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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Orange )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2005
7:15 PM

Post #1621435

Butterfly Weed, ( Asclepias curassavica) Naturalized plant, perennial,host and food plant for the Monarch butterfly.
For more information see the Plant Files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/604/index.html


This message was edited Jan 14, 2007 4:55 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2005
7:44 PM

Post #1621495

Texas Paintbrush, Indian Paintbrush, ( Castilleja indivisa ) Figwort family.
Beautiful native plant, annual, blooms May--June, covers whole fields with color.
For more information see the Plant Files,
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62386/index.html
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2005
7:01 AM

Post #1627255

Indian Paintbrush, Texas Paintbrush, Castilleja indivisa, Scrophulariaceae (Figwort) Family. Indigenous annual, 6 - 15 inches tall. Leaves 1 - 4 inches long, alternate. Flowers are small 1 inch cream-colored and slender. The larger bracts vary from red to pale orange and give the "flower" its color. Moist sandy loam and calcareous soils. Wildflowers of Texas calls them semi-parasitic because the roots grow until the touch the roots of other plants. They then penetrate the "host" roots and obtain part of their nutrients from the "host." Blooms from March through May.

For more information, see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62386/index.html
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2005
7:13 AM

Post #1627260

Indian Paintbrush, Texas Paintbrush, Castilleja indivisa, often grows in dense clumps that cover prairies, pastures, hillsides and roadsides. This photo shows clumping growth as well as the leaves.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
10:51 AM

Post #1629339

Indian Mallow, Texas Indian Mallow, Pelotazo (Abutilon fruticosum), Malvceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms May to October

This plant can be 2 to 3 feet tall and grows in rocky, dry ground of the Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains regions. The heart shaped leaves can be up to measure up to four inches long, They are covered with small hairs. It is an important food source: the foliage is eaten by sheep, goats and deer; mourning doves, bobwhite and quail eat the seeeds. The stem fibers are very tough and has been used in rope making as well as weaving. The blooms are about 3/8 of an inch wide.

For more information, see the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/74998/index.html

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
10:56 AM

Post #1629341

Indian Mallow, Texas Indian Mallow, Pelotazo (Abutilon fruticosum)

The lower leaves are much larger than the leaves at the top of the plant. The leaves are butterfly larval food. A view of one of the lower leaves ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
11:00 AM

Post #1629345

Indian Mallow, Texas Indian Mallow, Pelotazo (Abutilon fruticosum)

The chambered seedpods (seed pods) shown below still have a few seeds in them.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
6:26 PM

Post #1639190

Native Texas Plant, Coral Bean, Cherokee Bean, ( Erythrina herbacea)
Perennial dies to the ground after freeze in zone 8 but comes back in the Spring.
In warmer climates it becomes a shrub. The flowers are a beautiful glowing orange red. Bloom period April- June.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2724/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
6:28 PM

Post #1639192

Close up of Coral Bean blossom.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
6:30 PM

Post #1639197

Coral Bean seedlings, 2 weeks old.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
3:49 PM

Post #1648410

Prickly-Mallow, Prickly Fanpetals (Sida spinosa), Malvaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, subshrub, shrub, forb/herb, blooms May to October

Cross referenced -
See Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs ) for more photos and information:
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/529385/

Delicate orangish-peach 1/4" to 1/3" inches wide blooms on this Texas wildflower ...

This message was edited Jul 25, 2005 10:51 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 8, 2005
3:54 PM

Post #1747181

Spreading Fanpetals, Spreading Sida (Sida abutifolia), Malvaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, blooms mid-spring to mid-fall

This is a low growing plant that forms a groundcover. It can be invasive; but, it could be used in a wildscape, exeriscape or rock garden. The 1/4 to 1/2 inch delicate flowers can be yellow, pale orange or yellow-orange.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/75356/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
6:06 PM

Post #1751119

Bloodflower, Swallow-wort, Butterfly Weed, Mexican Milkweed, Scarlet Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica), Asclepiadaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, listed as a shrub/subshrub/forb/herb, blooms mid-summer through late summer.early fall


