From http://www.wildflower.org/:
Quoting:Description: Purple passion-flower is an herbaceous vine, up to 25 ft. long, that climbs with axillary tendrils or sprawls along the ground. Intricate, 3 in., lavender flower are short-stalked from leaf axils. The petals and sepals subtend a fringe of wavy or crimped, hair-like segments. The pistil and stamens are also showy. Three-lobed, deciduous leaves are dark-green above and whitish below. The fruit is a large, orange-yellow berry with edible pulp.

Comments: This unusual flower is widely distributed in the South, especially from Florida to Texas. The name relates to the resemblance of the floral parts to aspects of the crucifixion story. The 10 petal-like parts represent the disciples, excluding Peter and Judas; the 5 stamens the wounds Jesus received; the knob-like stigmas the nails; the fringe the crown of thorns. Yellow Passion Flower (P. lutea), a small yellow-flowered species, occurs from southeast Pennsylvania to Florida, west to Louisiana, and north to Missouri, Illinois, and West Virginia.


This plant is one of several Passifloras which are caterpillar host for the Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
http://pics.davesgarden.com/pics/debnes_dfw_tx_1165542366_774.jpg

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2006
8:44 PM

Post #3028852

Very pretty picture Debbie.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2006
9:14 PM

Post #3028913

Oxalis violacea
Violet Wood Sorrel

I think this one is more common in south eastern Texas but here is a link to central Texas:
http://www.bio.utexas.edu/courses/bio406d/images/pics/oxl/oxalis_violacea.htm

Here it is in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54398/index.html

Lucky for me, I love Oxalis species--I actually collect them in pots. While I really like the South African species the best--I haven't met many oxalis I don't like. This one just "popped up" next to the Ipheions and, obviously, will not need a pot to live in. It differs from Oxalis drummondi in leaves and flower structure--although they are similar in flower color. Its actually widespread and native in the US.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2006
9:39 PM

Post #3028989

Thanks Josephine,
Happy to say I have seeds for this one if anyone would like some.

:-D
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2006
9:55 PM

Post #3029027

Maurandella antirrhiniflora
Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine

This one's over in the vines too--but it is purple. This one shows a bit more of how the leaves look. It seems to refuse to die back this winter. I think it does well in a hanging basket because it really doesn't get too big and requires little water.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 27, 2006
10:56 PM

Post #3029148

Debbie dmj,
Oxalis is one of my favorites too! That violacea is one sweet little flower!

dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 27, 2006
11:28 PM

Post #3029219

Josephine
Thanks and what's not to love in an Oxalis, right? That and the roving sailor are also the only blooming subjects I had to play with my new camera with. I have a scuttelaria blooming that's native to Central America and that's all the blooming subjects I had. One has to work with the subjects one has at this time of year and be thankful for them. =)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
12:56 AM

Post #3029459

You are so right Debbie, I actually don't have a single thing blooming right now.
But you know, the Roving Sailor, Maurandella antirrhiniflora, happens to be the larval food for the Buckeye butterfly, is there any way that you might root me a cutting for the next R.U.?
I would really appreciate it. I am trying to collect as many larval food plants as possible.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
1:10 AM

Post #3029509

Alrighty then,
Maybe my posts aren't showing up, but I will give it a shot...

Debbie, Is there any chance that your Roving Sailor turns a good seed? If so, I would like to trade something I have for either a cutting or seeds. My son Ben's favorite Butterfly is Buckeye, and I have been searching for several of their larval hosts.

Deb
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
1:55 AM

Post #3029652

If you can get ahold of seeds for any of the Agalinis species, they are good host plants for the Buckeye in the fall. I have Snapdragon Vine and one other host plant listed in books for the Buckeye, but it seems that the Buckeyes around here are a wee bit picky...I've only found Buckeye caterpillars on the local Plateau Agalinis that grows around here, Agalinis edwardsiana. I even found a chrysalis on one Agalinis plant once that turned out to be a Tropical Buckeye. This year, with the extreme heat and drought, not one single plant of the Agalinis came up (they come up here in summer) here, even though I'd collected some extra seeds the year before and put them out. But hopefully next year they'll be back. Here's a link for my Agalinis edwardsiana, but there's a lot of other Agalinis species also used by Buckeyes.

http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/oro/agalinis_edwardsiana.htm

debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
2:46 AM

Post #3029784

Very helpful Linda, thank you!
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Aristolochia macrophylla
Dutchman's Pipe
(Sometimes incorrectly called Aristolochia durior)

Although the pipevines are all rather fast growing, this one grows a bit slower of the group. It is a larval host for the Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly Battus philenor (Linnaeus). PVST are very similar to Black Swallowtail, but they are the one in which mimicry plays in favor of both, because they are poisonous to their preditors. Of course the Pipevines are also poisonous.