The Mexican Milkweed is an excellent tall xeriscape plant. It blooms continually until the first hard freeze. The blooms attract butterflies. It self-seeds very freely. It has a taproot, which if harmed, will kill the plant. Transplant it when the plants are very small in order to nnot damage the taproot. It is a great butterfly attractor and a food source for monarch and queen butterfly catepillars.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/604/index.html

This message was edited Sep 10, 2005 1:12 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
6:08 PM

Post #1751120

Bloodflower, Swallow-wort, Butterfly Weed, Mexican Milkweed, Scarlet Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)

A view of a seedpod that has opened and two of the seeds are about to be dispersed. After the rain, they need to dry before they can sail away in the wind.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
6:09 PM

Post #1751121

Bloodflower, Swallow-wort, Butterfly Weed, Mexican Milkweed, Scarlet Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)

A monarch butterfly caterpillar along with several other types of insects munching on a Mexican milkweed. I can not irradicate the other insects because of the monarch caterpillars. The milkweed will bounce back after being eaten.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
6:12 PM

Post #1751125

Bloodflower, Swallow-wort, Butterfly Weed, Mexican Milkweed, Scarlet Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)

A Monarch butterfly caterpillar happily munching on a Mexican milkweed leaf in April. This is why the plant is also known as "butterfly weed".


This message was edited Feb 22, 2006 12:55 AM
Connie_G
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 22, 2006
4:27 AM

Post #2304609

Lantana...I hope this is an "orange"...or is it yellow?? Just looked it up and it says 'orange/yellow' in City of Austin's free book of Texas natives...
The book also says it is native to the Blackland prairie and the Edwards Plateau areas around Austin. It is probably the most deer resistant plant in our area (Lakeway) and requires very little water.

This message was edited May 21, 2006 11:30 PM
JuBabe
Midland, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 23, 2006
2:26 AM

Post #2307570

I don't remember the type of this lantana, but it comes back year after year.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2006
3:44 AM

Post #2307847

It is called Lantana horrida, and it is a Texas native, I think it is lovely and so reliable.
Josephine.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2006
11:04 PM

Post #2310508

Another Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed) with a few friends.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2006
2:07 PM

Post #2781748

Chisos Mountain False Indian Mallow, Velvet Leaf Mallow, Velvetleaf Mallow (Allowissadula holosericea), Malvaceae Family, perennial, Texas native, blooms June through October

Velvetleaf Mallow is a densely hairy, upright growing, scented, much branched herb. The leaves can be up tp 8 inches long and are heavily veined on the bottom surface. They are indented at the base. The margins are toothed and the leaves may be 3-lobed. The base is often somewhat woody. It natively inhabits dry, rocky soils of Trans-Pecos and the Edwards Plateau Regions often found growing around boulders and rocky ledges. It grows in sand, loam, clay and limestone soils and seems to like some shade in the afternoon. Several of the plants I saw were partially wilted in full sun especially since they had had no rain for quite some time. The ones with morning sun or filtered shade were blooming and were not wilted. I have seen quite a few often along margins of juniper-oak woodlands where they receive part sun.

The flowers may be eaten raw or battered and fried. Also, a tea may be made from the leaves. The tea is said to relieve headaches. It is a butterfly nectar source and butterfly larval host for the Common Checkered Skipper, Texas Powdered Skipper and Common Streaky-Skipper. It is highly deer resistent, has more conspicuous flowers than the other similar type mallows and the floiwers are fragrant.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113173/index.html

Its growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2006
2:09 PM

Post #2781758

Chisos Mountain False Indian Mallow, Velvet Leaf Mallow, Velvetleaf Mallow (Allowissadula holosericea)

A leaf which has lots of short hairs all over it which makes it look and feel velvety ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2006
2:11 PM

Post #2781766

Chisos Mountain False Indian Mallow, Velvet Leaf Mallow, Velvetleaf Mallow (Allowissadula holosericea)