At this time I do not have a good photo to post, although I do have seeds and a plant heeled into my back host garden ready for Spring. When it blooms the photo will be posted here. The bloom is greenish with a purple center in the pipe end. (Hard to know in which thread to put either of them.) Another Texas Native, Aristolochia tomentosa is posted in the "Other & Bi-color" thread. These are the 2 main larval hosts for Pipevine Swallowtail.

This is the best I can do for now, yet I believe this plant deserves an honorable place here in DG Native TX Plants... Likewise a mention of the creature for which it was created.

This message was edited Dec 27, 2006 10:22 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
3:44 AM

Post #3029900

Very good Linda and Deb, great job, and very useful information.
Josephine.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 28, 2006
9:03 PM

Post #3031499

Josephine--Yes I knew about the Buckeye butterfly. I will grow you one from seed in the spring--they are easier from seeds.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
9:52 PM

Post #3031630

Oh thank you very much Debbie, I will try to pass it on around here.
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
11:42 PM

Post #3031959

Debbie,
Do you ever see the caterpilars on your Roving Sailor Vine?
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 28, 2006
11:43 PM

Post #3031965

Nope--its in a hanging basket, they may not can find it.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 28, 2006
11:50 PM

Post #3031979

Thanks Debbie,
Also like Linda was saying they can be picky, and they prefer Agalinis. I will just look for the seeds for now..:-S

I didn find one source, for the edwardsiana, so far only one place, and they are kinda pricey. I may end up buying them anyway.

Deb
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 28, 2006
11:54 PM

Post #3031992

Native American Seed is a very reputable company and you get a lot of seeds for the money--very generous amounts, excellent germination rates too.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
12:01 AM

Post #3032010

Thanks a bunch!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
3:43 AM

Post #3032596

deb, I wish I had some seed for the Agalinis for you. I intended to collect some more this year and the plants were nowhere to be found. But any kind of Agalinis should do, for that matter, if it'll grow.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
9:46 AM

Post #3032831

Linda,
No worries, placed an order with Native Am. Seed. They were the only place I could find, and when Debbie recommend them, I decided to go for it. 4.98pkt seemed a little high, but if it is a generous pkt, I will be happy. Got a couple more kinds of seed also, for the same postage buck since they only seem to ship by UPS, $6.89(Standard Ground).
Thanks!

:-Deb
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 29, 2006
2:30 PM

Post #3033305

You will get a lot of seed from them--they are not one of these places that send 3, 6, or 10 seeds for that price. That seems to be the newest trend these days.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
2:51 PM

Post #3033367

Wow! Deb, that shipping business is what really gets you, makes you really appreciate all the things we get for free from our friends, doesn't it?
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
3:38 PM

Post #3033468

Yes it does Josephine.. I so appreaciate and love all of you!! I spoke to Jennifer at NASeed, and she said she would ship3 packs by USPS for $2.67.. So if anyone wants to go around the UPS cost, simply call them to place the orders.. 1-800-728-4043.
I'm all fixed up now tough.

Thanks y'all!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
3:45 PM

Post #3033488

Good thing to know Deb, thank you very much.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 26, 2007
3:40 PM

Post #3322521

I don't see these here or with the blues so I'll put them here because they look pale lilac to me; could just be my eyes.

Nemastylus geminiflora
'Celestial Lily'
The Prairie Celestial is native to Tennessee and Mississippi west to Texas and North to Kansas and Missouri; and is very widespread on the black land Texas prairies and all around the hill country. It is naturally found in grasslands and prairies, and also occurs in piney woods. This bulb grows deep (about 5”) and blooms in shades of sky-blue (rarely white) with white at the bloom base and yellow anthers. The flowers open mid-morning and fade before sundown and can grow in full sun to partial shade. Prairie Celestial’s are a delightful and delicate bloomer 6-12” high in March through May prefer dry conditions (probably drier than they are going to get here) during their dormancy. Started blooming today.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 26, 2007
5:23 PM

Post #3322836

Just lovely Debbie.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 26, 2007
9:58 PM

Post #3323788

It looked bluer as the afternoon progressed. I probably should have put it on the blue thread. Let me tell you they close up tighter than a clam at night, they are out by the rain lilies; I was checking on them for bud scapes real close to dark. Thanks Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 27, 2007
8:04 PM

Post #3327000

Dakota Mock Vervain, Great Plains Verbena, Prairie Vebena, Moradilla (Glandularia bipinnatifida), Verbenaceae Family, native, annual/perennial, blooms (may be pinkish or purple depending upon the subspecies), February through September (can bloom year round)

This is the lowing growing native verbena that forms a great groundcover. The Spanish name, Moradilla, is derived from morado (purple) and means “little purple one”. The up to 24 inch long stems are square and usually partly reclining. They may root at the at the lower nodes. The 1 - 2. 5 inch, opposte, hairy leaves are simple but highly dissected with sunken veins and curled under leaf edges. It grows natively in various soils; but prefers calcareous or sandy soil in sunny locations in prairies, plains, brushlands and fields and along roadsides and dry streambanks. It can form large mat-like colonies. The flowers are especially rich in nectar and attract many kinds of butterflies and other insects. Native Indians used the plant to produce a beautiful die. It can be used in cultivated beds and is especially nice in rock gardens. Be sure not to overwater.

Texas distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=GLBI2

For more unformation, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62648/index.html
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 31, 2007
1:38 PM

Post #3339941

Herbertia lahue
Prairie Nymphs

Prairie Nymphs are an iris relative native to Texas and are lovely violet subtropical spring-flowering bulbs with a white flower eyes. This petite species has narrow green foliage less than 6” in height making it an excellent candidate for container gardening. Prairie Nymphs like medium moisture levels, are best grown in full sun to partial shade, and bloom in our gardens from March through May. When given adequate moisture, they prove to be easy and reliable naturalizing bulbs that reward their owners by reproducing remarkably easily from seed. Recommended for growing in zones 8-9.

Hard to get this one with the constant rain this morning.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 31, 2007
1:39 PM

Post #3339945

Herbertia lahue
Prairie Nymphs

Unopened bud scapes.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2007
3:09 PM

Post #3340207

Really pretty Debbie.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 2, 2007
12:34 PM

Post #3346976

Golden-Eye Phlox, Roemer Phlox (Phlox roemeriana), Polemoniaceae Family, Texas endemic native, annual, blooms February through May

Golden-eye phlox may be a plant that goes unnoticied all year until it blooms (if it can fight its way through other plants). It can be found growing natively in the dry well-drained limestone soils of central Texas in the Edwards Plateau and in the adjacent High Plains Regions. Although it usually grows in clay or clay loam on rocky slopes and limestone barrens or more commonly in grasslands on uplands, it occasionally grows in sandier substrates. It is common on roadsides where fall mowing reduces shading by taller warm-season grasses.

It is very low growing typically reaching a height of three to five inches, but sometimes it may grow as tall as twelve inches. The slender 2” long and 3/8” wide leaves are covered with fine hairs and have longer hairs along the margins. The leaves sre alternately arranged on the stem.

Although the blooms are small, they standout in a crowd. Usually the bloom is a bright to magenta pink with a lighter pink to white center and a yellow or golden eye. However, the bloom may be a light purple or rarely white. The one below has purple lines pointing to the corolla tube which are called nectar guides. These assist insects with locating the center of the bloom, thereby, helpong the bloom become pollinated and helping the insect locate nectar quickly. Blooms of some plants (usually visited by bees) have low ultraviolet reflectance near the center of each petal. These nectar guides can not been seen by the human eye. The fruit are very small, ball-shaped capsules.