Blooms glowing in afternoon sunlight ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 6, 2006
7:52 AM

Post #2790193

Orange Fame Flower, Flame Flower (Talinum auranticum), Portulacaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, subshrub, blooms April/May through October/November after rains

Orange flame flowewr's Texas native habitat is the Edwards Plateau to North Central Texas to the Trans-Pecos region. It thrives in dry sandy, gravelly and rocky poor soils, It especially likes limestone soils. It can be found growing mostly on gravely hill tops and banks and often on rocky slopes. However, it grows in ravines, fllats, washes, dunes, sbenches, as well as often in grasslands, scrubs, and chaparrals. It blooms after rains with the approximately one inch flowers opening in the morning withering by late afternoon. The flowers are hermaphroditic (have both male and female organs). It has a large fleshy woody taproot which Native Americans used as food. It will grow in semi-shade. Foliage is often browsed by wildlife.

Texas distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,5,6,7,8,9,10&name=Talinum aurantiacum Engelm.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/69435/index.html

A view of the beautiful blooms which may be more yellowish as well ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 6, 2006
7:53 AM

Post #2790194

Orange Fame Flower, Flame Flower (Talinum auranticum)

A bloom backlit by morning sunlight ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

October 7, 2006
12:17 AM

Post #2792556

Two of my favorites! Beautiful pics, thank you. I have Velvetleaf Mallow and just want to add that it can be invasive. If you want it, put it in poor soil, don't fertilize it and don't water except to establish it...unless the drought stresses it out too way much, anyway. I love Flame Flower, but it doesn't last very long in my yard and doesn't come back from seed. Wish I had the kind of place it wants!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 7, 2006
5:19 PM

Post #2794145

Thanks, Linda. SOme of the velvet leaf mallows that are in full sun wilt some in the afternoons due to the lack of rain in my immediate area. The ones that receive some filtered shade seem to do the best right now in the high heat. I had never seen the Orange flame flower until this year. The blooms are so beautiful. They close up in the afternoon heat ... wish they would stay open longer.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2006
4:25 AM

Post #3032674

Woolly Butterflybush, Buddleia marrubiifolia. It has these cute little clusters of orange and gold flowers that are sometimes spherical in shape. The leaves are very furry and pale green. Within its range it is a perennial but it might not be cold hardy in many parts of the state. The plant can be 3 feet or more tall. It needs well drained soil and likes part or full sun. I've seen another native species of Buddleia, B. racemosa, that has off-white blooms.
magpied
Phoenix, AZ

January 14, 2007
6:09 AM

Post #3082212

Hi,
I love your native plant threads and have tried to emulate them in the Southwest Gardening forum... though most people don't share my passion for the natives.

I have Asclepias curassavica and love it. Although I desperately wanted to include it in a native plant thread, I couldn't because it's not native to any area of the Sonoran or Chihuahuan deserts. Now, how are y'all justifying this one? lol

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2007
1:55 PM

Post #3082590

Hello Magpied, good to hear from you.
The reason Asclepias curassavica is included is two fold. The first one is the first picture on this thread.
I was under the mistaken impression that A. curassavica, was A. tuberosa, I have since learned different, but forgot to have the picture replaced, and I apologize.
The second reason is that, we have as a group decided at the beginning that we would allow Naturalized or adapted plants in the threads, as long as it was specified, since they are very common to our area and fulfill a very important role in the beauty and usefulness they contribute.
I am glad you noticed this, because I had forgotten about it and that first picture needs to be changed.
I put in my word for you when you asked Dave about the sticky for your thread, did you get it?
Sincerely; Josephine.
magpied
Phoenix, AZ

January 14, 2007
4:22 PM

Post #3083034

Hi frostweed,

Thanks for clarifying. :-)
Unfortunately, the response from [Dave or Terry?] was that there needed to be a strong showing of interest before they'd do a sticky. (I think if there were a sticky, there'd be more interest.) It is disappointing because the Sonoran Desert is a unique ecosystem--and so imperiled. We have a huge problem here with people trying to make the desert look like the state from which they came. Personally, I think native plants are the most important aspect of gardening but I guess DG doesn't see it that way. :(
Thank you for asking, and for putting the word in. I admire your endeavors.
Loreen
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2007
4:40 PM