I just have to add this interesting report:

"FOILED BY SPIDERS The arrival of an insect-hungry crab spider (Misumenops celer) on a golden-eye phlox blossom (Phlox roemeriana) often spells misfortune for this central Texas wildflower. The spider is a sit-and-wait predator, but before sitting, it remodels its host. By tying together two of the five phlox petals to form a bower, the spider may perhaps be shading itself from the sun or concealing itself from its insect prey. Whatever its purpose, the bower significantly reduces the flower's chances of getting pollinated and setting seed, according to biologist James Ott and his colleagues at Southwest Texas State University. It's not because the spider's handiwork blocks access to the flower's reproductive organs; failure is just as likely even when the bower doesn't cover carpels and stamens. Ott says the next question he wants to answer is what prevents pollination: Do pollinators learn to avoid flowers with bowers or do they get eaten before they can deposit any pollen? ("The effect of spider-mediated flower alteration on seed production in golden-eye phlox," as published in The Southwestern Naturalist 43, 1998.

I couldn't find any information about whether or not he ever found the answer to his question.

Native Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/endemics_map_page2?code=K4852100

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55482/index.html

A plant with this color of bloom is rarer than the ones which have magenta or pink colored blooms. (See other colored blooms in the PlantFiles or the Texas Native Plants by Color - Pink entry.)
Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL
(Zone 5b)



April 7, 2007
7:19 AM

Post #3364307

Can you Texas natives ID this one? I photographed it last week near Corpus Christi.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2007
8:17 AM

Post #3364384

Todd, What a thrill that you posted here! I am not sure, it looks like Verbena halei, but there are more flowers on the stem and they are also larger, I don't know what it is, but I bet Hazel does, she lives farther south than I, and the wildflowers vary a lot int the different zones in Texas.
It is really beautiful, did you get a shot of the foliage?
I hope you had a great visiting in Texas.
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2007
8:41 AM

Post #3364475

I found a picture of Verbena halei in the plants files ;
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/35614/
Josephine.
Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL
(Zone 5b)



April 7, 2007
10:28 AM

Post #3364805

I saw those Verbena...this one has much larger flowers.

I was on a trip to Texas for 10 days looking at birds and wildflowers...had a great time!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 7, 2007
10:40 AM

Post #3364865

Todd, I thought I had it identified, but the plant (below) that I thought it was does not grow in Corpus Christie. Sorry ... Does it look similar to this? The blooms on your plant appear to have a more "open" shape.
Verbena neomexicana var. neomexicana
http://uvalde.tamu.edu/herbarium/vene.htm

This message was edited Apr 7, 2007 10:01 AM
Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL
(Zone 5b)



April 7, 2007
2:48 PM

Post #3365704

The flowers seem larger than V. neomexicana and the plant was not leafy-stalked, rather more rosetted. It was specifically growing at Lake Corpus Christi.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 7, 2007
4:07 PM

Post #3365941

Okay, thanks for the information, Todd. After I put my tropicals and other containered plants in my greenhouse and cover other plants because we're goiing to have a freeze, I'll get back to searching.
crystalspin
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2007
9:35 PM

Post #3367067

How about another of your natives, Gulf vervain or Verbena xutha?

http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/vrb/verbena_xutha.htm

~'spin!~

Editing to add USDA county map:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=VEXU

This message was edited Apr 7, 2007 6:43 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 7, 2007
10:39 PM

Post #3367252

Good to hear from you, crystalspiin. I looked ay some images of gulf vervain and thought that the blooms were too small in relationship to the stem to be Todd's plant. But, Todd needs to check it out. Thanks for your help.

http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/vrb/verbena_xutha.htm

crystalspin
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2007
11:37 PM

Post #3367385

It seemed the only one with the "denseness" of blooms along the stalk (but yes, the pics on the utexas site showed what seemed to be a fatter stalk in comparison).

Most of the wild verbenas/vervains seem much smaller bloom'ed -- almost like this was an escaped cultivar!

~'spin!~
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2007
12:00 AM

Post #3367424

I have been thinking that it may not be a verbena/vervain, but it sure resembles one. We have had some sleet. Thank goodness it is holding at 35 degrees so far. I am really worried about the angel trumpets that are in the ground and I did not have time to cover.

This message was edited Apr 7, 2007 11:03 PM
crystalspin
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 8, 2007
12:25 AM

Post #3367472

Wow, I cannot believe the snow/sleet/freezing in Texas -- Michigan is one thing, but Texas! in APRIL! -- it's supposed to be spring!

~'s!~
Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL
(Zone 5b)



April 8, 2007
9:43 AM

Post #3367997

The flowers on my mystery were much larger than the gulf vervain...the individual flowers were about an inch across.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2007
2:48 PM

Post #3368890

Texas Storksbill, Texas Stork's Bill, Texas Heronbill, Desert Stork's-Bill, Texas Filaree (Erodium texanum), Geraniaceae Family, Texas native, annual/biennial, blooms February through April

Texas storksbill can be found growing natively on sandy or rocky calcareous soils of disturbed areas, hillsides, prairies and other open areas in the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau Regions. The plant forms a low growing winter rosette and then may reach a mature height of about 2 feet. In times of drought, it does not reach that height. The herb branches from the base and it often has reddish stems. The leaves are scalloped, pinnately tri-lobed with a large middle lobe, deeply veined and are about 2 inches long. Texas Storksbill produces a cluster of three 5-petaled, up to 1.2 inches in diameter blooms from the leaf axils. The petals are veined and can be flat or wide spreading. The color of the blooms is difficult to describe and varies according to the maturity of the bloom and the weather conditions. I would say that they are reddish--purple, magenta-purple, pinkish-purple, rose purple or some variation thereof. Each bloom, which typically lasts one day, opens late in the day and closes in the morning.

The fruits (schizocarps) which stand erect are long, slender and resemble a stork's or heron's beak. Each consists of 5 seed bearing carpels. The carpels each have their own styles resembling little spears. When the carpels have matured and the seeds in them are ripe, they separate from the schizocarp. As the styles uncoil, the carpels are often forcibly ejected. After they have separated, the corkscrew-shaped styles twist around, contracting when dry and expanding when wet. In this manner, they can dig into the soil burying the seed conatining capel. So, they actually can plant their own seeds.

Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10&name=Erodium texanum Gray

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77415/index.html

An opened bloom with 2 bloom buds ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2007
2:52 PM

Post #3368901

Texas Storksbill, Texas Stork's Bill, Texas Heronbill, Desert Stork's-Bill, Texas Filaree (Erodium texanum)

Booms clusters appear from the leaf axils with usually 1 or 2 blooms open at a time ... It is difficult to capture the true color of the blooms with my digital camera.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2007
2:57 PM

Post #3368915

Texas Storksbill, Texas Stork's Bill, Texas Heronbill, Desert Stork's-Bill, Texas Filaree (Erodium texanum)

Blooms opening which gives a close look at the reproductive parts ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2007
2:59 PM

Post #3368920

Texas Storksbill, Texas Stork's Bill, Texas Heronbill, Desert Stork's-Bill, Texas Filaree (Erodium texanum)

Blooms blowing in the wind ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2007
3:03 PM

Post #3368930

Texas Storksbill, Texas Stork's Bill, Texas Heronbill, Desert Stork's-Bill, Texas Filaree (Erodium texanum)

3 inch fruit (schizocarps) which form from a long thin pistil - They resemble a stork's or heron's beak and are usually in a group of 3 (corresponding to the number of blooms in a cluster). One has been broken off here. For more photos go to its PnatFiles entry.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2007
9:40 PM

Post #3370039

Beautiful Hazel!
Would love to have this one... What interresting stamens!!

Deb
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 14, 2007
9:33 AM

Post #3389659

Thanks, Deb. The blooms are small, but there are 3 in each bloom cluster so they make more of an impact. They are only open at certain times of the day.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 14, 2007
10:12 AM

Post #3389811

Winecup, Tall Winecup, Cowboy Rose, Poppy Mallow, Tall Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe leiocarpa)

This photo shows the ways the color of the petals appear in different light situations due to the shadow to the right and the bright afternoon sunlight to the left.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 14, 2007
10:15 AM

Post #3389819

Winecup, Tall Winecup, Cowboy Rose, Poppy Mallow, Tall Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe leiocarpa)

A bloom viewed from the side showing that it does not have an epicalyx (a whorl of small bracts just below the calyx) which distinguishes it from Winecup (Callirhoe involucrata) which does have an epicalyx. Of course, C. leiocarpais is much taller as well.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 14, 2007
10:20 AM

Post #3389837

Winecup, Tall Winecup, Cowboy Rose, Poppy Mallow, Tall Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe leiocarpa)