Post #3083091

Loreen, keep posting native plant threads without the sticky. IMO, eventually it will happen. I've seen A. curassavica sold as being A. tuberosa at several nurseries in the area. I've never seen the real A. tuberosa for sale at a nursery and I wonder whether it could survive here if bought as a plant. Oh, and I know a lady in this general area whose husband inherited a place in Arizona. Now they go there for vacations. She was already an avid native plant enthusiast and wants to preserve the native flora which exists there. Maybe I can get her on DG to help you.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2007
5:57 PM

Post #3083295

Thank you Loreen, I will be glad to do whatever I can to help you get it started in your area.
I think that Linda's advice was good, keep posting, and people will eventually be interested.
I will try to keep an eye on the threads and whenever we have a plant that also is native to your area, we will post it on your thread too.
I'll see what I can do. In the meantime, don't lose heart, you are doing a very good thing, keep up the good work.
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2007
10:00 PM

Post #3084065

Loreen, I wasn't able to change the picture on the first post of this thread, Terry said it couldn't be done.
Bur I did change the copy to the right plant and also the link.
I posted the Giant Tree Cholla on your thread check it out.
Josephine.
magpied
Phoenix, AZ

January 14, 2007
10:28 PM

Post #3084139

Thank you so very much, Josephine, for taking time to contribute to the SW native plant threads. :-)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 28, 2007
12:35 AM

Post #3439443

Scarlet Pimpernel, Pimpernel, Adders Eyes, Poor Man's Weather Weather Glass(Anagallis arvensis), Primulaceae Family, naturalized, annual, blooms April through September, considered a weed by some

Scarlet pimpernel is a low-growing annual (2 to 6 inches) that sometimes is mistaken for chickweed. It can be found on roadsides and disturbed areas usually in moist soil. The square stems branch at the base and may reach 10 inches in length. Many times, the stems root at the nodes. The 1 inch, oval to elliptic leaves usually are opposite and do not have petioles. They sometimes may occur in whorls of three and may have tiny hairs. The lower leaf surfaces have small dark brown/purple spots. The 1/4 inch wide, red-orange (occasionally white or blue) blooms appear from the leaf axils and are open only when the sun shines. The bloom stalks are relatively long. The fruits are round capsules which contain many 1.3 mm long, brown, tiny seeds.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2267/index.html

The blooms are worth viewing close up.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 28, 2007
12:37 AM

Post #3439449

Scarlet Pimpernel, Pimpernel, Adders Eyes, Poor Man's Weather Weather Glass(Anagallis arvensis)

Bloom being blown a bit by a brisk breeze ...
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:26 PM

Post #4222080

Sorry this pic wasn't clearer... It was time to leave the Thicket, and I was not ready to go, lol. Still trying to capture a few more pics of the many fall blooming flowers.

The bloom on this plant is about 1"... thin and delicate, like tissue paper. From looking at the seed pods it could be of the Fabaceae family. Just a guess.

Next the seeds and pods
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:33 PM

Post #4222097

Seed pods with above.. The seeds are flat like cardboard. So my guess of a beaner could be way off.


debnes

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2007
3:47 PM

Post #4222137

Sorry I have no idea.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 13, 2008
11:48 AM

Post #4532302

debnes, was the bloom totally orange or was it orange and yellow? Was it shaped like a pea bloom?
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 13, 2008
12:49 PM

Post #4532405

Yes Hazel it was shaped like a pea bloom... I need to sow those seeds and see what I get. I have been collecting weed and native plant books this winter, and couldn't find it in any of them so far.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 13, 2008
5:23 PM

Post #4533512

I'll keep searching for it. How wide are the leaves?
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 13, 2008
5:32 PM

Post #4533563

They were pretty skimpy,... it was too hard to tell.

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