This photo includes one of my fingers holding the flower stem to provide a size perspective. The bloom stems are very long and are blown easily by the wind which was quite strong on this day as shown in the photo. (A very difficult bloom to photograph even in a slight breeze, have found it difficult to capture its true color with a digital camera)
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 18, 2007
1:22 AM

Post #3403683

Pointed Phlox (Phlox cuspidate)
Phlox Family (Polemoniaceae)
Blooms February-May. Delicate annual 2 ¼-6 in. high: stem slender, usually branched in upper portion. Flower is ½ - 3/4 in. across, light to rosy pink or purplish, sweetly fragrant, trumpet shaped, 5-lobed at rim, the lobes spreading flat, narrowed at base, wider and sharp-pointed at tip. Flowers numerous or with only few opening at one time, forming terminal clusters. Leaves to 1 1/4 in. long, ¼ in wide, stalkless, opposite in lower portion of plant, becoming alternate and narrower in upper portion; margins entire.
Habitat is sandy or loamy soils in grasslands, prairies and open oak woodlands. It reseeds readily & usually forms extensive colonies. It is frequently found growing with sandwort, blue-eyed grass, Indian paintbrush and yellow star-grass.

I have tons of this growing on my acreage here just a few miles south of San Antonio and the butterflies love it. It was the first show of color here. This photo and info are from the Texas Native Wildflowers book (my mom has). I will have to take a couple photos tomorrow & post one or two, so you can really see the effect of them in mass.

Judy

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2007
7:55 AM

Post #3403967

Yes Judy, please show us your beautiful wildflowers.
Josephine.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 19, 2007
2:35 AM

Post #3407292

Here's a couple that were taken back in early March. OK, I have to admit, I lied, lied, lied. Thought these guys were Pointed phlox. I'm a dummy as when I was taking some photos today, I noticed mine are not pointed. Can anyone ID these? Someone on another TX Gardening site said they might be Woodsorrel, but I knew better. When I first laid eyes on them, I thought of wild phlox. I did collect some flowers into a paer bag hoping to get seeds.

More photos to follow.

Judy
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 19, 2007
2:39 AM

Post #3407296

Close-up of the flowers. The leaves and stems in the description of the Pointed phlox seem to be like these little babies.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 19, 2007
2:41 AM

Post #3407302

Butterfly on a single bloom
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 19, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #3407315

Oh, also, they are now about 12" in high. I left a large patch out front of them. I also have loads of Indian Paintbrushes out front near road, so I can't mow there yet either.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 19, 2007
8:09 AM

Post #3407610

I have no idea why you might want to mow, let them grow please.
Josephine.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 22, 2007
10:39 PM

Post #3419888

Well, I had to mow. You see we moved here in Dec and since I let everything grow till the bluebonnets could go to seed, now I had weeds and wildflowers up over my knees in some places. I mean, even out my back & front doors. I also have grassburrs coming up everywhere and there is a big problem in this area with snakes (copper heads, rattlers and coral snakes). I have two grandsons, dogs, cats, chickens and I raise Holland Lop bunnies and don't wish to make any of those a meal for the snakes. I did leave a patch out front away from the house of wildflowers and the whole front near the road is still tall cause there are Indian Paintbrushes blooming there. I'm trying to establish a little yard area here near the house. Believe me, there are plenty of these flowers on all the surrounding land here nearby where no one lives. I will keep seeds for planting in specific areas, but can't deal with weeds up to my behind where I have to walk. That is not safe. I enjoy the wildflowers so much, but everyone's safety comes first.

Judy
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 22, 2007
10:55 PM

Post #3419947

As I said in my earlier post with the pictures, they are NOT Pointed Phlox, althought the stems and leaves are similair. Does anyone know what they might be???

Judy

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 22, 2007
11:45 PM

Post #3420144

It could be this one Phlox pilosa, there are many that are similar, but this one looks close
http://wildflower.utexas.edu/plants/result.php?id_plant=PHPI
I hope it helps.
It was a good idea for you to mow, I didn't knoe the plants were right up to your door.
Josephine.
sunnydove
Lytle (near San Anto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 24, 2007
12:00 AM

Post #3424042

Josephine,

Thank you for the info. I do believe you are right there. The photos on that website are just like my flowerws here. BTW, I have the Gyp Blue Curls (lots of them) in a med size paper bag. Hope I get seeds form them to pass around. They are so pretty when clumped in a large mass. I've taken some photos of them where they are growing in a large clump out back. Will post one of those later (haven't downloaded the pics from camera yet). I really love blue and purple colored flowers best.

Judy
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #3495157

This appears to be Snake Herb, Dyschoriste linearis. It's a perennial, spreading native ground cover with lavendar flowers, attached close to the plant stem. Flowers from mid-spring to mid-summer. Prefers fairly dry, sandy, rocky or calcareous soils. I've even seen it in lawns on rare occasions.
I just found another one, called Dyschoriste decumbens, at a nursery. Apparently, it's more of a low, sprawling plant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 27, 2007
4:00 PM

Post #3541388

Herbert's Iris, Propeller Plant, PrairieNymph (Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea), Iridaceae Family, perennial, blooms from March through May

DMJ1218 (Debbie) has already posted information about Prairie Nymphs (Herbertia lahue) above.

I was walking my dogs in the late afternoon between rain episodes when I saw one beautiful lavender bloom at the edge of a sidewalk in a neighbor's yard. His grass had died during the drought last year. I stopped and looked at it I was so happy when I realized that it was a prairie nymph. I remembered Debbie's photo above. I rushed to get my camera because this was its last bloom and the blooms close in the afternoon. By the time I got back to the plant (3 houses down), it had already started to close. I asked my neighbor if I could dig it up and pot it for him because it had been mowed down a few times. He said I could have it. :o)

I tried finding the differences between Herbertia lahue and Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea; however, I did not have much luck. Then, I came across some references that state that the differences are so miniscule that they should be combined into one. Because all 3 of my native Texas wildflowers books only list Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea and the blooms look the same so that's what I have identified it as. Herbertia lahue is listed as being in Bexar County according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. In other distribution maps, it is not shown as being documented in Bexar County. Distribution maps differ widely. The maps below for both species are the same.

Distribution - Herbertia lahue ssp. caerulea :
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=HELAC
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/endemics_map_page2?code=K3450600

Distribution - Herbertia lahue :
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/endemics_map_page2?code=K3450600
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=HELA6

For more infformation, see its entry in the PlantFiles (2 entries):
Herbert's Iris, Propeller Plant, PrairieNymph (Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea)
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/101489/index.html

Herbert's Iris, Prairie Nymphs (Herbertia lahue)
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/132027/index.html

Bloom starting to close in the afternoon with cloudy, overcast lighting
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 27, 2007
4:05 PM

Post #3541404

Herbert's Iris, Propeller Plant, PrairieNymph (Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea)

Bloom continuing to close as a minute or 2 of sunlight peered through the clouds. The colors are more true in this photo.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 27, 2007
4:12 PM

Post #3541424

Herbert's Iris, Propeller Plant, PrairieNymph (Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea)

Thin pleated leaf which is grass-like and can be up to 12 inchs long. The leaves were not standing up. They had been mowed a few times.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 27, 2007
4:14 PM

Post #3541427

Herbert's Iris, Propeller Plant, PrairieNymph (Herbertia lahue subsp. caerulea)

A fruit (capsule) which, when mature, is about 15-20 mm long. It dehisces at the apex only.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 26, 2008
7:22 AM

Post #4866019

Hazel--I have both of these "forms" of Herbertia lahue and am researching to publish in an upcoming article in 'Plant Science' from Botany.org:
http://www.botany.org/
a study on some of the bulbs such as Herbertia lahue and Habranthus tubispathus (and a few other obscure to the general public; Calydorea's, etc) bulbs that occur in both North and South America with no central American or Mexican counterpoints. It combines bulbs and Geology--my 2 passions. Its the age old taxonomy argument about lumpers and splitters (I'm a lumper by the way--lol). Most of the newer journal publications and scientific publications (JSTAR, etc) have the pendulum swinging back towards lumping rather than splitting. For instance (since you probably have both of these books), Dr. Thad Howard is a splitter (e.g. the TX native Allium fraseri page 20, Bulbs for Warm Climates) and in MCGary's 'Bulbs of North America' its Allium canadense var fraseri (which I happen to agree with). Its the age old broad or narrow view. I've seen really nice blue (not purple) variations of Herbertia Lahue from S America and from Texas. I don't think color variations or other minor morphological differences should justify calling something a new species or even a subspecies.

Here's a pretend story to illustrate my point. Pretend island X is 500 miles long. Chris Columbus gets off his boat and sees gorgeous blue Herbertia lahue's. He takes samples, gets in his boat and sails 500 miles south. Gets out of the boat, sees gorgeous purple H lahues. Wow, he says, and takes more samples. Later on the conquistadors come along and literally walk that 500 miles and see the very gradual change that occurs in the H lahues over that 500 mile spread. Is it really a new species or even a subspecies? Is it not possible to have natural variations within a population of the same species due to perhaps micro-climatic, soil micro-nutrient, rainfall, who knows the reason? Maybe a volcano XYZ splits island X in half or tectonic forces eventually divide the island into 2. What shall we call our different colored H lahues now?

By the way--google books is a great way for anyone to access this info nowadays without the book, enjoy the ride for however long it might last:
http://books.google.com/books?id=32O856W66n0C&printsec=frontcover&dq=bulbs of North America&sig=WmlZBDWBPP8M2drgG-fH9qJY-G0

use the search for in this book tab on the right to find exactly what you need.

Thanks for listening ya'll and I'll get off my taxonomy soapbox now and go type up some invoices (which is what I need to be doing--lol). By the way, I have some more info on some TX native alliums to update from last year as soon as I can.
Debbie
=)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:53 AM

Post #4866160

Debbie, I have very few books to which to refer and neither of the ones you mention. most of my research comes from searching the internet. I use the google books a lot. I have many photos of Texas native plants that I am unable to post because there is such conflicting information as to their IDs. The other difficult part is that some plants' scientific names have been changed back and forth especially after botanists are doing genetic testing. I have spent months researching some of the plants that I have posted. I sure know of what you speak. I wish I could register to be able to use JSTAR and see the complete papers. Are you able to do so? The one Herbertia lahue plant that I had dug up from a neighbor's yard last year came up; however when I visited my daughter for 10 days in Allen, Tx., my husband did not notice the small container in which the plant resides and did not water it. I think it died. I hope it comes back after I watered it. Let me know when your article is published. I would love to read it.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2008
4:24 PM

Post #5030927

My Mist flowers are blooming. In the past almost all have been blue. The first ones this year are a bright purple.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2008
4:30 PM

Post #5030946

Another Mist.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2008
6:27 PM

Post #5031393

Those are really pretty Trois.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2008
7:08 PM

Post #5031564

Thanks, Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2008
5:56 PM

Post #5036206

Propeller plant.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2008
5:58 PM

Post #5036213

One more.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2008
6:34 PM

Post #5036379

Those are so pretty, I have been trying to grow them from seed, but no luck.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #5036402

Next spring I will see if I can dig some up for you.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2008
6:41 PM

Post #5036407

Oh, that would be wonderful, thank you Trois you are a sweetheart.
jessaree
Anderson, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2008
12:33 AM

Post #5243825

Bluebells are blooming in Texas!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2008
1:31 AM

Post #5244128

Oh my Goodness, how gorgeous!!!
Thank you for posting the picture.
Josephine.
bellzeybubba
Bastrop, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 25, 2009
3:32 AM

Post #7101910

Liatris, but I am not sure which species:

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 25, 2009
3:48 AM

Post #7101940

I am not sure but it could be Liatris elegans, very pretty.
http://wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=10878

Loonie1

Loonie1
Rowlett, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 25, 2009
5:12 PM

Post #7103355

Trailing Lantana (Sept 2009) after the soaking rains.

Carla
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 4, 2010
3:38 PM

Post #8080481

Hey Native Lubbers!

I posted a plant in the ID forum if any of you can help let me know. I took a quick look in here and its not any of these from what I can tell. Hoping its a good one...
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1127021/

LMK

Deb
TexasDollie
Windcrest, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 12, 2014
10:32 AM

Post #9891759

"Ruellia nudiflora, Wild Petunia."

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/38221/

Growing in full sun...now I think I'll try it in the bright shade of our humongous Arizona Ash.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2014
10:36 AM

Post #9891766

Very nice Dollie, I have some in sum and semi shade and the both work just fin.
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